You are on page 1of 107

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo

Notes
Introduction
This document is revised and/or updated frequently as I learn new things or get a better understanding of
materials that I have already been taught. Although I have done quite a bit of research, I am most
certainly not an expert on any of the data contained herein. With Sensei Wilders permission this
information may be shared with fellow students without charge or compensation beyond reimbursement
for the cost of photocopies.
These notes were compiled from a variety of different sources, including:

Kris Wilder Senseis Karate classes


Kris Wilder Senseis West Seattle Dojo Handbook
Scott Schweizer Senseis Karate and Kobudo instruction
Devin Rider Senseis Karate instruction
Franco Sanguinetti Senseis web site (www.bushikan.com)
The Goju Ryu Karate Do web site (www.gojuryu.net)
The Kenshinkan web site (www.kenshinkan.cl)
In the Gravest Extreme by Massad Ayoob, Police Bookshelf, 1980
Okinawan Goju Ryu by Seikichi Toguchi, Black Belt Communications, 1979
Okinawan Goju Ryu II by Seikichi Toguchi, Ohara Publications, 2001
Pressure Point Fighting by Professor Rick Clark, Tuttle Publishing, 2001
The Judo Textbook by Dr. Hayward Nishioka, Ohara Publications, 1979
The Truth About Self-Protection by Massad Ayoob, Bantom Books, 1983
Legal research from Bruce Ritzen, Attorney at Law
My own understanding and interpretation based on all of the above

Disclaimer This document covers topics that I do not fully understand and includes some Kata (pulled
from the Internet) that I have not yet learned. Consequently there may be errors and/or omissions of
which I remain unaware. I continually strive to ensure that all information is complete and accurate, and
welcome feedback where it is not. Nothing in this document constitutes a legal opinion nor should any of
its contents be treated as such. My liability for this information is strictly limited to what you paid me to
receive it.
Organization These notes are organized into four main sections: (1) Karate history and technique, (2)
Kobudo history and technique, (3) Supplemental Information (primarily discussing legal issues of selfdefense, medical triage, and the aftermath of violence), and (4) Rank/Grading Information. A complete
table of contents follows on pages 2 through 5.
th

Version These notes were most recently updated on April 16 , 2003.

Lawrence

L. A. Kane

Page 1 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Table of Contents
Section 1 Goju Ryu Karate ..............................................................................................................6
1.0
History/Background...................................................................................................................6
1.1
Origin ...................................................................................................................................6
1.2
Chinese Kung-Fu ..................................................................................................................6
1.3
History of Okinawan Martial Arts.............................................................................................6
1.4
Kanryo Higaonna Sensei (Naha-Te) .......................................................................................7
1.5
Chojun Miyagi Sensei (Goju Ryu) ...........................................................................................8
1.6
Bubishi Poem Eight Precepts of Kempo ...............................................................................9
2.0
Fundamental Themes of Goju Ryu Karate................................................................................ 10
2.1
Strategy .............................................................................................................................. 10
2.1.1
Rules ........................................................................................................................ 10
2.2
Tactics................................................................................................................................ 10
2.2.1
Forms of Fighting ...................................................................................................... 10
2.2.2
Forms of Compliance................................................................................................. 10
3.0
West Seattle Karate Academy - Dojo Rules .............................................................................. 11
4.0
Reishiki (Etiquette).................................................................................................................. 12
4.1
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 12
4.2
Respect the Traditions of the Art........................................................................................... 12
4.3
Respect the Dojo (school) .................................................................................................... 12
4.4
Respect the Instructor(s)...................................................................................................... 12
4.5
Respect the Other Students ................................................................................................. 12
4.6
Respect Yourself................................................................................................................. 13
5.0
Opening / Closing Ceremonies ................................................................................................ 14
5.1
Opening Ceremony ............................................................................................................. 14
5.2
Closing Ceremony ............................................................................................................... 14
6.0
Dojo Kun (precepts or virtues) ................................................................................................. 15
6.1
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 15
6.2
West Seattle Karate Academy Dojo Kun ............................................................................... 15
7.0
Daruma (warm-up exercises)................................................................................................... 16
7.1
Warm-up............................................................................................................................. 16
7.2
Stretch Joints ...................................................................................................................... 16
7.3
Stretch Tendons .................................................................................................................. 16
7.4
Build Muscles ...................................................................................................................... 16
8.0
Karate Terminology................................................................................................................. 17
8.1
General Terminology ........................................................................................................... 17
8.2
Counting ............................................................................................................................. 18
8.3
Supplementary Exercises Equipment (Hojo Undo) .............................................................. 18
8.4
Moving / Shifting Techniques (Tae Sabaki Waza) .................................................................. 18
8.5
Stances (Tachi Waza).......................................................................................................... 19
8.6
Blocking / Receiving Techniques (Uke Waza)........................................................................ 21
8.7
Hand Techniques (Te Waza)................................................................................................ 22
8.7.1
Te Waza Dai Ichi ....................................................................................................... 23
8.8
Foot Techniques (Ashi Waza) .............................................................................................. 24
8.8.1
Ashi Waza Dai Ichi .................................................................................................... 24
8.8.2
Sensei Schweizers Ground Fighting Exercise............................................................. 24
8.9
Sparring Terminology (Kumite)............................................................................................. 25
9.0
Break-Fall Techniques (Ukemi Waza) ...................................................................................... 26
9.1
Front Falls........................................................................................................................... 26
9.2
Back Falls........................................................................................................................... 26
9.3
Side Falls............................................................................................................................ 26
9.4
Rolling Falls ........................................................................................................................ 26
10.0
Strangling / Choking Techniques (Shime Waza) .................................................................... 28
10.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 28
10.2
Techniques ...................................................................................................................... 28
11.0
Joint Locking Techniques (Kansetsu Waza) .......................................................................... 30
L. A. Kane

Page 2 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
11.1
11.2
12.0
12.1
12.2
13.0
13.1
13.2

Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 30
Techniques ...................................................................................................................... 30
Kihan Ido (First Basics)........................................................................................................ 32
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 32
Movement Drills ............................................................................................................... 32
Kata Centered Practice........................................................................................................ 33
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 33
Analyzing Kata for Application........................................................................................... 33
13.2.1 Kaisai No Genri ......................................................................................................... 33
13.2.2 Do Not Be Deceived by The Enbusen Rule ................................................................. 34
13.2.3 Techniques Executed while Advancing Imply Attack; Those Executed while Retreating
Imply Defense ........................................................................................................................ 34
13.2.4 There is Only One Enemy and He/She is In Front of You ............................................. 34
13.2.5 The Method of Kaisai No Genri................................................................................... 34
13.3
Hikite (Push/Pull) ............................................................................................................. 34
13.4
About Kata (By Morio Higaonna Sensei)............................................................................ 35
13.5
Beginning and Ending a Kata............................................................................................ 36
14.0
Taikyoku (First Course) Katas .............................................................................................. 37
14.1
Taikyoku Gedan............................................................................................................... 37
14.2
Taikyoku Chudan............................................................................................................. 37
14.3
Taikyoku Jodan................................................................................................................ 38
14.4
Taikyoku Mawashi Uke..................................................................................................... 38
14.5
Taikyoku Kake Uke .......................................................................................................... 38
15.0
Hookiyu Kata....................................................................................................................... 39
15.1
Hookiyu Kata Bunkai ........................................................................................................ 39
16.0
Gekisai Kata ....................................................................................................................... 40
16.1
Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi ........................................................................................................ 40
16.2
Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi Bunkai ............................................................................................. 40
16.3
Gekisai Kata Dai Ni .......................................................................................................... 41
16.4
Gekisai Kata Dai Ni Bunkai ............................................................................................... 41
17.0
Gekiha Kata ........................................................................................................................ 43
17.1
Gekiha Kata Dai Ichi ........................................................................................................ 43
17.2
Gekiha Kata Dai Ni........................................................................................................... 43
18.0
Saifa Kata........................................................................................................................... 45
18.1
Saifa Kata Bunkai ............................................................................................................ 45
19.0
Seiyunchin Kata .................................................................................................................. 47
19.1
Seiyunchin Kata Bunkai.................................................................................................... 48
20.0
Seisan Kata ........................................................................................................................ 50
20.1
Seisan Kata Bunkai .......................................................................................................... 51
21.0
Kakuha Kata ....................................................................................................................... 53
22.0
Shisochin Kata .................................................................................................................... 54
22.1
Shisochin Kata Bunkai...................................................................................................... 55
23.0
Sanseiru Kata ..................................................................................................................... 56
23.1
Sanseiru Kata Bunkai ....................................................................................................... 56
24.0
Saipai Kata ......................................................................................................................... 57
24.1
Saipai Kata Bunkai........................................................................................................... 58
25.0
Kurunfa Kata....................................................................................................................... 60
25.1
Kurunfa Kata Bunkai ........................................................................................................ 61
26.0
Suparinpei Kata................................................................................................................... 63
26.1
Suparinpei Kata Bunkai .................................................................................................... 63
27.0
Hakutsuru Kata ................................................................................................................... 64
28.0
Tensho Kata ....................................................................................................................... 65
28.1
Tensho Kata Bunkai ......................................................................................................... 65
29.0
Sanchin Kata....................................................................................................................... 66
29.1
Zen and Sanchin (by Seikichi Toguchi) .............................................................................. 66
29.2
Sanchin Breathing............................................................................................................ 66
29.3
Sanchin Kata (Long Version) ............................................................................................ 67
L. A. Kane

Page 3 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
29.4

Sanchin and Kiko Training (by Ryan Parker) ...................................................................... 69


29.4.1 Shoshyuten (Primary Meridians)................................................................................. 69
29.4.2 Inhalation.................................................................................................................. 69
29.4.3 Exhalation ................................................................................................................. 69
29.4.4 Daishyuten (Entire Body) ........................................................................................... 70
29.4.5 Dynamic Tension....................................................................................................... 70
30.0
Kiso Kumite (Prearranged Sparring) ..................................................................................... 71
30.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 71
30.2
Kiso Kumite Shodan (#1) .................................................................................................. 71
30.3
Kiso Kumite Nidan (#2)..................................................................................................... 71
30.4
Kiso Kumite Sandan (#3) .................................................................................................. 71
30.5
Kiso Kumite Yodan (#4).................................................................................................... 72
30.6
Kiso Kumite Godan (#5) ................................................................................................... 72
30.7
Kiso Kumite Rokudan (#6)................................................................................................ 72
30.8
Kiso Kumite Nandan (#7).................................................................................................. 73
30.9
Kiso Kumite Hachidan (#8) ............................................................................................... 73
30.10
Kiso Kumite Kudan (#9).................................................................................................... 74
30.11
Kiso Kumite Judan (#10) .................................................................................................. 74
31.0
Self-Defense Techniques (Bogiyo Waza or Goshin Do).......................................................... 75
31.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 75
31.2
Eighteen Commandments of Street Combat (by Willie Johnson) ......................................... 75
31.3
The Fearlessness of No Fear............................................................................................ 77
31.3.1 The Tea Master and The Ronin .................................................................................. 77
31.4
Selected Self-Defense Techniques from Kata Applications ................................................. 77
31.5
Hookiyu Kata Self-Defense Techniques ............................................................................. 78
31.6
Gekisai Kata Self-Defense Techniques .............................................................................. 78
31.7
Gekiha Kata Self-Defense Techniques .............................................................................. 78
31.8
Saifa Kata Self-Defense Techniques ................................................................................. 79
31.9
Seyunchin Kata Self-Defense Techniques ......................................................................... 80
32.0
Self-Defense from Knife Attacks........................................................................................... 81
32.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 81
32.1.1 Nikkyo technique....................................................................................................... 81
32.2
Rules of Engagement ....................................................................................................... 81
32.3
Augmented Exercises ...................................................................................................... 82
32.4
Open Hand Exercises ...................................................................................................... 82
33.0
Vital Areas (Kyushu)............................................................................................................ 83
33.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 83
33.2
Vital Area Descriptions ..................................................................................................... 83
34.0
Pressure Point Techniques (Atemi Waza) ............................................................................. 85
34.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 85
34.2
Diagram .......................................................................................................................... 85
34.3
Lung Points ..................................................................................................................... 86
34.4
Large Intestine Points....................................................................................................... 86
34.5
Stomach Points................................................................................................................ 86
34.6
Spleen Points .................................................................................................................. 87
34.7
Heart Points..................................................................................................................... 87
34.8
Small Intestine Points....................................................................................................... 87
34.9
Bladder Points ................................................................................................................. 87
34.10
Kidney Points .................................................................................................................. 88
34.11
Pericardium Points........................................................................................................... 88
34.12
Triple Warmer Points........................................................................................................ 88
34.13
Gallbladder Points............................................................................................................ 88
34.14
Liver Points ..................................................................................................................... 89
34.15
Conception Vessel Points................................................................................................. 89
Section 2 Matayoshi Kobudo ......................................................................................................... 90
1.0
Matayoshi Kobudo General History .......................................................................................... 90
1.1
Kobudo Gi and Logo ............................................................................................................ 90
L. A. Kane

Page 4 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
1.2
Matayoshi Shinko Sensei ..................................................................................................... 90
1.3
Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei..................................................................................................... 91
1.4
Matayoshi Yasushi Soke...................................................................................................... 92
1.5
Gakiya Yoshiaki Sensei ....................................................................................................... 92
2.0
Kobudo Weapons ................................................................................................................... 93
2.1
Bo-Jutsu (staff) .................................................................................................................... 93
2.2
Sai-Jutsu (Sai)..................................................................................................................... 94
2.3
Tonkua-Jutsu (Tonfa) .......................................................................................................... 94
2.4
Nunchaku-Jutsu (Nunchaku) ................................................................................................ 94
2.5
Sansetsu Kon-Jutsu (three-sectional staff) ............................................................................ 94
2.6
Suruchin-Jutsu (weighted chain or rope) ............................................................................... 94
2.7
Nunti-Jutsu (spear) .............................................................................................................. 95
2.8
Kama-Jutsu (sickle) ............................................................................................................. 95
2.9
Kuwa-Jutsu (hoe) ................................................................................................................ 95
2.10
Ueku-Jutsu (oar) .............................................................................................................. 95
2.11
Timbe-Jutsu (hatchet and shield) ...................................................................................... 96
2.12
Kurumanbo-Jutsu............................................................................................................. 96
Section 3 Supplemental Information ............................................................................................... 97
1.0
Self-Defense and The Law ...................................................................................................... 97
1.1
Washington State Laws ....................................................................................................... 98
1.1.1
RCW 9A.16.010 Definitions. .................................................................................... 98
1.1.2
RCW 9A.16.020 Use of force When lawful............................................................. 98
1.1.3
RCW 9A.16.030 Homicide When excusable. ......................................................... 98
1.1.4
RCW 9A.16.040 Justifiable homicide or use of deadly force by public officer, peace
officer, person aiding. .............................................................................................................. 98
1.1.5
RCW 9A.16.050 Homicide By other person When justifiable. ............................... 99
1.1.6
RCW 9A.16.110 Defending against violent crime Reimbursement........................... 99
1.1.7
RCW 9A.32.010 Homicide defined. ........................................................................ 100
1.1.8
RCW 9A.36.011 Assault in the first degree. ............................................................ 100
1.1.9
RCW 9A.36.021 Assault in the second degree. ....................................................... 100
1.1.10 RCW 9A.36.031 Assault in the third degree. ........................................................... 100
1.1.11 RCW 9A.36.041 Assault in the fourth degree. ......................................................... 101
1.2
Selected Case Law............................................................................................................ 101
1.2.1
Reasonable Force and Self-Defense ........................................................................ 101
1.2.2
Assault ................................................................................................................... 102
2.0
The Aftermath of Violence ..................................................................................................... 103
2.1
Medical Assistance............................................................................................................ 103
2.2
Interfacing with Your Lawyer .............................................................................................. 104
2.3
Your One Phone Call ......................................................................................................... 104
Section 4 Rank/Grading Information ............................................................................................. 105
1.0
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 105
1.1
Rank Tables ...................................................................................................................... 106
1.1.1
Ranks & Belts Table ................................................................................................ 106
1.1.2
High-Level Requirements Table ............................................................................... 106
1.1.3
Detailed Requirements Table ................................................................................... 107

L. A. Kane

Page 5 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Section 1 Goju Ryu Karate
1.0 History/Background
1.1

Origin

Based on mans instinct of self-defense, different fighting arts were developed in most cultures, especially
in central Asia, Egypt and Turkey. The principles of Asian martial arts are believed to have spread from
Turkey to India, where they were further developed into sophisticated arts.
1.2

Chinese Kung-Fu

Kung Fu means hard work in Chinese. According to legend, the Zen Buddhist monk Bodhidharma
traveled to the Hunan province in China around 500 AD. He spent nine years in the Shaolin temple,
where he started to teach different breathing techniques and physical exercises to the monks of Shaolin.
He also explained to the monks how to develop their mental and spiritual strength, in order to endure the
demanding meditation exercises. Bodhiharmas teaching is considered the birth of Chinese Kung Fu.
When Kung Fu was spread throughout China, it divi ded into two main styles the Northern style and the
Southern style. The Northern style was characterized by straight and hard techniques, while the
Southern had circular and softer techniques. The Kung Fu techniques were often inherited within a family
and kept as well preserved secrets.
1.3

History of Okinawan Martial Arts


th

Kung Fu was introduced into Okinawa during the 14 century. It won popularity and was trained as an art
of self-defense under the name Tote, which means Chinese Hand. In Okinawa the native fighting art of
Te was practiced long before the introduction of Kung Fu. It is believed that Te was combined with Kung
Fu to form the martial art karate.
When Japan invaded Okinawa in 1609, the ban of carrying weapons (first pronounced by King Sho Shin
in 1477) continued, but the Japanese also banned the practice of martial arts. Consequently, the
Okinawans had to continue their martial arts in secrecy.
During the next three centuries, the martial art developed into its own character and was named
Okinawa-Te. It is divided into three main styles:
Shuri-Te

influenced by the hard techniques of Northern Kung Fu and characterized by offensive


attitude
Naha-Te
influenced by the softer techniques of Southern Kung Fu and characterized with
grappling, throws, and locking techniques and a more defensive attitude
Tomari-Te influenced by both the hard and soft techniques of Kung Fu
th

With the end of the 19 century, Shuri-Te and Tomari-Te were subsumed under the name Shoren-Ryu,
which has developed into several slightly different styles. Naha-Te became known as Goju Ryu, which
means hard and soft style (or more precisely, hard gentle way of the infinite fist). Goju Ryu has
remained basically unified.

L. A. Kane

Page 6 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
1.4

Kanryo Higaonna Sensei (Naha-Te)


Kanryo Higaonna Sensei, the founder of Naha Te was born on March 10, 1853 in the
district of Nishimura in the city of Naha, Okinawa. His father, Kanryo, was a merchant
who traded food and clothing throughout the Ryukyu Islands. At the age of 10, he
started to work with his father, since his younger brothers had died very young and
his elder brother was physically unable to do so.

At the age of 14, in 1867, his father died suddenly as the result of a fight. Shortly
thereafter, he decided to travel to China to learn the deadly Martial Arts so that he
could avenge his father's death. In those days traveling to China was restricted only
to merchants, students or government officials, and permission to travel was only
granted by the King of Okinawa, and the only port of departure was the port of Naha. With the help of the
official Udon Yoshimura, he was able to get the permit to travel to Fuchow, China, as a student; departing
from the port of Naha in the year 1868.
At his arrival to the city of Fuchow, Kanryo Higaonna was accepted in the Ryukyu Kan or lodge where all
the students from Okinawa lived. Once in Fuchow, Kanryo Higaonna was introduced to the renowned
sensei Ryu Ryu Ko who had learned the martial arts in the southern Shaolin temple in the mountains of
the Fujian Province.
Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei's family was part of the Novel Court of China before they lost their status as result of
the politic turmoil in the country. Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei owned a bamboo shop and kept his house on the
second floor of the same building. Here he also taught martial arts to a select group of students.
Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei tested Kanryo Higaonna, having him perform menial duties in the yard or shop before
agreeing to teach him the martial arts. Kanryo Higaonna learned Sanchin Kata first. He was greatly
motivated and showed swift progress. He soon moved out of the Ryukyu Kan and started to live and
work full-time at Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei's bamboo shop. There he was introduced to various traditional
training aids such as Chiishi (weighted stick), Nigiri Game (gripping jars), Tan (log), and Makiwara
(striking post).
Although the training was very severe, he excelled at it, learning not only open hand techniques, but
weapons such Daito (long sword), Shuto (small sword), Sai, and Bo (staff) as well. He also learned
herbal medicine. In few years Kanryo Higaonna became Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei's top student. He studied
14 years in China before Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei told him that was time for him to go back to Okinawa, and in
1881.
On his return to Okinawa, he then started to teach a select group of students at his own house. As he
had learned from Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei, his instruction was very severe. As his fame spread, the King of
Okinawa invited Kanryo Higaonna to teach him the martial arts.
In 1905 he was invited to teach his Naha-Te or Te from Naha (as it was called then) in the Naha
Commercial School. The Principal wanted to teach the students the spiritual and moral aspects of the
martial arts. This was an important step in the Naha-Te, not only for the recognition of the benefits of the
practice but also because until then Te was taught as a martial art with the skill to kill.
After his research, Kanryo Higaonna decided to make an important change in the Sanchin Kata. Until
then, Sanchin Kata was practiced with open hands, so he started to teach it with close hands and slower
breathing with the purpose of promoting the health benefits, rather than promoting lethal techniques at the
school. He introduced the closed fist to emphasize the physical strength more than the ability to kill.
Tradition also play an important roll for this change because he noticed that a lot of young Okinawans,
without acknowledgement of martial arts, naturally stood with closed fists when they were going to fight.
He continued to teach the original way that he learned in China to his few students at his Dojo.

