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PPE 310: Healthy Literacy for Schools
Walking to the Goal
Final Highlighted Signature Assignment
Sindy Salgado
Course# 22849
Ms. Dean

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Introduction
Sunland Elementary is a Title I school in the Roosevelt School District. Out of all the
schools in the Roosevelt District, Sunland is the only one in the school with an A label
(Nethero, 2015). However, at Sunland Elementary before or after school programs are not
offered to primary grade students (K-5th). Only, 6th 8th grade students are offered extracurricular physical activities. Due to the lack of extracurricular activities for the primary grade
levels a physical improvement plan will be introduced to administration in hopes that they would
approve a before school walking club.
Physical education in schools is important for all students, when it is limited to those
students who are in primary grade levels there is a lack of health awareness. When students are
exposed at a young age, it promotes lifelong participation in physical activities and a range of
developmental, social skills. A discussion of how to promote health for students at the primary
grade level will be addressed in benefits of exercise, physical education importance, promotion
of physical activity, and implication of a before school program.
Literature Review
Michelle Webster in the article titled, Children Learn the Benefits of Exercise discusses
how the local health district in the community promoted physical activity through encouraging
students and parents to walk to school. If families lived far away from the school parents or
guardian were encouraged to park a block away from the school so students along their parents
could practice physical activity through walking. This article ties in perfectly with the Sunland
community because it is a walking school and many families, even though, they live around the
corner from the school choose to drive to school rather than walking to school. It is discussed in
the article the positive that can come from walking to school, for example getting to converse

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with family members can have positive effects in family relationships. In Walking to the Goal
Parents will be encouraged to join their students to walk alongside them during club hours to
promote an overall healthy life style for the whole family.
Benefits of Walking describes the vast amount of health benefits promoted by walking.
The insight provided by this section directly supports the purpose of Sunland Elementary
initiative Walking to the Goal. In particular, this section gave detailed examples of specific ways
walking positively impacts lifelong health namely in the areas of: weight management, blood
pressure management, boosting high-density lipoproteins, reducing the risk of type-2 diabetes,
and decreasing the risk of heart disease. Benefits of Walking as discussed in the Pangrazi text also
describes additional non-health related advantages of walking in comparison to other exercise
methods primarily: no required special equipment, specialized facilities, weather determinants,
or fear of injury. These insights make walking not only incredibly beneficial but also extremely
accessible for Sunland Students. The health facts coupled with advantages of walking provided
by this section will give purpose to Walking to the Goal and will empower student participants to
understand the purpose of the program.
Comparative Effectiveness of After-School Programs to Increase Physical Activity
discussed childhood obesity and the limited evidence for effective behavioral prevention
interventions to decrease childhood obesity. A study was conducted where 15 16 year olds
wore, similar to pedometers, on their waist to monitor physical activity in Latino and AfricanAmerican students. The study studies body mass index, body fat percentage, fitness,
demographics, and physical activity data analysis and how it improved over a three-month
period. In comparison to, Walking to the Goal the study supports the idea of gathering data over
a period of time. Walking to the Goal will teach students how to self-track and to progress

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monitor the miles walked daily/weekly and gathering and analyzing at the conclusion of the
month. Over a six-month period, lasting from September to April. Progress monitoring allows
students to become responsible, independent individuals in regards to their overall physical
activity and health improvement.
Most teenagers are reluctant to participate in daily physical activities if their friends do
not join them and or if it is socially accepted in their community. In the article titled, Barriers to
Exercise for Low-Income Teens discusses the stress low-income students face in regards to fitting
in and how this constant worry prevents them from participating in physical extracurricular
clubs. The study conducted identified five categories that describe the barriers face by lowincome teens. The five categories included: age limitations, academic pressures, family life,
community structures, and functional limitations (Fessler et al., 2014). All of which, support the
main idea behind Walking to the Goal to promote physical education at the primary grade level
so that this habitat is instilled at a young age and becomes a normality in low-income students
day-to-day lives.
Becoming a Quality Health Teacher in short depicts that the most difficult role of the
teacher is not to teach but to master in the difficult skill of inspiring motivation. Motivation, as
this section of the Anspaugh & Ezell text portrays, has the power to transform apathy into action
in students and requires teachers to take on an active and custom approach with each and every
student. The importance of this section is its attention to an array of interdisciplinary
proficiencies that guide teachers in becoming more mindful professionals on the impact they
have on students motivation and interest in learning. As it applies to Walking to the Goal, this
section more than anything provides a guide to teachers on practicing mindfulness and awareness

