P. 1
Prepare My Ninth Grader for College

Prepare My Ninth Grader for College

|Views: 47|Likes:
Published by J.A.Morgan

More info:

Published by: J.A.Morgan on Feb 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/12/2010

pdf

text

original

Prepare My Ninth Grader for College

Compiled by:

Table of Contents
Prepare My Ninth Grader for College, Month by Month Create a College­going Culture in My Home Know How Much to Save for College Create a Study Plan with My Ninth Grader Help My Ninth Grader with Smart Goal Setting Help My Ninth Grader Develop a Four­year High School Plan Worksheet: High School Four­year Plan Get to Know My Ninth Grader's Guidance Counselor Help My Ninth Grader Create a College Portfolio Talk with My Child about the Middle School Transition to High School Help My Ninth Grader Choose Extracurricular Activities Wisely Help My Ninth Grader Master Computer Skills Getting into College Takes Smart Goal Setting in Middle School Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home?  

2

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home?  

Prepare My Ninth Grader for College
Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you want to help your ninth grader create a comprehensive plan for college. This EduGuide contains information on paying for  college, choosing the right classes in high school, improving high school study skills, college­bound teenagers’ activities, and much  more. 

How does it work?
l l l

Quizzes help you know where you stand. Articles give you the background information you need to make a decision.  ShortCuts help you take immediate action. Choose one or go through them all.

What will I learn?
l l l l

How to save money for college  How to help my ninth grader set goals and study better  How to promote the idea of college in our home  How to help my ninth grader create a college prep course plan 

Quick Solutions
l l

l

What can I do in fifteen Minutes? Take the “Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home?" quiz. Color a banner in your  favorite college team’s school colors—hang it in your house.   What can I do in one hour? Find out about different careers (with your teen) on mappingyourfuture.org. Look through your  child’s high school course book and talk about different electives he or she might like to take during high school. Attend  freshman orientation with your child.  What can I do in a day? Visit a college campus or attend a college event with your family. Bring your high schooler to work with  you and let him or her see what you do at your job. 

 

Prepare My Ninth Grader for College, Month by Month
Monthly Checklist Provides Simple Tips for Parents
Follow these tips for parents and teens, and be sure your ninth grader is on the road to high school success and ready for college: 
3 September ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

 

Prepare My Ninth Grader for College, Month by Month
Monthly Checklist Provides Simple Tips for Parents
Follow these tips for parents and teens, and be sure your ninth grader is on the road to high school success and ready for college: 

September
l l

Attend freshmen orientation—Many schools hand out information on required classes during orientation, so it’s important to  have at least one parent attend the orientation with your freshman.  Encourage extracurricular activities—Consider the school newspaper, clubs, and academic organizations, or volunteer in  the community. Freshmen sports let kids compete with others their same size and age. For more help with activities, look at  EduGuide’s ShortCut “Help My Ninth Grader Choose Extracurriculars Wisely.”  

October
l l

Attend parent­teacher conferences—For a complete guide to conferences, check out our “Conferences Are Great Time for  Parent­teacher Communication” article.   Discuss internet rules—Make sure your teen is aware that what he or she posts on Facebook, MySpace, or other sites can  could be used against your child when applying to colleges if a college admissions officer has access to your child’s internet  accounts. 

November
l

Talk about grades—Encourage your child to start out strong in ninth grade. In addition, many scholarships are based on  academics, so the better your kids do during high school, the better chance they have to receive academic­based  scholarships. 

December
l

Continue to save—Even if you haven’t saved much (or nothing at all), it’s not too late. Even putting $25 a month into a savings  account for your child’s college can be helpful. Our EduGuide, Help My Child Pay for College offers several suggestions for  saving for college. 

January
l

Take your kid to work with you—Let your child see what you do at your job and what other jobs are available at your place of  employment. If your child is interested in learning more about your friend’s job, ask if he or she might tag along for a few hours.

February
l

Check out Career Day at the high school—Volunteer to get a close look at what types of careers are being presented to your  high schooler. Discuss what your child learned and what he or she might be interested in as a possible career. 

April
Research the PLAN test—This pre­ACT is usually given to students in tenth grade, so it’s beneficial to start researching it in  ninth grade. Have your child talk to older students and ask them what type of information is on the test. Talk to the  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE administrators at your child’s school and find out what type of prep work your child can do throughout the summer to get ready  for the test. The better your child does on this test, the more prepared he or she will be for the ACT. 
l

4

April
l

l

Research the PLAN test—This pre­ACT is usually given to students in tenth grade, so it’s beneficial to start researching it in  ninth grade. Have your child talk to older students and ask them what type of information is on the test. Talk to the  administrators at your child’s school and find out what type of prep work your child can do throughout the summer to get ready  for the test. The better your child does on this test, the more prepared he or she will be for the ACT.  Check out colleges—Attend several “college days” at your child’s high school. Although these visits are geared toward juniors  and seniors, your child can benefit by checking out different colleges during freshman year. Call the high school and ask when  college days are planned. 

May
l

l

Update your child’s college portfolio—Check out “Help My Ninth Grader Create a College Portfolio” ShortCut for step­by­step  instructions on how to make an extensive portfolio. Put any of the following in your child’s portfolio: awards, high­quality writing  samples, report cards, sports honors, and volunteer opportunities.  Start preparing for tenth grade—Meet with the counselor again and review your child’s schedule for the following year. For  help deciding which classes to choose, check out “Help My Ninth Grader Create an Effective Four­year High School Plan.”  

The Summer Before Tenth Grade:
l

l l

l

l l

Surf the web—Spend a few hours with your ninth grader exploring different careers and colleges by checking out websites  such as mappingyourfuture.org. Click on “Careership” to find a description of many possible careers plus a tool that helps  match your kid’s interest to different jobs.   Encourage summer jobs—Your kid doesn’t have to work 40 hours a week, but encourage even 10­50 hours of work or  volunteering each week. Colleges like to see that kids show initiative and responsibility at a young age.  Get to know your child’s guidance counselor—Meet in August and ask questions about your state’s high school  requirements, plus recommendations on what most colleges require. If your child isn’t signed up for classes that fit the college path, make the changes during your meeting. Refer to EduGuide’s, “Get to Know My Ninth Grader’s Guidance Counselor”  ShortCut for more details about how to make the most of your meeting.  Make a four­year plan—You can avoid scheduling problems in your child’s junior year if you have a clear idea of what classes  he or she needs to take each year of high school. For additional help, check out EduGuide’s ShortCut entitled, “Help My Ninth  Grader Create an Effective Four­year High School Plan.”   Research Honors, Advanced and AP classes—Colleges are interested in students who challenge themselves and take  advantage of opportunities that are available to them in high school.  Master computer skills—Teachers expect students to use computers for research, presentations, and general schoolwork,  and they will use computers even more as they get older. Many colleges even offer applications for free if you complete them  online, and most colleges charge about $60 per application, so that can really add up to big savings if students submit online  applications! For more information on how to achieve this goal, see EduGuide’s “Help My Ninth Grader Master Computer  Skills” ShortCut.  

