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Note Names and the Staf

LAMP
Spring 2015

Alisha Reeve
3rd Grade
Northwestern Elementary School
2/17-4/23

Table of Contents

Section
Page #
Purpose of the Project
3
National Standards
4
Primary and Secondary
Unit Objectives
5
Vocabulary
6
Unit Timeline
Lesson Plans
Supplemental Items
Student Assessment Tools
Technology
Differentiation and/or Accommodations
Pre/Post Tests
Student Copies and Teacher Copies
Pre/Post Test Data Graphs
Narrative Statements
2

Purpose Statement
The purpose of this unit was firstly to teach the 3 rd
graders at Northwestern Elementary the names of the notes
in the treble clef and their location in the staff. In order to be
most successful this also included drawing the notes in the
staff, composing short melodies with very specific
guidelines, and even playing glockenspiels using newly
learned notes. Reading music is a skill that students will
continue to use throughout the next three years in general
music, and even beyond that if they continue with band or
choir in their middle school and high school years. Reading
music is such a basic skill that is so often lacking in students
and it was my goal to use a comprehensive musicianship
approach to teach my students musical skills that will last a
lifetime.
Of course, being that this is my LAMP Project there is a
secondary purpose. That purpose is to show that I am
capable of planning and executing a unit plan that contains
varied musical skills and lessons and uses specific National
Standards for Music Education to prove growth of knowledge
through use of pre and post assessments.

National Standards for Music


Education
Primary Standards
Standards to be assessed in Pre/Post
Assessments
Content Standard #4 Composing and arranging music
within specified guidelines
Achievement Standard b create and arrange short
songs and
instrumental pieces within specified guidelines
Content Standard #5 Reading and notating music
Achievement Standard b use a system (that is,
syllables,
numbers, or letters) to read simple pitch notation in the
treble clef
in major keys

Secondary Standards
Standards to be assessed using rubrics
during daily
lessons
Content Standard #2 Performing on instruments, alone
and with
others, a varied repertoire of music
4

Achievement Standards:
a perform on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate
dynamics and
timbre, and maintain a steady tempo
b perform easy rhythmic, melodic, and chordal
patterns
accurately and independently on rhythmic, melodic,
and harmonic
classroom instruments

Unit Objectives
At the end of the unit student will be able to
Identify and label notes of the treble clef from C4
through F5 at sight (N5)
o Assessed informally through flashcards, formally
through Exit Tickets and Worksheets, Pre/Post Test
Draw the notes of the treble clef from C4 through F5
given a specific guidelines (N5)
o Assessed through worksheets and as part of a
composition project, Pre/Post Test
Identify at sight both treble clef and bass clef and
articulate which one indicates Mr. Everybodys
Apartment as taught in the supplemental books (N5)
o Informally through in class worksheets, activities,
formally through Pre/Post Test
Draw the treble clef in the staff (N5)
o Assessed informally through worksheets and
composition project

Identify eighth notes, quarter notes, and half notes by


sight (N5)
o Assessed informally through flashcards and
formally through Pre/Post Test
Compose a short melody given specific guidelines and
notate in the staff and label the note names (N4)
o Assessed through a rubric as part of a composition
project, and formally in the Pre/Post Test
Play a short melody on the glockenspiel using correct
rhythm and pitches (N2)
o Assessed informally as a class activity
Play a short melody the student composed on the
glockenspiel using correct rhythm and pitches (N2)
o Assessed formally using a rubric as part of a
composition project

Vocabulary
Bar Line a vertical line used to mark the division
between two measures.
Bass Clef
, also used at the beginning of the
staff to show that the staff is Grannys Apartment.
Double Bar Line Two lines placed at the end of a
piece of music to show it is the end of the song.
Eighth Note

, gets beat.

Half Note

, gets 2 beats.

Measure Space in the music where the notes are


written. Music is divided evenly into these.

Quarter Note

, gets one beat

Staf Five lines and four spaces that each


represents a different musical pitch with their own
name.

