You are on page 1of 49

Author:

Angela McGee
Grade Level: 3
Topic: Notes of the D and A strings (Note Reading)
Duration of Unit: March 27- April 8 (6 Days)


Table of Contents


Purpose of Unit - Page 3

Specific Skill Objectives Keyed to the Academic -Page 3

Time or Outline of Day-to-Day Plans - Page 4

Detailed Lesson Plans - Page 6

Supplemental Items - Page 17

Plans for Display of work - Page 22

Technology - Page 29

Differentiation or Accommodations - Page 29

Pre and Post Tests - Page 30

Pre and Post Tests Graphs- Page 34

Narrative Statements- Page 37

Purpose of Unit


The purpose of this unit was to strengthen the students note reading skills. It was
brought on by the students inability to identify the notes on the music page to their
instruments. The standards that are used in this unit come from the National
Standards for Music Education. I based my lessons off of standard 2- performing on
instruments a varied repertoire and standard 5- reading and notating music.



Specific Objectives Keyed to the Standards


Objectives related to N.S. 2
Students will be able to identify the notes of the D and A strings on their
violin by letter name.
Students will be able to label the notes of the D and A string on their violin by
fingering.
Students will be able to play the notes of the D and A strings on their violin.
Students will be able to play the notes written on the staff on their violins.

Objectives Related to N.S. 5
Students will be able to read the notes of the D major scale on a music staff.
Students will be able to notate (using a large music staff manipulative) the
notes of the D major scale.

These objectives will be formally assessed by a pre-test and post-test as well as
homework assignment. Assessment will also be informal through the asking of
questions and observation.














Timeline

March 16- Administer Pre-test

March 25 (Day 1)- At the suggestion of my cooperating teacher, students will
participate in the first musical spelling bee. Two students will go up to the music
staff manipulative and spell a word on the staff in proper reading order. The
students may call on their teammates to help them but the teammates cannot come
up to the staff and put the word up for them. The student that correctly spells the
word first will win a point for their team. The team with the most points overall will
be given a prize. The students will be given a homework assignment, which is very
similar to the musical spelling bee activity done in class, to allow them to draw on
previous knowledge related to the notes of the D major scale.

March 27 (Day 2)- At the beginning of class, the students will turn in their
homework. The students will then be given a worksheet to review the notes of the D
major scale. The worksheet will present to students a clear-cut way to identify notes
on staff based on what line or space it is on in the staff. The students and the
instructor will fill out the worksheet together in class. After the worksheet is
complete, the students and the instructor will sight read new music for the
upcoming concert. For homework, the students will be given flashcards to study the
notes of the D major scale. The students must write the name of the note pictured on
the backside of the flashcard along with the fingering on the violin. The students
must then have someone test them.

April 1 (Day 3)- The students will be instructed through demonstration how to
create a hand staff. The students will make their own hand staff. After the hand
staves are drawn, the students will play exercises in their book that use the notes on
their D and A strings. For homework, the students will be required to decorate their
hand staves to go on a bulletin board.

April 3 (Day 4)- The students will participate in the musical spelling bee with a
slight variation. For this edition of musical spelling bee, there will only be one
winner. Two people will come to the music staff but the person who wins the round
will stay at the staff and compete again. The person who wins will earn a prize. After
the musical spelling bee activity, the students will play exercises in their book that
use the same notes that were in the musical spelling bee.

April 8 (Day 5)- The students will participate in the musical spelling bee with a
twist. Instead of having the students spell a word that I dictate to them, the students
will be given a word to play first, then identify after. Once again, the students will be
split up in two teams and the team that has the most points will win a prize. After
the musical spelling bee activity, the students will play exercises in their book that
use the same notes that were in the musical spelling bee.

April 10 (Day 6)- The students will participate in the musical spelling bee with a
twist again but there will only be one winner. Once again, the student that survives
to the end will win a prize. After the musical spelling bee activity, the students will
play exercises in their book that use the same notes that were in the musical spelling
bee.