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of the importance of creating learning environments custom to conditions that inspire motivation
within every individual student.
The article, School Programs to Increase Physical Activity was selected to discuss three
key points: recommendation of minimum physical activity, importance making of physical
activity a lifelong habit, and administrative support to engage students and staff in physical
activity. Throughout the article Lee and Solmon discuss the importance of physical activity and
techniques to ensure successful starts to after school programs. This article is applicable to the
discussed material in the sense that it promotes physical activity for all students, like Walking to
the Goal is attempting to at Sunland Elementary. By promoting physical activity with the
primary grade levels. Not only does the research support physical activity for all primary and
secondary students but also suggestions on how to include staff member in the development
though engagement. If staff member are engaged, the probably of students engagement increases
because educators serve as role models for the students.
Active and Healthy Schools Program is a website hat discusses the importance of
encouraging students to be physically active and promote nutritional habitats, that provides
resources for educator to utilize in their classroom. Through the Assess Your School assessment
educators can build insight in regard to, where individual schools stand, as far as the schools
reinforcement and refinement. Which provides a starting point for administration and/or
educators in transitioning to a healthier school environment. Assess Your School tool is simple to
utilize and to comprehend to build insight on certain school areas. This website is a great staring
tool for schools like Sunland to use to analyze and become familiar with the school environment.
Synthesis of Information

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Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom is compared to the article
Children Learn Benefits of Exercise. These to pieces of literacy can be compared because they
both discuss the importance of taking initiative in physical activity, such as, walking. Walking is
a simple physical activity but it is starting line in promoting a healthier life style by staying
active. And what better way to learn to stay active than alongside a parent or guardian and
teacher. In contrast the Pangrazi text is more informative in regards of the health benefits that can
be gained through walking. While the article simply discuses positive outcomes that can occur
form walking with your child.
The Comparative Effectiveness of After-School Programs to Increase Physical Activity
article touches base on the importance of school demographics and the idea behind after school
club, which is similar to the idea behind promoting after school club in the article Barriers to
Exercise for Low-Income Teens. Both focused on the idea behind having a positive environment
and community that is supportive of physical education that can be encouraged by
administration, teachers, and parents. The focus of the first article was driven through data and
the negative effects of lack of exercise while the second article focused on the ideas behind
obesity rates in low-income teens.
The last and final article discussed the ideas behind promoting physical activity in
schools through a school wide initiative to encourage students to join extracurricular clubs that
promote physical activity. This article ties in with the Assess Your School Tool that gives
educators insight on how to improve physical activity in their school grounds and how they can
be the starting seed by being role models to their students to promote physical activity.
Practical Implication

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A role model is someone who teaches through example. And through example, children
can be taught to make healthy choices. Schools are becoming more aware of the importance of
making healthy choices for their students, in regards to their health a dominant conversation
amongst teachers and students. Educators are also becoming more aware of the importance of
modeling healthy life styles for their students. It is important, however, that teachers realize that
to be successful, they must form a partnership with the parents or guardians of their students.
Realizing that modeling and forming partnerships with parents is the starting line, which can lead
to healthier lifestyles in the community.
In society today, individuals live a very fast paste life style. Mornings are always the
busiest for the average person. It is a go, go, go routine. From getting dressed, brushing teeth,
and eating breakfast parents/ guardians are rushing out the door to make it to school on time.
Therefore, the idea of walking to school may become problematic for many families.
Sunland Elementary in the Roosevelt school District is considered to be a, walking
school, where the majority of the students live in a walking radius from the school. Similar, to
schools in rural communities, students have the option of walking to school but choose not to.
That is why the Illawarra Shoalhaven Health District is encourages families to chunk on some
sneakers and take a stroll as part of national Walk to School Day (Webster, 2013). The idea
behind Walk to School Day is to wreak the benefits of a healthier life style. Not only is it
beneficial for promoting physical activity, but also it can help students become independent,
learn about road crossing, and most importantly reducing car dependency, which, can have a
positive improvement on the environment.
Promoting a healthier life style was just a discussion amongst staff members at Sunland
Elementary, but with a little motivation and inspiration the idea of Walking to the Goal was