L. A. Kane

Page 7 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
After 1905 karate became a little bit more accessible to the general population because until then Te was
practice for just a selected group of people. Kanryo Higaonna Sensei passed away in October 1915 at
the age of 62.
1.5

Chojun Miyagi Sensei (Goju Ryu)


Chojun Miyagi Sensei, the founder of Goju Ryu, was born on April 25, 1888 in the
city of Naha, Okinawa. He began his practice at the age of 12 with Aragaki Ryuko
Sensei. Aragaki Ryuko's approach was only to teach the fighting itself and not too
much emphasis was placed on the martial art.
After seeing the dedication of Chojun Miyagi, Aragaki Ryuko decided to introduce
him to Kanryo Higaonna. In 1902, at the age of 14, Chojun Miyagi Sensei started to
practice with Kanryo Higaonna Sensei. At the age of 20, Chojun Miyagi became
Kanryo Higaonnas top student.

At the age of 22 he traveled to the main island of Kyushu for his military service. After 2 years of service he
returned to Okinawa. For the next 3 years Kanryo Higaonna taught him privately until Higaonna Sensei died in
1915.
After the death of his instructor, Chojun Miyagi decided to follow the steps of his Sensei and travel to Fuchow,
China, where he learned the martial arts. In his first trip in 1915 he went to Fuchow and trained for two months
with a student of Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei. The old man was very impressed with the skill of Chojun Miyagi. Chojun
Miyagi went to visit the grave of Ryu Ryu Ko Sensei as well as the temple where he trained. It was easy to see
the footmarks on the patio from the training.
Between 1920 and 1930 Chojun Miyagi traveled to China for the second time. This was not a productive trip
because the relations between China and Japan were not good around those days. In his third trip to China, in
1936, he was able to contact the Shanghai Martial Arts Federation. This was instrumental in helping him do his
research in the martial arts.
In the earlier 20's Chojun Miyagi developed the characteristic Goju Ryu warming up exercises or Yunbi Undo with
the help of a friend of his whom was a doctor. This series of exercises were based in not only in martial arts
fundaments but also on medical research. Is also around this time that Chojun Miyagi also developed the Kata
Tensho, and began to teach in high school in Okinawa.
In 1930 Chojun Miyagi sent his top student, Jihan Shinzato, to perform a demonstration of Te at the Meiji Shrine
in Tokyo. Upon his return to Okinawa, he asked his Sensei about the name of the style of karate that they
practiced. A Kobudo Sensei present at the demonstration inquired the same of Shinzato Sensei who could not
answer because until then they only referred to karate as Te (hand), To (China) or Bu (martial art).
Chojun Miyagi Sensei decided to call his style Goju Ryu. The meaning was extracted from the Bubishi, or book of
the poems, where there are references to different subjects including the martial arts and includes a poem entitled
the Eight Precepts of Kempo. The name Goju Ryu identifies the style as the style of the hardness and softness.
In this way Goju Ryu became the first style of karate to be named for something other than the city in which it was
practiced.
It was in 1933 when Goju Ryu was officially recorded and recognized in the Butotu Kai (the institution that groups
all the martial arts in Japan) in Kyoto. The official name was recorded as Goju Ryu Karate-Do, where the
meaning of the character (kanji) Karate was To (China) in recognition of the origin of this martial art, and not the
meaning "empty" as it is in the present day.
In 1934 Chojun Miyagi was appointed as the representative of the Butotu Kai in Okinawa. Also in this year,
Chojun Miyagi was invited to travel to Hawaii to teach karate to the Okinawans living on the island. He remained
in Hawaii for 6 months.

L. A. Kane

Page 8 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
In 1937 Chojun Miyagi was honored to receive the title Kyoshigo (master instructor) from the Butotu Kai. This was
the first time in the history that somebody in karate received this honor, bringing with it the same status as Judo
and Kendo.
During World War II Chojun Miyagi lost his top student Jihan Shinzato as well as two of his daughters. After the
war, he began to teach karate at the Police Academy in Okinawa and also in his home. Among his students were
Miyagi Anichi Sensei, Aragaki, Shuichi Sensei (whose grandfather had introduced him to Higaonna Sensei),
Toguchi Seikichi Sensei, and Iha Sensei among others. Students who had trained before the war such as Yagi
Meitoku and Miyazato Eiichi would come to pay respects.
Chojun Miyagi Senseis life was devoted to karate. He structured the system of Naha-Te, adapted it to the
demands of modern society, and made it available to the public. Chojun Miyagi Sensei passed away on October
8, 1953 at the age of 65.
1.6

Bubishi Poem Eight Precepts of Kempo

This is a Chinese Kempo poem found in the Bubishi (book of poems) of which Goju Ryu was named from the
third line. The Haiku is sometimes translated as Eight Poems of the Fist.
{ JinShin wa tenChi Ni onaji
(The mind is one with Heaven and Earth)
{ Ketsumyaku wa NIchigetsu Ni Nitari
(The circulatory rhythm of the body is similar to the cycle of the Sun and the Moon)
{ Ho wa Goju Ryu wo tondo su
(The way of inhaling and exhaling is hardness and softness)
{ Mi wa toki Ni Shitagai hen Ni ozu
(Act in accordance with time and change)
{ Te wa ku Ni ai sunawa Chi hairu
(Techniques will occur in the absence of conscious thought)
{ Shintai wa ha Karite riho su
(The feet must advance and retreat, separate and meet)
{ Me wa Shiho wo miru wo yosu
(The eyes do not miss even the slightest change)
{ Mimi wa Yoku Happo wo kiku
(The ears listen well in all directions)

L. A. Kane

Page 9 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2.0 Fundamental Themes of Goju Ryu Karate
The Goju-Ryu strategy is to stay close to an opponent, keep the opponent off balance, and use physiological
incapacitation to defeat him/her. If you can incapacitate their vision, breathing, or movement, you are in an
excellent position to defeat an enemy. Any two out of three will guarantee success.
2.1

Strategy
1.
2.
3.

2.1.1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
2.2

Close distance
Imbalance using Happo no Kuzushi, the eight directions of imbalance (imbalance can also apply to any
of the five senses and Goju-Ryu imbalances from the outside as well as the inside of the attacker)
Control using strikes to set-up imbalance and imbalance to set-up strikes. Use physiological damage to
incapacitate
Rules
Never retreat
Fight the whole body
Always move at an angle avoid force to force
Do not use two steps
See everything
A lock or hold is not a primary fighting technique
Avoid going to the ground
Do not kick above your waist
Tactics

2.2.1 Forms of Fighting


Types of combat used in Goju Ryu Karate and their
order of preference (in order of frequency used in
forms):
1.

Feet
20%

Standing (Atemi Waza)


a) Hands 70%
b) Feet 20%

2.

Throwing (Tachi Waza) 5%

3.

Groundwork (Nae Waza) 5%

Throws
5%

Ground
Work
5%

Hands
70%

2.2.2 Forms of Compliance


(In order of frequency used in forms):
1. Striking anatomical weak areas -Temple, Throat, Solar Plexus, Knees, Groin, Eyes, and others
2. Attacking the joints:
a) Hyperextension to move a joint in a direction past its normal range of motion
b) Dislocation to displace a bone from its normal connection to another bone
c) Lock to make fast by interlocking parts of your body and your opponents body
d) Separation - the act of pulling apart or twisting apart
3. Throws to cause injury to your opponent by throwing them into the ground with impetus
4. Nerve attacks are not stand alone techniques, they are used in conjunction with other techniques
5. Chokes
a) Air
b) Blood Flow

L. A. Kane

Page 10 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
3.0 West Seattle Karate Academy - Dojo Rules
The following rules have been promulgated for the West Seattle Karate Academy:
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{

Always bow toward the dojo before stepping on or off the training floor.
Don't be late. If you are late to class, bow and ask the instructor for permission to join class.
Remember to get a drink, go to the bathroom, etc. before class begins.
If you become ill or are injured during class, bow and ask your instructor for permission to sit out.
Never wear shoes on the dojo floor.
All shoes must be lined up on the edge of the floor, coats and clothing hung-up.
Swearing and foul language have no place in the Dojo.
Always bow before speaking to an instructor or higher rank.
Never wear watches or jewelry during class.
Always face away from higher ranks when adjusting your uniform or tying/untying your belt.
While traveling to and from the Dojo, you may wear your uniform but you may not wear your belt in public.
You may not wear your belt to class if you are not wearing your proper uniform. You must wear you Gi
top or one of the approved T-shirts.
{ Testing and tournament are formal events. Your uniform should clean.
{ No gum, food or candy on the dojo floor.
{ Please do your part to help keep the Dojo clean.

L. A. Kane

Page 11 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
4.0 Reishiki (Etiquette)
4.1

Introduction

Reishiki comes from two Japanese words. The first is Rei, which is defined as: bow, salutation, salute, courtesy,
propriety, ceremony, thanks and appreciation. The second part of the term is Shiki, which is defined as:
ceremony, rite or function. Combined the term Reishiki can translate as: etiquette or manners.
Etiquette is an integral part of Budo and without it we would be practicing nothing more than violence. As we
begin our training, the concepts of Reishiki are taught to us as much of the art is, through observing those who
have come before us. Watching our seniors in training and in their general actions and interactions in the dojo is
an outstanding way to learn, provided that the seniors have been observant over the years. The more training a
person receives the calmer, more dignified, and humble that Karateka should become. The beginner must
practice etiquette in order to make him/herself a better person.
In addition to the Dojo rules above, the following is my interpretation based on Kris Wilder Sensei and Scott
Schweizer Senseis instruction and recurring themes from other schools.
4.2 Respect the Traditions of the Art
{ There is no first strike in Karate use it is for physical conditioning, mental discipline, and defensive purposes
only
{ Learn the history of Goju Ry u Karate (and Matayoshi Kobudo)
{ Understand the terminology of Karate (and Kobudo)
{ Although bowing is foreign to American culture, it is required in the Dojo as a sign of respect toward the Dojo,
instructors, other students, and training equipment such as the Makiwara (striking post)
{ Follow the Dojo Kun (precepts or virtues)
{ Wear the traditional Gi (uniform) in class
{ Do not wear your Obi (belt) outside of the Dojo
{ Place left hand over right in Yoi (ready) position
{ Fold your Gi left over right
4.3
{
{
{
{
{
{
{

Respect the Dojo (school)


Bow upon entering and leaving the Dojo
Leave your shoes and mundane clothing neatly by the door
Keep the Dojo neat and clean
Put away equipment at the end of each class session or when you are done using it as appropriate
Face away from the Shomen (front or place of honor) or senior students/teachers when adjusting your Gi
Do not eat, drink, or chew gum in class
Do not swear or use inappropriate language in class

4.4
{
{
{
{
{
{
{
{

Respect the Instructor(s)


Bow before and after receiving instruction
Arrive at class on-time
Be attentive
Try to follow along even when you do not understand (i.e. if in doubt, fake it)
Determine when and how it is appropriate to ask questions by emulating senior students
Always be polite
If you arrive after the class has already started, warm up and wait for instructors invitation to join in
Volunteer to help set-up and tear-down the room and do other administrative tasks as needed

4.5
{
{
{
{
{
{
{

Respect the Other Students


Bow before and after practicing together
Line up according to rank
When students are lined-up formally go around the rows, do not walk between them
If you arrive late, line up in the back both at the beginning and end of class
Respect your elders and defer to those of higher rank
In the Dojo, we are all Karateka treat both males and females the same (as warriors)
Help those who know less than you

L. A. Kane

Page 12 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
{
{
{
{

Learn from those who know more than you


Be polite
Never intentionally hurt anyone in class
Remove jewelry and keep your finger and toenails short to avoid accidentally injuring others

4.6
{
{
{
{
{
{
{

Respect Yourself
Be sure that your Gi (uniform) is clean and neat
Always warm-up before practicing
Know your physical condition and practice accordingly
Never lose your temper
Work hard to improve your health, physical conditioning, and skill at Karate (and Kobudo)
Try to learn something new, no matter how small, from every person in every class
Ensure proper balance and harmony between home life, work life, and martial arts practice

Dozo One Gaishimasu means, please teach me. Arigato Gozaimashita means, thank you very much for
teaching me. These phrases are said when bowing to instructors and other students before and after practicing
together.

L. A. Kane

Page 13 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
5.0 Opening / Closing Ceremonies
Always bow when entering or leaving the Dojo. Each training session will usually begin and end with a short
ceremony to show respect for the head instructor, guest instructors, the Dojo, and the fellow students. Our
ceremony usually goes as follows:
5.1

Opening Ceremony

Instructor:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Instructor:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Everybody:

Head student:
Head student:
Everybody:
Head student:
Instructor:

5.2

Claps twice
Ki o Tsuke
Seiza
Mokuso Hajime
Mokuso Yame
Shomen Ni
Rei
Sensei Ni
Rei
Dozo One Gaishimasu

Line up (Shugo)
Attention
Kneel
Close eyes/meditate
Open eyes/end meditation
Face forward (towards Shomen)
Bow (right hand forward first followed by left, then bow)
Face towards instructor.
Bow
Please teach me. Said to the instructor as you bow to
start class and to fellow students before you begin
working together.
Yudansha Ni
Face towards black belts or guest instructor(s), if any
Rei
Bow
Dozo One Gaishimasu Please teach me
Shomen Ni
Face front
Tatsue
Straighten or stand up

Closing Ceremony

Instructor:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Instructor:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Head student:
Everybody:

Claps twice
Ki o Tsuke
Seiza
Mokuso Hajime
Mokuso Yame
Dojo Kun
Shomen Ni
Rei
Sensei Ni
Rei
Arigato Gozaimashita

Head student:
Head student:
Everybody:
Head student:
Head student:
Everybody:
Head student:
Instructor:
Instructor:
All

Yudansha Ni
Rei
Arigato Gozaimashita
Otogai Ni
Rei
Arigato Gozaimashita
Shomen Ni
Tatsue
Kurasant Jantov
Clap several times

L. A. Kane

Line up (Shugo)
Attention
Kneel
Close eyes/meditate
Open eyes/end meditation
Shout the Dojo Kun responsively (whole class)
Face forward (towards Shomen)
Bow
Face towards instructor
Bow
Thank you very much for teaching me. Said as you bow
to the instructor at the end of class and to fellow
students when you end working together.
Face towards black belts or guest instructor(s), if any
Bow
Thank you for teaching me
Face towards other student(s)
Bow
Thank you for teaching me
Face front
Straighten or stand up
Good Night (honored guests)
Applause

Page 14 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
6.0 Dojo Kun (precepts or virtues)
6.1

Introduction

The Dojo Kun are usually posted at the front of a Dojo. They are recited either at the opening or the closing of
class (or both) depending on the Dojo. The Dojo recites its Kun, or virtues, in hopes of making all those attending
or listening better people in general, both physically and mentally. While each person may not have the same
exact belief or definition for each virtue, this ritual is meant to instill a positive ideal in each person hearing it.
Typically the most senior student in the class recites one line, which is then repeated by the entire class until the
progression is ended. Through the practice of Karate, the discipline of the body and mind, and the reciting of
virtue we become better people, of higher nature, and better in contact with ourselves.
Although Dojo Kun tends to be similar within most Goju Ryu schools, the exact wording varies somewhat by
instructor and system. The Dojo Kun are not numbered as each item is equally important. We sometimes say
Itos (meaning first or most important) before each virtue. The following is used at the West Seattle Dojo
6.2

West Seattle Karate Academy Dojo Kun

We Karateka:
{
{
{
{
{
{

Respect good manners


Practice a sense of harmony
Learn to persevere
Give our minds to application
Make every effort to agree among heart and technique
As students, and later teachers, will follow the Dojo rules

L. A. Kane

Page 15 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
7.0 Daruma (warm-up exercises)
It is essential to always warm-up before practicing and to know your physical condition and practice accordingly.
Proper hydration and breathing are also of paramount importance.
Exercises begin with jumping jacks or other aerobic activity to warm and loosen the muscles so that stretching will
not cause injury. Once warm, proceed to stretch the joints, then stretch the tendons and finally to build muscles,
in that order. When stretching joints or tendons, work from the ground up. When building muscles be sure to
work opposing groups (e.g. when doing sit-ups also do back lifts, when building biceps also work triceps, etc.). A
typical routine might go something like this (this is representative, not an all inclusive list):
7.1

Warm-up
1. Jumping Jacks (and/or light jogging)

7.2

Stretch Joints
2. Stretch Toes (curls and cross-foot stretch)
3. Stretch Whole Foot (curls)
4. Stretch Ankle (circular motion)
5. Stretch Knees (hands on knees, rotate in circular motion)
6. Stretch Hips (hands on hips, rotate in circular motion)
7. Stretch Torso (hands on hips, rotate in circular motion and arms extended windmill stretch)
8. Stretch Shoulders (arms extended circles)
9. Stretch Neck (circular motion)

7.3

Stretch Tendons
10. Stretch Knees (drop to Shiko Dachi with hands on knees and rock back-and-forth)
11. Stretch Legs (feet together and touch toes, then cross feet and touch toes)
12. Stretch Groin (sit butterfly style with feet touching, pull-in while pressing down on knees)
13. Stretch Torso (drop to Shiko with hands supporting at knees, lift up while turtling neck and inhaling,
then drop down with exhale and repeat)
14. Stretch Shoulders (elbow raised above head, grip back and pull back and hands behind then lift up)
15. Stretch Wrists (make a wall with support hand then bent wrist stretch, and capture fingers pulling
downward, and twist toward thumb stretch)

7.4

Build Muscles
16. Crunch sit-ups and/or Back lifts
17. Push ups and/or mountain push-ups (two person)
18. Scoop ups (front arms together, legs spread wide, move down and forward then back)
19. Finger Grips
20. Hojo Undo exercises (e.g. Chiishi, Makiwara, or Nigiri Game)
21. Basic technique (punches, kicks, blocks, etc.) or Kata (e.g. Taikyoku or Hookiyu) practice

L. A. Kane

Page 16 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.0 Karate Terminology
8.1

General Terminology

Ashi
Bunkai
Chudan
Dojo
Daruma
Gedan
Fah Jing

Go
Goshin Do
Hajime
Happo no Kuzushi
Hantai

Hidari
Hikite
Jodan
Ju
Kamae

Kansetsu
Karate-do
Karateka
Kata
Ki
Kiai
Kime
Kumite
Ma-Ai
Mokuso
Migi
Muchimi
Mudansha
Nigiri
Obi
Otogai
Rei
Seiken
Seiza
Shime
Shomen
Tai Sabaki
Tanden
Te
Tori
Tsuki
Uchi
Uke
Ukeme
Waza
Yame
Yoi
Yudansha

L. A. Kane

Leg
Techniques and applications of a Kata
Middle area
Classroom
Warm-up exercises
Lower area
Explosive power (loose flowing movement, then tense entire body with strike,
kind of like a sneeze)
Hard
Self-defense techniques
Begin
Eight directions of imbalance
When used as a command, this means to switch to a position or posture opposite
to the one previously in.
Left
Push/pull
Upper area
Soft
Combative posture (generally one hand in chamber and the other in Uke or
receiving position)
Joint
Way or path of karate (from the Chinese Tao)
Karate practitioner
Sequence of pre-arranged movements and techniques
Spirit and energy
Shout given as technique is delivered to focus energy
Focus
Sparring
Correct distancing or timing with respect to one's partner
Meditation
Right
Emphasis/power
Kyu belts (colored belts white through brown)
Fingers
Belt or sash
Fellow students
Bow
Normal karate fist (striking 70/30 with front two knuckles)
Kneel
Choke or strangle
Front (place of honor or shrine)
Moving/shifting
Lower abdomen (or Hara)
Hand
Attacker (such as in Bunkai practice)
Thrust
Strike
Receive or block (also refers to the defender in Bunkai practice)
Break falls
Technique
Stop
Ready
Black belts (or guest instructors)

Page 17 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.2

Counting

One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Twenty
Thirty
Forty
Fifty
Sixty
Seventy
Eighty
Ninety
One Hundred

8.3

Supplementary Exercises Equipment (Hojo Undo)

Chiishi

8.4

Ichi
Ni
San
Shi (or Yon)
Go
Roku
Shichi
Hachi
Ku
Ju
Niju
Sanju
Yonju
Goju
Rokuju
Nanaju
Hachiju
Kuju
Hyaku

Makige Kigu
Makiwara
Nigiri Game
Tan
Tau
Tetsuarei

Concrete or stone weight mounted on a wood handle used for strength conditioning of upper
body
Wooden handle with suspended weight rolled to strengthen wrists
Padded striking post for practicing Tsuki, Uchi, and Ashi Waza
Gripping jars used to strengthen fingers
Heavy wooden log used for strength and conditioning exercises
Bundle of bamboo sticks used for Nukite practice and finger conditioning
Free weights

Moving / Shifting Techniques (Tae Sabaki Waza)


Ayumi Ashi
Chakuchi
De Ashi
Hiri Ashi
Keri Ashi
Mawari Ashi
Suri Ashi
Tenshin
Tsugi Ashi
Tubi Ashi
Yoko Ashi
Yori Ashi

L. A. Kane

Natural stepping
Replacing
Forward
Backward
Kicking foot
Circular
Sliding step or shift
Moving, shifting
Shuffling step
Jumping
Lateral step
Dragging step

Page 18 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.5

Stances (Tachi Waza)


It has been said that
nature kills a horse
from the ground up.
A horse that cannot
walk or run properly
is unable to search
for food or escape
from predators.
Hansa

Masubi Dachi

Heiko Dachi

Neko Ashi Dachi

Heisoku Dachi

Renoji Dachi

Kokutsu Dachi

Sanchin Dachi

Similarly, a martial
artist whose body is
out of position will
surely be defeated.
Strength of
technique and ability
to move to attack or
defend rely on
proper footwork and
good balance.
Pictures to the left
represent common
stances found in
Goju Ryu Karate.