Treble Clef
, also used at the beginning of the
staff to show that the staff is Mr. Everybodys
Apartment

Outline of Plans
1 Week Before Beginning Give Pretest
Day 1 - Read Bk. 1 Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment, C4-F4,
Practice with flashcards
Day 2 Review C4-F4, Use supplemental song from book and
Glockenspiel, Worksheet #1
Day 3 Read Bk. 2 Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment, G4-B4,
practice/review with flashcards, Begin Worksheet #2
Day 4 Finish Worksheet #2, Staff Rug speed game
7

Day 5 Read Bk. 3 Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment, C5-F5,


Practice/Review flashcards
Day 6 Review all notes C5-F5, use supplemental songs with
Glockenspiels to practice
Day 7 Introduce terms like bar line, measure, double bar line;
review staff, treble clef, quarter and half notes. Begin
composition project by creating rhythm for song
Day 8 Finish compositions using glockenspiels to assign notes
to rhythm already written and write it in the staff, practice
Day 9 Practice compositions and begin playing tests
Day 10 Review vocabulary, and note name flashcards before
Post Test, Finish Composition Playing Tests
Next class day after Day 10 Give Post Test
*Northwestern Elementary Music classes meet twice a week for
30 minutes. In an effort to keep all 3rd grade classes on the same
schedule, there are days, which were skipped when teaching this
unit which are caused by delays, schedule changes, ISTEP, and
field trips.

Lesson Plans
Mr. Everybody Pt. 1
Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 2/24/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Large staff rug
8

Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-F4 (no accidentals)
Standards:
Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will identify the notes C4, D4, E4, and F4 on the staff and in
flashcards to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will learn the names of each note Crazy Cat, Dumb Dog, Mr.
Everybody, and Funny Face according to Mr. Everybody.
3. Students will complete an Exit Ticket in which they identify these new
notes by writing the name below the note.
Procedure:
1. Students will listen as the teacher reads the first 15 pages of Mr.
Everybody. Explain to the students the words staff, note. Write an example
of quarter notes, half notes, and whole notes on the board. Also write
examples of each note, C, D, and E.
2. Students will identify each note several times using flashcards.
a. The entire class will do this activity together. Ask them to identify
the note as Crazy Cat, Dumb Dog, etc. the first time and as C, D,
and E the second time
3. Students will listen as the teacher finishes the first book of Mr. Everybody
and learn the note F. Again, write this note on the board as a quarter note,
half note, and whole note.
4. Again students will identify each note using the flashcards. Students will
use the names from Mr. Everybody the first time through, and only the
letter names the second time.
5. Students will play a game using a large the staff and note name flash
cards. In two teams on person from each team will see a flashcards and
must stand on the right on the staff. The first person to get it right gets a
point for their team. The winning team gets to line up first for gym at the
end of class.
Closure/Review
Students will complete the exit ticket in E-backpack and turn it in before
they leave. Teacher will explain directions before students begin. Students
will write the note name in the space provided below each note.

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Mr. Everybody Pt. 2


Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 2/26/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
Bells are Ringing
Materials:
iPads
Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Glockenspiels and mallets
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-F4 (no accidentals)

Standards:
Singing

Playing
X

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will identify the notes C4, D4, E4, and F4 on the staff and in
flashcards to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will read the notes in a piece of music and write the names under
the notes.
3. Students will play Bells are Ringing on the glockenspiels using the pitches
C4-F4 at an appropriate level.
4. Students will complete an Exit Ticket in which they write a short song
using the notes C4-F4 by writing them in a staff and identifying them
underneath the staff.

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Procedure:
1. Students will review the pitches learned last week by reviewing the note
name cards as a class. Begin by asking the students where each
character lies in the apartment to give a quick review before showing the
cards.
2. After reviewing the note names, students will review words like staff and
treble clef they learned last class.
3. Students will recall that the people living in Mr. Everybodys apartment can
appear in different ways, normal (whole note), with a stem (half note), and
face colored in with a stem (quarter note). Explain the name of each of
these notes and remind them of their value in common time.
4. Students will come up one row at a time to receive a glockenspiel and
mallet and then return to their seat. Before giving out instruments go over
the rules for instruments and have students open e-backpack.
5. Begin by having students practice quarter notes and half notes on the
glockenspiels for each note as a warm-up. Teacher will write short
examples on the board.
6. Students will listen as the teacher plays the song Bells are Ringing on the
glockenspiel. After listening, students will open the song in e-backpack
and write the names of the notes underneath each note.
7. Students will have a few minutes to practice the song on their own at their
desk before the whole class plays the song together.
8. Students will put their instruments under their desk and listen for
instructions for todays Exit Ticket.
a. At the top of the page you will see a practice section. Watch as I
demonstrate how to draw a treble clef. The directions are also on
your worksheet. Trace the first three treble clefs and then draw five
of your own.
b. After you have completed that, you may complete the graded
portion of the ticket. At the bottom you will compose a song similar
to the one we played early. You will draw a treble clef at the
beginning of the staff then use 8 quarter notes to compose a song
using only C, D, E, and F. Write the name of the note on the line,
then draw it as a quarter note in the staff.
Closure/Review
Students will complete the exit ticket in E-backpack and turn it in before
they leave. Teacher will explain directions before students begin. Students
will compose a short song using quarter notes and only the pitches C4-F4
and draw a treble clef at the beginning of the example.

