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5/23/2013

Early Childhood Education


Learning Experience Template
Name: Hannah Abbruzzese
Date: 2/ 10/ 2015

Grade Level: Preschool

Lesson Title: Texture Rubbings Around the Room


Developmental Domain: Development in the Arts, Physical
Well-Being and Motor Development, Cognition and General
Knowledge Cognitive-Science

Standard(s)/Guideline(s):
Domain: Development in the Arts Strand: Visual Art
Recognizable images and begins to use wrist.
Domain: Physical Well-Being and Motor Development Strand: Motor Development Topic: Small Muscle; Touch grasp, reach, manipulate.
Coordinate the use of hands, fingers, and wrists to manipulate objects and perform tasks requiring precise movements.
Domain: Cognition and General Knowledge Strand: Cognitive Skills Topic: Symbolic Thought
Demonstrate understanding that symbols carry meaning and use symbols to represent thinking (e.g., drawings, construction or movement).
Domain: Cognitive-Science Strand: Science Inquiry and Application Topic: Inquiry
Make inferences, generalizations and explanations based on evidence.
Pre-assessment of current knowledge: The students have had a previous lesson on texture and will be familiar with how it relates to our sense of touch.
Instructional Objectives (1-2)
One/Two Assessed Instructional
Objective(s): The student will be
able to...
1. Develop creative thinking
by rubbings with crayons
to make a visual
representation of the
texture on paper.
2. Connect the textures to
aspects in their life by
using the textures found
around the room and
creating a picture from it.
One Assessed Developmental
Skill: The student will be able to
1. Use correct hand and wrist
movement to create a
rubbing.
2. Use their rubbings to
create a picture that they
can connect to their
personal life.
Safety Considerations: Make

Assessment of Student Learning

Learning Experience

Identify Evidence: (What will you collect or record as data


to demonstrate students have met your objective(s) and
skill?)
Take a picture of the students rubbings to document if they
could clearly comprehend the task at hand.

Academic Language:
Textures, rubbing, sketching, pencils, markers, crayons,
rough, smooth, hard, soft, feel, touch, observations, and
inferences.
Procedural steps:
1. Gather students in center time circle
2. Put on the senses song. Allow the students to dance
and move to the song and when the song states a
sense have the students point to where the sense is
on their body.
3. Explain to students that they will be exploring touch by
creating rubbings of the different textures from across
the classroom.
4. Demonstrate an example of a rubbing by putting
paper over top of an object (like the wall) in the
classroom and coloring over it with a crayon. Show
them how it creates a unique texture on the paper.
Explain how everything around the room has different
textures and by creating rubbings you can see the
texture in a different way.
5. Have the students fold their individual papers into 4
sections. Each section will be for a specific rubbing of
their choosing.
6. In the first area have the students practice rubbings
using the wall since the teacher already did that

Program Monitoring: (How will you aggregate or compile


your evidence into a class or group view?)
Come together as a class after the activity to share the
different rubbings that the students made from around the
room. The students can guess which texture belongs to
what object/surface.

5/23/2013

Early Childhood Education


Learning Experience Template
sure children are acting,
communicating, and participating
in an appropriate manner while
maintaining a clean environment
while performing the rubbing on
classroom items (not coloring on
the actual object).

example.
7. After practicing using the have students go to different
parts of the room and collect 3 different rubbings.
8. Come back together as a class so students can share
the different textures they found around the room. The
students can guess which texture belongs to what
object/surface.
9. After they discuss the different objects that have
certain textures the students will work separately to
think of an object (different form the one in the room),
person, pet, etc. that has a similar texture to what they
found in the room.
10. On the same sheet of paper have the students draw a
different picture using each texture. EX. The wall has
a rough bumpy pattern to it and that reminds me of the
sand at the beach. So Im going to use my texture
drawing and create a beach setting.
11. Once all the students completed this part of the
activity they would individually share their drawing
and explain why they chose that texture to describe
that object, person, or pet.
Authentic Materials: (Describe authentic real life, hands-on
materials.)
White paper, crayons, markers, pencils
Song: provided by CT
Adult Roles: Watch and instruct students while they are
around the classroom producing different rubbings.

Resources & References:


Reflection:

This was the most successful lesson yet that has been done in the preschool classroom. The students were very engaged in finding different textures
from around the room and looking at objects in a new and unique way. They finally are grasping the new vocabulary words and using them on the

5/23/2013

Early Childhood Education


Learning Experience Template

correct context, which corresponds with the textures. First I asked the students questions such as, What do you remember about texture? What types
of textures do you remember feeling? What texture do you feel at home?. This got the children thinking about what we have been talking about in
the past weeks and what they have learned. I first had the children fold their paper into four parts so they could divide up their drawings. Some had
trouble comprehending how to fold the paper and needed more help and direct instruction. This also engaged their motor skills by folding and
rubbing down the crease, which was a new technique for them. After this was done I first demonstrated a rubbing of the bumpy wall to show the
unique texture and for an example so they understood what they were expected to do. The students then had to find a place on the wall to practice
their first rubbing so they could get the hang out doing a rubbing on a surface. After they understood how to properly do a rubbing, they had to find
three more textures from around the room, and fill out their last three boxes. They really enjoyed this part because they got the freedom to pick what
they wanted to record. Many students got creative and used pillows, foam blocks, small cars, the spiral part of a notebook, etc. When we came back
together as a class to discuss the next part of the lesson they were confused on the task. I wanted them to draw a picture from one of their texture
rubbings and they had a hard time comprehending how to do this. Some of the students would draw a completely new picture without using the
textures they found. For the next time, I would demonstrate drawing a picture from one of my texture rubbings to give them an example of what to do
instead of just explaining the activity to them. Some students did understand this part and described their pictures very well. They would say, Look,
will you feel my picture? That looks like it could be a Christmas tree I drew my mom and dad This is a tree with no branches but has leaves
Thats a crack and the people cant fall in. I think I split up the lesson well so that students could focus on one task at a time. I learned that children
at this age need a lot more direct instruction that I originally expected. The students do not understand an activity unless they are given every step
with detail. Overall, I think they got a deeper understanding of textures though this lesson by having them do a fun hands on activity where they get a
choice and allowing the students to have the freedom to explore new textures.

5/23/2013

Early Childhood Education


Learning Experience Template