Seiza

Shiko Dachi

Tsuruashi Dachi

Bensoku Dachi (crossed-leg stance)


Fudo Dachi (free stance)
Gyaku-Zenkutsu Dachi (rear defense stance)
Hachiji Dachi (natural stance)
Hakusura Dachi (crane stance)

Hansa (sitting)
Heiko Dachi (natural stance)
Heisoku Dachi (closed foot stance)
Kiba Dachi (side facing horse stance)

Kokutsu Dachi (back stance)

Migi Heiko Dachi (natural stance right forward)


Masubi Dachi (formal attention stance)
Naihanchi Dachi (toe-in horse stance)
Naname Shiko Dachi (diagonal straddle stance)
Neko-Ashi Dachi (cat stance)

L. A. Kane

Zenkutsu Dachi

A more complete
listing with detailed
descriptions follows
below.

One leg crossed over the other with both knees bent.
Front foot flat on ground. Rear leg supported on ball of
foot. Front foot facing to outside at 45.
Feet shoulder-width apart with toes pointing inward.
Zenkutsu Dachi reversed so that straight leg points
forward. Head and torso turned to face forward, leaning
to the rear.
Feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing slightly
outwards.
Front leg raised with thigh straight perpendicular to body
and knee bent 45. Toes point down. Back leg slightly
bent with body erect.
Sitting with legs crossed in front of body (Indian style).
Feet parallel, shoulder-width apart.
Feet and heels together, legs straight and relaxed.
Feet roughly two shoulder-widths apart, parallel, toes
pointed forwards, facing sideways.
Rear knee bent, with foot facing to the outside. Forward
leg approximately two shoulder-widths in front of and
perpendicular to rear foot (i.e. facing forwards). 70% of
weight on rear leg, 30% on forward leg.
Right foot forward Heiko Dachi.
Heels together, foot pointing outward 45.
Kiba Dachi with the heels out and toes in
Diagonal Shiko Dachi.
Rear knee bent, with foot flat on ground, and toes facing
to the outside. Resting lightly (10%) on the front leg,
approximately one shoulder-width from the rear leg.

Page 19 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes

Nissin Dachi (side defense stance)


Renoji Dachi (L stance)
Sagiashi Dachi (one-leg heron stance)
Sanchin Dachi (hourglass stance)

Seiza (kneeling)
Sesan Dachi (side facing straddle stance)
Shiko Dachi (straddle stance)

Shozenkutsu Dachi (half-front stance)


Tsuruashi Dachi (one-foot stance)
Uchi-Hachiji Dachi (toe-in natural stance)
Zenkutsu Dachi (front stance)

L. A. Kane

Toes of front foot facing forwards, flat on ground with


heel of foot raised. Crouching slightly, with front leg in
center of body, bent a little at the knee. Torso erect.
Legs parallel with front leg straight, back leg bent. 30%
of weight on front leg, 70% on back leg. Head faces
sideways.
Feet one shoulder width apart, front leg just off center of
body pointing directly forwards. Rear leg pointing
outward 45. Weight distributed 50/50.
Leg raised and tucked behind knee of supporting leg.
Supporting leg bent at knee and foot turned outward,
weight shifted back above supporting leg.
Feet shoulder-width apart, weight distributed 60/40.
Knees tensed and pulled inwards. Forward foot slightly
ahead of rear foot. Toes pointed slightly inward. Back
straight and hips tensed with pelvis pulled forwards and
upwards.
Sitting in kneeling position on heels.
Shiko Dachi, but looking directly to the side.
Feet spread approximately two shoulder-widths apart;
toes pointed outward at 45. Weight distributed evenly
over both legs. Knees bent deeply and pulled back as
far as possible with torso erect. Lower legs/shins
approximately vertical.
Same as Zenkutsu Dachi, but feet only one shoulderwidth behind lead foot.
Back (supporting) leg slightly bent, front leg elevated
with knee horizontal and lower leg angling downward
toward knee of supporting leg (Seisan Kata).
Hachiji Dachi with feet pointing slightly inwards.
Forward leg bent at the knee, rear leg locked and
extended approximately two shoulder-widths behind lead
foot, torso erect. If you drop to a kneeling position, back
knee aligns with front heel. Weight distributed 70/30.

Page 20 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.6

Blocking / Receiving Techniques (Uke Waza)


Uke actually means
to receive rather
than simply block. A
strong block looks
and feels much like
an attack to your
opponent.
Gedan Uke

Koken Uke

Age Uke
Ashi Uke
Chudan Uke
Gedan Barai Uke
Gedan Uchi Barai
Gedan Uke
Heisoku Barai
Hara Uke
Harai Uke
Hiji Uke
Hiki Uke
Hiza Uke
Jodan Uke
Joge Uke
Juji Uke
Kakai Uke
Koken Uke
Kosa Uke
Mawashi Uke
Marote Uke
Nagashi Uke
Osai Uke
Shotei Otoshi Uke
Shotei Uke
Shuto Uke
Sokutei Harai Uke
Sokutei Osai Uke
Soto Uke
Sukui Uke
Tomoe Uke
Uchi Uke
Ude Uke
Ura Uke
Yama Uke
Yoko Uke

L. A. Kane

Jodan Uke

Nagashi Uke

Juji Uke

Uchi Uke

Kakai Uke

These pictures
represent a variety of
blocks found in Goju
Ryu Karate.
A more complete
listing follows below.
Note that the range
is usually much
closer than shown
here.

Blocks to the outside


of an opponents arm
should be above the
elbow to jam/disrupt
while protecting
against an elbow
strike.
Blocks to the inside
of an opponents arm
should be below the
elbow so that they
cannot strike around
your block.

Rising block
Leg block
Middle inside circular (chest level) block
Downward circular block
Outside downward block (open hand)
Downward (waist level) block
Instep block
Archer block (from Seiyunchin)
Sweep block (deflects a kick, like in Gekisai Kata Bunkai)
Elbow block
Pulling/grasping open hand chest block
Knee block
Upward (head) block
Double block
X block
Hooking block (Gekiha, Seisan)
Wrist block
Cross block
Round house or wheel block
Double hand (augmented) block
Sweeping block
Pressing block
Open hand dropping block
Palm heel block
Knife hand block
Sole of the foot block
Pressing block with the sole of the foot
Outside forearm block
Scooping block
Circular block (same as Mawashi Uke)
Inside forearm block
Forearm block (wing block)
Back hand block
Mountain block (open hands start up like Seiyunchin, drop like Sanchin)
Circular block

Page 21 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.7

Hand Techniques (Te Waza)


Strikes work against
your opponents
force, while throws
work with it.

Age Tsuki

Gyaku Tsuki

Mawashe Tsuki

Oi Tsuki

Yama Tsuki

These pictures
represent a variety of
hand techniques
found in Goju Ryu
Karate.
A more complete
listing with
descriptions follows
below.

Ippon Ken

Nukite Tsuki

Seiken Tsuki

Age Tsuki
Awase Tsuki
Boshiken Tsuki
Choku Tsuki
Chudan Tsuki
Chukoken Tsuki
Furi Tsuki
Furi Uchi
Gyaku Tsuki
Haito Uchi
Hasami Tsuki
Heiko Tsuki
Heiko Hiji Ate
Hiji Ate
Hiraken Tsuki
Hiza Ate
Ippon-Ken
Kagi Tsuki
Kaikoken Tsuki
Kama-De Uchi
Keikoken Tsuki
Kizami Tsuki
Koken Uchi
Kote Uchi
Mawashi Tsuki
Marote Tsuki
Nagashi Tsuki
Nai Wan Uchi
Nakadaka Ken
Nakanishuto
Nihon Tsuki
Nukite Tsuki

L. A. Kane

Marote Tsuki

In order to deliver
blows with maximum
force aim attacks
through your
opponent, rather
than at him/her,
aligning the angle of
attack and striking
surface to your
opponents body.
Utilize pressure point
and vital area
attacks whenever
possible to enhance
your chances of
success.

Tetsui Uchi

Rising punch (uppercut)


U punch
Thumb fist
Straight thrust punch
Chest punch
Knuckle punch (second knuckle of middle finger)
Circular punch
Swing strike (back fist)
Reverse punch (rear fist)
Ridge hand strike
Scissors punch (double knuckle strike point inward)
Parallel punch
Horizontal elbow strike
Elbow strike
Knuckle punch (second knuckle of all four fingers)
Knee strike
Standing fist with knuckle of index or middle finger extended
Hook punch
Crab shell fist punch (second knuckle of index finger)
Bear hand (claw) strike
One knuckle fist
Leading punch, or jab (front fist)
Bent wrist strike
Forearm strike
Round hook punch
Double punch
Flowing punch
Dead arm strike
Middle finger knuckle fist
Inside sword hand
Double punch
Finger thrust
Page 22 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes

Oi Tsuki
Sanbon Tsuki
Seiken Tsuki
Shita Tsuki
Shotei Tsuki
Shotei Uchi
Shuto Uchi
Sotoshuto
Tate Tsuki
Tetsui Uchi
Ura Tsuki
Uraken Uchi
Washi-De Uchi
Yama Tsuki

8.7.1

Lunge punch
Triple punch
Fore fist (standard) punch
Palm up center (uppercut) punch
Palm heel thrust
Palm heel strike
Knife hand strike
Outside sword hand
Vertical (standing fist) punch
Hammer fist strike
Short uppercut punch (palm side up)
Whipping back fist strike
Eagle hand (fi ngers together like beak) strike
Mountain (U) punch

Te Waza Dai Ichi

This is the first combination hand technique. Sequence is Jodan Uke (head block), Chudan Uchi Uke (inside
forearm block), Uraken Uchi (back fist), Gedan Uke (down block), Gedan Gyaku Tsuki (downward reverse
punch). Switch sides and repeat. Optionally, this sequence can be done using both hands simultaneously or one
movement out of synch. Another option is to complete the original sequence then reverse the order (forward and
back).

L. A. Kane

Page 23 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
8.8

Foot Techniques (Ashi Waza)


In Goju Ryu we
generally do not kick
above the waist unless
an opponent is bent
over in such a way as
to make the upper body
a ready target.

Hiza Geri

Kakato Geri

Mae Geri

Mawashe Geri

These pictures
represent a variety of
foot techniques
found in Goju Ryu
Karate.
A more complete
listing follows below.
Mikazuki Geri

Ashi Barai
Fumikomi Geri
Gyaku Mawashi Geri
Heisoku Geri
Hiza Geri
Kakato Geri
Kansetsu Geri
Mae Geri Keage
Mae Geri Kekomi
Mae Geri
Mae Tobi Geri
Mawashi Geri
Nakanimikazuki Geri
Nidan Geri
Ren Geri
Sokuto Geri
Sotomikazuki
Tobi Nidan Geri
Tsumasaki Geri
Ushiro Geri
Ushiro Mawashi Geri
Yoko Geri Keage
Yoko Geri Kekomi
Yoko Geri
Yoko Tobi Geri

8.8.1

Ushiro Geri

Strikes work against


your opponents force,
while sweeps work with
it.
All kicks begin by
raising the knee (Hiza
Geri). Range is often
close enough that your
upraised knee strikes
first, and then you strike
again with the kick that
follows.

Yoko Geri

Foot sweep
Stamping kick
Reverse round house kick
Kicking with the instep
Knee kick
Stomping Heel kick
Joint kick
Front snap kick
Front thrust kick
Front kick
Jumping front kick
Round house kick
Inside hook kick
Double front snap kick (back leg first)
Double front snap kick (front leg first)
Kicking with the foot edge (foot sword)
Outside hook kick
Jumping double kick
Kicking with the tips of the toes
Back thrust kick
Round house to the rear kick
Side snap kick
Side thrust kick
Side kick
Jumping side thrust kick

Ashi Waza Dai Ichi

This is the first combination foot technique. Sequence is Mae Geri (front kick), Mikazuki Geri (hook kick),
Mikazuki Geri (hook kick), Ushiro Geri (back kick), Yoko Geri (side kick). Switch sides and repeat.
8.8.2
1.
2.
3.
4.

Sensei Schweizers Ground Fighting Exercise

Begin in Heiko Dachi (natural stance)


Move hands up into Yoi position, then execute a standing Ukemi Waza (backward breakfall).
Immediately roll to left-side Ukemi (breakfall) position and execute a Yoko Geri (side kick) with the right foot.
Roll to the right side Ukemi (breakfall) position and execute a Yoko Geri (side kick) with the left foot.

L. A. Kane

Page 24 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
5.

Roll back to the left side Ukemi (breakfall) position and execute a Mikazuki Geri (hook kick) with the right foot
while pulling the left leg back and in (similar to leg scissors takedown in Judo).
6. Roll back to the right side Ukemi (breakfall) position and execute a Mikazuki Geri (hook kick) with the left foot
while pulling the right leg back and in (similar to leg scissors takedown in Judo).
7. Roll to center position, slide hands back and lift your body so that you balance on hands and feet.
8. Immediately execute an upward Kakato Geri (heel kick) with the right leg, thrusting toward opponents
stomach.
9. Without changing position, follow with an upward Kakato Geri (heel kick) with the left leg, thrusting toward
opponents stomach.
10. Shift your weight to the left and execute a Fumikomi Geri (stamping kick with bottom of foot) with the left leg
aiming at the opponents ankle.
11. Shoot your left leg back past your left arm, rising into Shiko Dachi (straddle stance) while executing a right
hand Chudan Uke (middle block).
12. Shift back into Heiko Dachi (natural stance)
8.9

Sparring Terminology (Kumite)


Fuku Shiki Kumite
Go Kumite
Go no Sen
Goshin Do Ippon Kumite
Ippon Kumite
Jiyu Ippon Kumite
Jiyu Kumite
Kiso Kumite
Randori Kumite
San Dan Gi
Sanbon Kumite
Sanbon Shobu Kumite
Sen no Sen
Sen Sen no Sen

Yakusoku Kumite

L. A. Kane

Free style sparring with emphasis on Kata application


Full-contact sparring
Receive and respond
Prearranged sparring for self-defense application
One step sparring (block and counter)
Free one step sparring, emphasis on technique
Hard and fast controlled continuous free fighting
Prearranged sparring
Slow and soft free style sparring with emphasis on technique
Basic three step/three level sparring
Three step sparring
Three point competition (tournament Karate)
Meet before the attack is complete (intercept)
Move as opponents intent is formed (to an outsider this may look as if you
attacked)
Prearranged sparring

Page 25 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
9.0 Break-Fall Techniques (Ukemi Waza)
There are four basic types of falls: front, back, side, and rolling. Properly executed Ukemi cushions vital areas,
absorbs shock, and allows you to be thrown to the ground without injury.
9.1

Front Falls

Kneeling

Kneel with your heels raised. Let yourself fall forward. Just before your body hits the
ground, slap down with both hands. Your forearms should slant outward at a 45-degree
angle. Support yourself on your hands and toes in a similar position to that of doing
push-ups.

Squatting

Squat with your hands on your thighs. Fall forward. Just before your body hits the
ground, slap down with both hands. Your forearms should slant outward at a 45-degree
angle. Support yourself on your hands and toes in a similar position to that of doing
push-ups.

Standing

From a natural standing position with your feet close together and your arms at your
sides, lean forward and let yourself fall. Just before your body hits the ground, slap down
with both hands. Your forearms should slant outward at a 45-degree angle. Support
yourself on your hands and toes in a similar position to that of doing push-ups.

9.2

Back Falls

Seated

From a seated position, roll back and let your feet ride up. Slap the ground as the small
of your back hits. Let the momentum carry your buttocks up. Your upper body should
remain in contact with the ground. Be sure your hand slaps close to your body (6 to 10
away). Tuck your chin to your chest so that your head will not impact the ground.

Standing

From a standing position, do the same technique described above, but drop straight
down to a squatting position before rolling back to slap. When the legs have reached
their peak and begin to swing back down, use that momentum to bring your body back up
into a standing position.

9.3

Side Falls

Lying Down

Move from side to side. When moving right slap with the palm of the right hand. When
moving left slap with the palm of the left hand. The hand not in use should be placed on
your stomach. Be sure your hand slaps close to your body (6 to 10 away). Keep your
head up off the mat with your chin tucked-in. Legs should be slightly bent and apart.
When rolling from side to side, whip your legs up and back down again. Be sure to end
up with your upper body flat against the ground so that you will not roll too much.

Standing

Stand with the feet shoulder width apart. Kick the left leg across the right side and raise
the left hand to the right side. Squat straight down, continuing to raise the left arm.
Continue to descend until the left buttock hits the floor. Roll back and bring the arm
forcefully down to the ground. The side of the left leg should make contact with the
ground at about the same time as the left hand slaps. The right hand goes to the
stomach. This can be done to the reverse side as well. Be sure your hand slaps close to
your body (6 to 10 away). Keep your head up off the mat with your chin tucked-in.
Legs should be slightly bent and apart. Be sure to keep the knees from crossing or
knocking together. The upper leg should land on the ball of your foot for greater impact
absorption.

9.4

Rolling Falls

Standing

L. A. Kane

Rolling falls are only done from a standing position. Start with feet shoulder width apart.
Step forward with the right foot naturally turned to the left. Bend at the knees and hips
Page 26 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
and place the hands between the right and left feet, fingers pointed towards each other.
Lean forward so that the toes of the right foot are your only means of support. Look back
at the left foot and begin to roll over your right shoulder with your chin tucked-in against
your chest. Once contact is made, continue through getting ready to bring the right hand
to the mat and the left to the stomach. Continuing through the body should roll to the
right side and end up in the same position as a side fall. This Ukemi is usually repeated
to the opposite side, alternating as you transverse the Dojo floor. Be sure to point the
fingers inward to protect your wrist. Also be sure to roll over the shoulder, not the head
(like a somersault).

L. A. Kane

Page 27 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
10.0 Strangling / Choking Techniques (Shime Waza)
10.1 Introduction
There are two types of choking technique. By applying pressure to the trachea of an opponent, you can cut off
the oxygen supply to his or her lungs. The second method applies pressure to the carotid arteries, denying a
blood supply to the brain. While both are effective, the latter is somewhat less painful.
10.2 Techniques
Okuri Eri Jime

Sliding lapel strangle (assisting arm choke). Done from behind using opponents clothing
to execute the technique. Reach around from behind to grab the lapel with your right
hand. With the left hand, come up under the chin and encircle the neck, gripping the
lapel with the thumb to the inside of their Gi or clothing. Pull in and down with the right
hand and in and around with the left hand. Defense: grab the outside of your opponents
right sleeve or arm at the shoulder with both hands, pull down hard, lean backward, and
slip your head free.

Kata Ha Jime

One-side wing-strangle (single arm trap choke). Done from the front. Opponents
clothing helps, but is not required for this technique. From the regular Okuri-Eri-Jime
(sliding lapel strangle), the attackers right arm releases and is brought straight up. This
will raise the opponents arm and shoulder. The left hand remains gripping the Gi or
clothing under the chin. The right arm of the attacker is directed in the back of the
opponents head, trapping their arm high in the air. Pull back with the left arm while
pushing forward with the right. Defense: when your opponent is about to put his/her left
arm behind your neck, pull it down with your right hand and bend your head backward.

Juji Jime

Cross-strangle. Done from the front using opponents clothing to execute the technique.
Can be done from on top or under your opponent. Place your right thumb on the inside
of the opponents right lapel. With the left hand, place the fingers to the inside of the
opponents left lapel with the palm facing towards your. Simultaneously pull in and down
with the left hand while the right hand pulls in and the elbow goes across the opponents
neck for the choke. Defense: twist to your right side; get your left arm under your
opponents left arm, and place the palm of your left hand at the back of your neck. Push
his/her left elbow with your right hand or both elbows at the same time and roll him/her off
to your left side.

Hadaka Jime

Naked-strangle (bare arm choke). Done from behind. Opponents clothing is not
required to execute the technique. Version 1 Bring the right arm under and across the
opponents chin. Clasp both hands together with the right hand palm down. Push
forward with the right shoulder and pull back with both clasped arms. Version 2 Reach
around the opponents neck with your right arm palm down. Place the right hand on the
biceps with the little finger at the bend of the elbow. Next bend the left-arm over the
grasping right hand and place it behind the opponents head. Squeeze in and backwards
with the right arm while pushing forward with the right hand. Defense: grab the outside of
your opponents right sleeve or arm at the shoulder with both hands, pull down hard, lean
backward, and slip your head free.