11

Accommodations will be made for students with IEPs. Though students


who generally qualify for Complete/Incomplete Scores will also qualify for
this assignment.

Mr. Everybody Pt. 3


Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 3/5/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Large staff rug
Concept Focus:
Note names, G4-B4 (no accidentals)

Standards:
Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will identify the notes G4, A4, and B4 on the staff and in
flashcards to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will learn the names of each note, Good Boy, Always Awful,
and Bad Boy according to Mr. Everybody.
3. Students will complete an Exit Ticket in which they identify these new
notes, and old notes by writing the name below the note.
Procedure:
1. Students will listen as the teacher reads excerpts from Mr.
Everybody Bk. 2. Review with the students the words staff, note,
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treble clef, and quarter, half and whole note. Write an example of
quarter notes, half notes, and whole notes on the board. Also write
examples of each note, G4-B4.
2. Students will identify each note several times using flashcards.
a. The entire class will do this activity together. Ask them to
identify the note as Crazy Cat, Dumb Dog, etc. the first time
and as C, D, E, F, G, A, or B the second time.
3. Students will play a game using a large the staff and note name
flash cards. In two teams on person from each team will see a
flashcards and must stand on the right on the staff. The first person
to get it right gets a point for their team. The winning team gets to
line up first for gym at the end of class. If a team gets too loud they
can lose points for their team.
Closure/Review
Students will complete the exit ticket in E-backpack and turn it in before
they leave. Teacher will explain directions before students begin. Students
will write the note name in the space provided below each note.
Accommodations will be made for students with IEPs. Though students
who generally qualify for Complete/Incomplete Scores will also qualify for
this assignment.

Mr. Everybody Pt. 4


Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 3/5/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Large staff rug
Concept Focus:
Note names, G4-B4 (no accidentals)
13

Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Standards:

Objectives:
1. Students will complete Mr. Everybody worksheet #2 and turn it in to
eBackpack.
2. Students will review the names of the treble clef notes using flashcards
with a partner to teacher satisfaction.
3. Students will play a music game involving a large music staff rug and note
flashcards with reasonable accuracy if time allows.
Procedure:
1. Students will finish the second Mr. Everybody worksheet they began last
class.
2. After completing the worksheet and turning it in to eBackpack, students
will find a partner and using treble clef flashcards, quiz each other several
times. The first time through students will use the names they learned
from the Mr. Everybody books, the second time they will use the letter
names.
3. Students will prepare to play a game using a large the staff and note name
flash cards. In two teams on person from each team will see a flashcards
and must stand on the right on the staff. The first person to get it right gets
a point for their team. The winning team gets to line up first for gym or to
go back to their classroom at the end of class. If a team gets too loud they
can lose points for their team.
Closure/Review
Students will play the game. The two people who just played will move to
the board and mark the point for whichever team wins the next round
before moving to the end of the line.
3 minutes before the end of class students will move back to their seats
and wait quietly to line up to go to the next class.