April 15- Administer Post-test













Lesson Plans


3/25/2015

Content and Achievement Standards


Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin.
Notate a word on the music staff (left to right).
Materials
Musical Staff
Violin
Prize Bucket
Procedures
1. Students will participate in the Musical Words Spelling Bee.
a. The students will be split up into team A and team B.
b. 1 student from each team will go up to the musical staff.
c. The instructor will give the students a word to spell in correct order (left to
right).
d. The student who spells it correctly first will win a point for their team.
Students may call on their teammates if they need help.
e. The team with the most points overall will earn a prize.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will also be informal and achieved by questioning the students about the
material to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

Musical Spelling Bee Word List



1. Be
2. Cab
3. Bed
4. Egg
5. Bad
6. Ace
7. Add
8. Age
9. Dad
10. Bag
11. Fed
12. Fad
13. Gab
14. Beg
15. Ebb
16. Fee
17. Deed
18. Deaf
19. Feed
20. Face
21. Fade
22. Bead
23. Beef
24. Baggage
25. Cabbage

3/27/2015
Content and Achievement Standards
Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin.
Read through pg. 19 of their Essential Elements Book
Materials
D and A string worksheet
Essential Elements Book
Violin
Procedures
1. Students and instructor will complete the D and A string worksheet together.
2. Students will turn to page 19 and find exercise 83.
3. Students and instructor will clap through the piece.
4. Students will finger (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
5. Students will play through the piece.
6. Students will go to exercise 84 in their books.
7. Students and instructor will clap through piece.
8. Students will finger (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
9. Students will play through the piece on their instruments.
10. Students will listen as the instructor explains their homework.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will be informal and achieved by questioning the students about the material
to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

Name: ________________________________

Lets Go Over Our Notes D and A String Notes!


1. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the space below the
________ line. To play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down
on the D string.


2. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ line. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the D string.


3. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ space. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the D string.

4. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ line. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the D string.


5. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ space. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the A string.


6. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ line. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the A string.


7. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ space. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the A string.


8. This note is _______. I know it is this note because it sits on the _______ line. To
play this note on my violin, I would put _______ finger(s) down on the A string.


10

Lets Go Over Our Notes D and A String Notes! (Answer Key)


1. This note is D. I know it is this note because it sits on the space below the 1st
line. To play this note on my violin, I would put 0 finger(s) down on the D
string.


2. This note is E. I know it is this note because it sits on the 1st line. To play this
note on my violin, I would put 1 finger(s) down on the D string.


3. This note is F#. I know it is this note because it sits on the 1st space. To play
this note on my violin, I would put 2 finger(s) down on the D string.


4. This note is G. I know it is this note because it sits on the 2nd line. To play
this note on my violin, I would put 3 finger(s) down on the D string.

11


5. This note is A. I know it is this note because it sits on the 2nd space. To play
this note on my violin, I would put 0 finger(s) down on the A string.


6. This note is B. I know it is this note because it sits on the 3rd line. To play this
note on my violin, I would put 1 finger(s) down on the A string.


7. This note is C#. I know it is this note because it sits on the 3rd space. To play
this note on my violin, I would put 2 finger(s) down on the A string.


8. This note is D. I know it is this note because it sits on the 4th line. To play this
note on my violin, I would put 3 finger(s) down on the A string.


12

4/1/2015
Content and Achievement Standards
Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin using the
hand staff (visual model).
Sight-read music for the 4/30/2015 concert.
Materials
Paper
Pencil
Violin
Procedures
1. Students and instructor will create a hand staff to give the students a kinesthetic
and visual model of the music staff.
2. Students will turn to page 22 and find exercise 107.
3. Students and instructor will clap through the piece.
4. Students will finger (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
5. Students will play through the piece.
6. Students will go to exercise 111 in their books.
7. Students and instructor will clap through piece.
8. Students will finger (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
9. Students will play through the piece on their instruments.
10. Students will listen as the instructor explains their homework (take their hand
staves home and decorate them).
11. Students will play 1 measure from either of the exercises practiced in class that
the instructor specifies in order to pack up.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will be formal and achieved by having the students play one measure from
either of the exercises rehearsal in class to measure student understanding and connection
from sheet music to instrument and also specifying a note for the student to play ex. Play
E. The student must first tell the instructor what line or space the note is on and then
proceed to play it on their instrument. Assessment will also be informal and achieved by
questioning the students about the material to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