Sode Guruma Jime Sleeve wheel choke. Done from the front. Opponents clothing is not required to execute
the technique. Put your right forearm against your opponents throat and your left
forearm against the back of his/her neck. Grasp your right lower sleeve or forearm with
your left hand and thrust your right hand into the right side of his/her neck. Apply
pressure by making circular movements with both arms.
Sangaku Jime

L. A. Kane

Triangle-strangle. Done from behind. Opponents clothing is not required to execute the
technique. Apply pressure to your opponents neck by wrapping your right leg over
his/her left shoulder and your left leg under his/her right armpit. Catch your right foot

Page 28 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
under the back of his/her left knee diagonally. Squeeze your legs to put pressure on the
left side of the neck.

L. A. Kane

Page 29 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
11.0 Joint Locking Techniques (Kansetsu Waza)
11.1 Introduction
Joint locks are directed against the opponents joints, which are twisted, stretched, or bent with the hands, arms
or legs. This can cause dislocation or hyperextension of the entangled limb. These techniques are described
from only one side but can obviously be done from the reverse side as well.
11.2 Techniques
Ude Garami

Entangled arm lock. Done on the ground. Taking your opponents wrist in your left hand,
put your right forearm underneath his left upper arm, and grab your own left wrist. Lock
his elbow joint by pressing against his upper arm with your right forearm. For this
technique to be effective, you must control your opponents left arm and apply efficient
leverage. The same lock can be applied while on top or underneath an opponent.
Defense: grab your own left wrist with your right hand, turn your body to the left, and
stand up. Another defense is to grab your own belt or jacket with your left hand, turn over
to your left, then stand up before your opponent can re-apply the technique from behind.

Juji Gatame

Cross arm lock. This technique is generally applied on the ground, either when your
opponent is still holding your left sleeve after you have thrown him/her, or when your
approach him from his/her right side kneeling on your left knee and he grabs for you with
his/her right hand. The same technique can be applied while on ones back. While
holding your opponents right wrist with both hands, trap his/her right arm between your
thighs and bend it back toward the elbow on the little-finger side. Be sure there is no
space between his/her arm and your body. Hook your right leg over your opponents
neck/shoulder and press your left leg into his/her left side. Leverage with your whole
body against his/her arm strength. Defense: with your left hand, grab your right wrist or
lower right sleeve before your opponent can take hold of it and twist and bend to your
right. If caught in this lock, turn and bend your right arm until your elbow points to the
side. Push your opponents left leg away with your left hand, then roll your body to the
left until it is parallel with your opponents, then pull your arm free.

Zempaku Gatame

Arm arm lock. This technique can be done standing or lying down. This can be used
against a front grab. Pull your opponents left wrist against your right shoulder, place
your hands or right forearm above the elbow of his/her outstretched arm, and press it
downward toward your body bringing pressure to bear on his/her left elbow. Be sure that
your opponents arm is straight and fully extended. Defense: instead of attempting to pull
free, simply push your arm past your opponents shoulder and bend it.

Hiza Gatame

Knee arm lock. Hold your opponents right wrist in your left armpit and press down on
his/her elbow from the outside with your left knee. It is very important to coordinate three
movements: push against the opponents right side with your left foot, break his/her
balance forward, and press his/her right elbow with your left knee. Defense: twist your
right wrist clockwise and pull it out of your opponents armpit, push your arm through
his/her armpit to relieve pressure on your elbow, and then roll forward over his/her body.

Waki Gatame

Armpit arm lock. From the side, grip one of your opponents wrists with both hands and
hold his arm in your armpit. Stretch his/her elbow and lock the straightened arm.

Hara Gatame

Stomach arm lock. Grip one of our opponents wrists from the side using either left or
right hand. Use your stomach or chest to apply pressure to his/her elbow. Lock the
elbow by straightening, twisting, or bending the arm.

Ashi Gatame

Leg arm lock. With your opponent face down on the ground and you to one side, catch
his/her forearm with one leg. Straighten to bend the arm and lock the elbow.

L. A. Kane

Page 30 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Te Gatame

Hand arm lock. From your opponents right side, slip your left hand through his/her right
armpit and grasp his left front collar. Take hold of his/her right wrist with your right hand,
straighten his/her arm, and lock the elbow. It is also possible to grasp his/her wrist with
one or both hands and apply a lock to the elbow by twisting his/her arm behind your
opponents back.

Sangaku Gatame

Triangular arm lock. Wrap one leg over your opponents shoulder and the other under
the opposite side armpit to control the head. This can be done from the front, side, or
rear. Using one or both hands, either straighten or bend his/her trapped arm to lock the
elbow.

L. A. Kane

Page 31 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
12.0 Kihan Ido (First Basics)
12.1 Introduction
Kihan Ido combines movement, stance, and technique in short combinations. These techniques are done both to
the left and right sides. There are ten sets of techniques that get progressively more advanced. Although these
drills are no longer taught at the West Seattle Karate Academy, they are a good introduction to combination
techniques and movement in preparation for learning Kata, Bunkai, and Kiso Kumite.
12.2 Movement Drills
1) Ichi

Start in Zenkutsu Dachi

2) Ni

Start in Zenkutsu Dachi

3) San

Start in Zenkutsu Dachi

4) Shi

Start in Zenkutsu Dachi

5) Go

Start in Sanchin Dachi

6) Roku

Start in Sanchin Dachi

7) Shichi Start in Sanchin Dachi


8) Hachi

Start in Sanchin Dachi

9) Ku

Start Neko Ashi Dachi

10) Ju

Start in Kiba Dachi

L. A. Kane

Step Zenkutsu, Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch), Chudan Gyaku


Tsuki (reverse chest punch).
Step Zenkutsu, Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch), Chudan Gyaku
Tsuki (reverse chest punch), Mai Geri (front kick) from back leg.
Mai Geri (front kick) from back leg, step Zenkutsu, step Zenkutsu again,
Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch), Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (reverse
chest punch).
Step Zenkutsu, Jodan Oi Tsuki (lunge punch head), Nakanishuto (inside
Shuto) to neck, Mai Geri (front kick) from back leg, Sotomikazuki (outside
hook kick)
Drive in and up with Jodan Age Uke (rising head block), step Sanchin,
Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch)
Shift, Uraken Uchi (back fist strike), Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (reverse chest
punch)
Mai Geri (front kick) from back leg, Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch),
shift in Sanchin, Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch)
Step Sanchin, Chudan Oi Tsuki (chest lunge punch), Chudan Gyaku
Tsuki (reverse chest punch), Mai Geri (front kick) from back leg,
Sotomikazuki (outside hook kick)
Mai Geri (front kick) from front leg, Sotomikazuki (outside hook kick), turn
and look over shoulder, Ushiro Geri (back kick), turn
Step Bensoku Dachi, Yoko Geri (side kick), step Kiba Dachi, Uraken
Uchi (back fist strike)

Page 32 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
13.0 Kata Centered Practice
13.1 Introduction
Centuries ago information on style and technique was passed on from master to student using oral tradition. Very
little was written down, partially because literacy was quite rare outside the nobility and certain privileged
merchant classes. These instructors imbedded their unique fighting systems within their Kata, which became
fault-tolerant methods for ensuring that techniques could consistently be taught and understood over the
generations. As students learned the basics and gained their instructors confidence, they would be initiated into
the secrets of his system.
13.2 Analyzing Kata for Application
Individuals who diligently practice the various Kata learned real-world fighting applications they can use to defend
themselves. While the Kata are always done the same way, there is a plethora of applications, or Bunkai, from
each movement that demonstrates these applications. As we watched skilled practitioners go through the
movements, we can often visualize joint locks, throws, grappling techniques, and even pressure point applications
hidden within the more obvious strikes and punches in each Kata.
Even basic Katas can contain powerful, hidden techniques. For example, one interpretation of the chest block,
down block, down punch combination from Hookiyu Kata is to block a punch, apply an arm-lock to bend your
opponent over, and then strike to their temple, a very powerful combination.
Katas demonstrate the angle and direction of attack, either front, back, or side to which we are responding. They
also give clues about the type of attack we are receiving, such as a punch, kick, grab, push, or whatever, and
what the proper counterattack might be. For example, hand techniques are often delivered to the upper part of
the body while kicks usually are lower. Strikes work against an opponents force, while throws work with it.
Each movement of a Kata is designed to cause serious bodily harm to your opponent in the shortest amount of
time possible. Most times that you block an aggressive motion you are actually striking or grabbing vital points,
which is why the work Uke translates better to receive than it does to block. This movement will stop or
redirect your opponents attack and may even put him or her out of the fight. If you have accurately struck or
grabbed a vital point you will elicit pain, temporary paralysis, dislocation of a joint, or even a knockout. At the very
least, a good, aggressive block should make your opponent think twice about continuing to attack you.
Both hands are utilized simultaneously in almost all techniques. Whenever you throw a basic punch with one
hand, the other invariably returns to chamber. In a Katas application, there is often something in that returning
hand (when it is closed). For example, as one hand deflects an attack, the other secures a grip for a joint lock or
counter-throw. In another example you may be striking an attacking limb and also your opponents body with
block and counterstrike combination.
Your attacker is rarely going to stand there like a Makiwara and let you apply your techniques. You need to
disrupt him/her in order to be able to strike and strike to disrupt. If you think of each move of a Kata as a note of
music, look at the spaces between the notes for hidden techniques that will disrupt your opponent and facilitate
your ability to successfully counter-attack. For example, between the chest punch to down block transition in
Hookiyu Kata, there can be a strike to your opponents ear. Expanding on this idea, the return from your chest
punch becomes a grab and pull, followed by the disruptive ear strike, turning the down block into an effective
groin strike. Since head and hands follow pain, effective techniques typically move along the body high-low-high
or low-high-low to present openings via disruption.
13.2.1 Kaisai No Genri
Kata is composed of many apparent movements of fighting techniques, or Hyomengi. Many of these movements
are stylized with the actual application is hidden. The work to find hidden techniques in Kata is called Kaisai.
Kaisai No Genri, the theory of Kaisai, was once a great secret, revealed only to trusted disciples of the ancient
masters in order to protect the secrets of their Kata. It offers guidelines for unlocking the secrets of each Kata.
The three main principles of Kaisai No Genri are:
L. A. Kane

Page 33 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
1) Do not be deceived by the Enbusen Rule.
2) Techniques executed while advancing imply attacking techniques. Those executed while retreating imply
defensive or blocking techniques.
3) There is only one enemy and he or she is in front of you.
13.2.2 Do Not Be Deceived by The Enbusen Rule
Enbusen literally means lines for performance of fighting techniques. The rule of Enbusen was created in order to
make Kata concise (able to be performed using limited space). There are eight directions indicated by straight
lines originating from a center point called the Kiten. Using this rule, stepping patterns of Kata are designed to be
symmetrical. For example three steps forward followed by three steps backward or one step to the right followed
by one to the left. Most Kata begin and end at or near the Kiten point.
In order to keep Kata concise, the number of steps was limited, often to only three in any direction at one time.
These short movements obviously have nothing to do with real fighting situations. No one would automatically
step back because they advanced previously nor limit the number of steps in a street fight where each technique
needs to be free, fast, and spontaneous. Remember that Kata is choreographed and artificial. Punching left does
not necessarily mean that you fight against an enemy on your left side.
13.2.3 Techniques Executed while Advancing Imply Attack; Those Executed while Retreating Imply Defense
When executing a Kata technique while advancing the real meaning should be considered an attack, even if it
appears to be defensive. Similarly, those techniques executed while retreating imply defensive or blocking
techniques, even if they look like attacks.
For example, in the Seyunchin Kata, there are Gedan Uke (low blocks) executed while moving forward in Shiko
Dachi (straddle stance). It seems somewhat odd to be blocking while moving forward, especially in this low
stance. According to the second rule of Kaisai, these must be striking techniques. Using this rule, the Kata
becomes more usable in real life situations.
13.2.4 There is Only One Enemy and He/She is In Front of You
As we face toward many directions moving along lines of Enbusen, we tend to believe that Kata were created to
emulate situations wherein one person fights against several opponents at the same time. The origin of Kata,
however, was in two-man tandem sparring. Consequently, the Kumite are also one-on-one. The dance-like
direction shifts were created to keep the movement concise, not to imply multiple attackers.
In reality, from a street-fighting point of view, it is impossible to make a Kata that is designed to fight against
multiple attackers at once. One person cannot simultaneously execute many different techniques against multiple
opponents except in well-choreographed movie stunts or in books. Although there are some Kata where the
imaginary enemy is behind us, there is always only one opponent at a time. Once they have been defeated, we
can move on to the next.
13.2.5 The Method of Kaisai No Genri
Using the three main principles of Kaisai No Genri we can roughly guess at the original intent of Kata techniques.
There are two methods for doing this, deductive and inductive. Using these methods, we logically analyze each
specific technique to find its meaning with the Kaisai No Genri three principles. (Note: there are many
supplemental principles as well, but I have not found a source that lists them yet).
After finding what one believes is the application of a Kata technique, it must be examined to determine whether
or not it would be effective in actual combat. To do this we can practice the technique in a Kumite situation with a
partner, trying to reverse engineer the Kata. This is how many of the original Kiso Kumites were developed.
13.3 Hikite (Push/Pull)

L. A. Kane

Page 34 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Hikite is a push/pull concept that ensures proper body mechanics for maximum power in each technique. This
concept works both with empty hands and when using weapons and is a fundamental concept for properly
executing martial techniques.
Beginning with a basic chest punch, imagine a large rubber band stretching from your left hand around your back
to your right hand. As one hand punches, the other returns to chamber at your waist, pulled by the rubber band.
If you put your mind in the chambering hand while visualizing this imaginary rubber band launching your punch,
you will find your attacks are faster and more powerful. Adding a push/pull with your hips to this push/pull from
your hands amplifies this effect by rotating your hips in concert with the technique.
To add another layer, lets do the chest punch again, but from a Zenkutsu Dachi stance. As you step into the
stance, one hand goes to chamber while the other punches using the visualization technique and hip rotation
above. As you sink into the stance, put your mind in you back heel, ensuring it is anchored to the ground, then to
your lower buttocks to sink into the stance and lower your center of gravity. Finally move your mind to your waist
to drive forward pressure.
Combining the push/pull from the movement, hip-rotation, and punch together gives you the maximum impact.
Hikite.
13.4 About Kata (By Morio Higaonna Sensei)
A Kata is a pattern of movements, which contains a series of logical and practical attacking and blocking
techniques. In each Kata there are certain set or predetermined movements, which the student can practice
alone, without a partner. Previous masters have created these Kata after many years of research, training, and
actual combat experience.
The applications of the techniques in these Kata have evolved from and have been tested in actual combat. In
this way each Kata has been improved and refined, and has evolved into the Kata we practice today. Because of
the time and the Kata's complex evolution it is impossible to trace the exact development that the Kata underwent,
but it is known that the old masters studied the combative techniques and movements in the fighting between
animal and animal, animal and man, and man-to-man. They also studied the physiology of the human body and
its relationship to combat, taking into account such factors as the circulation of the blood in a twenty-four hour
day, the vulnerability of the vital points in relation to the time of day, and other cyclic laws of nature such as the
rising and setting of the sun, and the rise and fall of the tides. All of these elements are incorporated into the
Kata.
The purpose for developing Kata also varied with the times and with the people who developed them. For
example, in China over 1600 years ago Kata was developed and practiced for the purpose of self-defense,
whereas the Buddhist monks would practice Kata for the purpose of strengthening the spirit as well as the body.
The true meaning and spirit of karate are imbedded in the Kata and only by the practice of Kata can we come to
understand them. For this reason, if we change or simplify the Kata either to accommodate the beginner or for
tournament purposes, then we also will have lost the true meaning and spirit of karate.
In karate there is no first attack. Every Kata begins with a defensive movement, which exemplifies this spirit. Not
only is there no first attack, but the best defense is to avoid the fight altogether. That is why it is said that karate is
the art of a wise man.
To practice the Kata correctly every movement must be repeated over and over again. Only through constant
repetition can the techniques become reflex action. Fortunately to that end, an important aspect of Kata is that it
can be practiced alone, anytime and anywhere. When a well-trained person performs Kata, its dynamic power
and beauty of movement become almost aesthetic in quality.
Almost all of the Goju Ryu Kata were handed down from Higaonna Kanryo Sensei. Higaonna Sensei had studied
and trained for many years under Ryu Ryuko Sensei in Fukien Province, China. The following Kata were handeddown by Higaonna Sensei from Ryu Ryuko Sensei: Sanchin, Saifa, Seiyunchin, Shisochin, Sanseiru, Saipai,
Kururunfa, Seisan, and Suparinpei. The original creators of these Kata are unknown.
L. A. Kane

Page 35 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Many of the Kata names are Chinese numbers symbolizing Buddhist concepts. For example, Suparinpei (the
number 108 in Chinese) has a special significance in Buddhism. It is believed that man has 108 evil passions,
and so in Buddhist temples on December 31st, at the stroke of midnight, a bell is rung 108 times to drive away
those spirits. The number 108 in Suparinpei is calculated from 36 X 3. The symbolism of the number 36 is given
in the explanation of Sanseiru, which follows. The number 3 symbolizes past, present and future.
Sanseiru, written in Chinese characters, is the number 36. Symbolically it is calculated from the formula 6 X 6.
The first six represents eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and spirit. The second six symbolizes color, voice, taste,
smell, touch, and justice.
Saipai, similarly, is the number 18. It is calculated from 6 X 3. The six here is the second six of Sanseiru. The
three represents good, bad, and peace.
The four Kata, Gekisai Dai Ichi, Gekisai Dai Ni, revised Sanchin, and Tensho are relatively new, having been
created by Miyagi Chojun Sensei. Gekisai Dai Ichi and Dai Ni were developed by Miyagi Sensei in order to
popularize karate among young people. These two Kata, performed with exaggerated movements, are relatively
easy to understand.
Miyagi Chojun Sensei's Sanchin preserves the essence of Higaonna Kanryo Sensei's Sanchin, of which it is a
variation. Miyagi Sensei developed it particularly to balance the former one. Its performance requires a different
use of the muscles, leading it to a more symmetrical development. This is important for optimum use of the body,
and especially in the prevention of injury to the back and other areas.
Whereas Sanchin Kata can be considered an aspect of the Go (hard) of Goju, Tensho Kata represents the Ju
(soft). One of the purposes of Tensho Kata is concentration on shifting focus points while performing the soft
hand movements. Moreover, within these soft hand movements tremendous power is generated.
13.5 Beginning and Ending a Kata
To begin a Kata, stand in Masubi Dachi with your hands at your sides and bow. Say the name of the Kata you
will be demonstrating. Lift your hands together (left over right with palms towards you) up to chest height in front
of you then down to Yoi (ready position) at your waist keeping your left hand over your right (palms toward you).
From here you may begin directly or you may step into the first stance of the Kata in a Kamae (combative
posture) position and then begin.
To end a Kata after completing all the movements stand in Masubi Dachi with both hands at your sides and bow.
If you are in a line with other students and have not returned to the Kiten point (where you originally started the
Kata), you may be required to follow with a Yanjigo (large diagonal step) to re-center everyone in the room.

L. A. Kane

Page 36 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
14.0 Taikyoku (First Course) Katas
Taikyoku means, "First course". Gichin Funakoshi, the founder of the Shotokan style, created the original
Taikyoku series. The Goju Ryu versions have been modified to reflect elements within our style, such as the
Zenkutsu Dachi stances. They all follow the basic "H" pattern, and increase slightly in difficulty as more
techniques are added.
The Taikyoku series are as follows:
Taikyoku Gedan
Taikyoku Chudan
Taikyoku Jodan
Taikyoku Mawashi Uke
Taikyoku Kake Uke

First Course Lower


First Course Middle
First Course Upper
First Course Circular Block
First Course Hooking Block

14.1 Taikyoku Gedan


Start in Heiko Dachi. Pivot 90 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a left Gedan Barai (down
block). Step forward with the right foot into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform Oi Tsuki (lunge punch). Stepping
with the right foot, turn 180 degrees to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a right Gedan Barai (down
block), followed by stepping forward into left Zenkutsu Dachi and performing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Stepping with the left foot, turn 90 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi, facing Shomen, and perform a left
Gedan Barai (down block), followed by three stepping Oi Tsuki's (lunge punches) in Zenkutsu Dachi. Kiai on the
last punch.
Stepping with the left foot, turn 270 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a left Gedan Barai
(down block) followed by stepping into right Zenkutsu Dachi and performing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch). Turn 180
degrees to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform the a right Gedan Barai (down block) followed by
stepping into left Zenkutsu Dachi and executing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Next, step left 90 degrees into left Zenkutsu Dachi and perform a left Gedan Barai (down block), followed by three
stepping Oi Tsukis (lunge punches) in Zenkutsu Dachi. Kiai on the last punch.
Turn 270 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi, perform a left Gedan Barai (down block), and then step into
right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute Oi Tsuki (lunge punch). Stepping with the right foot, turn 180 degrees to the
right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a right Gedan Barai (down block), followed by stepping forward into
left Zenkutsu Dachi and performing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Step with the left foot and turn 90 degrees to the right into right Heiko Dachi, facing Shomen. Yame.
14.2 Taikyoku Chudan
Note: be sure to work good double-blocks with every turn. The arm that is extended executes the check portion
of the block (or strike), while the arm in chamber executes the control. This is a very offensive Kata. Imagine
charging your opponent with deep Zenkutsu stance driving them off balance. Even though there is a pause
shown between blocks and strikes, in a real-life self-defense situation these movements would flow together.
Start in Heiko Dachi. Pivot 90 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a left Chudan Soto Uke
(outside forearm block). Step forward with the right foot into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform Oi Tsuki (lunge
punch). Stepping with the right foot, turn 180 degrees to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a right
Chudan Soto Uke (outside forearm block), followed by stepping forward into left Zenkutsu Dachi and performing
Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Stepping with the left foot, turn 90 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi, facing Shomen, and perform a left
Chudan Soto Uke (outside forearm block), followed by three stepping Oi Tsukis (lunge punches) in Zenkutsu
Dachi. Kiai on the last punch.