Sources:  www.questbridge.org www.ed.gov www.publicschoolreview.com

 

Create a College­going Culture in My Home
If you want your kids to attend college after high school, you have to start by creating a college­going culture in your home. A college­ going culture includes the practices, attitudes, and actions of parents and siblings that support and encourage kids to attend college.  Here are some ways you can be sure that your family is creating a college­going culture in your home:
l Attend local (or close by) college sporting events. Many kids look up to college athletes and get excited watching them on the  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE field or court. By taking your kids to a college event, you’re opening up an exciting new world.   Visit college campuses. Pick a few colleges to visit. Not only will it get your kid excited about college, but also it will save you  l

5

www.ed.gov www.publicschoolreview.com

 

Create a College­going Culture in My Home
If you want your kids to attend college after high school, you have to start by creating a college­going culture in your home. A college­ going culture includes the practices, attitudes, and actions of parents and siblings that support and encourage kids to attend college.  Here are some ways you can be sure that your family is creating a college­going culture in your home:
l l l

l l l

l l

Attend local (or close by) college sporting events. Many kids look up to college athletes and get excited watching them on the  field or court. By taking your kids to a college event, you’re opening up an exciting new world.   Visit college campuses. Pick a few colleges to visit. Not only will it get your kid excited about college, but also it will save you  time during junior and senior years when you and your kid will want to visit several campuses.  Talk about where, not if. Discuss where your kid wants to attend college. Make it a part of normal conversation, not just  something that’s talked about once in a while. When you talk about your child’s graduating class, instead of using their high  school graduation date (class of 2010), use the date of college graduation (class of 2014).  Talk about goals. Encourage your kids to talk about their goals after high school. Emphasize the importance of smart goal  setting and achieving your dreams. Inform them about your own goals in your life and how you plan to reach them.  Discuss your experiences. If you attended college, tell your child about your experiences and how much college changed your  life. If your child is the first one in the family to attend college, create excitement by talking about all the positives of college life.   Support a specific college. If your family has a favorite college, hang that school’s banner or flag somewhere in (or outside of)  your home, or wear a college t­shirt. Your child doesn’t necessarily have to attend that school, just show your kids your  excitement and support.  Use outside experiences. Use a trip to your pet’s veterinarian as a chance to talk about what a veterinarian does in her or her  job daily. Expand the conversation to include what other types of doctors do in their jobs.  Create a “college month.” And pick a different university each month to highlight. Involve the whole family to find out the college sports team name, school colors, academic specialties, size, location, and any other interesting facts. Be creative: make  cupcakes in the school colors and watch the school’s sporting events on TV.  

sources:  www.collegetools.berkeley.edu www.colorincolorado.org

 

Know How Much to Save for College
Use a College Savings Calculator
If you’re not sure what kind of financial goals to set to fund your child’s college education, a college saving calculator, such as this one  on the TIAA­CREF Web site, can help as you think about saving money for college.

Information You’ll Need before You Start  
6
l Cost of tuition for one year of college today: If you’re not sure where your child might go to school, simply pick a public four­ www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE year college in your state and check its Web site for its annual tuition.  l Tuition inflation rate: This calculator sets a default rate of six percent. Depending on the school, the area of the country, and 

www.collegetools.berkeley.edu www.colorincolorado.org

 

Know How Much to Save for College
Use a College Savings Calculator
If you’re not sure what kind of financial goals to set to fund your child’s college education, a college saving calculator, such as this one  on the TIAA­CREF Web site, can help as you think about saving money for college.

Information You’ll Need before You Start  
l l l l l l

Cost of tuition for one year of college today: If you’re not sure where your child might go to school, simply pick a public four­ year college in your state and check its Web site for its annual tuition.  Tuition inflation rate: This calculator sets a default rate of six percent. Depending on the school, the area of the country, and  the current economy, this figure could be between two and eight percent.  Years to save before college:  Assume your child will start college at eighteen, and subtract his or her current age to arrive at  this number.  Initial savings: the amount of money you already have set aside for college  Contribution amount: If you have a dollar amount you’d like to contribute monthly, put it in here. You can change the amount to  see how the totals change on the calculator.  Assumed rate of return: This calculator sets a default rate of six percent. 

What the Calculator Will Tell You 
l l l l

What four years of college will cost by the time your child attends  How much money your savings plan will have earned by that time  Your savings shortfall  What you would need to do to make up the difference, either as a lump sum, additional monthly contributions, or additional  yearly contributions 

Keep in mind that most students do not pay full price for college (see “The Real Cost of College”).  Note: This exercise focuses on  tuition only. College costs usually include room and board, books, and other costs.

Putting It All Together: Three Examples
1.  Aaron and Julie have a new daughter, Alicia. They want to open a 529 college savings plan for her with the hope that she will attend  Big State University in eighteen years. They already have five hundred dollars to open up an account. They are not sure how much to  invest monthly, but think that fifty dollars a month sounds reasonable. Let’s see: 
l l l l l l

Today’s tuition at Big State U: $9,000   Tuition inflation rate: 6 percent  Years to save before college: 18  Initial savings: $500  Monthly contributions: $50  Rate of return: 6 percent 