Mr. Everybody Pt. 5


Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 3/17/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
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Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment Bk. 3
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Large staff rug
Concept Focus:
Note names, (no accidentals)
Standards:
Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will identify the notes C5, D5, E5, and F5 on the staff and in
flashcards to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will learn the names of each note Si Si, Mr. Deserves, Eerie E,
and Fudge Face according to Mr. Everybody.
3. Students will complete an Exit Ticket in which they identify these new
notes and old notes by writing the name below the note.
Procedure:
1. Students will listen as the teacher reads the first section of Mr. Everybody
and introduces Si Si.
2. Students will identify this note along with notes previously learned several
times using flashcards.
a. The entire class will do this activity together. Ask them to identify
the note as by their person name the first time and as the letter
name the second time
3. Students will listen as the teacher reads each section and follows the
same plans at steps 1 and 2.
4. After learning all four notes students will identify each note using the
flashcards. Students will use the names from Mr. Everybody the first time
through, and only the letter names the second time.
5. If time allows students will play a game using a large the staff and note
name flash cards. In two teams on person from each team will see a
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flashcards and must stand on the right on the staff. The first person to get
it right gets a point for their team. The winning team gets to line up first for
gym at the end of class.
Closure/Review
Students will complete the exit ticket in E-backpack and turn it in before
they leave. Teacher will explain directions before students begin. Students
will write the note name in the space provided below each note.
Accommodations will be made for students with IEPs. Though students
who generally qualify for Complete/Incomplete Scores will also qualify for
this assignment.

Name: Alisha Reeve


Date: 3/24/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
C Scales and Arpeggios
Ghost C
Materials:
iPads
Mr. Everybodys Musical Apartment Bk. 3
Whiteboard
Note name flashcards
Glockenspiels and mallets
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-F5 (no accidentals)
Standards:
Objectives:
1. Students will identify the notes C4 through F5 on the staff and in
flashcards to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will read the notes in a piece of music and write the names under
the notes.
3. Students will play C Scale and Arpeggio and Ghost C on the glockenspiels
using all known pitches at an appropriate level.

16

Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Procedure:
1. Students will review the pitches learned last week by reviewing the note
name cards as a class. Begin by asking the students where each
character lies in the apartment to give a quick review before showing the
cards.
2. After reviewing the note names, students will learn the sayings that can be
used to remember the notes of the lines and the spaces.
a. Students can use their hands as a staff to visualize this. To
remember the lines say Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge, and to
remember the spaces say FACE.
3. Students will recall that the people living in Mr. Everybodys apartment can
appear in different ways, normal (whole note), with a stem (half note), and
face colored in with a stem (quarter note). Explain the name of each of
these notes and remind them of their value in common time. Also
introduce eighth note and remind them that it gets only beat.
4. Students will come up one row at a time to receive a glockenspiel and
mallet and then return to their seat. Before giving out instruments go over
the rules for instruments and have students open e-backpack.
5. Begin with C Scales and Arpeggios, have the students label the notes
before beginning.
6. Students will read the rhythm of the song on rhythm syllables.
7. Students will listen as the teacher plays the song on the glockenspiel.
After listening, students will begin practicing the song.
8. Students will have a few minutes to practice the song on their own at their
desk before the whole class plays the song together.
9. Play the song all together as a class.
10. Students will follow the same procedure with the next song.
Closure/Review
Students will play the song Ghost C as a class before putting instruments and
mallets under their desks and lining up.
Mr. Everybody Pt. 7
Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 3/26/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
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Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Whiteboard
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-F5 (no accidentals)
Rhythm
Standards:
Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will articulate the words bar line, staff, treble clef, measure, half
note, quarter note, and double bar line to teacher satisfaction.
2. Students will write a simple rhythm using quarter and half notes as a class
and read on rhythm syllables with reasonable accuracy.
3. Students will write a simple rhythm using quarter and half notes with
appropriate success.
Procedure:
1. Students will review words leaned in previous lessons like staff, treble clef,
and various note value. Tell the students that we will spend the next few
classes working on a composition project.
a. If needed explain that the word composition means to create their
own song, they will later play this song by themselves for me on the
glockenspiel.
2. Introduce new words like bar line, double bar line and measure. These
should be review from previous years, but likely they will need to be
retaught.
a. Teach these by setting up a four-measure rhythm example in
common time. Tell the students that we will be making a sample
rhythm together before they write their own.
3. Students will raise their hand to choose the type of note, quarter or half
that they would like to put next in the song. Make it very clear that each
measure can have only four beats. Go over what different options this
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might mean. When students volunteer a note that wont fit in a measure
ask them to figure out why they cant use that particular note.
4. After creating a four-measure example, students will read the rhythm on
rhythm syllables. This is part of the playing test in the future.
5. Students will get out their iPads and locate the assignment called 3 rd
Grade Composition in eBackpack and put it into Notability before
beginning.
Closure/Review
Students will write their own rhythm, when they are done can come show Miss
Reeve and she will check for correctness, or they can play music games. Remind
them that the rhythm is part of their grade.
Accommodations may be necessary for this assignment. Based on needs
some students may be allowed to write the specific letter of a note rather
than an actual note in the staff. Where it is impossible for the student, the
steady beat, and/or rhythm will not be counted into the final score. As with
any assignment, many students with IEP qualify for a Complete/Incomplete
score rather than a number score.