13

4/3/2015
Content and Achievement Standards
Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin using the
hand staff (visual model).
Sight-read music for the 4/30/2015 concert.
Review Ode to Joy.
Materials
Musical Staff
String Basics book
Violin
Procedures
1. Students will participate in the Musical Words Spelling Bee.
a. 2 students will go up to the musical staff.
b. The instructor will give the students a word to spell in correct order (left to
right).
c. The student who spells it correctly first will remain standing at the staff,
while another student comes up for the next round.
d. The person who wins overall will earn a prize.
2. Students will play a D major scale using the bow stroke Mississippi Hotdog.
3. Students and instructor will review exercise 107 on page 22.
4. Students will play through the piece.
5. Students will go to exercise 111 in their books.
6. Students and instructor will clap through piece.
7. Students will pluck (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
8. Students will play through the piece on their instruments.
9. Students will play 1 measure from either of the exercises practiced in class that
the instructor specifies in order to pack up.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will be formal and achieved by having the students play one measure from
either of the exercises rehearsal in class to measure student understanding and connection
from sheet music to instrument and also specifying a note for the student to play ex. Play
E. The student must first tell the instructor what line or space the note is on and then
proceed to play it on their instrument. Assessment will also be informal and achieved by
questioning the students about the material to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

14

4/8/2015
Content and Achievement Standards
Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin using the
hand staff (visual model).
Sight-read music for the 4/30/2015 concert.
Review Ode to Joy.
Materials
Musical Staff
String Basics book
Violin
Procedures
1. Students will participate in the Musical Words Play Off.
a. 2 students will go up to the musical staff (Team A and Team B).
b. The instructor will place a word on the board.
c. The student who plays it correctly first on their instrument and can tell the
instructor what the word is will win a point for their team.
d. The team with the most points will earn a prize.
2. Students will play a D major scale using the bow stroke Mississippi Hotdog.
3. Students will go to exercise 111 in their books.
4. Students and instructor will clap through piece.
5. Students will pluck (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
6. Students will play through the piece on their instruments.
7. Students will play 1 measure from either of the exercises practiced in class that
the instructor specifies in order to pack up.
8. Students and instructor will review exercise 107 on page 22.
9. Students will play specific sections in the music and with the guidance of the
instructor making corrections where they are needed.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will be formal and achieved by having the students play one measure from
either of the exercises rehearsal in class to measure student understanding and connection
from sheet music to instrument and also specifying a note for the student to play ex. Play
E. The student must first tell the instructor what line or space the note is on and then
proceed to play it on their instrument. Assessment will also be informal and achieved by
questioning the students about the material to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

15

4/10/2015
Content and Achievement Standards
Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Reading and notating music.
Class Goals and Objectives
Identify the notes of the D major scale and their fingerings for the violin using the
hand staff (visual model).
Sight-read music for the 4/30/2015 concert.
Materials
Musical Staff
String Basics book
Violin
Procedures
2. Students will participate in the Musical Words Play Off.
a. 2 students will go up to the musical staff.
b. The instructor will place a word on the board.
c. The student who plays it correctly first on their instrument and can tell the
instructor what the word is will remain standing at the staff, while another
student comes up for the next round.
d. The person who wins overall will earn a prize.
3. Students will play a D major scale using the bow stroke Mississippi Hotdog.
4. Students will go to exercise 108 in their books.
5. Students and instructor will clap through piece.
6. Students will pluck (no bow) through the piece on their instruments while saying
the fingers.
7. Students will play through the piece on their instruments.
8. Students will play 1 measure from either of the exercises practiced in class that
the instructor specifies in order to pack up.
9. Students and instructor will review exercise 107 on page 22.
10. Students will play specific sections in the music and with the guidance of the
instructor making corrections where they are needed.
Assessment of Goals and Objectives
Assessment will be formal and achieved by having the students play one measure from
either of the exercises rehearsal in class to measure student understanding and connection
from sheet music to instrument and also specifying a note for the student to play ex. Play
E. The student must first tell the instructor what line or space the note is on and then
proceed to play it on their instrument. Assessment will also be informal and achieved by
questioning the students about the material to make sure they understand.
Follow up Lessons
Future lessons will focus on expanding the students knowledge of the D major scale and
the respective fingers that go with the scale on the violin.

16

Supplemental Items

17

ANSWER KEY

B E E
F

B A D G E
B

C A F E
G

D A D
G

C A G E D
A
A D A G E
E

B E E

D A D

B A D G E

E D G E

F A D E D

C A G E D

D E C A D E

C A F E

B A G

A D A G E

18

http://makingmusicfun.net/htm/printit_notenam
e.htm


http://denleymusic.com/wordpress/2011/08/1019
/complete-set-violin-flash-cards-printable/

Answers to Flashcards




G
3




D
3




F#
2




C#
2




E
1




B
1




D
O




A
0

20

Music Staff Manipulative





















21

Plans for Display of Work





















Hand staves where displayed inside of the
classroom. A total of 4 students followed the
directions to color their hand staff.







