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Kendra Nielsen

ENG 480
Hays
3 November 2014
American Romanticism
ENDURING OUTCOMES
Students will know the themes of American Students will utilize elements and devices
Romanticism.
to compose original pieces of creative
writing.
Students will recall the elements and
devices used by Edgar Allan Poe, Walt
Students will analyze and justify the
Whitman, Washington Irving, and Emily
relationship between two of the authors and
Dickinson.
American Romanticism.
Classroom Discussion

EVIDENCE OF ENDURING OUTCOMES


Gothic Horror Emulation

Notebook Checks (x4)


--Class Notes
--Annotations
--Writing Process

Free Verse Emulation


Irving/Dickinson Emulation
Romanticism Analysis Essay

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
What Essential Question lies at the heart of
What Essential Question addresses an
this assignment and the purpose of
important concept of philosophical issue?
learning?
What is American Romanticism?

How do people use writing to express their


ideals?

What are the overlaying purposes of


American Romanticism (what is it
rebelling against?)?

How can shifts in ideology be seen in


literature?

What are the themes of American


Romanticism?

How can literary movements change the


society around them?

What are the elements and devices used by


the novelists and poets of this literary era?
Lesson Topics
Content Standards
Day 1
What is American
Romanticism?

11-12.RL.2

Measurable/Observable
Learning Objectives
Students will be able to
describe American
Romanticism.

Instructional
Strategies/Tasks
Differentiation
Prezi on American
Romanticism

Guided notes
Day 2
Intro Edgar Allan Poe
EAP Tell-Tale Heart
Annotate in class Gothic
Horror elements

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4

Intro to unit routine


Students will be able to
Short Powerpoint on
recognize elements of Gothic EAP and Gothic Horror:
horror.
Guided notes
Students will be able to
identify literary devices used
by EAP in Tell-Tale Heart.

Pass out Tell-Tale


Heart
Annotate first paragraph
together as a class
Annotate second
paragraph with shoulder
partners
Go over second
paragraph together as a
class.

Day 3
Edgar Allan Poe The
Cask of Amontillado
Annotate on own or 2-4

Day 4
Edgar Allan Poe The
Raven
Annotate on own or 2-4
Class Discussion: Prep
for In Class Writing

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4
11-12.RL.9

Students will be able to


compare and contrast
elements and devices in the
two EAP stories.

Students will be able to


identify poetic devices and
themes in The Raven.
Students will be able to
compare and contrast EAP
poem and short stories.
Students will be able to
recognize A.R. themes in
EAP works.

Annotate rest of story on


own or in groups of 2-4
Quick review of Gothic
horror elements.
Annotate The Cask of
Amontillado on own or
in groups of 2-4.
Discuss differences
between Tell-Tale
Heart and The Cask of
Amontillado.
Annotate The Raven
on own or in groups of
2-4.
Discuss differences
between elements and
devices in poem and
short stories.
Review A.R. themes,
GH elements, EAP
devices to prepare

Day 5
Gothic Horror
Emulation
Notebook Check for
Annotations and Notes

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.3

Day 6
Intro Walt Whitman
Walt Whitman Song of
Myself Excerpt
Annotate in Class Free
Verse/Whitman devices

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4
11-12.RL.9

Students will be able to


compose short story
comprised of A.R. themes,
G.H. elements, and EAP
devices.
Students will be able to
recognize free verse traits.
Students will be able to
identify devices used by
Walt Whitman.
Students will be able to
relate themes of A.R. to Walt
Whitmans poetry.

Day 7
Walt Whitman Leaves of
Grass Excerpt
Annotate on own or 2-4

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.9

Students will be able to


compare and contrast themes
in Song of Myself and
Leaves of Grass.
Students will be able to
relate themes of A.R. to Walt
Whitmans poetry.

Day 8
Walt Whitman Leaves of
Grass Excerpts Pt. 2
Annotate on own or 2-4
Day 9
Walt Whitman Out of
the Cradle Endlessly
Rocking
Annotate on own or 2-4
Class Discussion: Prep
for In Class Writing

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4

Students will be able to


identify devices used by
Walt Whitman.