L. A. Kane

Page 37 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Stepping with the left foot, turn 270 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a left Chudan Soto
Uke (outside forearm block) followed by a stepping into right Zenkutsu Dachi and performing Oi Tsuki (lunge
punch). Turn 180 degrees to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform a right Chudan Soto Uke (outside
forearm block) followed by stepping into left Zenkutsu Dachi and executing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Next, step left 90 degrees into left Zenkutsu Dachi and perform a left Chudan Soto Uke (outside forearm block),
followed by three stepping Oi Tsukis (lunge punches) in Zenkutsu Dachi. Kiai on the last punch.
Turn 270 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi, perform a left Gedan Barai (down block), and then step into
right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute Oi Tsuki (lunge punch). Stepping with the right foot, turn 180 degrees to the
right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a right Gedan Barai (down block), followed by stepping forward into
left Zenkutsu Dachi and performing Oi Tsuki (lunge punch).
Step with the left foot and turn 90 degrees to the right into right Heiko Dachi, facing Shomen. Yame.
14.3 Taikyoku Jodan
This Kata is identical to Taikyoku Chudan, except that the Chudan Soto Uke blocks are substituted with Jodan
Age Uke (rising head block). Again, be sure to work good double-blocks with every turn. The arm that is
extended executes the check portion of the block (or strike), while the arm in chamber executes the control. With
Jodan Uke, the checking arm executes a forearm strike. This is a very offensive Kata. Imagine charging your
opponent with deep Zenkutsu stance driving them off balance. Even though there is a pause shown between
blocks and strikes, in a real-life self-defense situation these movements would flow together.
14.4 Taikyoku Mawashi Uke
This Taikyoku routine is not done at the West Seattle Karate Academy.
Step forward with the right foot and shift 90 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi and execute Mawashi Uke.
Step forward with the right foot into right Shiko Dachi and perform right Hiji Ate (elbow strike) into an open left
hand, followed by a right Kote Uchi (forearm strike), right Harai Otoshi and then shift into right Zenkutsu Dachi
and execute Gyaku Tsuki (back fist strike). Stepping with the right foot, turn 180 degrees to the right into right
Sanchin Dachi and execute Mawashi Uke, followed by stepping forward into left Shiko Dachi and performing the
same combination of techniques.
Stepping with the left foot, turn 90 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi, facing Shomen, and perform
Mawashi Uke, followed by stepping into right Shiko Dachi and repeating the Hiji Uchi-Kote Uchi-Harai OtoshiGyaku Tsuki combination. Step into left Shiko Dachi and repeat. Follow by stepping into right Shiko Dachi and
repeating once more. Kiai on the last punch.
Stepping with the left foot, turn 270 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi and execute Mawashi Uke followed
by a stepping into right Shiko Dachi and again performing the Hiji Uchi-Kote Uchi-Harai Otoshi-Gyaku Tsuki
combination. Turn 180 degrees to the right into right Sanchin Dachi and perform Mawashi Uke followed by
repeating the combination again.
Step left 90 degrees into left Sanchin Dachi and perform Mawashi Uke, followed by three stepping combinations
beginning in right Shiko Dachi. Kiai on the last punch.
Turn 270 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi, perform Mawashi Uke, and then step into right Shiko Dachi
and execute the combination. Step with the right foot and turn 90 degrees to the right into right Sanchin Dachi,
facing Shomen, and perform Mawashi Uke. Yame.
14.5 Taikyoku Kake Uke
This Taikyoku routine is not done at the West Seattle Karate Academy.
This Kata is identical to Taikyoku Mawashi Uke, except that the Mawashi Uke blocks are substituted with Kake
Uke (wrist block).
L. A. Kane

Page 38 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
15.0 Hookiyu Kata
Universal or unified Katas created by Seikichi Toguchi. Hookiyu introduces the basics of Goju Ryu stances and
defensive postures. This Kata is no longer taught at the West Seattle Karate Academy.
Hookiyu begins with a 90-degree turn to the left in left Sanchin Dachi with a left-hand Jodan Age Uke (rising head
block), followed by stepping into right Sanchin Dachi and executing Chudan Oi Tsuki (lunge punch at chest).
Next is a step backwards with the right foot 90 degrees to Shiko Dachi with a Gedan Uke (downward closed-hand
block) over the left knee. This entire sequence is then repeated to the right in opposite stances (i.e.: right instead
of left, etc.) ending up facing back in the starting direction.
Stepping into left Sanchin Dachi, perform left Chudan Yoko Uke (middle chest block) and Gedan Barai (downward
middle block). Next is Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse punch) with the right hand.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi (with a
stomp) then deliver a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). You then step forward into
left Sanchin Dachi, perform a left Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block) and Gedan Barai (downward middle block).
Next is Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse punch) with the right hand.
Turn 90 degrees again execute another right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi (with a stomp) then
deliver a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). You then step forward into left Sanchin
Dachi, perform a left Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block) and Gedan Barai (downward middle block). Next is Chudan
Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse punch) with the right hand.
Step back into right Zenkutsu Dachi and deliver a Marote Tsuki (double punch). Yame.
15.1 Hookiyu Kata Bunkai
Begin by bowing to each other and assuming Sanchin Kumai position. Done in a straight line back and forth.
Uke follows both Shuto's. Tori wins. End by bowing to each other again. For pictures of this Kata Bunkai, see
Okinawan Goju Ryu by Seikichi Toguchi.

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)

Tori (Attacker - does the anti-Kata)


Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki, Gedan Tsuki
Chudan Uke
Pivot, Jodan Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke, Gedan Barai Uke
Chudan Tsuki
Sweep, stomp, Shuto
Step off line Zenkutsu, Marote Tsuki

L. A. Kane

Uke (Defender - does the Kata)


Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke, Gedan Barai Uke
Chudan Tsuki
Sweep, stomp, Shuto
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki, Gedan Tsuki
Chudan Uke
Pivot, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki

Page 39 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
16.0 Gekisai Kata
Gekisai means "attack and smash, destruction". They were created by Chojun Miyagi in 1940 and are beginner's
Kata, the first to be learned in some styles. Although these Kata were done primarily with open hands, the hands
are currently closed most of the time. These Kata introduce the fundamentals of stances, attacks, and the three
basic blocks Jodan, Chudan, and Gedan. We use two versions of this Kata, Dai Ichi (first) and Dai Ni (second).
16.1 Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi
Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi begins with a 90-degree turn to the left in left Sanchin Dachi with a left-hand Jodan Age Uke
(rising head block), followed by stepping into right Sanchin Dachi and executing Jodan Oi Tsuki (lunge punch at
head). Next is a step backwards with the right foot 90 degrees to Shiko Dachi with a Gedan Uke (downward
closed-hand block) over the left knee. This entire sequence is then repeated to the right in opposite stances (i.e.:
right instead of left, etc.) ending up facing back in the starting direction.
Stepping into left Sanchin Dachi, perform left Chudan Yoko Uke (middle chest block). Step forward and repeat
with right stance and block. Next is a left Chudan Mae Geri (front kick toward middle of the body) stepping into
left Zenkutsu Dachi, followed by 3 rapid techniques with the left hand Hiji Ate (elbow strike), Jodan Uraken Uchi
(back fist toward head) and Gedan Barai (downward middle block). Next is Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse
punch) with the right hand. Kiai with the punch.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi (with a
stomp) then deliver a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). You then step forward into
left Sanchin Dachi, perform a left Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block) and then repeat the Chudan Mae Geri into
Zenkutsu Dachi followed by the Hiji Ate, Jodan Uraken Uchi, Gedan Barai, Chudan Gyaku Tsuki combination
using the right side instead of the left. . Kiai with the last punch. Repeat of the Ashi Barai-Hachiji, Dachi-Jodan
Sotoshuto Uke (sweep, stomp, Shuto) moves.
Step back into right Zenkutsu Dachi and deliver a left Marote Tsuki (double punch) with a Kiai, then slide the left
foot up into Heiko Dachi. Cross your arms, then slide the right foot back into left Zenkutsu Dachi while
simultaneously performing Migi Chudan Uchi Uke (inside forearm block) and Hidari Chudan Yoko Uke (left
circular block), and then delivering a right Marote Tsuki (double punch). . Kiai with the punch. Yame.
16.2 Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi Bunkai
Begin by bowing to each other and assuming Sanchin Kumai position. Done in a straight line back and forth.
Follow your own Shuto. Uke wins. End by bowing to each other again. For pictures of this Kata Bunkai, see
Okinawan Goju Ryu by Seikichi Toguchi.

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)

Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)


Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Sweep kick with arm, pivot to block elbow
Push elbow to block backfist
Pivot back, Gedan Tsuki
Gedan Uke
Pivot, Jodan Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Mae Geri, Hiji Ate
Uraken Uchi
Gedan Uke
Gedan Tsuki

L. A. Kane

Uke (defender - does the Kata)


Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Mae Geri, Hiji Ate
Uraken Uchi
Gedan Uke
Gedan Tsuki
Sweep, stomp, Shuto
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Sweep kick with arm, pivot to block elbow
Push elbow to block backfist
Pivot back, Gedan Tsuki
Gedan Uke

Page 40 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
19)
20)
21)
22)

Sweep, stomp, Shuto


Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki

Pivot, Jodan Uke


Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Step off line Zenkutsu, Marote Tsuki

16.3 Gekisai Kata Dai Ni


Gekisai Kata Dai Ni begins with a 90-degree turn to the left in left Sanchin Dachi with a left-hand Jodan Age Uke
(rising head block), followed by stepping into right Sanchin Dachi and executing Jodan Oi Tsuki (lunge punch at
head). Next is a step backwards with the right foot 90 degrees to Shiko Dachi with a Gedan Uke (downward
closed-hand block) over the left knee. This entire sequence is then repeated to the right in opposite stances (i.e.:
right instead of left, etc.) ending up facing back in the starting direction.
Stepping into left Sanchin Dachi, perform left Chudan Yoko Uke (middle chest block). Step forward and repeat
with right stance and block. Next is a left Chudan Mae Geri (front kick) stepping into left Zenkutsu Dachi, followed
by 3 rapid techniques with the left hand Hiji Ate (elbow strike), Jodan Uraken Uchi (back fist toward head) and
Gedan Barai Uke (downward middle block). Next is Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse punch) with the right
hand. Kiai with the punch.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi (with a
more pronounced stomp than Dai Ichi) then deliver a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward
head). You then step forward into left Sanchin Dachi, perform a left Chudan Hiki Uke (open-hand chest block),
step forward into right Sanchin Dachi, performing a right Chudan Kake Hiki, then quickly back to left Sanchin
Dachi with another left Chudan Hiki Uke.
Repeat the Chudan Mae Geri into Zenkutsu Dachi followed by the Hiji Ate, Jodan Uraken Uchi, Gedan Barai, and
Chudan Gyaku Tsuki combination using the right side instead of the left. Kiai with the punch. Repeat of the Ashi
Barai and Sotoshuto Uke (sweep, stomp, Shuto) moves.
From Hachiji Dachi, slide the left foot back on a 45-degree angle into right Neko Ashi Dachi while performing a
Mawashi Uke (circular wheel block). Use Suri Ashi (shift) to slide the right foot to the opposite side at 45-degrees
from center and repeat with Neko Ashi Dachi with another Mawashi Uke. While still in Neko Ashi Dachi pivot
back toward Shomen (front) then straighten to Yoi (ready) position. Yame.
16.4 Gekisai Kata Dai Ni Bunkai
Begin by bowing to each other and assuming Sanchin Kumai position. Done in a straight line back and forth.
Follow your own Shuto. Uke wins. End by bowing to each other again. For pictures of this Kata Bunkai, see
Okinawan Goju Ryu by Seikichi Toguchi.

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)

Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)


Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Sweep kick with arm, pivot to block elbow
Push elbow to block backfist
Pivot back, Gedan Tsuki
Gedan Uke
Pivot, Jodan Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Kake Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Kake Uke
Mae Geri, Hiji Ate

L. A. Kane

Uke (defender - does the Kata)


Retreat Sanchin, Jodan Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Shiko, Gedan Uke
Step Sanchin, Jodan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Mae Geri, Hiji Ate
Uraken Uchi
Gedan Uke
Gedan Tsuki
Sweep, stomp, Shuto
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Sanchin, Kake Uke
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Sweep kick with arm, pivot to block elbow

Page 41 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
18)
19)
20)
21)
22)
23)
24)

Uraken Uchi
Gedan Uke
Gedan Tsuki
Sweep, stomp, Shuto
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Neko, Mawashe Uke
Step Sanchin, Marote Tsuki

25) Recover Neko Kamae

L. A. Kane

Push elbow to block backfist


Pivot back, Gedan Tsuki
Gedan Uke
Pivot, Jodan Uke
Retreat Neko, Mawashe Uke
Step Sanchin, Marote Tsuki
Retreat Neko, Mawashe Uke, Grab obi pull to
chamber with right while pushing shoulder with left
Double push Tori away

Page 42 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
17.0 Gekiha Kata
Created by Seikichi Toguchi based on conversations with Chojun Miyagi. Gekiha means to destroy something
large, very hard, or well fortified. Gekiha Kata expands on the basics introduced in Hookiyu Kata adding more
complex strikes, counter strikes, body movements, and blocks. Most blocks are done with open hands. Nissin
Dachi stance is introduced. This Kata is no longer taught at the West Seattle Karate Academy.
17.1 Gekiha Kata Dai Ichi
Begin formally then step forward right Sanchin Marote Komai. Pull left-hand back slowly and fast Chudan Tsuki
(chest punch). Immediately snap arm back up into Chudan Uke (chest block) returning to Marote Komai position.
Step forward into left Sanchin Dachi, pulling right arm back to chamber. Repeat Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and
Chudan Uke (chest block) movements. Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi, pulling left arm back to chamber.
Repeat Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and Chudan Uke (chest block) movements.
Right foot steps back into Nissin Dachi while executing a left Taihineri Gedan Harai Uke (downward palm block).
Step back with left foot into Nissin Dachi while executing a right Taihineri Harai Uke (palm block). Pivot back 180
degrees in Nissin Dachi and block Jodan Koken Uke (wrist block). Step forward Sanchin Dachi and punch
Chudan Tsuki (chest). Step back with right foot in Shiko Dachi while blocking Gedan Harai Uke (open hand down
block).
Step up 180 degrees in Nissin Dachi, blocking Jodan Koken Uke (wrist block) with right hand. Step forward in
Sanchin Dachi and punch Chudan Tsuki. Step back with left foot in Shiko Dachi while blocking Gedan Harai Uke.
Step up 90 degrees in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist
over, pulling/grasping block). Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block
with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block).
Mae Geri (front kick) with left leg. Land with a stomp in Zenkutsu Dachi and strike left Hiji Ate (elbow), keeping
your hand open as it pulls back by the side of your head. Close your left-hand and strike Chudan Uraken Uchi
(backfist) and Gedan Barai Uchi (closed hand down block). Shita Tsuki (uppercut) with right hand.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi then deliver
a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). Step up in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan
Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block). Step forward into right Sanchin
Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block). Quickly
step back in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over,
pulling/grasping block).
Mae Geri (front kick) with right leg. Land with a stomp in Zenkutsu Dachi and strike right Hiji Ate (elbow), keeping
your hand open as it pulls back by the side of your head. Close your right-hand and strike Chudan Uraken Uchi
(backfist) and Gedan Barai Uchi (closed hand down block). Shita Tsuki (uppercut) with left hand.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a left Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi then deliver a
left Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). Slide left foot back 45 degrees into Neko Ashi
Dachi while blocking right Chudan Ura Uke (back hand). Shift forward in Han Zenkutsu Dachi and Marote Tsuki
(double punch). Slide right foot back 45 degrees into Neko Ashi Dachi while blocking left Chudan Ura Uke (back
hand). Shift forward in Han Zenkutsu Dachi and Marote Tsuki (double punch). Slide back into left Neko Ashi
Dachi and Mawashe Uke (circular block).
End formally. Yame.
17.2 Gekiha Kata Dai Ni
Begin formally then step forward right Sanchin Marote Komai. Pull left-hand back slowly and fast Chudan Tsuki
(chest punch). Immediately snap arm back up into Chudan Uke (chest block) returning to Marote Komai position.
Step forward into left Sanchin Dachi, pulling right arm back to chamber. Repeat Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and

L. A. Kane

Page 43 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Chudan Uke (chest block) movements. Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi, pulling left arm back to chamber.
Repeat Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and Chudan Uke (chest block) movements.
Right foot steps back into Nissin Dachi while executing a left Taihineri Gedan Harai Uke (downward palm block).
Step back with left foot into Nissin Dachi while executing a right Taihineri Harai Uke (palm block). Pivot back 180
degrees in Nissin Dachi and block Jodan Koken Uke (wrist block). Step forward Sanchin Dachi and punch three
times alternating Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (reverse chest punch) right-left-right.
Pull right hand downward and execute a right Gedan Sokuto Geri (sword foot strike). Step back with right foot in
Shiko Dachi while blocking Gedan Harai Uke (open hand down block).
Step up 180 degrees in Nissin Dachi, blocking Jodan Koken Uke (wrist block) with right hand. Step forward in
Sanchin Dachi and punch three times alternating Chudan Tsuki (chest punch) and Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (reverse
chest punch) left-right-left.
Pull left hand downward and execute a left Gedan Sokuto Geri (sword foot strike). Step back with left foot in
Shiko Dachi while blocking Gedan Harai Uke (open hand down block).
Step up 90 degrees in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist
over, pulling/grasping block). Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block
with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block).
Mae Geri (front kick) with left leg. Land with a stomp in Zenkutsu Dachi and strike left Hiji Ate (elbow), keeping
your hand open as it pulls back by the side of your head. Close your left-hand and strike Chudan Uraken Uchi
(backfist) and Gedan Barai Uchi (closed hand down block). Shita Tsuki (uppercut) with right hand.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi then deliver
a right Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). Step up in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan
Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block). Step forward into right Sanchin
Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over, pulling/grasping block). Quickly
step back in left Sanchin Dachi and block Chudan Kakai Uke (hook block with back of hand, roll wrist over,
pulling/grasping block).
Mae Geri (front kick) with right leg. Land with a stomp in Zenkutsu Dachi and strike right Hiji Ate (elbow), keeping
your hand open as it pulls back by the side of your head. Close your right-hand and strike Chudan Uraken Uchi
(backfist) and Gedan Barai Uchi (closed hand down block). Shita Tsuki (uppercut) with left hand.
Next, turn 90 degrees to the right and execute a left Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi then deliver a
left Jodan Sotoshuto Uchi (outside sword hand toward head). Slide left foot back 45 degrees into Neko Ashi
Dachi while blocking right Chudan Ura Uke (back hand). Shift forward in Han Zenkutsu Dachi and Marote Tsuki
(double punch). Slide right foot back 45 degrees into Neko Ashi Dachi while blocking left Chudan Ura Uke (back
hand). Shift forward in Han Zenkutsu Dachi and Marote Tsuki (double punch). Slide back into left Neko Ashi
Dachi and Mawashe Uke (circular block).
End formally. Yame.

L. A. Kane

Page 44 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
18.0 Saifa Kata
Saifa means "smash and tear" and is of Chinese origin, brought back to Okinawa by Kanryo Higaonna. There are
several bottom-fist and back-fist strikes in this Kata.
Begin formally. Clasp your right fist in the left hand while taking a large step forward with the right foot, followed
by bringing the left foot into Masubi Dachi and turning the body 90 degrees to the left. Next, shift the hands from
the right to the left side, step back with the left foot into Shiko Dachi, and perform a left Osai Uke (center press
block) and a right Jodan Uraken Uke (back fist to the head). You then execute the same movements to the
opposite (left) side, and then repeat again to the right side, ending in Shiko Dachi.
Next, slide the left foot in an arc until facing forward and, while looking to the right, shift your weight to the left foot
in Hakusura Dachi and perform a left Chudan Sukui Uke (middle scoop block) and a right Gedan Shotei Barai
(open hand down block) simultaneously. As you execute the blocks, bring your knee up in a right Hiza Uchi (knee
strike) followed after a slight pause by a right Mae Geri (front kick). Then, looking to the left, perform the same
movements to the opposite side.
After the second kick, step back into right Zenkutsu Dachi and strike with Marote Heiko Tsuki (double parallel
punch), followed by Marote Gedan Uchi (right hammer fist into left open hand at knee level), in a fluid arc, then
pivot on the left foot 180 degrees and repeat.
Next, perform a right Ashi Barai (foot sweep) landing in Hachiji Dachi (with a stomp) facing 90 degrees to the
right. Perform a right Tetsui Uchi (hammer fist), followed by a right Tsukami Hiki (grab). Pivot hips and a launch
a left Yoko Ura Tsuki (center uppercut). Kiai with the uppercut. Repeat of the same techniques facing the
opposite direction.
From Hachiji Dachi, pivot 90 degrees to the left and step into right Han Zenkutsu Dachi and deliver a left Chudan
Tsuki. Next, slide the left foot forward and pivot 180 degrees (like you are stepping around and behind an
opponent) into right Neko Ashi Dachi and perform a swinging Haito Uchi (ridge hand strike) left and then right,
followed by a Mawashi Uke (circular block) with Muchimi (emphasis). Note that the Mawashi Uke is done fully
with the right hand while the left hand stays pretty much in place.
End formally. When bringing hands up into the Yoi position shift your weight slightly forward. Shift backward
when returning to Masubi Dachi. Yame.
18.1 Saifa Kata Bunkai
Begin by bowing to each other, stand naturally with both hands in front. Done in a straight line back and forth.
Uke wins. End by bowing to each other again. For pictures of this Kata Bunkai, see Okinawan Goju Ryu II by
Seikichi Toguchi.

