You are on page 1of 3

Lesson Planning Form for Accessible Instruction — Calvin College Education Program 

 
Teacher 
Daniel Alderink
 
Date 
4/16/15
Subject/ Topic/ Theme 

 
Miklós Radnóti’s ​
Postcards

Grade _________9_______ 

 

I. Objectives 
How does this lesson connect to the unit plan? 
Today we will begin to look at certain poems pertaining to the Holocaust. Specifically, we will look at a collection of four poems entitled ​
Postcards ​
Miklós 
Radnóti. 
 
cognitive­ 
physical 
socio­emoti
Learners will be able to: 
R U Ap An E C*  development 
onal 




Read a poem aesthetically, i.e., to find beauty in the poem 
Remember the biographic context in which these poems were written. i.e., able to find biographic elements within 
the poems that relate to the author 
Begin to recognize certain elements key to Holocaust Poetry 
Begin to voice thoughts in a journal 
 

r, u, ap 
r, u 

 
 

 
 



 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Common Core standards (or GLCEs if not available in Common Core) addressed:  
By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with 
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 
 
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; 
provide an objective summary of the text. 
 
Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are 
emphasized in each account. 
 
Taken from “Common Core State Standards Initiative”  
 
(Note​
:​
 Write as many as needed.  Indicate taxonomy levels and connections to applicable national or state standards.  If an objective applies to particular 
learners write the name(s) of the learner(s) to whom it applies.) 
*remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, create 

 
II. Before you start 
Identify prerequisite 
knowledge and skills. 
 

All students will have already spent a few weeks reading ​
The Sunflower​
, by Simon Wiesenthal, giving 
them adequate background knowledge on various aspects of the Holocaust 
Pre­assessment (for learning):   

I will ask a variety of questions before beginning (e.g., What do you think makes Holocaust poetry 
unique?) 
Formative (for learning):   

Outline assessment activities 
(applicable to this lesson) 

What barriers might this lesson 
present? 
 
 
What will it take – 
neurodevelopmentally, 
experientially, emotionally, 
etc., for your students to do this 
lesson? 

9­15­14 

 
Formative (as learning):   

Informal assessment will be carried out through class discussion. I will keep track of who participates by 
checking off names. If certain students are not participating, I may try calling on them.  
Summative (of learning​
):   
No summative learning yet. Later lessons may allow for this.  
Provide Multiple Means of 
Representation 
Provide options for perception­ 
making information perceptible 
 
Handouts as well as Powerpoints 

Provide Multiple Means of 
Action and Expression 
Provide options for physical action­ 
increase options for interaction 
 
Students will work in groups  

Provide Multiple Means of 
Engagement 
Provide options for recruiting 
interest­ ​
choice, relevance, value, 
authenticity, minimize threats 
 
Students may freely voice opinions 
in discussion and in their own 
journals 

Provide options for language, 
mathematical expressions, and 
symbols­ ​
clarify & connect 
language 

 
I will clarify any literary terms 
or concepts that the students may 
not be familiar with 
Provide options for comprehension­ 
activate, apply & highlight 

 
 

Materials­what materials 
(books, handouts, etc) do you 
need for this lesson and are 
they ready to use? 
 

How will your classroom be set 
up for this lesson?   

 
 
 
 
 
2min 
1min 
 
 
 
 
1min 
 
 
10min 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9­15­14 

Motivation 
(opening/ 
introduction/ 
engagement) 
 

 
Journals allow students to 
express in ways other than 
discussion  

 

Provide options for executive 
functions­ ​
coordinate short & long 
term goals, monitor progress, and 
modify strategies 

Provide options for self­regulation­ 
expectations, personal skills and 
strategies, self­assessment & 
reflection 

 

Normal way with seats facing frontward towards the whiteboard.  
May be move later when put into groups 
 
 
 
 

Describe​
 teacher​
 activities                 AND                           ​
student​
 activities 
for each component of the lesson. Include important higher order thinking questions and/or prompts. 
● Explain the starting activity to students and 
● Students get into groups of about four and 
put up the corresponding PowerPoint slide: 
compose stanzas of a poem related to the 
The activity is a chain poem written by the 
topic I choose. After about 10 minutes the 
whole class. I will suggest a topic for the 
students will share their chosen poem with 
students to write about. The goal of this is to 
the rest of the class 
get the students thinking about poems in a 
 
creative way. 
 