Mr. Everybody Pt. 8


Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 4/2/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Whiteboard
Glockenspiel/Mallets
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-C5 (no accidentals)
Standards:
19

Singing

Playing

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
4. Students will compose a simple song using the notes C4-C5 with
reasonable accuracy.
5. Students will play their composition on the glockenspiel with correct
rhythm to teacher satisfaction.
Procedure:
6. Students will review the assignment and go over the rhythm part
completed previous.
7. Teacher will explain how to use that rhythm to write a song. Using a two
bar rhythm, create a short song with the students on the board. Tell the
students they will do the same with their rhythm.
8. One row at a time, students will come get a glockenspiel and mallet and
beginning composing their song using their instrument. Again, if they
would like Miss. Reeve to check their work, or listen to them play and offer
suggestions she is available.
9. Students will work on song, notating their work in Notability and practicing
their song.

Closure/Review
Students will clean up, and listen to reminders that Miss Reeve will begin playing
tests next class. Before beginning tests she will go over the rubric and what
specifically she is looking for.
Accommodations may be necessary for this assignment. Based on needs
some students may be allowed to write the specific letter of a note rather
than an actual note in the staff. Where it is impossible for the student, the
steady beat, and/or rhythm will not be counted into the final score. As with
any assignment, many students with IEP qualify for a Complete/Incomplete
score rather than a number score.

Mr. Everybody Pt. 9


Name: Alisha Reeve
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Date: 4/16/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Whiteboard
Glockenspiels/Mallets
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-C5 (no accidentals)
Standards:
Singing

Playing
X

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will compose a simple song using the notes C4-C5 with
reasonable accuracy.
2. Students will play their composition on the glockenspiel with correct
rhythm to teacher satisfaction.
Procedure:
1. Students will listen as teacher goes over the playing test rubric and
what is required.
2. Students will practice their song for at least 5 minutes before beginning
testing.
3. When they feel they are ready, they may add their name to the list on
the board and wait for their name to be called, while waiting they may
continue to practice, find a partner and use note name flashcards, or
play Noteworks.
Closure/Review
Students will cleanup and listen to reminders about completing the playing test
next class, and the Post Test next week.
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Accommodations may be necessary for this assignment. Based on needs


some students may be allowed to write the specific letter of a note rather
than an actual note in the staff. Where it is impossible for the student, the
steady beat, and/or rhythm will not be counted into the final score. As with
any assignment, many students with IEP qualify for a Complete/Incomplete
score rather than a number score.
Mr. Everybody Pt. 10
Name: Alisha Reeve
Date: 4/21/2015
Setting: 3rd Grade General
Song Title:
NA
Materials:
iPads
Whiteboard
Glockenspiels/Mallett
Concept Focus:
Note names, C4-C5 (no accidentals)
Standards:

Singing

Playing
X

Movin
g

Improvising

Composing

Reading/Writing

Listening

Evaluating

Objectives:
1. Students will review important terms and note names in preparation for the
post test.
2. Students will compose a simple song using the notes C4-C5 with
reasonable accuracy.
3. Students will play their composition on the glockenspiel with correct
rhythm to teacher satisfaction.
Procedure:
1. Students will listen and answer questions as the teacher reviews words
like staff, treble clef, bass clef, bar line, double bar line, measure, half
note, quarter note, and eighth note. Students will identify these from
pictures and descriptions of the words.
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2. Students will identify the phrases used to remember the notes on the lines
and in the spaces.
a. Every good boy deserves fudge for the lines, and FACE for the
spaces.
3. Students will practice reading the note names C4-F5 using flashcards.
The teacher will go through more than once if she feels they need more
practice.
4. If they have already completed their playing test they can use the
remaining time to play note works, otherwise they need to pull up their
composition in Notability.
5. When they feel they are ready, they may add their name to the list on the
board and wait for their name to be called, while waiting they may
continue to practice, find a partner and use note name flashcards, or play
Noteworks.
Closure/Review
Students will cleanup and listen to reminder about the Post Test on Thursday.
Accommodations may be necessary for this assignment. Based on needs
some students may be allowed to write the specific letter of a note rather
than an actual note in the staff. Where it is impossible for the student, the
steady beat, and/or rhythm will not be counted into the final score. As with
any assignment, many students with IEP qualify for a Complete/Incomplete
score rather than a number score.