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)

Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)


Shift forward Sanchin, Right Chudan Tsuki
Shift back Shiko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
In place, Gedan Tsuki
In place, Jodan Ko (wrist) Uke
Shift back Neko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
Step Shiko, Hiji Uchi (elbow strike)
Shift Sanchin, Shotei Otoshi (drop) Uke
In place, Uraken (backfist) Uchi
Shift forward Sanchin, Right Chudan Tsuki
Shift back Shiko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
In place, Uraken (backfist) Uchi
Step Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Shift Neko, Sukui (scoop) Uke
Shift Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Shift Neko, Sukui (scoop) Uke and pull
Retreat Zenkutsu, Marote Hari Uke

L. A. Kane

Uke (defender - does the Kata)


Shift back Neko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
Step Shiko, Hiji Uchi (elbow strike)
Shift Sanchin, Shotei Otoshi (open hand drop) Uke
In place, Uraken (backfist) Uchi
Shift Sanchin, Right Chudan Tsuki
Shift back Shiko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
In place, Gedan Tsuki
In place, Jodan Ko (wrist) Uke
Shift back Neko, Shotei Osai (lateral palm) Uke
Step Shiko, Hiji Uchi (elbow strike)
In place, Jodan Ko (wrist) Uke
Shift Neko, right Gedan Harai (open hand) Uke
In place, Mae Geri (front kick)
Shift Neko, left Gedan Harai (open hand) Uke
In place, Mae Geri (front kick)
Step Zenkutsu, Marote Tsuki

Page 45 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
17)
18)
19)
20)
21)
22)
23)
24)
25)
26)
27)
28)
29)
30)
31)
32)

In place, Pivot Shiko, Gedan Tsuki


Pivot Zen, Taihineri Jodan (arc) Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Uke
Step Zen, Marote Tsuki
Pivot Zen, Taihineri Gedan Hari Uke
In place, Jodan Tetsui (hammer) Uchi
In place, Chudan Tsuki
In place, Jodan Tsuki
Pivot Zen, Taihineri Jodan Uke
In place, Kuri Uke
In place, Pivot Zen, Shotei Otoshi Uke
In place, Jodan Uke
In place spin arm counterclockwise, Tetsui Uchi
In place Soko Tsuki
Shift back Renoji Dachi, Shotei Osai Uke
Shift Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki

33) Ukemi (break fall)

In place, Pivot Zen, Gedan Harai Uke


Pivot Zen, Jodan Tetsui (hammerfist) Uchi
Step Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Retreat Zen, Marote Hari Uke
In place, Pivot Shiko, Gedan Tsuki
Pivot Zen, Jodan Taihineri (arc) Uke
Pivot Zen, Shotei Otoshi Uke
In place Jodan Uke
In place, spin arm counterclockwise, Tetsui Uchi
In place, Soko Tsuki
In place, Chudan Tsuki
In place, Jodan Tsuki
Pivot Zen Taihineri Jodan Uke
In place Kuri Uke
Retreat Sanchin, Chudan Tsuki
Step, Shotei Osai Uke, Gedan Sokuto Geri,
Nai Wan Uchi, (block/dead arm strike w/ forearm/foot
throw or back kick. Be sure to clamp down on neck to
choke with right hand while pulling down with left to
overbalance and facilitate the foot throw)
Marote Tsuki, immediately withdraw

Note: there is an alternate ending to this Bunkai where Uke spins behind Tori, kicking the back of the knee and
driving him/her down to a kneeling position, then executing Hadaka Jime (bare arm choke).

L. A. Kane

Page 46 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
19.0 Seiyunchin Kata
Seiyunchin is a very old Chinese Kata, and its origins are probably in the Hsing-I internal system. It means to pull
off balance and fight. Shiko Dachi is emphasized and all of the movements are hand techniques with no kicks, a
very unusual feature. It is in the tiger series of Katas. There are some fifty techniques in this Kata, at least half of
them attacking.
It begins by moving the right foot forward into a 45 degree Shiko Dachi and performing Marote Sukui Uke (double
scoop block) with Muchimi (emphasis). Then, place the hands back to back as they are raised to the chin,
keeping the elbows close to the chest and pointing the fingers upward. Next, execute Marote Gedan Barai Uke
(double downward block), then open both hands right Sukui Uke (scoop block) pulling the left hand to the side,
and then perform a right Chudan Hiki Uke (pulling block) and a left Hiri Nukite Tsuki (finger strike).
You then step forward with the left foot into a 45-degree Shiko Dachi and repeat the sequence using the opposite
hands, followed by stepping forward with the right foot and repeating the opening sequence once again.
Form a fist with the right hand and turn it palm up on top of the left hand and step back with the right foot into Suri
Ashi. Continue to slide the right foot forward into right Heiko Dachi while simultaneously turning the hands over
and performing Hojo Oshi strike (left hand open parallel to knuckles over top of right fist) with a Kiai. The right
foot is then pulled back into left Han Zenkutsu Dachi while pulling the right fist into chamber, leaving the left hand
where it was, then deliver a right Hiji Ate (elbow strike) into the left palm. Slide the right foot forward into right
Renoji Dachi while performing a right Hojo Uke (supported block). Step forward with the left foot into a 45 degree
Shiko Dachi and execute a left Gedan Barai (down block), followed by stepping back in the same line into Shiko
Dachi facing the opposite way and executing a right Gedan Barai (down block).
Next, slide the left foot into left Renoji Dachi and perform the Hojo Uke (supported block), followed by the double
Shiko Dachi-Gedan Barai (down block) movements. Next, step back with the left foot into right Shiko Dachi in line
with Shomen (facing to the front) and perform Harai Uke (high/low block) with open hands, then step back with
the right foot and repeat the technique facing in the opposite direction. Then, sweep the right foot forward into
right Heiko Dachi and deliver a right Jodan Uchi Uke (inside forearm block) into the left palm. Immediately follow
by sliding the feet forward into the same stance and delivering a right Jodan Uraken Uchi (back fist strike to
head), moving the arm up and down with the elbow resting in the left hand.
Slide the right foot across the front into Bensoku Dachi (cross-foot stance) and pivot 135 degrees to the left into
left Heiko Dachi while performing a left Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block) and a right Gedan Barai (down block).
Step forward with the right leg into Shiko Dachi at a 45-degree angle and execute a right Age Tsuki (rising punch)
while dropping the left hand to the solar plexus and follow with a right Jodan Uraken Uchi (back fist strike) and
then a right Gedan Barai (down block). Step back with the right foot on the same line into Shiko Dachi and
perform a left hand Gedan Barai (down block), chambering the right hand. Turning to face Shomen (front), draw
the right foot back into right Neko Ashi Dachi, folding the arms across the chest and deliver a right Hiji Age (elbow
strike) and a left Ushiro Hiji Ate (reverse elbow strike). Step back into left Neko Ashi Dachi and repeat the same
hand movements. Next, step over with the left foot into Bensoku Dachi and turn 135 degrees to the right,
repeating the same sequence up to the second Neko Ashi Dachi-Hiji Age-Ushiro Hiji Ate combination using
opposite sides.
From right Neko Ashi Dachi, slide the right foot forward and take a large step into right Heiko Dachi while
executing a left Shotei Otoshi Uke (dropping press block) together with a right Jodan Uraken Uchi (back fist
strike). Kiai with the punch. Then take a large step back into left Neko Ashi Dachi while simultaneously raising
both hands over the head and bringing them together back to back. Slowly lower them with tension, separating
the elbows into Kuri Uke (triangle block). Yame.

L. A. Kane

Page 47 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
19.1 Seiyunchin Kata Bunkai
This Bunkai Kumite is based on personal research and methods presented by Taira Sensei. In this bunkai utilize
these principles:
1) Once you make contact, try to keep contact. Dont allow large open space between yourself and the
opponent.
2) Whenever possible, move forward. Defense is actually the offense.
3) Each technique will try to leave only one option for your opponent to use. When they do pounce on it!
Always be one step ahead.
4) Keep moving in continuous and relaxed motion. Allow the bunkai to flow like Kata and the answers will
come naturally.
This bunkai is also based on the principles of Kaisai as defined by Miyagi Sensei and outlined by Toguchi Sensei
in his Okinawan Goju-Ryu II book:
1) Dont be fooled by the Enbusen rule.
2) Techniques executed while advancing imply offense. Those executed while retreating imply defense.
3) There is only one enemy and they are in front of you at all times.
The bunkai Kumite makes attempts to closely follow Kata. Applications have been chosen that lend themselves
to actual combat and allow continuation of the bunkai Kumite, but are not the only applications. Kata is actually
limitless in application. Some parts of the Kata are not fully represented and repetitive parts are eliminated.
Thus, where the Kata does a set of techniques on both sides, only one side is represented here. Note that step 1
is optional. Many start at step 2.
Begin by bowing to each other, stand naturally with both hands in front. Uke wins. End by bowing to each other
again.
Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)

Uke (defender - does the Kata)

1) Left Mae Geri, left Chudan Tsuke, left Empei


Chudan Uke.
2) Step right head punch. Block groin attach with
left hand.

3) Step left head punch. Use right palm to support


left elbow and keep it from being hyper-extended.

4) Step right head punch. Block punch with left


forearm while rotating body to right.
5) Step right head punch. Use left palm to support
left elbow.

6) Come back with left punch to the head while


trying to stand-up. Use right palm to shoulder to
stop hammer fist.
7) Step right head punch. Check elbow.

L. A. Kane

Step back left Shiko, Marote Gedan Shotei Uke,


left Kake Uke, grab, and pull with rib strike.
o
Shift to left while moving forward 45 . At same
time and use both hands in front of the face to
block the punch Slide forward into left Shiko Dachi
behind attacker. Pull the Toris right arm down and
to your right hip. Using left come over arm and
hammer fist to the groin.
Catch Toris left wrist with your left hand and lift it
up while switching your feet to right Shiko Dachi.
(Keep your right leg inside of Toris right leg.
Strike to the Toris elbow with your right Shuto,
driving over into arm bar.
Pivot left and block with right while slapping to ear
with left. Continue over and press down (Osai
Uke) to open, shift in and chest punch with right.
Right Kakai Uke block and grab wrist. Strike
elbow with your left elbow, putting attacker on
o
toes. Step forward with left foot 45 to Shiko
Dachi and drive elbow down.
o
Pivot 90 to right and do same technique on other
side. Follow with hammer fist to face.
Pivot right, right inside Jodan Kake Uke, grab with
left (Hara Uke). Shift in right Neko and elbow
strike to ribs, groin slap with right palm.

Page 48 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)

Uke (defender - does the Kata)


o

8) Step left head punch.

9) Right punch. Right Kake Uke for Uraken. Push


away.
10) Right punch. Go with twist
11) Left punch
12) Right punch
13) Die gracefully

L. A. Kane

Pivot 90 left. Use right arm to perform inside


chest block. Left arm comes under in Chudan
Uke to trap arm. Keep body turning to apply arm
bar.
Pivot to front and use left arm to trap elbow,
Uraken.
As Tori pushes, step back with right to left Neko.
As you move trap arm and twist to apply arm bar.
Hold ground, strike to face with right elbow, pull in
and arm bar in right Neko.
Pivot to front, foot sweep, move in, and press with
left palm, Uraken.
Step back and pull. Separate arms, strike to ears
with palms. Marote palm strike to ribs.

Page 49 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
20.0 Seisan Kata
Traditionally Goju-Ryu relies upon many techniques, which involve grabbing and controlling an attacker while
striking a vulnerable part of the body. The Kata Seisan is a perfect example of this principle. Seisan literally
translates as "thirteen hands". It contains 8 defensive and 5 offensive techniques, both of which involve a change
in direction. The form stresses close-range fighting using short punching and low kicking techniques to break
through an opponent's defenses.
Step forward to right Sanchin Marote Kamae (double block guard position). Bring the left hand slowly to chamber,
fast punch Chudan Tsuki (chest) with immediate return to Chudan arm position in blocking motion. Step with left
foot to Sanchin Dachi; repeat with right hand. Step with right foot to Sanchin Dachi; repeat again with left hand.
Bring hands together with a Shuto (ridge hand strike) from right into left palm. Pull down and in. Rotate right
hand over Nukite strike followed by upward circular Shotei Uchi (palm heel strike) left, right, left. Drop palms
downward in Yame Uke (mountain block).
Simultaneously raise hands up and out into Marote Chudan Uke (double block with palms facing toward you) and
Hiza Ate (knee strike) with the right knee followed by double ridge hand strike at kidneys. Be sure to keep
forward pressure and do not rock backward. Shift forward in Sanchin twice more repeating this sequence with the
left then right knee strikes.
Reach forward with backs of hands together, grab and pull in, shifting your weight slightly to left leg. Raise right
o
knee, strike Kansetsu Geri (joint kick). As you bring the foot back in, rotate your body 180 and cross blocking
with the right arm, then strike Shotei Uchi (palm heel) with the left while simultaneously dropping right hand down
to right side. There should be significant whipping motion with arms/hips.
Step forward in Sanchin Dachi bringing right arm up Kakai Uke and dropping left hand down to side. The Kakai
Uke is slow and deliberate showing separation of block and hook. Thumb opens up on the hook. Step forward
and repeat this sequence to the left and right.
o

Repeat one more time to the left, but instead of rolling hand over for the hook, sweep/stomp, and rotate body 90
while dropping left hand down and rolling up and into chamber with a grab (think wrapping around opponents arm
and locking it in). Simultaneously grab throat with right hand. Both actions take place very close to your body.
Drop right arm down toward side while shifting weight slightly to left leg. Strike Kansetsu Geri (joint kick). As you
o
bring the foot back in, rotate your body 180 and cross blocking with the right arm, then strike Shotei Uchi (palm
heel) with the left while simultaneously dropping right hand down to right side. There should be significant
whipping motion with arms/hips.
Shift forward into Shiko Dachi with simultaneous right hand Shotei Uchi (palm heel strike) over your left arm.
Block Chudan Hiki Uke (open hand chest block) with left hand, bringing right back to chamber. Throw three rapid
o
Chudan Tsuki (chest punches) at 45 left, right, left. Drop right arm down toward side while shifting weight slightly
to left leg and straightening up into Sanchin Dachi. Strike Kansetsu Geri (joint kick) directly to the side then drop
shifting with the direction of the kick into Shiko Dachi.
Strike Age Tsuki (uppercut), Uraken Uchi (backfist), downward Hiji Ate (elbow strike), Gedan Tetsui Uchi
(downward hammerfist strike) with right hand while holding left hand palm open in center guard position. Close
left fist sliding your hand across toward your right side while simultaneously closing right fist and twist pulling in
toward your right side under the left hand.
Shift your weight slightly to left leg while straightening up into Sanchin Dachi. Strike Kansetsu Geri (joint kick)
o
with the right leg. As you bring the foot back in, rotate your body 180 and block Chudan Hiki Uke (open hand
chest block) ending up in Sanchin Dachi.
Reach forward with backs of hands together, grab and pull in, then execute an immediate Mae Geri (front kick).
Cheat left hand forward. As your right leg pulls back from the kick, end up in Zenkutsu Dachi while punching
Chudan Tsuki (chest) with the right hand and dropping the left hand palm down across the right forearm.

L. A. Kane

Page 50 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Shift back into Neko Ashi Dachi while executing a Mawashe Uke (wheel block). End formally. Yame.
20.1 Seisan Kata Bunkai
This Bunkai Kumite was compiled by Schweizer Sensei and is based on personal research and methods
presented by Taira Sensei. In this Bunkai utilize the following principles:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Once you make contact, try to keep contact. Do not allow large open space between yourself and your
opponent.
Whenever possible, move forward. Defense is actually the offense.
Each technique will try to leave only one option for the opponent to use. When they do pounce on it! Always
be one-step ahead.
Keep moving in continuous and relaxed motion. Allow the Bunkai to flow like the Kata and the answers will
come naturally.

The Bunkai Kumite makes attempts to closely follow Kata. Applications have been chosen that lend themselves to
actual combat and allow continuation of the Bunkai Kumite, but are not the only applications. Kata is actually
limitless in application. Some parts of the Kata are not fully represented and repetitive parts are eliminated.
Thus, where the Kata does a set of techniques on both sides, only 1 side is represented here.
Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)
1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

Begin by stepping forward right Sanchin with


right palm open meeting Ukes hand (back side
of hand to each other. Alternately this could be
an initial punch.
Using right hand cut in and down with fingers,
drop arm to press Toris arm down. Step left
punch over top of arm. If possible, block rib
punch with left elbow retracting.
o
Pivot 45 and step with right, punch with right.
Turn head away from punch and cross block
Shotei Uke with left, grab hand/arm.
Block palm heel strikes with vertical arm blocks.

Shift back and drop into Neko to avoid knee


strike. If possible use hands to press down to
stop kick.
If possible protect knee by picking up, or pivot
o
90 and drop knee to ground to avoid break.

7)

Pivot back and block Uraken, lunge punch,


reverse punch.

8)

Use right inside Chudan Uke to stop strike.

9)

Punch with right. Stop grab to neck by pulling


down.

10) Pivot back and block Uraken, lunge punch,


reverse punch.

L. A. Kane

Uke (defender - does the Kata)


Begin by stepping forward right Sanchin with right palm
open meeting Toris hand (back side of hand to each
other. If Tori did a punch then this would be Chudan
Uke.
o
Using left block punch with shift to right and pivot 45 to
left Sanchin, immediately punch to ribs with right.
o

Shift to left and pivot 90 to right while blocking with


right, at same time punch to side of neck with left.
o

Pivot 45 to get back on center. With right downward


Shuto Uchi to Toris wrist to break grab, strike pressure
point, and open centerline. Follow up with 3 palm heel
strikes to face.
Left arm Chudan Hiki Uke with grab, right arm Chudan
Hiki Uke, grab and move in with right knee to groin.
Shift in to follow as Toris shifts back. Marote Shotei
Uchi to ribs/kidney area. Right arm to Toris right
shoulder and then grab with both hands, pull and kick to
knee.
o
Pivot 180 to left Sanchin and strike Uraken with left.
Using same arm pull in while blocking punch with elbow.
Block Gedan Harai with right. Using left strike sharply to
shoulder with left palm. This will work all as one motion.
Shift to right, block with left Hiki Uke, using right come
under arm behind elbow and press up and in to bar.
Open with left Hiki Uke (grab is optional) and right
Gedan Uke. Step in right and strike to solar plexus with
right downward Shotei Uchi. Come straight up to grab
neck. Punch left then right to chest and ribs.
o
Pivot 180 to left Sanchin and strike Uraken with left.
Using same arm pull in while blocking punch with elbow.
Block Gedan Harai with right. Using left strike sharply to
shoulder with left palm. This will work all as one motion.

Page 51 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
11) Be the bag!
12) Try to keep composure!
13) Try to pull arm in.

14) Bend knee to avoid break, pivot back and start


punching.

15) Die gracefully.

L. A. Kane

Shift in left Shiko and press arms out to open center and
force Toris balance back, 3 punches to center.
Step in right Shiko upper cut to neck, back fist to neck,
down strike to chest, down strike to groin.
Grab with left and reach under Toris elbow with right
and pull in while applying outward pressure with left to
make arm bar.
Strike to knee, pivot and left Hiki Uke and grab. Right
Hiki Uke and grab. Mai Geri, step back Zen and pull
sharply. Using left hand, reach up to head and force
way down. Grab hair and twist neck to expose then
follow-up with right strike to either side of neck.
Using right, come under head and grab Gi. Using left
grab Gi on the other side. Twist to roll over, stepping
back as necessary. This is useful if they try to stand up
which could happen if the strike was off target.

Page 52 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
21.0 Kakuha Kata
Represents the three basic traditional schools of karate from the three major port cities in Okinawa Goju Ryu,
Shorin Ryu, and Tomari Te. The name means each school or each style. It is sometimes translated to represent
each schools difference of opinion or separation from each other. Kakuha is designed to bring these differences,
or representative applications and philosophy, together in one form. Seikichi Toguchi, a direct student of Chojun
Miyagi, created it. This Kata is no longer taught at the West Seattle Karate Academy.