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established. Walking to the Goal is the idea behind promoting a healthy life style for students,
where they can learn and practice being healthy with their peers. In more detail, Walking to the
Goal will be introduced to administration as a before school extracurricular club. A club where
students can support one another in reaching independent goals and whole group goals to walk,
jog, or run to a desired location. The goal location will be selected in the first club meeting as
part of encouraging students to reach their desired independent and whole group goals by the
conclusion of the six month long club. Students will also be given a charm bracelet to solidify
their membership and responsibility to the club, where they will collect mini footsies that they
will earn upon completing their weekly goal.
Since, there is an extrinsic reward system in place, a budget will have to be established
and calculated upon meeting with administration. There, administration will decide if funds are
available to support an extrinsic reward. However, if funds are unavailable a fundraiser will be
organized by the leading teacher to acquire money to support the extrinsic motivation. The goal
of meeting with administration is to persuade them, to alongside teachers and families to wreak
the benefits of being role models for students.
After, discussing the overall idea of Waking to the Goal with administration and setting a
plan of action surveys will be sent out to 1st 4th grade students to fill out alongside their parents
to give teacher information in regards to their home habitats in regards to physical activity
(Appendix A: Physical Activity Survey). The survey has a total of ten questions that gain insight
on childrens interest in participating in physical activity. Questions 1- 8 are specific to students
actions when they are home after school and on the weekends. Questions 9 10 will determine if
students will be considered for the before school Walking to the Goal club. Depending if parents
are willing to enroll students in such a club. When surveys are collected, surveys will be

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analyzed and students will be given application (Appendix B: Application) to join Walking to
the Goal. The overall goal will be to handout sixty applications in hopes that thirty will be
returned stating that they will join Walking to the Goal.
The application gives parent insight on to what the club will consist of. What the
requirements for the club are needed and what to expect if their child joins the club. Overall, the
application is persuading parent to let their students join Walking to the Goal while, getting
students excited to exercise alongside their peers. When applications are returned student will
receive a brochure (Appendix C: Brochure) of Walking to the Club letting them know that they
are part of the club and what to look forward to. Also, the brochure includes Sunland general
information, suggestions for athletic wear, how to pedometers function, important dates, how to
start goal setting. The overall idea of Walking to the Goal is to promote physical activity in
primary grade students so that they may continue practicing physical activity, as they get older.
Conclusion
The main idea behind Walking to the Goal is to promote physical activity at Sunland
Elementary through teacher modeling. Which finalizes the overall idea of implementing a school
wide awareness pf physical activity that can be as simple as walking. The long term goal is to
instill in young students the importance of physical activity so that they may carry it into their
teen age years, when it becomes much more difficult to feel comfortable in their own skin, in
hopes that they will continue this habitat into their adulthood and pass it along creating a chain
reaction of healthy lifestyles.

References

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Anspaugh, D., & Ezell, G. (2013). The Need for Health Education. Teaching Today's Health
(10th ed., p.21). Glenview: Pearson Education.
Lee, A., & Solmon, M. (2007). School programs to increase physical activity. Journal of
Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 78(5), pp. 22-28.
Assess Your School. (2015, January 1). Retrieved February 1, 2015,
from http://www.activeandhealthyschools.com/home/assess_survey.cfm
Gesell, S., Sommer, E., Lambert, E., Vides de Andrade, A. R., Whitaker, L., Davis, L., Beech,
B., Mitchell, S. J., Arinze, N., Neloms, S., Ryan, C. K., & Barkin, S. (2014). Comparative
effectiveness of after-school programs to increase physical activity. Journal of Obesity,
1-8. Retrieved February 15, 2015, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/576821
Fessler, M., Selimos, M., Williams, B., & Fessler, K. (2014). Barriers to exercise for low-income
teens. Journal of Adolescent Health, 54(2), 1-1.
Nethero, Natasha, personal communication, January 29, 2015.
Pangrazi, R., Beighle, A., & Pangrazi, D. (2009). Improving the Health of America's Children.
Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom (1st ed., p.233). Glenview:
Pearson Education.
Webster, M. (2013, May 24). Children learn benefits of exercise. Llawarra Newspapers
Holdings. Retrieved February 15, 2015, from http://pl8cg5fc8w.search.serialssolut...

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Appendix

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Appendix C: Brochure

! Starting Month:
September
! Month Off: December
! Ending Month: April
! Check your school
calendar for district
recess or days off .
! If club meetings are
canceled students and
parents will be informed
ahead of time.

Wal
to t
Go

Sun
Eleme

Monday
7:00 A.M
Septemb
2015
(602) 2

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The clothing

Walking to th

be comforta

to move in. E
1. Fasten the pedometer.

athletic wear

2. Reset pedometer.

shoes, sweat

3. Start moving.

shorts, and t

4. Check your

excludes sho

pedometer at the end

tank tops. Re

of the day.

are still on sc

5. Log in your daily steps.

and we MUS

follow schoo

Than

Criteria with
Professional
Standards
Referenced
Outline
Outline Turned
In(Already
submitted for
points)

Rubric for Signature Assignment


5
4
3
Exemplary
Highly
Proficient
(97 100%)
Proficient
(83 92%)
(93 96%)

2
Approaching
Proficient
(73 82%)

1
Unsatisfactory
(72%
and below)

10 Points

Logical,
detailed outline
with at least 5
original peer

Brief outline
with at least
5 original
peer

Brief outline
with some
references but
not 5 original

Brief outline
No outline
with one or no was
references
submitted.
submitted.