22

This a model hand staff that I completed after


demonstrating how to do the hand staff in class.

23

Photos of Hand Staves

24

25



26

27

28

Technology

Audio recordings for the students to play along with in their books

Differentiation and/or Accommodations



Through talking with my cooperating teacher, I discovered that one student in my
targeted class had a learning disability. Unfortunately, that disability was never revealed
due to privacy issues. However, I did make accommodations to my unit project by
including a hand staff lesson plan. This lesson accommodated visual and kinesthetic
learners by providing an alternate method of learning the notes of the staff. Similar to
counting numbers on fingers, the hand staff allows students to visualize the musical staff
on their hand and physically count up the notes to the desired note or space (finger or
space between fingers).

29

Tell me what you know! (Pre-test)



Please read the directions carefully and be sure to finish all of the
steps.
1. On the music score below, CIRCLE all of the notes on your D
string.
2. Label ALL of the notes with the correct note names BELOW the
note-heads.
3. Label ALL of the fingerings ABOVE the note-heads for each note.









1. When you put your first finger down on the D string, you are
playing the note ______?
a. F
b. C
c. E


2. The note A sits on the second space. (Circle One)
True or False

3. What is a scale?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


30





4. Fill out this fingering chart with the appropriate note names
for each finger.
a. Name the open strings for all 4 strings first.
b. Then name the notes for each finger on the D and A
strings ONLY.





















5. Playing Test
Practice plucking the melody until Ms. McGee calls on you
to play.

31

Tell me what you know! (ANSWER KEY)


75 PTS.
Please read the directions carefully and be sure to finish all of
the steps.
1. On the music score below, CIRCLE all of the notes on your D 11 PTS.
string.
2. Label ALL of the notes with the correct note names BELOW the 32 PTS.
note-heads.
3. Label ALL of the fingerings ABOVE the note-heads for each
32 PTS.
note.
2 2 0 0/4 3 1 3 1 3 0/4 3 2 1 3 2 0 0 0/4 0 1 3 3 2 0 1 0 0/4 2 2 0/4 2 0


F# C# E A G E D B G A D C# E B F# E D A E B G D C# D E E A C# F# A C# E


= Correct


= Correct only if consistent in marking all 4th fingers


1. When you put your first finger down on the D string, you
are playing the note ______?
a. F
b. C
c. E

2. The note A sits on the second space. (Circle One)
True or False


3. What is a scale? (Did not go over this in class so students
get extra 4 points on post-test.)

1 PT.

1 PT.

4 PTS.

A scale is a set of musical notes in which each note is higher or


lower than the previous one by a particular amount.

32

4. Fill out this fingering chart with the appropriate note names
for each finger.
a. Name the open strings for all 4 strings first.
b. Then name the notes for each finger on the D and A
strings ONLY.


G D A E





E B






F# C#



G D







5. Playing Test
Practice plucking the melody until Ms. McGee calls on you
to play.

33

34

35

36

Unit Narratives
National Standards for Music Education Addressed in Unit

N.S. 2- Performing on instruments a varied repertoire


o perform on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate dynamics and timbre, and
maintain a steady tempo
o perform easy rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately and
independently on rhythmic,
o melodic and harmonic classroom instruments
o perform expressively a varied repertoire of music representing diverse
genres and styles
o echo short rhythms and melodic patterns
o perform in groups, blending instrumental timbres, matching dynamic
levels, and responding to the
o cues of a conductor
o perform independent instrumental parts while other students sing or play
contrasting parts

N.S. 5- Reading and notating music.


o read whole, half, dotted half, quarter, and eighth notes and rests in 2/4, *
and 4/4 meter signatures
o use a system (that is, syllables, numbers or letters) to read simple pitch
notation in the treble clef in major keys
o identify symbols and traditional terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and
articulation and interpret them correctly when performing

37

o use standard symbols to notate meter, rhythm, pitch and dynamics in


simple patterns presented by the teacher

Accommodation of students of different abilities


Through talking with my cooperating teacher, I discovered that one student in my
targeted class had a learning disability. Unfortunately, that disability was never revealed
due to privacy issues. However, I did make accommodations to my unit project by
including a hand staff lesson plan. This lesson accommodated visual and kinesthetic
learners by providing an alternate method of learning the notes of the staff. Similar to
counting numbers on fingers, the hand staff allows students to visualize the musical staff
on their hand and physically count up the notes to the desired note or space (finger or
space between fingers).