According to the calculator, in eighteen years, four years at Big State University will cost $112,380, or about $25,689 per year. Aaron  and Julie’s 529 Plan will have $20,567, not quite enough to cover one year’s tuition. If they set their monthly contributions at $100 per  month, they will have $40,550, enough to cover all of Alicia’s first year of school and $14,800 of her second year. To fully fund Alicia’s  college tuition, they would need to set aside $265 per month.  2.  Phil and LaDonna have a ten­year­old son, Ty. They haven't really thought much about college, but now that Ty is approaching  middle school, they think they should invest something toward his college education. They plan to start with the thousand dollars they  www.EduGuide.org 7 ONLINE EDUGUIDE received as a federal tax refund, and then deposit one hundred fifty dollars a month in a 529 plan. Will that work? Here’s how the  numbers work out:

and Julie’s 529 Plan will have $20,567, not quite enough to cover one year’s tuition. If they set their monthly contributions at $100 per  month, they will have $40,550, enough to cover all of Alicia’s first year of school and $14,800 of her second year. To fully fund Alicia’s  college tuition, they would need to set aside $265 per month.  2.  Phil and LaDonna have a ten­year­old son, Ty. They haven't really thought much about college, but now that Ty is approaching  middle school, they think they should invest something toward his college education. They plan to start with the thousand dollars they  received as a federal tax refund, and then deposit one hundred fifty dollars a month in a 529 plan. Will that work? Here’s how the  numbers work out:
l l l l l l

Today’s tuition at Big State U: $9,000   Tuition inflation rate: 6 percent  Years to save before college: 8  Initial savings: $1,000  Monthly contributions: $150  Rate of return: 6 percent 

According to the calculator, in eight years, four years at Big State University will cost $62,752, or $14,345 per year.  By investing one  hundred fifty dollars a month, Phil and LaDonna will have saved $20,321, enough to pay for one full year and part of a second. If they  were to invest $265 a month (what Aaron and Julie need to invest to fully fund their child’s education), they would have $35,609,  enough to pay for about 2 1/2 years of college. To fully fund Ty’s college education, Phil and LaDonna will have to invest $455 per  month.  3.  James and Elise have a fifteen­year­old daughter, Mandy, who just informed them that she wants to go to Big State University in  three years. James and Elise have never really thought much about paying for college. Mandy is a smart girl, but they’re not sure how  much she might get in scholarships.  They decide to start putting something away but aren’t sure how much good it will do. Here are  the numbers:
l l l l l l

Today’s tuition at Big State U: $9,000   Tuition inflation rate: 6 percent  Years to save before college: 3  Initial savings: $500  Monthly contributions: $200  Rate of return: 6 percent 

According to the calculator, in three years, four years at Big State University will $46,892, or $12,044 per year. By investing $200 per  month, James and Elise will be able to pay $8,482 towards Mandy’s first year of college. If they invest $455 per month (what Phil and  LaDonna need to invest to fully fund their child’s education), they will have $19,007, enough to pay for all of Mandy’s first year and  about two­thirds of her second year. To fully fund her education, they will need to invest a whopping $1,073 per month.  These examples illustrate the benefits of investing early for your child’s college education. But if you haven’t started saving yet, does  that mean you shouldn’t? Should James and Elise even bother if all they can put aside is two hundred dollars a month? Absolutely.  The $8,482 they save is $8,482 they won’t have to borrow and pay back later. Saving is always worthwhile.   You may wonder if saving now will cut your child’s financial aid later. A little for some families, but you’re still better off having money  than not, just as you’re better off earning wages than not despite income taxes. Using today’s aid formula, a low­ or middle­income  family could lose up to five dollars in aid for every one hundred dollars extra they saved in any of the current college savings tools.   

Create a Study Plan with My Ninth Grader
A Good Plan Puts Study Tips in High Gear
It takes a plan of action to make study tips effective. According to Joan Carver, an educational researcher and expert on helping  students improve their high school study skills, the best study plan is: 1. Simple. A good plan is uncomplicated.  ONLINE EDUGUIDE 2. Specific. A good plan states what you're going to do and where, when, and how you're going to do it.  3. Positive. A good plan states what you're going to do (not what you're going to stop doing). 

8

www.EduGuide.org

family could lose up to five dollars in aid for every one hundred dollars extra they saved in any of the current college savings tools.   

Create a Study Plan with My Ninth Grader
A Good Plan Puts Study Tips in High Gear
It takes a plan of action to make study tips effective. According to Joan Carver, an educational researcher and expert on helping  students improve their high school study skills, the best study plan is: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Simple. A good plan is uncomplicated.  Specific. A good plan states what you're going to do and where, when, and how you're going to do it.  Positive. A good plan states what you're going to do (not what you're going to stop doing).  Repetitive. A good plan includes something you can repeat frequently.  Independent. A good plan is based on you doing the work; it doesn't depend on somebody else.  Immediate. A good plan can be started soon, usually within twenty­four hours.  Committed. A good plan includes I will statements. 

Write the study plan down. Why? Because when people write something, they are more likely to do it.

Here's an Example
This is a study plan for completing an assigned reading. Does it include the seven traits listed above? “I will read at least ten pages of Animal Farm between four and five every afternoon until I’ve finished the book. I'll read in my bedroom  where it's quiet and there are fewer distractions. After I finish every page, I'll pause to ask myself what happened in the story. I'll answer out loud to help me remember.” 

Now It's Your Turn
Create a study plan for one assignment.
l l l

Write down your plan.  Make sure it includes Joan Carver's seven steps.  Check it over. 

Don't underestimate the power of making plans. Remember: if you fail to plan, you plan to fail.  

Help My Ninth Grader with Smart Goal Setting
Take a few minutes with your teenager and discuss the following steps to “properly” find goals to set and keep them realistic. Be sure  to click on the highlighted links for further help with achieving goals.
9 Brainstorm ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Don't underestimate the power of making plans. Remember: if you fail to plan, you plan to fail.  

Help My Ninth Grader with Smart Goal Setting
Take a few minutes with your teenager and discuss the following steps to “properly” find goals to set and keep them realistic. Be sure  to click on the highlighted links for further help with achieving goals.

Brainstorm
l l l

Free­write. Jot down ideas as they come to you without evaluating or editing them until all possible smart goal setting has  been captured.  Make an idea web. Ideas go in the center circle, details in the smaller circles.  Experiment with mind­mapping software such as FreeMind, MindNode, or MyMind, all of which you can download from the  Internet for free. 

Goals to Set
Pick a goal. That’s right, just one. Once you accomplish your first goal, you can celebrate and move on to the next goal. 

Goal Setting and Success
All right, all you goal­setting students: select a goal that you can accomplish in weeks or months, not years. For example, if your long­ term goal is to become a ballet dancer, set a goal of practicing for an hour a day for a month. Assess your progress after a month and  then set the next goal.