L. A. Kane

Page 53 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
22.0 Shisochin Kata
Shisochin means "battle in four directions", and is sometimes called four fighting monks. It is of Chinese origin,
taught to Kanryo Higaonna by Ryu Ryuko. It is said to be one of Chojun Miyagi's favorite Katas in his later years,
and that it was well suited to his body. It is unique to Goju Ryu and is not used in other Naha Te styles.
I do not know this Kata yet. The following may or may not be correct
Slide the right foot forward into right Sanchin Dachi and assume Marote Chudan Nukite No Kamae. Pull the left
hand back to chamber and deliver a left Chudan Nukite, immediately returning to Marote Chudan Nukite No
Kamae. Next, slide the left foot forward into left Sanchin Dachi and repeat the movements using the opposite
sides, followed by stepping forward into right Sanchin Dachi and repeating the first sequence again.
Bring both hands together in a circular scooping movement with the palms up in front of the chest, and then step
back into left Zenkutsu Dachi while performing Marote Gedan Barai. Slide the right foot forward into a 45-degree
right Zenkutsu Dachi while crossing the arms left over right and perform a right Chudan Ura Kake Uke together
with a left open-hand Gedan Barai. Next, bring the left-hand to the right side below the elbow. The right hand
crosses making a right Chudan Uchi Kake Uke while the left performs Yoko Hiki Uke. Pull both hands to the right
side with the left hand beneath the right in a circular fashion and shift the hips to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi
(facing to the left of Shomen). Deliver a right Ude Osai while pulling the left hand to the left side with the palm
facing down.
Step toward Shomen with the left foot into left Zenkutsu Dachi facing 45 degrees to the left and perform the same
combinations as the right-facing 45-degree stance using opposite-sided technique.
Pull the left foot into Heisoku Dachi facing Shomen and deliver a right Age Hiji Ate together with a left Ushiro Hiji
Ate, thrusting the hips. Then, turn the hips 180 degrees to the left, stepping the right foot back into left Zenkutsu
Dachi while executing a left Jodan Shotei Tsuki and a right Gedan Shotei Barai. Pivot 180 degrees to the right,
facing Shomen, crossing the left foot behind into right Zenkutsu Dachi, and perform the same techniques using
the opposite hands. Next, pivot 90 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi and repeat the hand techniques,
followed by pivoting 180 degrees to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi and repeating the same hand movements
once again.
Slide the left foot forward into left Sanchin Dachi and perform a left Chudan Hiji Uke while chambering the right
hand and deliver a right Mae Geri, maintaining the hand positions. Follow by landing the right foot into right
Zenkutsu Dachi and execute a right Hiji Ate, pulling the left palm to the solar plexus. Pivot left 180 degrees,
crossing the right foot behind, into left Sanchin Dachi and perform a left Chudan Hiki Uke while pulling the right
hand into chamber. Then, slide the right foot forward into right Sanchin Dachi and perform the same hand
movements on the opposite side, followed by the same Mae Geri-Zenkutsu Dachi-Hiji Ate combination.
Next, pivot 90 degrees to the right facing Shomen into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform a left Shotei Osai
followed quickly by a right Hiji Ate. Follow by pivoting 180 degrees to the left, pulling the left foot back into left
Neko Ashi Dachi while crossing the arms and then performing a Marote Chudan Ura Kake Uke. Then, move the
right foot forward into right Zenkutsu Dachi, turning the palms down, followed by grabbing and pulling up with both
hands and deliver a Marote Hiji Ate.
Then, step the left foot forward 45 degrees to the left into left Zenkutsu Dachi while crossing the arms right over
left and perform a left Chudan Ura Kake Uke together with a right open-hand Gedan Barai. Next, bring the right
hand to the left side below the elbow. The left-hand crosses making a left Chudan Uchi Kake Uke while the right
performs Yoko Hiki Uke. Then, pull both hands to the left side with the right hand beneath the left in a circular
fashion and shift the hips to the right into right Zenkutsu Dachi (facing to the left rear). Deliver a left Ude Osai
while pulling the right hand to the right side with the palm facing down.
Step toward the rear with the right foot into right Zenkutsu Dachi facing 45 degrees to the right and perform the
same combinations as the left-facing 45 degree stance using opposite-sided technique, ending up in left Zenkutsu
Dachi facing 90 degrees to the left of the rear.

L. A. Kane

Page 54 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Pivot on the left foot 90 degrees to the right and bring the right foot into Heisoku Dachi, pulling the hips in, and
deliver a thrusting left Age Hiji Ate and a right Ushiro Hiji Ate. Next, slide the left foot forward and pivot 180
degrees to the left, drawing the left foot back into left Neko Ashi Dachi facing Shomen, crossing the arms in front
of the chest left over right, and execute a right Chudan Ura Kake Uke with a left open-handed Gedan Barai.
Yame.

22.1 Shisochin Kata Bunkai


more coming

L. A. Kane

Page 55 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
23.0 Sanseiru Kata
Sanseiru means "36 hands" (6x6=36), and is also referred to as the dragon Kata. It also focuses on fighting in all
four directions. The first six represent eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and spirit. The second six represent color,
voice, taste, smell, touch, and justice. Sanseiru develops low kicks and other double hand techniques.
I do not know this Kata yet. The following may or may not be correct
It begins by sliding the right foot forward into Sanchin Dachi and performing Marote Chudan Yoko Uke. Pull the
left hand back into chamber and throw a Chudan Seiken Tsuki, followed by a Chudan Kake Uke with the same
hand. Slide the left foot forward into Sanchin Dachi and repeat with the opposite side, followed by stepping
forward with the right foot and repeating the punch.
Keep the punch extended and open the right hand, turning the palm towards the front, and bring the left hand to
chamber with tension. Slide the right foot to the rear into left Zenkutsu Dachi, while clasping the inside of the right
arm with the left hand and chambering the right hand strongly, as the left hand slides down to an open hand
Gedan position.
Move the right foot forward into right Zenkutsu Dachi while the right hand scoops in front of the right knee,
followed by a left downward palm strike over the right hand. Next, execute a left Mae Geri followed by a right Mae
Geri, moving forward and keeping the hands crossed. As the foot lands into right Zenkutsu Dachi, execute a right
Hiji Ate and a left Gedan Tsuki.
Maintaining the hand positions, slowly draw the right foot into chamber and throw a right Kansetsu Geri, followed
with a left pivot of 180 degrees into left Sanchin Dachi with a left Chudan Yoko Uke. Repeat the Mae Geri/Hiji
Ate/Gedan Tsuki combination, followed by repeating the Kansetsu Geri, and turn 90 degrees to the right and
repeat the entire combination again. Next, turn 180 degrees to the left and repeat one more time, up until the
Gedan Tsuki.
Shift left into Shiko Dachi and execute Gedan Kosa Uke, right hand over left, then shift the weight onto the left
foot draw the right foot back into Shiko Dachi facing the opposite direction (Shomen), and repeat the Gedan Kosa
Uke, this time with open hands. Shifting the weight back onto the left foot again, slide the right foot into Shiko
Dachi facing the opposite direction, and perform a right open hand Jodan Age Uke with the left hand chambered
open just under the right pectoral muscle. Next, draw the right foot back and then quickly out into Heiko Dachi
(dragging the left foot forward to cover distance as you step) and execute a left Awase Tsuki.
Slide the right foot across into Kosa Dachi and pivot 180 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi, executing left
Chudan Uke. Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi and repeat the block. Next, slide the left foot forward into
Shiko Dachi, and repeat the Jodan Age Uke into Awase Tsuki combination. Pivot on the right foot 270 degrees
into Shiko Dachi (facing Shomen) and execute Marote Ko Uke. Yame.

23.1 Sanseiru Kata Bunkai


more coming

L. A. Kane

Page 56 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
24.0 Saipai Kata
Saipai translates as "18 hands" (3x6=18), and is of Chinese origin. It contains many hidden techniques designed
to confuse the opponent in combat. It is said to be impossible to understand the true meaning of the techniques
by simply watching them performed. It is considered a tiger Kata and is a continuation of Seisan. The six
represent color, voice, taste, smell, touch, and justice. The three represent good, bad, and peace. Saipai is
made up of a variety of unusual hand, foot, and body techniques.
It begins from the Yoi position by pivoting torso and arms to the left and stepping back with the left foot into Shiko
Dachi, while simultaneously moving an open left hand in a circular motion from the back, over the front of the
face, and ending up at the solar plexus. The right hand simultaneously follows a circular path over the head,
ending up in a face-level Shuto position to the front. Bend the wrist slightly downward then back to level.
Step forward into a left Sanchin Dachi while bringing the left hand, palm up, and the right hand, palm down,
together in a clasp. Step forward with the right foot into Sanchin Dachi (slightly longer step), turning the hands
over, and perform a clasped-hand punch. Next, simultaneously pivot both feet into Shiko Dachi, dropping the hips
and raising the right elbow into Hiji Ate (elbow strike) while drawing the left elbow tight to the side of the body.
Shift forward into right Nissen Dachi while simultaneously blocking Gedan Uke (downward open-hand block) with
the left. Start the block with your left hand wrapped around your right arm. As the left hand finishes the block, the
right is raised up to jaw level (sort of like drawing a bow). In place, block Chudan Ura Uke (middle back hand
block) with the left hand.
Turn the hips pivoting into left Zenkutsu Dachi while executing a right Jodan Shuto Uchi (knife hand strike), and
chamber the left hand to the side, palm forward and fingers down. Keeping the hands in position, throw a right
Mae Geri (front kick), then step back into Shiko Dachi, and execute a left Ushiro Hiji Ate (elbow strike) and a left
Hiji Ate (backfist), followed sliding your left hand across your body at Hara (center stomach) level.
Bring the left foot back into (right) Neko Ashi Dachi, facing the rear, and perform a right Gedan Barai (down
block), Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block) and Chudan Hiki Uke (open-hand chest block), while leaving the left hand
in a fist, palm down, under the right elbow. Step over with the left foot, turning 180 degrees to face Shomen in
right Sanchin Dachi, punching down with the left hand, then circling back up, while simultaneously rotating the
right hand inward in front of the chest. Then, twist the left hand up and the right hand downward (arm break).
Pivot to the left 270 degrees, facing the right rear of Shomen, into right Sanchin Dachi, while raising the left hand
over the head in an arc and comes down on the left side into a Mawashi Uke (circular block), and simultaneously
executing a right Gedan Furi Uchi (finger slap strike) while the right hand. Next, shift forward in a straight line into
and execute a left open hand Gedan Harai Uke (open down block) and a right open hand Shotei Osai (palm heel
strike).
Shift forward with the right foot into Shiko Dachi, moving the arms up, right over left in front for a Marote Renoji
Kamae, then pull both hands back into Naka Daka Ippon Ken (middle finger extended fist) while executing right
Ashi Barai Fumikomi (foot sweep), and then perform a Ryoken Naka Daka Ippon Ken Gedan Tsuki (double down
punch with Ippon Ken strike). Then step back with the right leg into an opposite (left) Shiko Dachi and execute a
left Gedan Harai Uke (down block).
Shift the weight onto the left foot and, using Suri Ashi, slide into Sanchin Dachi and repeat the same sequence as
previous to the left rear of Shomen, in mirror image, ending in the same Shiko Dachi/Gedan Harai Uke
combination.
Slide the right foot over using Suri Ashi into Neko Ashi Dachi facing Shomen and execute a left Chudan Yoko Uke
(chest block) and right Jodan Furi Tsuki (whipping backfist) combination. Again, using Suri Ashi, slide the right
foot forward, followed by sliding the left foot behind it into Bensoku Dachi (cross foot stance), and perform a mirror
image of the previous hand technique. Immediately pivot 270 degrees to the left into left Sanchin Dachi and
execute a left Chudan Hiki Uke. Pivot to the right 90 degrees into right Nissin Dachi and execute a left Gedan
Furi Uchi (downward swing strike) with Ippon Ken (first knuckle), chambering the right hand in a fist, immediately
followed by a left Chudan Uraken Uke (chest block). Next, pivot back to the left 90 degrees into left Sanchin
Dachi and execute a right Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block), followed by a right Mae Geri (rising front kick),
L. A. Kane

Page 57 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
stepping back into Shiko Dachi, and delivering a left Ura Tsuki (palm-up center punch) with the right palm (open
hand) chambered at the solar plexus.
Moving the left foot, slide 90 degrees to the right, and repeat the same techniques in mirror image to the opposite
side.
Using Suri Ashi, slide the left foot to the rear and bring the right foot back into right Neko Ashi Dachi and assume
Renoji No Kamae (left hand over right). Step back with the right foot, and draw the left foot back into left Neko
Ashi Dachi, circling both hands clockwise, followed by grabbing and pulling the hands back, and then followed by
a Marote Mawashi Uchi (circular punch) with the right fist in the left palm. Yame.
24.1 Saipai Kata Bunkai
This Bunkai Kumite was compiled by Schweizer Sensei and is based on personal research and methods
presented by Taira Sensei. In this Bunkai utilize the following principles:
1) Once you make contact, try to keep contact. Dont allow large open space between yourself and the
opponent.
2) Whenever possible, move forward. Defense is actually the offense.
3) Each technique will try to leave only 1 option for them to use. When they do pounce on it! Always be 1
step ahead.
4) Keep moving in continuous and relaxed motion. Allow the bunkai to flow like Kata and the answers will
come naturally.
The bunkai kumite makes attempts to closely follow Kata. Applications have been chosen that lend themselves to
actual combat and allow continuation of the bunkai kumite, but are not the only applications. Kata is actually
limitless in application. Some parts of the Kata are not fully represented and repetitive parts are eliminated.
Thus, where the Kata does a set of techniques on both sides, only 1 side is represented here.
Uke (defender - does the Kata)

Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)

1) Begin by stepping forward right Sanchindachi with right palm open meeting Ds
hand (backs of hands meet).
2) From Heko-dachi. Pivot body to L, block
reverse punch with inside of R arm
crossing body to L. Pivot back, use L shote
uke to block R punch and press down.
Keeping R punch in check, make ippon ken
with R and shift in with ippon ken strike
over As arm to chest/rib vital points.
3) While stepping forward with L Sanchindachi, Grab arm with R and come up under
elbow with L Shotei-uke. This will apply
arm bar and block possible L punch. Step
inside of Os forward leg with pivot into
Nenshin-dachi, pull with R and strike low
with L.
4) Pivot to front while doing L Ura-uke. R
Shuto-uchi to neck, R Maigeri or R Hizagere.
5) Grab and pull with step back into Zen.
Pivot Shiko and Uraken with L. R
continues hold.
6) Step back R Neko, R Gedan-uke, R
Chudan-uke, R grab.

L. A. Kane

Begin by stepping forward right Sanchin-dachi


with right palm open meeting As hand (back
side of hand to each other)
L gayaku tsuke, R tsuke.

Using L arm stop low strike.

Drop R arm and punch high with L. Cross


palm block to Shuto-uchi, drop into Neko to
block kick by removing target and jamming
kick.
Go with pull and L cross palm block to back
fist.
Push away and follw in with R Mai-geri, R
punch.

Page 58 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
7) Step in and pivot 180 to apply arm bar. As
you cross over arm strike to jaw with Empiuchi to side of head (use care).
8) As O pulls, pivot 180 to R Sanchi-dachi,
strike to groin with R fingers using a quick
snapping motion.
9) L Gedan-barai, hook arm under leg. R
Cross palm block strike. Step in with R
behind Os supporting leg. Push with
elbow to take down. Strike to vital areas in
Shiko-dachi, escape by stepping back
Shiko-dachi, gedan uke.
10) Step to outside with L cudan uke,
simultaneous R jodan Furi-tsuki.
11) Drop R arm to pin Os arms down, step in
bensoku-dachi, furi tsuke with L.
12) Pivot 270 around L hiki-uke, Pivot L gedan
barai, pivot back L ura-uchi.
13) Shift to L, R reverse chudan uke, L maigeri. Step back to L shiko-dachi, pull with
rib strike.
14) Step back R neko, R cross osai uke.
Secure under arm with L. R hiki uke, turn
and lock arms. Step back L zen, twist to
throw. Hammer fist to head.

L. A. Kane

Duck head blow, reach over with L and grab R


fist, pull back before arm bar.
As A strikes to groin step back to avoid strike
into L Sanchin-dachi pulling target out of range.
R Mai-geri, L reverse punch. Break fall, roll
kick to knee, roll other side, kick to knee, get to
knees, stand up. Suggested way to stand up is
to come to tripod position (2 arms, 1 leg) then
step out to back into Shiko-dachi.
Step in Zen jodan tsuki. Cross palm block Furitsuke.
Do what ever it takes not to get hit.
Push away, R high punch, L reverse low
punch, cross palm block.
R punch, drop to neko to avoid kick, go with
pull and try to minimize rib strike.
Come over R with L, step and punch. R
reverses punch.

Page 59 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
25.0 Kurunfa Kata
Kururunfa is an advanced Kata brought back from China by Kanryo Higaonna Sensei. It features Tai Sabaki
(evasive maneuvers) and very quick movement. It contains a wide variety of open-hand techniques especially
hand and hip coordination techniques.
I do not know this Kata yet. The following may or may not be correct
It opens with a sliding step to the right into left Neko Ashi Dachi, while performing a right open-hand Chudan Osai
Uke and then a left open-hand Chudan Kuri Uke, followed by a Sokuto Kansetsu Geri with the left leg. Slide the
left foot over and repeat the same movements in mirror image.
After the kick, bring the left foot forward in an arc into right Heiko Dachi. The right hand moves up in a scooping
motion, executing a right Chudan Sukui Uke, with the left hand executing a Gedan Shotei Osai Uke, beginning at
the solar plexus. Next, pivot to the left into left Heiko Dachi while executing a right open-hand Gedan Harai Uke,
chambering the left hand at the solar plexus.
Snap quickly back into right Heiko Dachi facing Shomen and execute right Chudan Sukui Uke and left Gedan
Osai Uke. Step forward with the left foot into left Heiko Dachi and perform a mirror image of the hand techniques.
Pivot quickly to the right into right Heiko Dachi while executing a left open-hand Gedan Harai Uke with the right
hand chambered at the solar plexus.
Bring the hips quickly to face Shomen in left Heiko Dachi and perform the same scooping right hand Chudan
Sukui Uke and left hand Gedan Shotei Osai Uke combination. Next, step forward into left Heiko Dachi and repeat
the same hand techniques, followed by a pivot to the left into left Heiko Dachi and repeating all the techniques as
in the previous pivot, ending up twisting to Shomen and repeating those hand techniques as well.
Step back 45 degrees with the left leg into left Neko Ashi Dachi while bringing the left hand from the right side in
an arc, and execute a left Chudan Haishu Mawashi Osai Uke, with the left hand crossing behind and chambering
at the solar plexus. Slide the right foot forward, still facing 45 degrees into left Heiko Dachi while executing a right
Chudan Osai Uke and a left Age Tsuki, followed by a right Mae Geri, stomping the foot down into Shiko Dachi.
Then perform a right open-hand Age Hiji Ate, left hand chambered at the solar plexus.
Bring the right leg back into left Neko Ashi Dachi pulling both hands to the abdomen into Renoji No Kamae. Next,
slide left with the left foot into right Neko Ashi Dachi, facing the opposite 45 degree angle and perform a mirror
image of the previous techniques, ending up in right Neko Ashi Dachi with the hands in Renoji No Kamae.
Pivot to the left to face Shomen in the same stance and perform a Mawashi Uke, ending with the left hand at
Jodan and the right at Gedan. Then, pivot 90 degrees to the left into left Heiko Dachi while executing a left
Chudan Ura Kake Uke, with the open right hand chambered at the side. Next, pivot to the left, right foot crossing
the left, into left Heiko Dachi, and execute right Ushiro Hiji Ate, grabbing with the left hand and pulling to the
abdomen. Step into right Heiko Dachi and perform a right Chudan Ura Kake Uke, followed by 180-degree turn
and a mirror image of the Ushiro Hiji Ate technique, ending up in right Heiko Dachi.
Pull the left foot over into Shiko Dachi facing Shomen, moving the hands parallel in front of the chest, right over
left. Raise the hips so that the stance becomes a wide Hachiji Dachi while extending the arms out to either side,
palms down. Bend both elbows so that the forearms face straight up, palms towards the head, bringing the hands
together behind the head. Rotate both hands so that the knuckles are together with the palms outward, bring the
hands over the head, clenching into fists. Drop into Shiko Dachi and pulls the arms together in front of the chest,
knuckles forward, elbows at the solar plexus, and execute a Koto Ate.
Open both hands and execute a Ryosho Gedan Osai Oshi in front of the abdomen, left hand on top. Step forward
into right Zenkutsu Dachi and perform a Furi Sute to the rear with both hands. Bring both hands into an openhand Jodan Kosa Uke. Next, bring the left foot up to the right, pivot to the left 180 degrees into Masubi Dachi,
drop into Kosa Dachi, closing the hands into fists and pulling down.

L. A. Kane

Page 60 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Step right 45 degrees into right Zenkutsu Dachi, scooping with the right hand and pushing with the left. Step left
45 degrees and perform a mirror image of the scoop and push. Slide the right foot forward, rotate to the left 180
degrees facing Shomen, bringing the left foot over into left Neko Ashi Dachi, and execute a Mawashi Uke. Yame.
25.1 Kurunfa Kata Bunkai
This Bunkai Kumite was compiled by Schweizer Sensei and is based on personal research and methods
presented by Taira Sensei. In this Bunkai utilize the following principles:
1) Once you make contact, try to keep contact. Dont allow large open space between yourself and the
opponent.
2) Whenever possible, move forward. Defense is actually the offense.
3) Each technique will try to leave only 1 option for them to use. When they do pounce on it! Always be 1
step ahead.
4) Keep moving in continuous and relaxed motion. Allow the bunkai to flow like Kata and the answers will
come naturally.
This bunkai is also based on the principles of Kaisai as defined by Miyagi Sensei and outlined by Toguchi Sensei
in his Okinowan Goju-Ryu II book.
1) Dont be fooled by the Enbusen rule.
2) Techniques executed while advancing imply offense. Those executed while retreating imply defense.
3) There is only 1 enemy and they are in front of you at all times.
The bunkai kumite makes attempts to closely follow Kata. Applications have been chosen that lend themselves to
actual combat and allow continuation of the bunkai kumite, but are not the only applications. Kata ia actually
limitless in application. Some parts of the Kata are not fully represented and repetitive parts are eliminated.
Thus, where the Kata does a set of techniques on both sides, only 1 side is represented here.
Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)

Uke (defender - does the Kata)

1) Begin by stepping forward right Sanchin


with right kake uke meeting Ds kake uke
in center.
2) Using R hand cut in and down to lower
Ds arm. Step L Sanchin and punch over
top of Ds arm with L chudan tsuki. Pick L
leg up to avoid knee kick.