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4
11-12.RL.9

Students will be able to


compare and contrast Walt
Whitmans works.

Day 10
Free Verse Emulation
Notebook Check for

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11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.3

Students will be able to


recognize A.R. themes in
Whitmans poetry.

Students will be able to


utilize prior knowledge of
A.R. and Whitman to

students for tomorrow.


Students will write short
Gothic horror story in
class.
Notebook check while
they write.
Prezi about Walt
Whitman and Free
Verse: Guided Notes.
Annotate a short section
of Song of Myself as a
class.
Annotate rest of excerpt
on own or in groups of
2-4.
Quick review of free
verse traits and Walt
Whitman devices.
Annotate Leaves of
Grass excerpt Pt. 1 on
own or in groups of 2-4.
Discuss observed
differences/opinions
between SoM and LoG.
Annotate Leaves of
Grass Excerpt Pt. 2 on
own or in groups of 2-4.
Annotate Out of the
Cradle Endlessly
Rocking on own or in
groups of 2-4.
Review elements,
themes, devices in Walt
Whitmans poetry
throughout the week to
prepare for tomorrow.
Students will write
Whitman-themed free
verse poem in class.

Annotations and Notes


Day 11
11-12.RL.2
Intro to Washington
11-12.RL.4
Irving
Irving Rip Van Winkle
Annotate in Class
Romantic Elements

Day 12
11-12.RL.2
Irving Rip Van Winkle 11-12.RL.9
Annotate on own or 2-4

Day 13
Intro Emily Dickinson
#340, #479, #620,
#656
Annotate in Class
Dickinson Devices

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4
11-12.RL.9

Day 14
Emily Dickinson
#764, #1263,
#1668, 1773
Annotate on own or 2-4
Class Discussion: Prep
for In Class Writing

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.4
11-12.RL.9

Day 15
Irving or Dickinson
Emulation
Notebook Check for
Annotation and Notes

11-12.RL.2
11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.3

compose original free verse


poem.
Students will be able to
identify A.R. themes present
in Rip Van Winkle.
Students will be able to
recognize the devices,
elements and voice unique to
Irvings work.
Students will be able to
compare and contrast Poe
and Irvings works.
Students will be able to
relate Rip Van Winkle to
A.R. traits and purposes.
Students will be able to
identify themes and devices
in Dickinsons poetry.
Students will be able to
relate Dickinsons poetry to
A.R.
Students will be able to
compare and contrast
devices and themes in
Dickinsons poetry.
Students will be able to
relate Dickinsons poetry to
A.R.
Students will be able to
synthesize original short
story or poem based on
Dickinson and Irving.

Notebook check.
Prezi about Washington
Irving
Annotate Rip Van
Winkle excerpt
together as a class.
Start annotating on own
or in groups of 2-4.
Finish annotating Rip
Van Winkle on own or
in groups of 2-4.
Discuss the similarities
and differences between
Irving and Poe.
Prezi about Emily
Dickinson.
Annotate #269
together as a class.
Annotate 320, 340, 479,
620, 656 on own or in
groups of 2-4.
Annotate 706, 764,
1263, 1668, 1773 on
own or in groups of 2-4.
Review and discuss
traits of both Irving and
Dickinson to prepare for
tomorrow.
Students will write
either a short story
emulating Irvings style
or a poem emulating
Dickinsons style.
Notebook check.

Day 16

11-12.RL.1

Students will be able to

Handout assignment
sheet for culminating
Romanticism essay.
Talk about essay,

Romanticism Essay

11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.2
11-12.W.5
11-12.W.10

synthesize knowledge of the


4 authors and A.R. to argue
relationship between two
authors and A.R.

expectations, etc.
Prewriting Activity
(Brainstorming)
Share with shoulder
partner
Write outline of paper.