Be Specific When You Have Goals to Set
The goal “I will be nicer to my sister” isn’t specific enough. Ask yourself the question, “How?” Answer: “I will invite my sister to go  shopping or to a movie at least once a week.” Need practice writing realistic goal statements? Try the “Get These Goals in Line!”  Challenge.

Measure It!
A realistic goal is one that can be measured, either by time or amount. 

Getting Motivated
A goal that is too hard can be discouraging. Breaking a challenging goal down into steps (see EduGuide ShortCut: "Achieve Your Goals") can help keep your spirits up and give you the mini­successes you need to stay focused.

Stay Positive
Positive goals are motivating (see EduGuide ShortCut: "Use Affirmations and Visualization"). Word your goal in a positive way: “I will  get a B in English” instead of “I’ll stop flunking English.” 

Write It Down
Make your goal real by writing it down, perhaps in your goal journal if you are keeping one (see EduGuide ShortCut: "Make a Goal Journal"). Need practice writing realistic goal statements? Try the “Get These Goals in Line!” Challenge.    www.EduGuide.org 10 ONLINE EDUGUIDE

Write It Down
Make your goal real by writing it down, perhaps in your goal journal if you are keeping one (see EduGuide ShortCut: "Make a Goal Journal"). Need practice writing realistic goal statements? Try the “Get These Goals in Line!” Challenge.   

Help My Ninth Grader Develop a Four­year High School Plan
Know Your High School's Graduation Requirements
Your kids may tell you that they have their class schedule all figured out and you don’t need to be involved. Don’t believe them. While  schools give students responsibility for selecting their classes, most require a parent’s signature for approval. Take the following  steps to build a solid high school course plan (a blank planning sheet and sample four­year plan are included in “Work Sheet: High  School Four­year Plan"): 1. Make an appointment with the guidance counselor. If you’re having trouble filling out your child’s schedule, the school’s  guidance counselor can be very helpful with creating a plan that works for your child. Some schools encourage creating a four­ year plan for incoming freshman, while others feel a two­year plan is more beneficial. Create a course plan using our blank  worksheet “High School Four­Year Plan.” For more information on meeting with the counselor, see the ShortCut “Get to Know  My Ninth Grader’s Guidance Counselor.”   Know your state’s graduation requirements. These requirements should be the foundation of your child’s course plan and  will include three to four years each of math, science, social studies, and English, and one to two years of fine arts and a world  language. Your high school counselor can tell you what the requirements are, or you can Google “high school graduation  requirements in <insert your state’s name here>.”   Explore all the options. Ask your high school counselor if your child can fulfill the graduation requirements on the internet or at  a local community college.  Earn college credit in high school. Advanced Placement (AP) courses are popular options in high school. There are 35  nationally designed AP courses that allow high school teachers to provide college level options on­site. Score well enough on  the end­of­course exam, and you can even earn college credit. International Baccalaureate (IB) is also becoming an  increasingly popular option. The IB program is designed to offer students a high school degree rigorous enough to meet any  nation’s highest standards. IB programs are available from kindergarten through graduation, and some colleges grant credit  for students completing some junior and senior level IB courses. See our ShortCut “Earn College Credit in High School.”   Look ahead. Call the admissions department at the colleges your child wants to attend and ask about the college admissions  requirements. If possible, sign your child up for these courses.  Take an ACT prep class. Some schools are now offering an ACT prep class for students during their junior year. This can save you considerable money if you don’t have to pay for a weekend prep course that’s offered outside of your school. Be sure to  leave room for this class (if it’s offered at your school) when completing your four­year plan.   Take the hard road. Even if your child is only in ninth grade now, plan now for senior year. Classes such as calculus and  trigonometry (that are usually taken during senior year) may have prerequisites (classes students have to take to prepare them for the advanced class), so be sure both of you know what these prerequisites are. Remember: Your child may be tempted to  pick easy courses so he or she can get the highest grade point average (GPA), but colleges are more impressed by students  who take challenging courses—even if their grades are a little lower.   Know what you're signing up for. Classes with similar titles can have very different levels of difficulty. If you're not sure, ask. AP Chemistry and college prep chemistry sound like they should be very similar, but the work load is quite different. Some high  schools offer Algebra II/Trigonometry as a one­year course—faster pace, higher expectations, but it gets you to calculus a year  earlier. Other schools spread it over two years—slower pace, more time spent with the various concepts. Depending on when  your child takes these courses, he or she might not have the opportunity to take calculus in high school.  Extras count, too. Make room in the class schedule for electives, like music, drama, business, and computer classes.  Find out more. Many high schools subscribe to “career” websites (such as Career Cruising) where students can take quizzes  related to career interests, research different professions, check their transcripts, and much more. Ask your child’s guidance  counselor if your school has a similar tool available. In addition, the following websites provide valuable information on  creating a college­worthy high school schedule:  ¡ ACT—Recommended College Prep Courses   ¡ College Board—Create a Solid Academic Portfolio   ¡ College Board—A Balanced Course Load  

2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

9. 10.

  11

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Make your goal real by writing it down, perhaps in your goal journal if you are keeping one (see EduGuide ShortCut: "Make a Goal Journal"). Need practice writing realistic goal statements? Try the “Get These Goals in Line!” Challenge.   