Supplemental Materials

23

Rubrics
Performance-based Rubric
This rubric was used to assess the student during the playing
test portion of their composition project. The skill of reading
music can sometimes be a difficult skill to assess in the
psychomotor domain; I choose to use the secondary
24

standard of playing in this assessment to make the skills as


authentic as possible.

Correctly read
rhythm of Part 1
on rhythm
syllables.
Rhythm in Part 1
matches rhythm
in
Part 2.
Each measure in
Part 2 contains
the correct
number of beats.
Play the rhythm
of each measure
correctly on the
glockenspiel as
written on their
composition
sheet.
Play the correct
pitches on the
glockenspiel as
composed by the
student.

Unsatisfactory
1 or 0

Basic
2

Proficient
3

Only 1 measure or
less read correctly.

2 measures read
correctly.

3 measures read
correctly.

Only 1 or less
measure matches
correctly.

2 measures match.

3 measures match.

Only 1 measure or
less with exactly four
beats.

2 measures with
exactly four beats.

3 measures of
exactly four beats.

Played only 1
measure or less with
the rhythm as written
(even if it doesnt not
contain the correct
number of beats).

Played 2 measures
with the rhythm as
written.

Played 3 measures
with the rhythm as
written.

Played the pitches of


1 measure or less
correctly on the
glockenspiel.

Played the pitches


of 2 measures
correctly on the
glockenspiel.

Played the pitches


of 3 measures
correctly on the
glockenspiel.

The following rubric was used exclusively by the instructor to


assess her own instruction and the instructional needs of the
students. This rubric was used while using note name flash
cards to determine whether or not the students needed
further instruction, or were reading to move on to other
activities.
Students read
the note name
flash card
correctly the
first time.
Students take
no more than 5
seconds to read

Unsatisfactory

Basic

Proficient

Rarely on the first try.

First try
sometimes.

First try most


times

Rarely five seconds or


less.

5 seconds or less
sometimes.

5 seconds or less
most times.
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and respond to
the card.
Student follow
directions by
listing either the
person name or
letter name ask
asked
Students follow
directions by
not shouting or
being mean to
their classmates

Few students using


correct name.

Some students
using correct
name.

Most students
using correct
name.

Few students
following directions.

Some students
following
directions.

Most students
following
directions.

Technology
Northwestern School Corporation offers its students 1:1
technology. As such every student in the district has his or her
own iPad. I utilized this technology in nearly every lesson in this
unit. One of the best ways to do this, is by sharing documents
with every third grade class through the app eBackpack. This app
can also be accessed via website. From here I can upload
assignments, and also grade assignments. Notability is another
app that I found very important. One unfortunate thing about
eBackpack is its tendency to delete files, even after they have
been saved. By having students send files to Notability they are
easier to work with and dont require any work at all to save.
Finally, I really enjoyed the app Noteworks. This is a music game
that the kids really enjoyed, it directly ties in with reading the
treble clef so this was a great thing to have on hand if there was
ever any extra time. The final piece of technology I used in this
unit was Skyward, the online grading system used by
Northwestern Schools. Whether on my computer or iPad I was
easily able to look at grades, take attendance, and mark down
scores. It updates automatically so parents can instantly see any
changes to their students score.
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Diferentiation/Accommodation
As with any classroom the music classroom is full of students with
many different ability levels. Many students have IEPs, while others
are considered high ability. It is our jobs as educators to challenge
them all. One way I allowed for this differentiation in my unit was by
asking many different questions of varying levels of difficulty. For
easier questions, I often looked for students with IEP who were will
to answer. For higher order questions, that required a little more in
depth think and synthesis of background knowledge, I looked to
those students who consistently had their hand in the air and knew
the answer to every question. Grading was one place I had to make
a few accommodations in this unit. Most of the in class activities
were easily attainable for students of any level. While grading
assignments I often thought of which students had IEPs, it was these
students who generally received a grade of Complete/Incomplete for
their assignments simply because it wasnt always possible for them
to complete the assignment in the same way that other students
might. Another accommodation I was always sure to make was to
read the directions out loud, whether that be for an Exit Ticket, or
the Post Test. Many students have trouble comprehending the
directions themselves, but by reading and clarifying I found that
many more students were successful at an assignment.