Day 17
Romanticism Essay

Day 18
Romanticism Essay

Day 19
Romanticism Essay

Day 20
Romanticism Essay

11-12.RL.1
11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.2
11-12.W.5
11-12.W.10
11-12.RL.1
11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.2
11-12.W.5
11-12.W.10
11-12.RL.1
11-12.RL.9
11-12.W.2
11-12.W.5
11-12.W.10
11-12.W.10

Students will be able to


compose analytical essay.

Students will be able to


evaluate their peers work.
Students will be able to
justify their suggested
revisions.
Students will be able to
synthesize peer feedback in
the revision process.
Students will be able to
assess the usefulness of the
writing process.
Students will be able to
appraise the decisions they
made in their revision.

Begin rough draft


Rough draft (finish for
homework if not
completed)
Workshop in groups of 3
or 4. Fill out peer
evaluation worksheets
for each essay student
reads over.
Revise essay.

Turn in final essay.


Notebook check for
rough draft and peer
evaluation forms.
Write reflection: What
did you change in your
final draft? Why did you
make these changes?
How did the peer
feedback assist you?

Standards Used
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matter uncertain. (11-12.RL.1)
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development
over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to
produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. (11-12.RL.2)
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (11-12.RL.4)
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early-twentieth-century
foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the
same period treat similar themes or topics. (11-12.RL.9)
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and
information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and
analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that
each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole;
include formatting, graphics, and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant
facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
and examples appropriate to the audiences knowledge of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of
the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas
and concepts.
d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented.
(11-12.W.2)
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view,
and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of
experiences or events.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection and


multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and
outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey
a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experiences,
observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
(11-12.W.3)
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific
purpose and audience. (11-12.W.5)
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes,
and audiences. (11-12.W.10)

Detailed Lesson Plan for Day 2


Standards:
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development
over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to
produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. (11-12.RL.2)
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (11-12.RL.4)
Objectives:
Students will be able to recognize elements of Gothic horror.
Students will be able to identify literary devices used by EAP in Tell-Tale Heart.
Introduction to lesson/mini-lesson
Pass out guided notes at beginning of class then ask students what they already know
about Gothic Horror. Then start Powerpoint/Prezi introducing Gothic Horror and its
relation to American Romanticism. Then move on to focus on Edgar Allan Poes works
and his biographical information.
Task/Activity
Pass out copies of Tell-Tale Heart. Show class how to annotate in general (using
different colors for different focuses, marginal notes, etc.). Then talk about what they
should be looking for when working with EAPs works this week (Gothic Horror
elements evident in text, A.R. themes that arise, EAPs voice). Annotate the first
paragraph together as a class, calling on students to find the things that should be
underlined/highlighted and appropriate marginal notes. The students will then work with
their shoulder partner to annotate the second paragraph before coming back together as a
class. Each partner will share something that they highlighted and made note of. After
successfully doing this, students will annotate the rest of the work. They can choose to do
this on their own or in groups of up to four people.
Closing
Wrap up with discussion about Poes writing style and voice, how his works fit into the
Gothic Horror genre, and how they also fit into the literary era of American Romanticism.

Detailed Lesson Plan for Day 10


Standards:
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development
over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to
produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. (11-12.RL.2)
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early-twentieth-century
foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the
same period treat similar themes or topics. (11-12.RL.9)
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view,
and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of
experiences or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection and
multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and
outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey
a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experiences,
observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
(11-12.W.3)
Objectives:
Students will be able to utilize prior knowledge of A.R. and Whitman to compose original
free verse poem.
Introduction to lesson/mini-lesson
Quickly review elements of free verse, Whitmans style and American Romanticism and
remind students that they are allowed to use their notebooks and that their notebooks
must be out on their desk so that I can check it.
Task/Activity
Students will use the class period to create their own Whitman-styled free verse poem
with 3-5 traits and elements utilized to complete this task. As the students write, I will
walk around and check their notebooks to make sure that the guided notes from the
Whitman and free verse presentation as well as the annotations that they worked on
throughout the week are completed and taped in to their notebook.
Closing
After they finish their poems, remind them that next week we will be starting Irving and
Dickinson and that they should be thinking about their final essay.