Help My Ninth Grader Develop a Four­year High School Plan
Know Your High School's Graduation Requirements
Your kids may tell you that they have their class schedule all figured out and you don’t need to be involved. Don’t believe them. While  schools give students responsibility for selecting their classes, most require a parent’s signature for approval. Take the following  steps to build a solid high school course plan (a blank planning sheet and sample four­year plan are included in “Work Sheet: High  School Four­year Plan"): 1. Make an appointment with the guidance counselor. If you’re having trouble filling out your child’s schedule, the school’s  guidance counselor can be very helpful with creating a plan that works for your child. Some schools encourage creating a four­ year plan for incoming freshman, while others feel a two­year plan is more beneficial. Create a course plan using our blank  worksheet “High School Four­Year Plan.” For more information on meeting with the counselor, see the ShortCut “Get to Know  My Ninth Grader’s Guidance Counselor.”   Know your state’s graduation requirements. These requirements should be the foundation of your child’s course plan and  will include three to four years each of math, science, social studies, and English, and one to two years of fine arts and a world  language. Your high school counselor can tell you what the requirements are, or you can Google “high school graduation  requirements in <insert your state’s name here>.”   Explore all the options. Ask your high school counselor if your child can fulfill the graduation requirements on the internet or at  a local community college.  Earn college credit in high school. Advanced Placement (AP) courses are popular options in high school. There are 35  nationally designed AP courses that allow high school teachers to provide college level options on­site. Score well enough on  the end­of­course exam, and you can even earn college credit. International Baccalaureate (IB) is also becoming an  increasingly popular option. The IB program is designed to offer students a high school degree rigorous enough to meet any  nation’s highest standards. IB programs are available from kindergarten through graduation, and some colleges grant credit  for students completing some junior and senior level IB courses. See our ShortCut “Earn College Credit in High School.”   Look ahead. Call the admissions department at the colleges your child wants to attend and ask about the college admissions  requirements. If possible, sign your child up for these courses.  Take an ACT prep class. Some schools are now offering an ACT prep class for students during their junior year. This can save you considerable money if you don’t have to pay for a weekend prep course that’s offered outside of your school. Be sure to  leave room for this class (if it’s offered at your school) when completing your four­year plan.   Take the hard road. Even if your child is only in ninth grade now, plan now for senior year. Classes such as calculus and  trigonometry (that are usually taken during senior year) may have prerequisites (classes students have to take to prepare them for the advanced class), so be sure both of you know what these prerequisites are. Remember: Your child may be tempted to  pick easy courses so he or she can get the highest grade point average (GPA), but colleges are more impressed by students  who take challenging courses—even if their grades are a little lower.   Know what you're signing up for. Classes with similar titles can have very different levels of difficulty. If you're not sure, ask. AP Chemistry and college prep chemistry sound like they should be very similar, but the work load is quite different. Some high  schools offer Algebra II/Trigonometry as a one­year course—faster pace, higher expectations, but it gets you to calculus a year  earlier. Other schools spread it over two years—slower pace, more time spent with the various concepts. Depending on when  your child takes these courses, he or she might not have the opportunity to take calculus in high school.  Extras count, too. Make room in the class schedule for electives, like music, drama, business, and computer classes.  Find out more. Many high schools subscribe to “career” websites (such as Career Cruising) where students can take quizzes  related to career interests, research different professions, check their transcripts, and much more. Ask your child’s guidance  counselor if your school has a similar tool available. In addition, the following websites provide valuable information on  creating a college­worthy high school schedule:  ¡ ACT—Recommended College Prep Courses   ¡ College Board—Create a Solid Academic Portfolio   ¡ College Board—A Balanced Course Load  

2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

9. 10.

 

12

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

¡

College Board—A Balanced Course Load  

 

Worksheet: High School Four­year Plan
Print a copy of the table for each year of high school. Fill in the courses you must take for graduation at the high school you will attend.  Use the remaining space to fill in the courses recommended for a student planning your career. If you need help determining  requirements or finding out what courses are available to you during high school, speak to a counselor.   English Mathematics History/social studies Science Foreign language Visual/performing arts Electives Credits earned Accumulated credits (including previous years) Grade ____ Fall Semester                   Credits                   Grade ____ Spring Semester                   Credits                  

Source: http://www.aie.org/Planning­for­college/Making­choices/high­school­four­year­plan.cfm

Sample Four­year Plan: Grand Haven High School, Grand Haven, Michigan
(Graduation Requirements: 27.5 Credits) Courses English 9th Grade English 10th Grade English (American Literature/Composition) 11th Grade English 12th Grade English Social Studies 9th Grade World History 10th Grade 20th Century American History 11th Grade Civics/Economics Science 9th Grade Earth Science 10th Grade Biology 11th Grade Chemistry or Physics 12th Grade Physics Mathematics 9th Grade Algebra 1
13 ONLINE EDUGUIDE 10th Grade Geometry

Credits Required 4 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1
www.EduGuide.org

11th Grade Algebra II

12th Grade Physics Mathematics 9th Grade Algebra 1 10th Grade Geometry 11th Grade Algebra II 12th Grade Visual/Performing, Allies Arts Physical Education/Health Electives TOTAL

1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 11.5 27.5

 

Get to Know My Ninth Grader's Guidance Counselor
These Simple Tips for Parents Can Improve Your Kid's Chances of High School Success
Do you know who your child’s counselor is? Does your child know? Now is the time to get acquainted with a person who can help your child achieve high school success. You want to make sure that he or she remembers your child—for the right reasons.  

Schedule an Appointment
Call the school to find out the name of your child’s counselor and schedule an appointment. You don’t have to have a specific problem to solve, but in order to get the most out of your meeting, try to keep focused on a single topic. Here are some ideas:
l

l

l

l

l l

Getting to know you. Share your hopes and dreams for your child. Tell the counselor about his or her interests, activities, and  jobs so the counselor can begin to create a picture of your child. Let the counselor know your child’s academic strengths and  weaknesses, and ask advice about the best courses for your child.  Show me the money. If you’re unsure how to pay for college, high school counselors can provide information about high  school scholarships, grants, awards, and financial aid for school. They may even be able to walk you through the forms that  you and your child will need to complete.  So many choices. Your child’s counselor has information about hundreds of colleges. Ask which colleges might be a good fit  for college student financial aid. The counselor should be able to let you know about college fairs in your area, when college  admissions representatives will visit your child’s school, and even FAFSA student loans.   On the right track. If your child is excelling in school, inquire about advanced classes, programs, and extracurricular  opportunities to keep him or her challenged. If your child is struggling, ask about tutors, peer assistance programs, and  outside help.  Testing, testing. Find out what college admission and placement tests your child should be taking. The high school counselor  can keep you informed about test dates, locations, and costs; and can help you interpret test scores.  Red flags. If your child or your family is going through a difficult time—divorce, illness or death in the family, unemployment,  etc., be sure to let the counselor know, especially if these circumstances are affecting your child’s grades.  