Authentic (real-life), Critical Thinking and/or Problem-Solving Skills Developed


through the Unit
The purpose of this unit was to strengthen the students note reading skills of the
note of the D major scale so that consequently, they would play better and more
accurately. The first lesson of the lamp project addressed problem-solving skills. The
students were given a word to spell on the music staff in correct reading order (left to
right). The problem being to know where the letters of the word fall on the music staff
and that the word must be spelled correctly regardless of register. In order to accomplish
this goal, the students had to be able to:
1. Know their left from right (the correct spelling was already given to students),

38

2. Know which note on the staff is which


3. If only knowing a few notes, use critical thinking skills to count up the staff to find
the desired note.
This lesson focused mainly on problem solving skills because the authentic skill, that is
playing the notes on their instruments, would have overloaded them. Critical thinking
was involved only if the student did not know all of the notes of the staff but only knew
some as a reference point. At that point, the student would have to use logic to count up
or down the scale to figure what the notes around the familiar note were.
As the lamp project progressed, higher thinking skills were also relied on. These
skills called for the students to relate their note reading skills to the actual note on their
violins (authentic) and to figure out using a visual model what a note is even if was not
apart of the D major scale. Authentic skills were applied in the fifth lesson of my LAMP
project. The students had to identify a word that was already given to them on the staff
and play it correctly on their instruments. The focus of this activity to was the playing
portion but it relied on the students note reading skills as well. In the third lesson (hand
staff lesson) of my lesson assessed the students ability to apply their current knowledge
to new materials. The students were asked to identify a note that was not in the D major
scale by counting by whole step up or down the staff and alphabet to find the note
desired. This activity exercised the students ability to think critically.

Different Instructional Strategies Used in Unit

Addressing student-learning styles- I incorporated visual and kinesthetic learners


by having the students make hand staffs. I addressed the auditory learners by

39

spelling out the words I wanted them to spell and also by reading the directions of
the pre test and post-test.

Checking for understanding-To check for understanding, I asked many questions

Connect to prior knowledge/learning- I had students reference the notes they were
familiar with on the staff to find notes that did not know.

Demonstration- I demonstrated how the musical spelling be would work before


having them participate in it.

Feedback to student- I gave feedback in the moment to the students when they
played the words on the staff and also when we played actual music.

Formative Assessment- For formal assessment, the students were given a pre test
and post test.

Hands-on activities- I created a worksheet in which the students had to write what
note was shown, how they knew it was that note based on what line of space was
on and what finger they would put down in order to play it on their instruments.

Homework- The students completed two homework assignments to assess


whether they understood the content.

Monitoring and adjusting- When doing the hand staff lesson, I walked around to
see if all of the students were doing it correctly. I also stayed near the staff to
provide help when groups were competing against each other.

Oral Reading- I read the questions on the pre and post-tests. I also spelled out the
words that I wanted the students to put on the staff.

Praise/recognition- Positive reinforcement was used when I wanted to students to


continue trying and not get frustrated when they didnt understand something.

40

Use of visuals- The hands-on music staff allowed the students to manipulate
melodies and words.

Whole group instruction- Used mostly whole group instruction but team learning
was allowed when the students did the musical spelling bee the first time.

Technologies and Media Integrated in Unit


I did not use much technology in this unit because the manipulative music staff was all I
needed. The technology I did use was an accompaniment recording of a piece they were
working on after I had taught the unit. It was use to support the practical skills used in
the unit.

Assessment
Accommodations made for the differing needs of the students in my assessment
The accommodation I used in my assessment was reading the directions out loud instead
of just making the students read them for themselves.