Pre/Post Tests
In each test Pt.1-4 correspond to N5 and Pt. 5
corresponds to N4.

Student Copies

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28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

Teacher Copies

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

Pre/Post Test Graphs


Test Scores

Class Average

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Class Average N5 and N4

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Narrative Statements
Unit Narrative

a)

Primary Standards

Standards to be assessed in Pre/Post


Assessments
Content Standard #4 Composing and arranging music
within specified guidelines
Achievement Standard b create and arrange short
songs and
instrumental pieces within specified guidelines
Content Standard #5 Reading and notating music
Achievement Standard b use a system (that is,
syllables,
numbers, or letters) to read simple pitch notation in the
treble clef
in major keys

b)

Secondary Standards

Standards to be assessed using rubrics


during daily
lessons
Content Standard #2 Performing on instruments, alone
and with
others, a varied repertoire of music
Achievement Standards:
a perform on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate
dynamics and
timbre, and maintain a steady tempo

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b perform easy rhythmic, melodic, and chordal


patterns
accurately and independently on rhythmic, melodic,
and harmonic
classroom instruments
c) Surprisingly in these classes and with this specific topic
that wasnt an outstanding need for accommodation. I was
very aware of IEPs and gifted students and tried as best as
possible to tailor question types to fit certain students. I also
made sure to always read directions aloud and make clear
any directions. For many assignments students were allowed
to work at his or her own pace. If something did not get
finished in class I almost always allowed a student to finish it
for the next class. This allowed students who finished early
to play music games, and students who needed extra time
had at minimum two days to complete the assignment and
turn it in.
d) Reading music is a skill many of these students will use
for years to come. At the very least all of them will use these
skills for the next three years in general music. This unit has
taught them to not only read the treble clef, but also draw
notes in the treble clef, and play notes in the treble clef
which is great for sight reading skills and future band skills if
they every want to head in that direction. I think this unit
also helped to show students that by breaking something
that seemed so hard into small chunks and assigning
sometimes funny names to the notes, information can
become easier to remember in the long run. This could be
really helpful for future study habits.
e)

Playing test
Rhythm reading
Higher-order questions
Direct instruction cycle
Chunking
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Creativity
Assessment (formal and informal)
Group work
Partner work
Worksheets
Guided activities
Rubrics
Individual work/practice
Technology incorporation
f) One of the main technologies utilized in the Unit was the
student iPads. Almost everything can be traced back to iPads
from a technology standpoint. From worksheets, to grades,
to games, nearly everything needed for this unit was done
on the iPad. For myself, I used the iPad to keep grades and
attendance up to date and to make sure items I needed for
class were in the students eBackpack ahead of time.

Assessment Narrative
a) The main accommodation made in terms of students of
differing needs has to do with grades. Oftentimes when
a student is capable of completing a project, but not
necessarily to the same standard as most other
students we can assign them a Complete/Incomplete
rather than a numbered score, in this way it is possible
to show that they did the work to the best of their own
ability. The other main accommodation came in the
form of very clearly reading the directions for every
assignment and assessment throughout the unit.
b) Students were tested before and after the unit using a
paper and pencil test. During the unit they were
assessed formally using a rubric as part of a
composition project. They were also assessed informally
using Exit Tickets and worksheets. Group assessments
took place while using note name flashcards.

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c) Rubrics are one topic I tend to err on the side of simple


on. My rubrics tend to be bare bones to make it easier
to assess at a glance. The skill-based rubric used during
the composition project contains more explanation of
each level than most since it is intended to be viewed
by students so that they are aware of what is expected
from their playing test. The rubric I designed to assess
the students during flashcard reading is very simple in
order to easily discern whether a topic needs more
clarification before moving on.