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reviewed
references
written in APA
format is
submitted with
a technology
choice selected
to embed the
assignment.

15
15
15
15
15
15

reviewed
references
written in
APA format
is
submitted.

peer reviewed
references
written in
APA format
are submitted.

Introduction
is fully
developed
with all
topics
introduced.

Introduction
is addressed
well,
somewhat
organized and
created a plan
for the paper

Introduction
is addressed
adequately.

Introduction is
omitted or
was
disorganized
and did not
create a plan
for the paper.

1. Literature
review
addresses
major issues
in the area.
2. Thorough
use of a
range of
references
to support
key issues.

1. Literature
review may
address major
issues, but
issues may
not be
supported
with expert
knowledge.

1. Literature
review does
not address
the major
issues in the
area; the level
of support for
the issues is
not adequate.

1. Literature
review does
not have the
depth of
knowledge
appropriate to
this upper
level course.

2. Good use
of references,
but additional
references

2. Includes 3
references.

5 x 2=10
points
Introduction

10 Points

Introduction to
the topic and
overview (In
your purpose
statement also
introduce all
subtopics)

Introduction is
fully
developed,
well organized,
introduces all
topics, created
a plan for the
paper and
invites the
reader to read
further.

InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8
Literature
Review
Adequacy of
Knowledge
(includes 5 peer
reviewed
original research
articles
references)
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;

5 x 2=10
points

15 Points
1. Literature
review
highlights
major issues in
the area.
2. Through use
of a range of
references to
support key
issues.
3. Description
of important
studies

3. Includes
descriptions

2. Includes
less than 2
references.

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CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

establishes
context for the
reader.
4. Includes
more than 5
informative
references.

Synthesis of
Information
Synthesis of
Information
(what did the
articles
collectively say
about the topic?
Which authors
had similar and
different
findings?)
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

of important
studies to
provide
context for
the reader.

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16
16
16
16
16
may have
strengthened
the paper.
3. Includes 4
references.

4. Includes
5 or more
references.

5 x 3=15
points
15 Points
1. Studies
covering the
same topic
synthesize
related
research.
2. Described
similar or
differing and
detailed
themes
throughout the
articles
3. Demonstrate
thoroughly
how your
research and
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why
your healthy
and active
school plan is
not only
important for
hope and
engagement at
your school
and in your
community,

Studies
covering the
same topic
are
summarized
and
integrated
level work.

Information is
presented
study-bystudy rather
than
summarized
by topic.
2. Described
similar or
differing
themes
throughout
the articles
which were
not detailed
3. Somewhat
emonstrated
how your
research and
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why
your healthy
and active
school plan is
not only
important for
hope and
engagement at
your school

The literature
review is a
mixed set of
ideas without
a particular
focus.

The literature
review does
not
demonstrate a
particular
focus and
lacks ideas
based on the
subject
chosen.
2. Described
similar or
differing
themes
throughout the
articles,
however they
were not
detailed
3. Did not
demonstrate
how your
research and
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why
your healthy
and active
school plan is
not only

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but ties to
academic
success in your
classroom as
well.

and in your
community,
but ties to
academic
success in
your
classroom as
well.

5 x 3=15
points

Practical
Implications and
Technology
infusion
Practical
Implications
(Discuss how
the findings can
or will later be
applied to your
teaching setting)
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

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important for
hope and
engagement at
your school
and in your
community,
but ties to
academic
success in
your
classroom as
well.

30 Points

1. Practical
implications of
your event
details
including your
teaching level
and in a
particular
setting are
discussed
thoroughly. A
minimum of 6
topics are
applied.
2. Contains
thorough
discussion on
how each of
the 6
program/comp
onents that are
in place are
organized,
conducted, and
overseen or a
detailed plan
about how
each
component can
be added.

1. Pratical
implications
are
discussed
but not
related to a
particular
teaching
setting or
topic or
certain
details are
missing.