● Read through the poem the class made 
● Critique or revise the poem.  


Development 
(the largest 
component or 
main body of 
the lesson) 
 

 
 

Provide options for sustaining 
effort and persistence­ ​
optimize 
challenge, collaboration, 
mastery­oriented feedback 

 
The long term goal is to build 
Their journals allow for 
literacy, specifically in poetry. 
self­reflection 
This  
Postcards​
 by Miklós Radnóti, provided in the unit poetry packet that I will hand out as well.  
Laptops for Journals  
PowerPoint with the poems typed out 
Students will apply what they 
learned from ​
Sunflower​
 to other 
poems 

III. The Plan 
 
Components 
Time 
10min 

Provide options for expression and 
communication­ ​
increase medium 
of expression 

Pass out poetry packets, explain that we will 
use them throughout the whole unit. Tell 
them they can look through them if they 
wish. Highlight the list of websites that 
make good resources for the unit project 
Briefly explain the project that we will be 
doing at the end of the unit when they will 
have to find a poem on their own and 
evaluate it in a presentation.  
Proceed to main part of lesson. Ask students 
to go to the pages in their packets that have 
the poems written by Miklós Radnóti. 
Explain his story (that he was a Hungarian 
Jew who was put in a labor camp during the 
war. These poems were found on his body 
after his grave was exhumed, etc.) Tell 
students to look his poem entitled ​
Forced 
March​
 and briefly explain its background. 
Ask for volunteers to read the poem aloud. 

Look through packet, put names in so they 
don’t lose it.  

Begin to brainstorm ideas for their project 

Turn to the appropriate pages. Take note of 
what the teacher says about Radnóti. Read 
along as the poem is read aloud. Mark up 
and underline things that stick out in the 
poem. Practice reading the way they 
learned in the previous lesson. Start 
recognizing certain themes in Holocaust 
poetry 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
10min 

 
 
 
 
5min 

 

Lead the class through an analysis of the 
poem, making sure the students note the 
biographical elements.  
Break the students into the same groups they 
had before and assign them all one of the 
Postcards​
. We may have to double up on 
certain poems. Instruct them to read through 
the poems in a similar way we did as a class. 
Put the instructions up on a slide.  
Bring class back together and have the 
students share what they found. Highlight 
anything that the students missed or that is 
especially important 

 
 
 

Get into groups and read the poem. Work 
together as a group to find elements within 
the poem that interest them. Relate certain 
elements back to ​
Sunflower​
.   

Designate one person to share what their 
group found particularly interesting. Other 
students may comment on other groups’ 
findings.  

Write in the journals and save them to the 
Google drive folder. If guidance is needed, 
then follow the prompts, but if they want to 
write about something else, they may do 
that as well.  

 
 

 
5min 
 
 

Closure 
(conclusion, 
culmination, 
wrap­up) 
 
 
 
 

If this lesson does not occur on a chapel 
day,​
 instruct the students to journal about 
what they learned this class period. The 
journals should be on a computer and saved 
to a Google drive so that I can monitor them. 
Put suggested questions on the PowerPoint 
so that the students have some direction 

Your reflection about the lesson, including evidence(s) of student learning and engagement, as well as ideas for improvement for next 
time. ​
(Write this after teaching the lesson, if you had a chance to teach it. If you did not teach this lesson, focus on the process of preparing 
the lesson.) 
 
 
 
 

9­15­14