You are on page 1of 4

Curriculum planning chart

Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Perspective        Subject: Literacy ­ K
Concept*

Standard

("The student will 
understand…")
(The big idea, the 
"enduring 
understanding" 
[Wiggins, 1998]; a 
broad way of 
making sense of the
world, or a “life 
lesson”)
There are multiple 
perspectives for 
any given event, 
problem, issue, etc. 
and all angles 
should be examined
before making a 
conclusion. 
Central problem / 
issue / or essential 
question (intended 
to "get at" the 
concept; the 
“motorvator”)  
How can 
perspective lead to 
increased empathy 
in the classroom 
and beyond?

•CC.1.2.K.C: With 
prompting and support, 
make a connection 
between two individuals,
events, ideas, or pieces 
of information in a text
•CC.1.4.K.I: Support the 
opinion with reasons

Assessment

Facts 

Skills

Problems to pose 

(How will you have 
evidence that they 
know it?)

("The students will 
know…")

("The students will 
be able to…")

("Guiding questions"
or "unit questions")

Read a story 
and identify the 
different points 
of view

Identify 
similarities and 
differences 
between 
kindergarten 
schedule and 
the schedules of
two other 
individuals/grou
ps

•CC.1.3.K.H: Compare 
and contrast the 
adventures and 
experiences of characters
in familiar stories
•CC.1.4.K.G: Use a 
combination of drawing, 
dictating, and writing to 
compose opinion pieces 
on familiar topics

                Name: Sarah Deak

Write an 
opinion piece 
and use two 
pieces of 
evidence to 
back up opinion

How to 
identify 
different 
points of view 
in a story
Identify 
similarities 
and 
differences in 
points of view
How to 
identify their 
opinion and 
back up their 
opinion with at
least two 
reasons

…understand 
another’s point
of view

What does it 
mean to be 
fair?

…have 
empathy for 
another’s point
of view

Is there more 
than one 
“right” in a 
situation?

…form 
opinions based
on evidence

Why do we 
have the 
opinions we 
have?

How are we 
similar to 
others? How 
are we 
different?

Activities:

Create a chart 
showing the 
points of view
in a story

Compare the 
Kindergarten 
schedule to 8th
grader, the 
principal, 
and/or the 
student’s 
parents 
(interview 
others on 
schedules)

Write an 
opinion piece 
after reading 
different 
opinions on a 
topic of 
interest

Create a one­
act play based
on a story 
showing 
multiple 
perspectives

* It is important to note that the concept might remain the same across subjects (e.g., the concept on the math curriculum table might 
be the same as the concept on the social studies curriculum table), OR it might be different.

Curriculum planning chart
Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Perspective        Subject: Math ­ K
Concept*

Standard

("The student will 
understand…")
(The big idea, the 
"enduring 
understanding" 
[Wiggins, 1998]; a 
broad way of 
making sense of the
world, or a “life 
lesson”)
There are multiple 
perspectives for 
any given event, 
problem, issue, etc. 
and all angles 
should be examined
before making a 
conclusion. 
Central problem / 
issue / or essential 
question (intended 
to "get at" the 
concept; the 
“motorvator”)  
How can 
perspective lead to 
increased empathy 
in the classroom 
and beyond?

•CC.2.3.K.A.2: Analyze,
compare, create, and 
compose two­ and three­
dimensional shapes.
•CC.2.4.K.A.1: Describe
and compare attributes 
of length, area, weight, 
and capacity of everyday
objects.

                Name: Sarah Deak

Assessment

Facts 

Skills

Problems to pose 

(How will you have 
evidence that they 
know it?)

("The students will 
know…")

("The students will 
be able to…")

("Guiding questions"
or "unit questions")

Create a “bird’s 
eye” view of a 
familiar space 
(room in house, 
classroom, 
playground)
Items in “bird’s 
eye view” are of
similar shape 
and proportion 
to actual space

How to 
measure items

How to create 
a map

The meaning 
of a bird’s eye 
view

…understand 
different ways 
to view a 
space

…measure 
items using

…create a map

How can we 
look at the 
same space in 
different 
ways?

What are 
different ways
we can 
represent a 
space? 

Activities:

Create a map 
of a familiar 
place in the 
students’ lives

Look at the 
classroom 
from multiple 
angles

Practice 
measuring 
items in the 
classroom

Look at 
objects on 
classroom 
from different 
angles and 
draw them

Measure items
using different
units 

Curriculum planning chart
Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Perspective        Subject: Science ­ K

                Name: Sarah Deak

Concept*

Standard

("The student will 
understand…")
(The big idea, the 
"enduring 
understanding" 
[Wiggins, 1998]; a 
broad way of 
making sense of the
world, or a “life 
lesson”)
Animals/insects go 
through a life cycle 
from an egg to 
adult.
Observations from 
multiple viewpoints
create a fuller 
picture of things
Central problem / 
issue / or essential 
question (intended 
to "get at" the 
concept; the 
“motorvator”)  

 •CC.1.4.K.B: Use a 
combination of drawing, 
dictating, and writing to 
focus on one specific 
topic
•CC.1.5.K.A: Participate 
in collaborative 
conversations with peers 
and adults in small and 
larger groups

Assessment

Facts 

Skills

Problems to pose 

(How will you have 
evidence that they 
know it?)

("The students will 
know…")

("The students will 
be able to…")

("Guiding questions" 
or "unit questions")

Putting stages of
a life cycle in 
order

Engaging in 
discussion about
life cycle stages

Representing 
life cycle stages

Drawing 
observations of 
insect/animal at 
different stages

…the life cycle
of the 
particular 
animal/insect

…the order of 
a life cycle

…how to 
recognize the 
stages of the 
life cycle

…put the life 
cycle stages in 
order

…describe 
each stage of 
the life cycle 
accurately

…piece 
information 
together from 
different 
perspectives to
get a big 
picture

…how to make
and record 
observations

…how to use a
magnifying 
glass

What is the life 
cycle of the 
specific 
animal/insect?

What do the 
stages of the 
life cycle look 
like?

How do the 
different views 
of others create 
a full picture of 
what is 
happening?

How does the 
animal/insect 
look different 
from different 
angles/levels of
magnification?

Activities:

Read a story 
about the life 
cycle of 
animal/insect 
from the 
perspective of 
animal/insect 
and compare 
with what we 
see in class

Have the 
animal in class
and record 
observations 
of life cycle, 
then piece 
each view 
together to 
create full 
picture

Look at 
animal at 
different 
stages in cycle
from far away,
close up, and 
with a 
magnifying 
glass

Make 
observations 
of self/each 
other

What is the life 
cycle of an insect or
animal?
How do multiple 
perspectives make a
fuller picture?