1. Pratical
implications
are discussed
but not at a
particularly
level or in a
particular
setting and
many details
of your event
are missing.
2. Contained
at least 4-5
components
of a
comprehensiv
e school
program;
however,
some of the
needed detail
is missing.
3. Contains
thorough
discussion on
how most of
the
program/com
ponent that

1. Practical
implications
are not
thoroughly
discussed and
only a few
details of the
event are
present

1. Practical
implications
are not
discussed and
no details of
the event are
present.
2. Contained 3
or fewer
components
of a
comprehensiv
e school
program
3. Contains
little
discussion on
which
programs/com
ponents are
currently in
place
4. Contains
little
discussion on
how each
program/com
ponent is

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3. All
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
4. Contained a
detailed
description of a
special event
that promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
5. Contained
discussion on a
specific health
behavior
highlighted by
the special
event
6. Specific
target grade
level was
identified and
was
appropriate for
students of that
age
7. Contained
discussion on
how to involve
the entire
school in the
event
8. Embeding
Technology as

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are in place
are organized,
conducted,
and overseen
or a detailed
plan about
how the
components
can be added.
4. Most
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
5. Contained a
somewhat
detailed
description of
a special
event that
promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
6. Contained
some
discussion on
a specific
health
behavior
highlighted by
the event
7. Specific
target grade
level was
somewhat
identified and
was

organized,
conducted,
and overseen
and little
detail about
how the
components
can be added.
5. Few
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
6. Contained
little detail on
a special
event that
promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
7. Contained
little
discussion on
a specific
health
behavior
highlighted by
the special
event
8. Specific
target grade
level was not
identified
and/or not
appropriate
for students of
that age

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a platform to
enhance your
proposal was
used with an
approved
application
from your
instructor

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appropriate
for students of
that age

9. Contained
little
discussion on
how to
involve the
entire school
in the event

8. Contained
some
discussion on
how to
involve the
entire school
in the event

5 x 6=30
points

9. Technology
infusion was
not used.

9. Technology
infusion was
used but it did
not enhance
the proposal
Conclusion
Conclusion
ITASC 1c,k; 5k;
9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8
Writing and
Referencing
Style
First Draft of all
sections
submitted with
changes made
integrating
instructor
comments from
the outline

10 Points
Major issues
support and
establish
conclusions.

The major
issues are
summarized
under
conclusions.

The
conclusions
are not
complete.

Provides
opinions, but
not a
summary of
findings.

No
conclusions
are included.

Detailed
draft of ALL
sections
with some
errors in
content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0
style.

Detailed draft
of MOST
sections with
some errors in
content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0 style.

Missing
sections or
paper has
regular errors
across content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0 style.

Incomplete
(missing half
of the
requirements)
or completely
missing paper.

5 x 2=10
points

10 Points
Detailed draft
of all sections
of the paper
with
appropriate
content,
headers,
writing style, a
choice of
technology to
embed the
assignment and
references in
APA 6.0 style.

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Integration of
instructor
comments from
first draft

All comments
from instructor
integrated into
final version.
All were
highlighted in
yellow

Writing and
referencing style

1. Cover page
included,
proper spelling
and grammar,
all references
in APA 6.0
style. Paper
was
appropriate
length (at least
5 pages)

Most
comments
from
instructor
integrated
into final
version. All
were
highlighted
in yellow
1. Cover
page
included,
few
grammatical
errors and
misspellings
, all
references
in APA 6.0
style.

20
20
20
20
20
20
Some
comments
from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
Most were
highlighted in
yellow

Very few
comments
from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
Most were
highlighted in
yellow

No comments
from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
The changes
were not
highlighted

1. Cover page
included,
some
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
some errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

1. Cover page
not included,
many
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
some errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

1. Cover page
not included,
major
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
many errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

2. Paper was
too short for
the topic (1-2
pages)

2. Paper was
too short for
the topic (1-2
pages)

2. Paper was
too short for
2. The file
2. Paper was the topic (3-4
document
appropriate pages)
name
length (at
contains
least 5
3. The file
Lastname.first pages)
name
name.assignme
somewhat
nt#.course#
contains the
Lastname.first
3. This rubric
name.assignm
was added to
ent#.course#
the last page of
the document
4. This rubric
submitted
was added but
not at the end
4. All
of the
sentences are
document
clear and well
submitted
developed
5. Most
sentences are
5. Proposals
clear and well
and events are
developed
appropriate
length with
6. Proposals
standard

3. The file
document
name does not
contain the
Lastname.first
name.assignm
ent#.course#
4. This rubric
was not added
to the
document
submitted
5. Many
sentences are
not clear and
underdevelop
ed
6. Proposals

Running head: WALKING TO THE GOAL


margins, font,
and size of text

21
21
21
21
21
21
and events are
mostly
appropriate
length with
standard
margins, font,
and size of
text

and events are


not of
appropriate
length with
larger than
standard
margins, font
and size of
text