Detailed Lesson Plan for Day 18


Standards:
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matter uncertain. (11-12.RL.1)
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early-twentieth-century
foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the
same period treat similar themes or topics. (11-12.RL.9)
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and
information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and
analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that
each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole;
include formatting, graphics, and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant
facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
and examples appropriate to the audiences knowledge of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of
the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas
and concepts.
d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented.
(11-12.W.2)
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific
purpose and audience. (11-12.W.5)
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes,
and audiences. (11-12.W.10)
Objectives:
Students will be able to evaluate their peers work.
Students will be able to justify their suggested revisions.
Introduction to lesson/mini-lesson

Place them back in English class by reminding them what theyve already completed for
their paper and what they still need to complete (peer evaluation, revision, and final turn
in on Friday). Today is workshop day.
Task/Activity
Students will get into groups of three or four. Once they are sitting with their groups, each
person will pass their paper to the person on their right. Each person in the group will fill
out the peer feedback paper that has guiding questions for them to focus on as a reader, as
well as check for sentence-level issues as well. Each paper should get at least two
readers. If a group has more time, a third reader is encouraged. If a group is able to
complete that, I will go over and make sure that their feedback is detailed and useful.
Closing
Students are reminded to use their peers feedback in their revision stage as well as
encouraged to challenge themselves and their writing to make it better. Reminder that
tomorrow is a work day to begin typing up their revisions and final draft.

Assignment for Summative Assessment


11th Grade American Literature
Gothic Horror Writing Assignment
Due at the End of Class
Weve been studying Edgar Allan Poes work all week, identifying themes, elements, and
voice present in his work. You are going to write your own gothic horror story of 2-3
pages that include these traits. This story can be about anything you want, as long as it
uses 3-5 characteristics of gothic horror! If you dont want to create your own original
story, you can modernize and adapt one of the short stories we have read during this unit.
The length is not as important as the coherency of the story and the presence of the
elements that we have been talking about.
Formatting Guidelines:
Usual heading on the left hand side (Name, Class, Teacher, Date)
Title of assignment on the first line, centered
Remember that there is no length requirement as this is an in-class essay. Im
looking for those elements, so spend your time on those!
Grading Criteria
Does it follow the formatting guidelines?
Does it have 3-5 Gothic horror elements?
Remember that you are allowed and ENCOURAGED to use the class notes and your
annotations from your notebook.
If you have any questions, please raise your hand I will come and assist you.

Rubric

Story Writing : Gothic Horror Assignment


Teacher Name: Ms. Nielsen
Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

Organization

The story is very well


organized. One idea
or scene follows
another in a logical
sequence with clear
transitions.

The story is pretty


well organized. One
idea or scene may
seem out of place.
Clear transitions are
used.

The story is a little


Ideas and scenes
hard to follow. The
seem to be randomly
transitions are
arranged.
sometimes not clear.

Focus on
Assigned Topic

The entire story is


related to the
assigned topic and
allows the reader to
understand much
more about the
topic.

Most of the story is


related to the
assigned topic. The
story wanders off at
one point, but the
reader can still learn
something about the
topic.

Some of the story is


related to the
assigned topic, but a
reader does not
learn much about
the topic.

No attempt has been


made to relate the
story to the assigned
topic.

Spelling and
Punctuation

There are 2-3


spelling or
punctuation errors in
the final draft.
Character and place
names that the
author invented are
spelled consistently
throughout.

There are 4-6


spelling or
punctuation error in
the final draft.

There are 7-10


spelling and
punctuation errors in
the final draft.

The final draft has


more than 10
spelling and
punctuation errors.

Characteristics

The paper has 3-5


Gothic horror
elements clearly
portrayed.

The paper has 3-5


Gothic horror
elements that are
not portrayed clearly.

The paper has 1-3


Gothic horror
elements clearly
portrayed.

The paper has 1-3


Gothic horror
elements that are
not portrayed clearly.