Types of Assessment
The pre test and post-test were the same. For the first part of the test, the students had to
be able to circle all of the notes on their D string, label all of the fingerings, and label all
of the notes by letter names of a short passage of music. The second part of the test had
one multiple-choice question that dealt with naming the note that is being play if a
certain finger is put down on the violin, one true/false question that question the position
of a certain note on the staff, and one short answer that asked what a scale was. The third
part had one fill in the blank section of all of the fingers of the violin. The final part was

41

a playing test. The melody of the playing test was simple and mostly scalar; there was
one tricky leap to test if the students were actually reading the notes or following the
contour of the melody. The answers for all of my questions were subjective. The playing
test was scored based on how many notes the students played correctly.
Other types of assessment used in this unit were a homework assignment that
required the students to label each note with a letter name to spell a word, and informal
questioning used daily.

Design and Use of Rubrics


There were no rubrics used for this unit project. The playing test was graded for the
purpose of determining how many notes were played correctly by the number of fingers
put down. Intonation was not a factor. This process was very subjective so no rubric was
needed. I simply tallied how many notes were played correctly and their percentage was
based off of how many notes were right by how many notes there were in total. Had I
considered other musical elements, I would have provided a rubric.

Instructional Narrative

How Directions were presented to Students


Directions for classroom activities were presented to students orally. For homework that
did not have printed directions, instructions were also spoken. For the pre test and post
test, the directions were given both orally and written.

42

How the Project Relates to the Standards in the Unit


The standards that I used of my LAMP project were an integral in planning each lesson.
If both standards were not included in each lesson, at least one of them was incorporated.
N.S. 2 was included in every lesson except one. The reason it was not included in that
lesson is because I wanted to sequence learning in a manner that the students wouldnt be
overwhelmed by too many tasks. For the other lessons, N.S. 2 was used to apply the
knowledge learned through N.S. 5 in a real life situation. N.S. 5 was incorporated in
every lesson because it was the reason for this unit. The students were having trouble
reading the notes in their music so the issue was in understanding N.S. 5. To fix this
problem, the students were required to read music or notate (using music staff
manipulative) music everyday. The different ways N.S. 5 was presented were by me first
having the students use their knowledge of the notes of the treble clef to spell a word,
then, on another day, the students had to determine what word was being spelled by
identifying what notes were on the staff and what order they were placed in.

How the Project Accounts for the Differences in Students


As it relates to how I taught the unit, the only accommodation I made in the unit plan was
the hand staff lesson for visual and kinesthetic learners. However, when I taught the unit,
I was very flexible on how I could help very student. If a student needed help, I provided
assistance. Many times during this unit, the musical spelling bee activities took much
longer than expected because the students needed extra help in figuring out words.
Although I was not aware of the different abilities of the students, I was open to helping
them in any way they needed it.

43

How the Project Connects/Engages Students in Real-life Application


This project engages students in real-life application because it addresses a previous
problem they were having in their string class a class that they take for grade. The idea
for this unit came from their strings teacher herself in order to improve their playing in
her class. This unit strengthens the students ability to play the notes in their music
accurately. This project is applicable in real-life outside of their strings class as well.
Although the focus in many of the lessons was relating the notes of the treble clef to their
violins, once the students know the notes of the treble clef, they will have a better chance
at playing any other upper ranged instrument. Furthermore, learning to read and write
music enables the student to become an independent musician that can communicate their
musical thoughts with any musician that also reads music because music is the only
universal language.

What the Criteria for the Project was and How Students were Informed of the
Criteria
Since the lessons for my project were just variations of one activity, the criteria was
basically the same for each lesson. The students success in the activities was based
on their ability to identify the notes of the D major scale, be able to notate them on
the music staff manipulative, and be able to play them on their instrument
regardless of order. The students were orally made aware of these criteria before
each activity. For example, for the musical spelling bee lesson that required the
students to play the word then tell me what the word was, they told that the answer

44

is only correct if they play the word correctly first, then tell me what word it is. I
demonstrated with 2 examples to reinforce my directions.

Result/Interpretation Narrative

How Students Performed Collectively and Individually on the Pre-Test
As a group, the students had an average of 49% on the pre-test. Individually, there
were more students that scored on the lower have of the spectrum than on the
upper half. Only one student earned what I would deem as a passing grade. The gap
between the lowest and highest grade was 46. The gap between the two highest
scores was 8. The gap between the two lowest score was 8. If I had to give a letter
grade to each student, the grades would be as follows: C (71%), D (63%), F (51%), F
(37%), F (44%), F (43%), F (54%), F (25%). As a class, the overall letter grade
would be an F.