Keep in Touch
Even if you only have one formal face­to­face meeting with the counselor, be sure that he or she knows you are out there, active and  concerned about your child’s school progress. How?  Say “hello” when you see the counselor at school functions like open houses, parent­teacher conferences, school plays and concerts, athletic events, and award ceremonies. Don’t discuss your child’s academic situation, just be friendly and visible.   l Attend school­sponsored workshops and parent meetings related to course selection, graduation requirements, and college  planning. You might be surprised how few parents attend these events. Your presence there will show how committed you are  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE to your child’s educational success.   l Call or email with questions. Most counselors will reply to phone and email messages from parents. This respects their time 
l

14

 

Get to Know My Ninth Grader's Guidance Counselor
These Simple Tips for Parents Can Improve Your Kid's Chances of High School Success
Do you know who your child’s counselor is? Does your child know? Now is the time to get acquainted with a person who can help your child achieve high school success. You want to make sure that he or she remembers your child—for the right reasons.  

Schedule an Appointment
Call the school to find out the name of your child’s counselor and schedule an appointment. You don’t have to have a specific problem to solve, but in order to get the most out of your meeting, try to keep focused on a single topic. Here are some ideas:
l

l

l

l

l l

Getting to know you. Share your hopes and dreams for your child. Tell the counselor about his or her interests, activities, and  jobs so the counselor can begin to create a picture of your child. Let the counselor know your child’s academic strengths and  weaknesses, and ask advice about the best courses for your child.  Show me the money. If you’re unsure how to pay for college, high school counselors can provide information about high  school scholarships, grants, awards, and financial aid for school. They may even be able to walk you through the forms that  you and your child will need to complete.  So many choices. Your child’s counselor has information about hundreds of colleges. Ask which colleges might be a good fit  for college student financial aid. The counselor should be able to let you know about college fairs in your area, when college  admissions representatives will visit your child’s school, and even FAFSA student loans.   On the right track. If your child is excelling in school, inquire about advanced classes, programs, and extracurricular  opportunities to keep him or her challenged. If your child is struggling, ask about tutors, peer assistance programs, and  outside help.  Testing, testing. Find out what college admission and placement tests your child should be taking. The high school counselor  can keep you informed about test dates, locations, and costs; and can help you interpret test scores.  Red flags. If your child or your family is going through a difficult time—divorce, illness or death in the family, unemployment,  etc., be sure to let the counselor know, especially if these circumstances are affecting your child’s grades.  

Keep in Touch
Even if you only have one formal face­to­face meeting with the counselor, be sure that he or she knows you are out there, active and  concerned about your child’s school progress. How? 
l l

l

Say “hello” when you see the counselor at school functions like open houses, parent­teacher conferences, school plays and concerts, athletic events, and award ceremonies. Don’t discuss your child’s academic situation, just be friendly and visible.   Attend school­sponsored workshops and parent meetings related to course selection, graduation requirements, and college  planning. You might be surprised how few parents attend these events. Your presence there will show how committed you are  to your child’s educational success.   Call or email with questions. Most counselors will reply to phone and email messages from parents. This respects their time  and yours. 

 

15

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Help My Ninth Grader Create a College Portfolio

and yours.   

Help My Ninth Grader Create a College Portfolio
Keep Track of Kids' Accomplishments
During the application process, one of the most important pieces of information colleges will ask for is a list of your child’s  accomplishments during high school. The best way to keep track of those accomplishments is to create a portfolio as soon as your  child begins ninth grade. To avoid a last­minute scramble to find the necessary information during your child’s senior year, follow  these tips for parents and kids.

What Should My Teen Include in the College Portfolio?
l l l l l l l

l

High school academic information. This includes class schedules from each year in high school, transcripts, and report  cards.  Sports awards. If addition to the actual award, keep any sports banquet programs that include a special recognition (MVP,  academic honors, etc.) your child might have received.  Community service (volunteer) hours. Even if your teen volunteered for just an hour or two raking leaves with a church group,  write it down. You’ll be amazed how the hours add up!   Extracurricular activities. Include any high school clubs, dance classes, piano lessons, jobs (including babysitting), and any  other activity your child has been involved in during high school.  Academic nominations and awards. Even if your child was nominated but didn’t actually receive the award, keep track of the  nominations. Also, be sure to keep a copy of the honor roll from your local newspaper when your child is listed.  ACT, SAT, PSAT scores. If your child takes any of the tests more than once, keep all scores.  Letters of recommendations. Have your teen ask one or two favorite teachers from each grade to write a letter of  recommendation highlighting his or her strengths in the classroom. If your child has the opportunity in high school to complete  an internship, be sure their boss also writes a letter of recommendation.  Middle school awards. Some colleges are also interested in your child’s accomplishments as far back as middle school, so  be sure to hold on to those awards as well. 

How Should My Child Create a College Portfolio?
l l l l

Buy a portfolio. Keep it simple: a three­ring binder (with dividers) or an accordion file is all you need.  Label the dividers. You can either divide the information by years (9th – 12th grades) or by categories as listed above.   Design a cover. Your child is going to have this portfolio for the next four years, so encourage him or her to make it unique and  add some personal flair.  Keep your portfolio updated. Add to it as often as you can. If there’s some information you’re not sure if you should keep, save  it anyway. If you don’t use it, you can always throw it away later.  

 

Talk with My Child about the Middle School Transition to High School
A Positive Transition is Key to Success
www.EduGuide.org 16 ONLINE EDUGUIDE Parents can help their eighth graders prepare for a positive middle school transition by getting the right information, and by staying  involved with their school. Just talking to your child and answering his high school questions, can help him form realistic expectations 

it anyway. If you don’t use it, you can always throw it away later.    

Talk with My Child about the Middle School Transition to High School
A Positive Transition is Key to Success
Parents can help their eighth graders prepare for a positive middle school transition by getting the right information, and by staying  involved with their school. Just talking to your child and answering his high school questions, can help him form realistic expectations  about high school and alleviate any fears he may have.

Get Help from Your School
Sign up for any and all high school orientation or “walk­through” programs (designed to help freshman find their lockers and  classrooms) and attend them with your child. Ask your middle school counselor or principal what events are planned and what help is  available.

Find a Peer Mentor
If your child doesn’t have an older sibling, ask a friend’s older sibling, an older cousin, or older teen in your neighborhood if they would be willing to answer questions or act as a mentor. Invite them over to your home if your child is shy about contacting them. 

