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Annotated Bibliography: Terrorism and its Effects


Raynor, Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print. Terrorism
Past, Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former navy
communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism from
its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the highly
organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist sentiment
with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions. Granted the
writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist groups. Though
biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The writing is easy to
read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler vocabulary well,
describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal weaseling.

Akbar, M.J. "Introduction" in The Shade of Swords: Jihad and the Conflict Between Islam and
Christianity. (New York: Routledge, 2002), xv-xx. In this opening discussion, the author
describes the purpose of his book as an effort to interpret and synthesize Islamic text and
history to clarify the concept of jihad. He points to the failure of today's Muslim rulers and
governments to create a sustainable representative system of government or cooperate in
restoring the caliphate. Many Muslims are convinced that they cannot rely on their
government leaders - who are seen today as unrepresentative, undemocratic, and evasive
about the needs and demands of the community - to protect their faith. Jihad is permitted
against the infidel; it is compulsory against the apostate - he who turns back after guidance

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has been shown him - and against all those who support an apostate Muslim state (including
Christian Europe and the United States).

Abraham, Shara. "Chechnya: Between War and Peace." Human Rights Brief, vol. 8, no. 2
(2001), 1-8.
This article examines issues of accountability in the Chechen war. Abraham argues that the
West's response
to the conflict has been contradictory, and international efforts to put an end to the atrocities have
been
limited to non-binding resolutions which deplored humanitarian law violations in Chechnya and
called upon
the Russian government to immediately establish a national, broad-based commission of inquiry
and to
investigate and prosecute alleged violations of human rights and breaches of humanitarian law.
However,
Russia has refused to implement the resolution' s key provisions. Reluctance to deal harshly with
Russia
compromises the international commitment to protecting human rights and denigrates the
credibility of international bodies. Abraham argues that the international community must
insist on a credible, impartial, and transparent accountability process. Ensuring truth and
justice is necessary to building long term peace in the region.

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Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print. Terrorism Past, Present, Future is an
informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former navy communications officer on
the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism from its inception to terrorism
today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the highly organized, militant terrorist
cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist sentiment with all violent terrorist
groups having little to no justification for their actions. Granted the writer is a former sailor
and would obviously be biased against most terrorist groups. Though biased, the information
is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The writing is easy to read due to its young
adult audience, but the author wields the simpler vocabulary well, describing complex
political situations with everyday words and minimal weaseling.
Raynor, Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print. Terrorism
Past, Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former navy
communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism from
its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the highly
organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist sentiment
with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions. Granted the
writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist groups. Though
biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The writing is easy to
read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler vocabulary well,
describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal weaseling.

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Raynor, Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print. Terrorism
Past, Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former navy
communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism from
its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the highly
organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist sentiment
with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions. Granted the
writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist groups. Though
biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The writing is easy to
read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler vocabulary well,
describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal weaseling. Raynor,
Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print. Terrorism Past,
Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former navy
communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism from
its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the highly
organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist sentiment
with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions. Granted the
writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist groups. Though
biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The writing is easy to
read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler vocabulary well,
describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal weaseling. Raynor,
Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982. Print.

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Terrorism Past, Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former
navy communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism
from its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the
highly organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist
sentiment with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions.
Granted the writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist
groups. Though biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The
writing is easy to read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler
vocabulary well, describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal
weaseling. Raynor, Thomas P. Terrorism: Past, Present, Future. New York: F. Watts, 1982.
Print.
Terrorism Past, Present, Future is an informative read by Thomas P. Raynor, a writer and former
navy communications officer on the subject of terrorism. In it expands on modern terrorism
from its inception to terrorism today beginning with the French revolutionaries up to the
highly organized, militant terrorist cells of the 1980s. The tone has a heavy anti-terrorist
sentiment with all violent terrorist groups having little to no justification for their actions.
Granted the writer is a former sailor and would obviously be biased against most terrorist
groups. Though biased, the information is thoroughly researched and well-delivered. The
writing is easy to read due to its young adult audience, but the author wields the simpler
vocabulary well, describing complex political situations with everyday words and minimal
weaseling.