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SM 1. Four Learning Domains

SM 1. Four Learning Domains

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Published by PaulCJBurgess
Describes the four learning domains: knowing, understanding, doing and being. Applied to general study methods.
Describes the four learning domains: knowing, understanding, doing and being. Applied to general study methods.

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Published by: PaulCJBurgess on Feb 04, 2010
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07/12/2013

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Study Methods

Four Learning Domains: Questions to ask yourself after a day’s study

Four Learning Domains
Four areas in which to improve your learning:

KNOWLEDGE of FACTS (Information - KNOWING) UNDERSTANDING of IDEAS (Insight - UNDERSTANDING) ABILITY to DO (Performance - DOING)

ATTITUDE to LIFE (Character - BEING)

Knowing
At the end of a day’s study ask yourself:

What topics am I more informed about today than I was yesterday?

What are the six most significant facts that I have learnt today?

Understanding
At the end of a day’s study ask yourself:

What new insights have I gained today? Which is the most significant?

What wrong / unclear understandings have been corrected / clarified?

Ability
At the end of a day’s study ask yourself:

Is there anything that I can do now as a result of today’s learning that I could not do before?

Attitude
At the end of a day’s study ask yourself:

Has my attitude to something in my life, or about something else, been altered today? Have I learnt anything that might change my behaviour?

Journaling
If you decide to keep your answers in a note-book, you will in effect be writing a journal of your own mental and spiritual development.

Studying a Book
This approach to studying in general can also be applied to studying a specific book

Study as Nourishment
A “good book” (as opposed to a textbook, a guidebook, or a book read for entertainment) will nourish the mind and soul in all four areas. (The supreme example is the Bible.)

Studying for Growth
“Read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest” Questions to ask yourself when studying a book that you really want to “digest”.
Note: Only a few books deserve this kind of attention!

Studying a Book
Study a few pages only each day or period of study. Either mark your book (if it is yours!) with colour coding for the four “answers” you find in the section. Or keep your findings in a small notebook. Note: Not every question will produce answers every time.

Knowing

What is the writer’s main point in this section? What interesting information (relevant to life) have I learnt from reading this?

Understanding

What have I come to understand that was not clear to me before? What is not clear in what I have read? (Where could I get help to clarify this?)

Doing ( or performing)

What can I possibly do now, after reflecting on this passage, that I could not do previously?

What can I now do better?

Being (or becoming)

What has challenged me to change my attitude or behaviour?

Suggested Book for Reflective Study:

“The Divine Conspiracy”
by Dallas Willard 1998 (Jesus’ Sermon on The Mount)

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