Talk Early and Often
Try some of the conversation starters below, but don’t lecture and don’t tackle the whole topic at once. Even if your child doesn’t  respond, it may help her to hear you say some of the things she’s too embarrassed to say. 
l

Tell them it’s normal to be both excited and nervous about high school.   Share some of your positive high school memories, like being able to drive to school or staying up all night to work on the  homecoming float. Ask your child what he is most looking forward to about high school. Share some bad or sad memories, like throwing up in study hall or losing the lead in a play to an upperclassman. Ask your  child what she’s nervous about. Listen when she tells you and don’t jump in immediately with a “solution” or, worse, don’t  dismiss her fears as “silly.” 

l

Explain the difference between middle school and high school academics.  Encourage her to sign up for college­prep courses (if you don’t know what these courses are, read the ShortCut: “Update My  High School Student’s Course Plan” Explain that her high school grade point average (GPA) is cumulative—a low freshman  GPA can drag down her GPA at graduation.

l

Talk about peers and friendships.  Talk to your child about how your choice of friends affected your high school experience, for better or worse—like the time you  swiped your parents’ car to impress an older girlfriend. Talk about how peers affected your decisions about sex, illegal drugs,  and other risky activities. Suggest that clubs, sports, and other extracurricular activities can be good places to meet new friends who share your child’s values and goals. 

l

Review her organizational and time­management skills 

17

Share some simple organization or time­management techniques that work for you. Help your child find a system that fits her  style or to use the system that her school requires. (For some ideas, see the ShortCut, “Help My Teen Manage Time”  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE l Let your actions speak louder than your words. 

l

Review her organizational and time­management skills  Share some simple organization or time­management techniques that work for you. Help your child find a system that fits her  style or to use the system that her school requires. (For some ideas, see the ShortCut, “Help My Teen Manage Time” 

l

Let your actions speak louder than your words.  Support his new endeavor in a new school: show up for any extracurricular activities (ballgames, concerts, competitions) your  child is involved in. Encourage your child’s independence by loosening the reins a little (a later curfew, a higher allowance).  Listen to his ideas, even if you don’t always agree with them. If both of you agree that a subject is too touchy to talk about in  person (if doing so always ends up in a fight), let him leave you a note explaining how he feels under your pillow, then leave  him your response under his pillow.

 

Help My Ninth Grader Choose Extracurricular Activities Wisely
Extracurriculars Can Make Your Kid's College Application Stand Out in a Crowd
The choices may be overwhelming, but the benefits of extracurricular activities are numerous. Students learn time management skills, make more friends, try new challenges, enhance college applications, and even get chances to travel. Here are some helpful tips for  parents and teens for choosing the right activity:

How Many Should My Child Choose?
Encourage your child to pick one or two (including an after school job, if your teen has one) and then try these activities for a few  months. If he or she is staying on top of school work and balancing the extra activities successfully, consider adding one more. Ask  other parents or advisers to help you understand how much of a time commitment is required.

Some Teenagers’ Activities to Consider 
Although there may be additional activities at your local high school and in your community, this list will give you and your teen some  ideas.
l

l l

l

l l

Careers. Volunteering in a classroom or mentoring would be a good way to see what teaching is all about. For kids interested  in a career in the health field, local hospitals have Candy Striper and other volunteer opportunities. Estimated time  commitment: Once a week.  Sports. Freshman sports provide opportunities for ninth grade students to participate with kids their same size and age. Time  commitment: Every day.  Special interest groups. Green Club, Interact (youth community service group), SADD (Students Against Destructive  Decisions), Junior Achievement, Computer Club, just to name a few! Check with your high school’s student services  department for a complete list of groups. Time commitment: Once a week to once a month.  Yearbook/school newspaper . These groups provide valuable experience in editing, writing, layout, and design. A  recommendation from your child’s English teacher is usually required. Time commitment: Usually a course elective, but may  require extra hours to make printing deadlines.  Foreign language club. Club advisers often chaperone students during junior or senior year on a trip to one of the countries  studied, providing your child a chance to travel at a reduced price. Time commitment: Once a week to once a month.  Band/jazz band/choir. Most high schools offer some type of band or choir program. Some schools even offer their members a  chance to travel to band competitions in other states. Time commitment: Usually a course elective, but often requires extra  practice time. 

Sources: kidshealth.org

18  

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

person (if doing so always ends up in a fight), let him leave you a note explaining how he feels under your pillow, then leave  him your response under his pillow.  

Help My Ninth Grader Choose Extracurricular Activities Wisely
Extracurriculars Can Make Your Kid's College Application Stand Out in a Crowd
The choices may be overwhelming, but the benefits of extracurricular activities are numerous. Students learn time management skills, make more friends, try new challenges, enhance college applications, and even get chances to travel. Here are some helpful tips for  parents and teens for choosing the right activity:

How Many Should My Child Choose?
Encourage your child to pick one or two (including an after school job, if your teen has one) and then try these activities for a few  months. If he or she is staying on top of school work and balancing the extra activities successfully, consider adding one more. Ask  other parents or advisers to help you understand how much of a time commitment is required.

Some Teenagers’ Activities to Consider 
Although there may be additional activities at your local high school and in your community, this list will give you and your teen some  ideas.
l

l l

l

l l

Careers. Volunteering in a classroom or mentoring would be a good way to see what teaching is all about. For kids interested  in a career in the health field, local hospitals have Candy Striper and other volunteer opportunities. Estimated time  commitment: Once a week.  Sports. Freshman sports provide opportunities for ninth grade students to participate with kids their same size and age. Time  commitment: Every day.  Special interest groups. Green Club, Interact (youth community service group), SADD (Students Against Destructive  Decisions), Junior Achievement, Computer Club, just to name a few! Check with your high school’s student services  department for a complete list of groups. Time commitment: Once a week to once a month.  Yearbook/school newspaper . These groups provide valuable experience in editing, writing, layout, and design. A  recommendation from your child’s English teacher is usually required. Time commitment: Usually a course elective, but may  require extra hours to make printing deadlines.  Foreign language club. Club advisers often chaperone students during junior or senior year on a trip to one of the countries  studied, providing your child a chance to travel at a reduced price. Time commitment: Once a week to once a month.  Band/jazz band/choir. Most high schools offer some type of band or choir program. Some schools even offer their members a  chance to travel to band competitions in other states. Time commitment: Usually a course elective, but often requires extra  practice time. 