What Changes Were Made to the Unit Based on Pretest Data?
Based on the pre-test data, I knew I had to begin with the students from scratch. To
do that, I made a worksheet that had a picture of each note in the D major scale, a
prompt asking them what note it was, how they knew it was that note and how to
play it on their instrument. We went over this worksheet together in class and I
made sure to ask everyone at least one question. After that we sight-read a new
piece of music that had those notes in it. I also asked questions that tested their
newly developed knowledge as we went over the notes of the piece.

45


How Students Performed Collectively and Individually on the Post-Test
As a group, the students improved their average by 2 percent meaning the
knowledge of the content grew to 51% between the pre-test and the post-test.
Individually, all students scores increased except 3 students. Unfortunately, all but
2 students were on the lower side of the grading scale. The gap between the highest
score and the lowest score was 81. The gap between the two highest scores was 7.
The gap between the two lowest scores was 4. If I were to give a letter grade to each
student, the grade would be as follows: A (99%), A (92%), F (58%), F (58%), F
(11%), F (47%), F (58%), F, (30%), F (15%). Again, as a class, the overall letter
grade would be an F.
The scores of the 2 students with the lowest scores are related. The two
students that scored the lowest were sitting next to each other in the back of the
class using the same music stand to write on (They were not talking to each other.
Many other students were also sharing stands but Ive learned that this is not a good
idea and even if takes extra time, each student needs his or her own testing space.).
Their tests have the same unnecessary addition of a random number on the top of
their page. On the pre-test, both students scored higher. One of the students in
particular percentage of correct answers was 63%. Her score dropped dramatically
to 11% on the post-test. The student that was sitting by the previous student earned
a score of 15%. Her score dropped from 25% to 15%. The student with the higher
pre-test score typically performs in class at a greater level than the student than
only received a 10% deficit in her score. Ive learned from this information is that

46

the stronger student academically has more influence over the student that already
struggled to understand. These students seemed to struggle on the same problems
and had the same answers or lack of for certain questions. Ive also learned that
these particular students should not sit by each other. The student that struggled
most consistently should sit by someone who consistently excels that is not
necessarily his or her friend.

Overall Final Statement
This unit project was very fun to execute. I enjoyed doing something out of
the ordinary and the students seemed to like it as well. However, based off of the
results of the test, I dont believe I was as effective in teaching them what they
needed to learn as I could have been. Although most of the students scores
improved, it appears that I only taught to 2 students because their scores
skyrocketed, while everyone elses scores increased a little or not at all. Another
thing Ive begun to consider looking back is that extrinsic motivation (prize bucket)
may have just simply hindered their desire to learn and taken the focus away from
the importance of learning the notes.
On the other side, it is unfair to blame the teacher for the students not
knowing something that they were taught multiple times and in various ways in
class that they were also instructed to go home and practice, even when given aids
(flashcards, homework) to scaffold learning. Students cant learn everything in
school and students cant remember everything that was taught to them in class.
People lose 50%-80% of what they have learned after one day. (University of

47

Waterloo, Curve of Forgetting) Thats why it is critical that students practice and
study at home everyday. Im sure anyone who became an expert at anything would
agree that they didnt learn everything they know from class only, but it takes
practice to get better.
As far as using this unit in my future teaching, I dont know if I would
consider using this unit as a whole to teach note reading. I realize that it may take
even more than what you plan to reach a student. One this I may consider is more
drilling of the notes and then more frequent assessment. This is not the new-age
thinking of education but sometimes you have to consider all options to get a
desired result. The musical spelling bee would be an activity that I would reward the
students with after Im sure that they know all of their notes.
The value in completing this unit is that majority of the students improved
their note reading skills which in turn helped their playing skills. Some students
even took the initiative to learn different ways of knowing the notes outside of what
I taught them, which shows a good work ethic. Another valuable thing Ive learned
from this unit is where the students actually are in their learning. This is sometimes
difficult in a large performance based class.
The value of completing this unit for me was that I learned a lot! Each
instance of failure teaches you a lesson. Ive learned that I must be even more
flexible in my approaches to learning and I must assess more often. I learned that
even if you do all of those things, you may still experience bad results but you must
not give up. I learned that essentially bribing the students with prizes does not

48

always work. From this unit, I can see that Im ever improving in teaching but I still
have a ways to go.

References

Curve of Forgetting. University of Waterloo Counselling Services. 24 April 2015.
<https://uwaterloo.ca/counselling-services/curve-forgetting>

49