Instructional Narrative
a) Directions in this unit were presented in a variety of
ways. In general most directions were oral. If the
directions went along with a paper (iPad) activity, the
directions were also posted on the assignment, but
were always read aloud and clarified. Most directions
were repeated several times and I would ask students
to repeat back to directions or to give thumbs up if they
understood before allowing them to begin.
b) Learning the names of the notes and their placement in
the staff is the most basic form of reading/notating and
as such fits with N5 perfection. Learning to write these
notes and make sense of them on the staff fits directly
with N4. I truly wanted these students to have a clearer
understanding that notes that were higher on the staff
sounded higher sounding in their composition and lower
on the staff lower sounding.
c) Because there is a very real difference in simply
understanding where different pitches are on the staff
and how to put them together to create a song are very
different, I knew I would have students who would
struggle with both things. Some students could
49

compose beautiful songs, but were clueless as to how


to take it from glockenspiel to staff. Others were easily
able to write notes in the staff, but no real
understanding of how to make them fit together into a
song. Every student is different and for some the
creative portions came more easily, for others the rote
memorization.
d) Reading and notating music is a skill that will follow
these students throughout the next three years of
general music and beyond into middle school general
music, or choir/band if they so choose. The skills they
learn now will help them for years to come. The Mr.
Everybody books are a great series. Although I had
never previously heard of them, they are a purchase I
will soon be investing in. I still hear 6th graders use the
names they learned in these books three years later to
remember the names of the various notes in the treble
clef. The same company recently released another
collection of books for bass clef that is equally good.
e) Students were informed of the contents of the grading
rubric before beginning the playing test. We talked
about how the grade would be broken up, and ways to
correct their grade if they didnt do as well as they had
hoped. I always tried to inform the students of my
expectations in any activity before beginning in order to
keep them honest.

Results/Interpretation Narrative
a) In general most students did quite poorly on the
pretest. Several students got 0 points out of 53. 2
students scored quite high both in the 40s, they were
definitely an anomaly. The average score on the pretest
was 12 out 53. One of the sections that seemed the
most difficult was the matching section with vocabulary
terms.
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b) Originally, I had planned the matching to be easy


review. Instead I quickly realized that I would have to
cover each of these items quite in depth, up to and
including learning to draw treble clefs. I made a few
adjustments to the composition section after getting
many answers featuring all one note, which may have
skewed Pretest scores in that section.
c) The only true score that students received for this unit
involved the playing test. This was a graded
assignment with clear expectations, and many chance
to improve the grade by redoing the assignment. Other
grades were mostly completion grades. I have not yet
decided if I will allow the students to see their Post
Tests, I think that the scores would bolster confidences
in many cases, but since they are not going in the
grade book I also dont want to cause any undue
nervousness.
d) Post Test results were truly impressive, all scores but
one were above 40 and the one that wasnt has an IEP
and I had no expectation of him achieving that. That he
achieved an 11-point increase was wonderful enough.
The class average on 47, which is a 35-point increase
from the Pretest. Surprisingly the section that seemed
to trip most students up was Pt. 3. Many students
confused the sayings for the spaces and the lines. They
knew both sayings, they simply confused which went
what part of the staff.
e) The main strength was the great books I had as
resources, and number of repetitions used when
learning the note names. The students had very few
problems with those sections of the test. The
composing was a little more difficult, but after a project
that was twice the length of the one on the test, most
students found this one quite simple. One weakness
was covering the sayings for the spaces and lines. We
51

repeated the sayings many times, but it didnt quite


click which went with lines and which went with spaces.
In teaching this lesson again, I would probably begin
using the hand-staff sooner to help make that
connection clearer.

Final Statement
This is a unit I will most likely use again and again. The result
I saw not only in this class, but also in the other three third
grade classes clearly show how effective it is. The Mr.
Everybody books really work and they are a great resource
to use with younger kids. Without the pre and post tests I
may not have really been able to see exactly how big of a
difference a few months and 10 lessons can make. These
kids really learned a lot, and it is my hope that this new
knowledge sticks with them over the summer and into the
next year. Although creating the graphs may have seemed
like a pain, they really do show the disparity between the
pretest scores and the post test scores. This really shows
that in order to be most effective you need to find the base
line knowledge before beginning any unit. Without a baseline
to begin from it is impossible to know if you have actually
taught anything or if you are simply reviewing old
information and wasting weeks of time. I will absolutely be
more aware of my students previous knowledge before
beginning a new unit, or a new year.

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