Sources: kidshealth.org

 

Help My Ninth Grader Master Computer Skills
19

Practical and Useful Tips for Parents

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Sources: kidshealth.org

 

Help My Ninth Grader Master Computer Skills
Practical and Useful Tips for Parents
Though kids usually know more about computers than their parents, there are some ways parents can help their kids master  computer skills.

What Computer Skills Should Kids Have?
l l

l

l l

l

Touch typing skills. The hunt­and­peck method might work during middle school, but it won’t work as well for your kids during  high school and beyond.  Word processing. Programs such as Microsoft Word, AppleWorks, or Word Perfect are a must for kids (and adults). Most high  schools require students to type reports and English papers in word­processing format. In addition, college students will need  to prepare nearly all of their work on a computer.  Spreadsheets, graphs, and presentations. Programs like Excel (for spreadsheets) and PowerPoint (for graphs and  presentations) are becoming more popular as teachers’ expectations increase. Make sure your kid understands the  information as well as how to present it.  Web literacy. Knowing how to surf the web wisely is critical to high school students when looking for assistance with their  homework. Being literate means knowing which sites have legitimate (i.e. researched) information and which are opinion.  Email and social networking accounts. Most kids in high school should be mature enough to handle their own email address and FaceBook (or MySpace, Twitter, etc.) accounts. Schools (especially colleges) often use exclusively electronic  communication—in other words, no more paper notices.   General computer maintenance. Computers are great as long as they are working properly. Knowing how to maintain  software and hardware is the key to a healthy relationship between operator and machine. 

What Should My Child Do to Master Computer Skills?
l l

l

l

l l l

l

Get creative. Ask your teen to develop a household chores list in a chart format (using PowerPoint, for example), manage bank accounts online, create a practice resume, or anything that helps him or her improve computer skills.  Set up email and social networking accounts. Your local internet provider can help your child set up an email account—just  call the customer service number and ask for help. The social networking sites usually have step­by­step instructions for  setting up accounts as well.  Be internet safe. Before your kids set up their social networking sites talk to them about what should and shouldn’t be posted  for all to see. Read and discuss “Family Ideas for Online Safety” about the dangers of cyber bullying, predators, and general  computer etiquette.  Take classes. Most high schools offer computer (and typing) classes as electives for students. When helping your teen finalize his or her schedule, be sure to leave room for one or two of these classes. In addition, local computer stores, community  libraries and community colleges often offer similar classes for a reasonable fee.  Get online. Even if you don’t have internet access in your home, your kids can still get online. Public libraries, coffee houses,  print shops, and school libraries often have computers and wireless internet that can be used for free or for a slight fee.   Practice, practice, practice. The more your child practices computer skills, the faster he or she will learn how to use different  programs. Trial and error is sometimes the best way to improve.  Ask for help. One of the best resources for computer help is friends. Ask your friends or your teenager’s friends to spend  some time helping your child navigate the computer. Be sure to prepare a list of specific questions ahead of time to make the  most of your friend’s time as well.   Become web literate. Knowing how to use Google, Yahoo!, and similar search engines is helpful, but deciphering the  information from these websites can be more difficult. How do you know if the information is accurate and from a credible  source? Guide your kids to ask questions like, “Is the site trying to sell a product? How old is the information? Is the  information one­sided or does it give both sides of a story? The last thing you want your child to do is turn in a high school (or  college) paper with inaccurate information. 

20

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Sources: www.allbusiness.com               www.questbridge.org

source? Guide your kids to ask questions like, “Is the site trying to sell a product? How old is the information? Is the  information one­sided or does it give both sides of a story? The last thing you want your child to do is turn in a high school (or  college) paper with inaccurate information. 

Sources: www.allbusiness.com               www.questbridge.org

 

Getting into College Takes Smart Goal Setting in Middle School
When Kids Plan for College They Get There Sooner than Later EduGuide staff
It’s never too early to start thinking about your child’s transition to college. Teacher Sherry Bowen recently reviewed a government  publication that makes a convincing case for starting early to plan for college with smart goal setting. Take a few minutes with your  teenager and check out the link below. According to Bowen, Think College? Me? Now? A Handbook for Students in Middle School and Junior High School starts with the  following tips: Keep your options open. College can mean any path to higher learning: four­year, two­year, technical, business, or  community college.
l l

Think about money. By starting now, you can explore many options.  Raise hope. The book offers many examples that show how attending college affects future earnings. 

This booklet, available free from the U.S. Department of Education, also explains why people need a college education, what kinds of  jobs college graduates can get, how to get ready for college, and what courses to take. Readers will learn the importance of putting together a college support team. This team can include parents, teachers, counselors,  librarians, and other students who plan to attend college. With easy­to­read pie graphs and lists of ways to start looking for state financial aid, grants, scholarships, loans, work­study programs and federal aid information, this booklet covers all areas of college preparation.

Source: Lynda Wacyk is a former EduGuide editor from Grand Ledge, Michigan.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home? 
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/62/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx
21 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

Sources: www.allbusiness.com               www.questbridge.org

 

Getting into College Takes Smart Goal Setting in Middle School
When Kids Plan for College They Get There Sooner than Later EduGuide staff
It’s never too early to start thinking about your child’s transition to college. Teacher Sherry Bowen recently reviewed a government  publication that makes a convincing case for starting early to plan for college with smart goal setting. Take a few minutes with your  teenager and check out the link below. According to Bowen, Think College? Me? Now? A Handbook for Students in Middle School and Junior High School starts with the  following tips: Keep your options open. College can mean any path to higher learning: four­year, two­year, technical, business, or  community college.
l l

Think about money. By starting now, you can explore many options.  Raise hope. The book offers many examples that show how attending college affects future earnings. 

This booklet, available free from the U.S. Department of Education, also explains why people need a college education, what kinds of  jobs college graduates can get, how to get ready for college, and what courses to take. Readers will learn the importance of putting together a college support team. This team can include parents, teachers, counselors,  librarians, and other students who plan to attend college. With easy­to­read pie graphs and lists of ways to start looking for state financial aid, grants, scholarships, loans, work­study programs and federal aid information, this booklet covers all areas of college preparation.

Source: Lynda Wacyk is a former EduGuide editor from Grand Ledge, Michigan.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home? 
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/62/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

22

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Source: Lynda Wacyk is a former EduGuide editor from Grand Ledge, Michigan.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Do We Have a College­going Culture in Our Home? 
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/62/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

23

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->