Begin by stepping forward right Sanchin with


right kake uke meeting As kake uke in center.

3) Step R and repeat on R side.


4) Check down strike with L, prepare to
strike with R

5) R punch. Use L to check throat grab.

6) Pull R arm back, shift R Sanchin, R head


punch. Lower R elbow to cover ribs.
Continue R arm down with sweeping
gedan uke to block kick. Block elbow
strike with L cross palm heel block. Shift
in R chest punch.
7) Step opposite side
8) Step R HP. Check rib strike with L
9) After check punch with L, check rib strike.
10) Silde to L while blocking with R. As D
turns keep close and turn body (hips).
L. A. Kane

Shift to R while blocking up with L in high kake


type motion, then reverse to down motion and
block with L elbow (chudan kuri uke). With
change in stance to L neko. Kick with L to
knee (kansetsu gere).
Shift to L and repeat on L side.
Using R rising palm block strike and lift under
As R elbow. While stepping in with R
nenshin-dachi continue to open A with a high
L ura uke and simultaneously strike down
(palm heal, gedan shote uchi) with R.
Pivot back to front and check As R elbow with
L. Come over top with R and grab for throat
with tiger claw.
Shift to L, pivot R Neko, R ura uku. Strike ribs
with R gyaku tsuki, R mai gere, step R shiko
R rising elbow strike (ago hiji ate). Step back
R Neko, block with elbow.

Turn and do on opposite side.


Turn to R block head punch, grab and pivot to
R, slide in with L rib strike.
Turn with punch and slip into R rib strike.
Using L pull arm down and shuto uchi over
arm to neck. As A slides to R, tune and strike

Page 61 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Tori (attacker - does the anti-Kata)

Uke (defender - does the Kata)

turns keep close and turn body (hips).

arm to neck. As A slides to R, tune and strike


with L shuto uchi.
Use escape technique to break hold.

11) Slip hands under arms to make full


Nelson hold
12) R head punch.

13) Break fall


14) Roll and kick

L. A. Kane

Pivot 180 to R Sanchin, morote jodan juji-uke.


Step in with L between As legs and pivot 180.
Use step to force As leg to drop back.
With R grab for heal area. Using L push on
knee to do leg pick.
Turn palm to block kick, Use R knee to trap
and pin leg, move in with strike.

Page 62 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
26.0 Suparinpei Kata
Represents the number 108 (3x36=108) and has special significance in Buddhism. It is believed that
st
man has 108 evil passions, so in Buddhist temples on December 31 , at the stroke of midnight, a bell is
rung 108 times to drive away those spirits. The symbolism of 36 is the same as Sanseiru. Suparinpai is
Goju Ryus longest Kata. It utilizes a large number of techniques including breath control and contains
the largest number of applications.
As an interesting side note, it has been said that in the 1600s there was a group of warrior-heroes who
had risen above their passions that traveled the countryside righting wrongs, taking from rich feudal lords,
and giving to the poor. This is sort of a Chinese version of Robin Hood and his men. There were said to
be 108 of these men, called the 108 hands.
Although they were ultimately defeated and scattered, it may have been one of these men who made it to
Ryukyu and taught the Suparinpei form. The form might have been named in reference to this survivor
who taught it, or to honor those men. Regardless, the importance of the number 108 is probably why
there were thought to be exactly 108 of these heroes who had taken an oath to fight injustice, seek
enlightenment, and escape from their 108 mortal passions.
I do not know this Kata yet. More coming

26.1 Suparinpei Kata Bunkai


more coming

L. A. Kane

Page 63 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
27.0 Hakutsuru Kata
Hakutsuru means "white crane fist", and is a Kata practiced in some Goju Ryu schools, usually taught to a
select few students after learning the rest of the Kata syllabus. It is a white crane form, and its true
origins are unclear. It is definitely derivative of the Chinese white crane styles, but some versions have a
uniquely Okinawan flavor. Gokenki taught these forms in Okinawa, and to others in their travels to China,
but is reputed to have taught a different version to different people on any given day, and this has
probably added to the confusion and mysticism surrounding the form.
I do not know this Kata yet. More coming

L. A. Kane

Page 64 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
28.0 Tensho Kata
Chojun Miyagi created Tensho Kata. Tensho means, "revolving hands". It is a combination of hard
dynamic tension with deep breathing and soft flowing hand movements, concentrating strength in the
Tanden, and is very characteristic of the Goju Ryu style.
Tensho Kata begins by stepping into right Sanchin Dachi while breathing in deeply with both hands
crossing in front of the solar plexus into Chudan Yoko Uke (double middle block), breathing out as you
are finishing the arm movements. Then, while breathing in, pull the left hand back into the chambered
position, and then punch Chudan Seiken Tsuki (chest punch) while exhaling strongly in one breath, bring
arm back up into Chudan Yoko Uke (chest block). Step forward and repeat with the right hand. Step
forward and repeat again with the left. Bring the left hand back to chamber.
With the right hand, all the while keeping the rest of the body held firm with dynamic tension, perform
Chudan Hiki Uke (outside center open block) and Chudan Ushiro Kake Uke (inside center block with the
back of the hand pulling in), breathing in smoothly and deeply. Next, perform Jodan Shotei Oshi (palm
heel strike to head), breathing out forcefully as you straighten the elbow, and then turn the wrist inward
and pull it back as if blocking in Kake Uke while breathing in slowly. Then, slowly push down with a
Gedan Shotei Oshi (palm heel strike), breathing out forcefully, followed by raising the wrist into Chudan
Koken Uke (wrist block) while inhaling and then exhaling forcefully with a Chudan Shotei Uchi (palm heel
strike).
Step forward in Sanchin Dachi and repeat the same movements to the left side. Step forward again, and
repeat with both hands simultaneously.
Stepping back into left Sanchin Dachi, inhale as you execute a two-handed Yama Uke (mountain block),
breathing out as you finish the technique. Step back with the left foot and repeat. Step back into right
Sanchin Dachi and repeat a third time to the left.
Perform a Mawashi Uke (wheel block) in place, exhaling on the push. Step back into left Sanchin Dachi
and repeat the Mawashi Uke (wheel block) sequence on the opposite side. Bring your hands up and
back down into the Yoi position, making several forceful exhalations to equalize your breathing. Yame.
28.1 Tensho Kata Bunkai
While applications exist, there is no codified Bunkai for Tensho Kata.

L. A. Kane

Page 65 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
29.0 Sanchin Kata
The name Sanchin means three battles mind, body, and spirit. Sanchin is a moving meditation unifying
mind, body and spirit.
29.1 Zen and Sanchin (by Seikichi Toguchi)
The Japanese martial arts have always been deeply related to Buddhism and, in particular, Zen
Buddhism. In essence, the ultimate goal of the serious martial artist, "reaching a stage of enlightenment,"
is rooted in Buddhism. Although others exist, two of the roads to this Buddhist "enlightenment" are the
practice of "sitting Zen" and "standing Zen." While "sitting Zen" is based on stillness, "standing Zen" is
based on action. Both, however, are one internal reality viewed and practiced from different perspectives.
In this discussion, the primary concern is the use of "standing Zen" in training. Both Zen monks in China's
Shorin (Shaolin) Temple and swordsmen in early Japan used "standing Zen" to help discipline, control
and strengthen their physical and mental energies. Eventually, this "standing Zen" system of focusing
energy on attaining a "stage of enlightenment" (and physical superiority) was developed into a method of
martial arts training known as Sanchin.
Although every Japanese martial art style has its own individual characteristics, their origins can be
traced to one source, a source that utilized this particular method of training. Therefore, it might be said
that all past styles performed Sanchin. Looking at present-day karate, then, it seems strange that every
style does not practice a perfect body-training program such as Sanchin. (NOTE: In actuality, the
physical education curriculums of some Okinawan schools practicing the Shorin style of karate did
include Sanchin. However, because Sanchin was not suitable, medically speaking, for youths at the
crucial age of incipient manhood, it was later eliminated.)
It might prove helpful for students to look back once again and use the Sanchin methods and techniques
of the past that still have value.
We can be proud of Sanchin. It is unique to karate and does not exist in any other Japanese martial art. I
feel that it should be regarded not only as part of the Goju Ryu system but as a precious resource of
Okinawan Karate-do.
Anyone who studies Goju Ryu must first use Sanchin to develop proper breathing methods, basic body
strength and mental power. The phrase, "Three-Year Sanchin," was heard often at our training sessions,
with Sanchin accompanied by preparatory, complementary and utilitarian exercises used to develop body
strength. After that, Sanchin training concentrated on open hand and combat practice forms.
Recently, karate has been studied with an emphasis on free fighting without basic body training or prior
training in basic techniques. This practice contradicts the essential aims of karate and can lead to both
injuries and lifetime regrets. We must be careful.
Sanchin training is very difficult and complex. As a result, it cannot be explained here completely. Its use,
however, is not exclusively limited to martial arts preparation. It does not necessitate much time and
space. And, it can serve as a refreshing, physically beneficial diversion from study or work. Also,
because it does not demand much in the way of either time or space, it can and should be practiced
frequently.
29.2 Sanchin Breathing
Proper breathing is very important to the proper execution of Sanchin Kata. Inhale throughout he nose
and exhale through the mouth. Concentrate on coordinating the breathing with the physical techniques.
There are five combinations of breathing in this Kata:
Long inhale, long exhale
Long inhale, short exhale
L. A. Kane

Page 66 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Short inhale, long exhale
Short inhale, short exhale
Hold breath inhale and hold, exhale and hold
29.3 Sanchin Kata (Long Version)
The pattern is 3-4-5-5-1 (3 punches, turn 180 degrees, 4 punches, turn 180 degrees, 5 punches, 5 press
blocks, and 1 circular block). While your hand will cross your centerline on its way back to chamber as
normal, punches are straight out (not down the center). Dont overextend your punches; keep your
shoulders down, back straight.
Movements and transitions are soft and fluid, while applications of technique are rigid and firm (dynamic
tension). The pacing is very slow and forceful, with some techniques slightly exaggerated. Breathing is
emphasized and loud.
The Kata begins in Masubi Dachi where you bow while breathing normally. Bring your (open) hands up in
front of your chest with the left over the right, then back down to Yoi (ready position) and let out a long
breath. Open your stance to Heiko Dachi bringing your arms out to your sides in a circular motion (like
around the rim of a barrel) while closing both fists. Exhale strongly and hold.
Step forward into right Sanchin Marote Komai (double chest block guard position) with a long inhale and
short exhale. Tighten your entire body and lower your center of gravity to lock in the stance. Leaving
your right hand in Chudan Uke (chest block position), bring the left hand back to chamber while inhaling
strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 1) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your left
fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into left Sanchin Dachi while holding your breath. Leaving the left hand in Chudan Uke
(chest block), pull the right hand back into chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch right Chudan Seikan
Tsuki (chest punch 2) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your right fist back up into Chudan Uke
(returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi while holding your breath. Leaving your right hand in Chudan Uke
(chest block), bring the left hand back to chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan
Tsuki (chest punch 3) with a strong exhaled breath. Return your left hand to chamber with a long inhaled
breath.
Keep your right arm in the right block. Bending your left elbow, hold your left arm in front of you against
your solar plexus. Position your left fist, palm up, between your right elbow and your torso. Cross your
right foot in front of your left in Bensoku Dachi with a short exhale and pivot counterclockwise back into
Sanchin Dachi 180 degrees from your original direction. As you turn, execute Chudan Uke (chest block)
so that you end up in left Sanchin with your left hand in Chudan Uke and your right hand in chamber.
Punch right Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 1) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your right fist back
up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into right Sanchin while holding your breath. Leaving your right hand in Chudan Uke (chest
block position), bring the left hand back to chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan
Tsuki (chest punch 2) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your left fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns
you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into left Sanchin Dachi while holding your breath. Leaving the left hand in Chudan Uke
(chest block), pull the right hand back into chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch right Chudan Seikan
Tsuki (chest punch 3) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your right fist back up into Chudan Uke
(returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi while holding your breath. Leaving your right hand in Chudan Uke
(chest block), bring the left hand back to chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan
L. A. Kane

Page 67 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Tsuki (chest punch 4) with a strong exhaled breath. Return your left hand to chamber with a long inhaled
breath.
Keep your right arm in the right block. Bending your left elbow, hold your left arm in front of you against
your solar plexus. Position your left fist, palm up, between your right elbow and your torso. Cross your
right foot in front of your left in Bensoku Dachi with a short exhale and pivot counterclockwise back into
Sanchin Dachi 180 degrees from your original direction. As you turn, execute Chudan Uke (chest block)
so that you end up in left Sanchin with your left hand in Chudan Uke and your right hand in chamber.
Punch right Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 1) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your right fist back
up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Step forward into right Sanchin Dachi while holding your breath. Leaving your right hand in Chudan Uke
(chest block), bring the left hand back to chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan
Tsuki (chest punch 2) with a strong exhaled breath. Bring your left fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns
you to Marote Komai position) with a long inhale and short exhale.
Without stepping, leave your left hand in Chudan Uke (chest block) and bring the right hand back to
chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch right Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 3) with a strong exhaled
breath. Bring your right fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long
inhale and short exhale.
Without stepping, leave your right hand in Chudan Uke (chest block) and bring the left hand back to
chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch left Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 4) with a strong exhaled
breath. Bring your left fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) with a long
inhale and short exhale.
Without stepping, leaving your left hand in Chudan Uke (chest block), bring the right hand back to
chamber while inhaling strongly. Punch right Chudan Seikan Tsuki (chest punch 5) with a strong exhaled
breath. Bring your left fist back up into Chudan Uke (returns you to Marote Komai position) and open
both hands palms up with a short inhale.
Push both open hands out and down with palms toward fl oor in a Shotei Otoshi Uke (open hand dropping
block 1) ending at about the level of your solar plexus with a long exhale. With a long inhale, bring both
fists back to chamber, palms up.
Push both open hands out and down with palms toward floor in a Shotei Otoshi Uke (open hand dropping
block 2) ending at about the level of your solar plexus with a long exhale. With a long inhale, bring both
fists back to chamber, palms up.
Push both open hands out and down with palms toward floor in a Shotei Otoshi Uke (open hand dropping
block 3) ending at about the level of your solar plexus with a long exhale. With a long inhale, bring both
fists back to chamber, palms up.
Push both open hands out and down with palms toward floor in a Shotei Otoshi Uke (open hand dropping
block 4) ending at about the level of your solar plexus with a long exhale. With a long inhale, bring both
fists back to chamber, palms up.
Push both open hands out and down with palms toward floor in a Shotei Otoshi Uke (open hand dropping
block 5) ending at about the level of your solar plexus with a long exhale. With a long inhale, bring both
fists back to chamber, palms up.
Step back into left Sanchin Dachi and execute a Mawashi Uke (circular block 1), inhaling at the halfway
point and exhaling strongly at the end.

L. A. Kane

Page 68 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Step up into Masubi Dachi bring both hands up to chest level, left over right with an exhale. Drop your
hands down to the Yoi (ready) position with a short inhale followed by four forceful exhales trying to force
all the air from your lungs. Bow while breathing normally. Yame.
29.4 Sanchin and Kiko Training (by Ryan Parker)
In the past I have made references to the Kiko training associated with the practice of Sanchin Kata. A
number of people have asked me to describe this training so this is an attempt to do so. There are
numerous different forms of Sanchin Kata. The one that I will be describing is a Ju or soft version. There
are also Go or hard versions that involve dynamic tension. I'll touch upon the dynamic tension versions
towards the end of this article.
According to many Okinawan masters Sanchin Kata is based directly on exercises taught by Daruma.
These are Ekkin Kiko (tendon transforming Ki exercise) and Senzui Kiko (Marrow cleansing Ki exercise).
The first set (Ekkin Kiko) focuses on first circulating Ki through the primary meridians then through the
whole body. As this is done, the muscles and tendons are strengthened and stretched. The Senzui Kiko
stresses leading the Ki into the bones and up the cerebrospinal system.
29.4.1 Shoshyuten (Primary Meridians)
Many of the specific instructions associated with Sanchin Kata relate directly to Shoshyuten Kiko. In
Shoshyuten Kiko the Ki or vital energy is circulated through the two primary meridians of the body
(Tokumyaku-kei the Governor Vessel and Ninmyaku-kei the Conception Vessel). In Sanchin Kata the Ki
is circulated in coordination with the breath and small movements of the internal musculature and sacrum.
When practicing Sanchin Kata, it is important to remember that the chin is tucked in and the neck is
pulled back in order to align the cervical vertebra with the back making the spine as straight as possible.
The pelvis is also tucked forward in order to eliminate the lumbar curve. This is done to allow the Ki to
flow freely and directly up the back (through Tokumyaku-kei). Also remember that the tip of the tongue is
held on the roof of the mouth. This connects Tokumyaku-kei (Governor Vessel) with Ninmyaku-kei
(Conception Vessel). Here's a short description of the breathing process used while performing
Shoshyuten Kiko during Sanchin Kata.
29.4.2 Inhalation
As you inhale you envision the Ki/breath descending down the centerline (Ninmyaku-kei) of the body
towards the Tanden area. As you do this, the abdomen will expand very slightly. This motion should be
very small and scarcely visible to the naked eye. This slight expansion of the abdomen helps to draw Ki
to the lower abdomen. As you are reaching the upper limit of your inhalation the pelvis rotates very
slightly back. Again this motion should be very small and scarcely visible to the naked eye.
At the same time you do this you visualize the Ki circling from the Tanden down under the body and then
up to the base of the spine. This is the end point of the inhalation phase. The slight outward/backward
motion of the pelvis helps to lead the Ki from the Tanden to lower areas (in this case towards the spine).
29.4.3 Exhalation
As you exhale, you lead the Ki up Tokumyaku-kei. As you do this your abdomen will move slightly inward
(again this motion is very small). This inward motion aids in leading the Ki to the back. You also lightly lift
the urogenital diaphragm (lift the anus) and pull up on (rotate it tightly forward) the pelvis as you exhale.
These actions both help to force the Ki gently up the back (in this case via Tokumyaku-kei). Towards the
end of the exhalation the Ki is guided up around the head to the nose and then the tongue. At this point
you have completed one cycle of the Shoshyuten. Note that the next cycle begins where the last stopped
(i.e., just under the tongue). This type of breathing can be used in all of the "long breaths" of the Kata.
There are a number of "short breaths. During the short breaths the cycle does not need to be precisely
visualized but rather one should simply feel a sense of "movement" along both Ninmyaku-kei and
Tokumyaku-kei.
L. A. Kane

Page 69 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
29.4.4 Daishyuten (Entire Body)
A more advanced stage of Sanchin training involves leading the Ki through the entire body. This training
is called Daishyuten Kiko. Daishyuten Kiko is really just an expansion on the Shoshyuten training
outlined above. In Daishyuten Kiko the Ki is still circulated through the entire paths of both of the primary
meridians. Thus the anal lift, pelvis rotation, spinal alignment, and tongue position still are used and
serve the same purpose. The main difference between the Shoshyuten and Daishyuten methods is that
the Ki is also circulated through the limbs in the Daishyuten method.
It is noteworthy that both the Higashionna (Higaonna) and the Magusuku (Miyagi) versions of Sanchin
Kata seem to have been structured to allow the easiest practice of Daishyuten Kiko. The first several
movements involve a double breath cycle (i.e., pull the hand back and inhale, move the hand forward and
exhale, circle hand into the Marote Chudan Uke position inhale/exhale). The next few movements involve
a single breath cycle and a simple hand movement. The last movements again use a single breath but
with a complex hand movement. The short huffs at the end of the Kata are used to circulate Ki through
the Shoshyuten cycle and then into the Tanden after Daishyuten training.
Thus the Kata is structured to allow a person to "warm up". First the practitioner does the Daishyuten
cycle in two breaths, which is comparatively easy. Next s/he performs the cycle in one breath but with a
very simple hand motion (this makes it easier to visualize). Last the Karateka again uses one breath but
uses a complex hand motion (which can cause visualization to be difficult). As you can see the Sanchin
Kata is laid out in such a way as begin with an easy method of Daishyuten training and builds up slowly to
the harder methods. I might describe the Daishyuten Kiko associated with Sanchin in a future post.
29.4.5 Dynamic Tension
Dynamic tension is used in some styles of karate while performing Sanchin Kata. Traditionally there were
two reasons dynamic tension would be used. The first reason is that during Daishyuten training tensing
the musculature would lead Ki to the limbs and near the surface of the torso. When the body was then
relaxed the Ki would circulate through the body. Thus, it acts a sort of intensifier for Daishyuten Kiko.
The other reason dynamic tension was used was to force the Ki into the bones during Senzui Kiko. Many
Okinawan Senseis feel that dynamic tension is potentially very dangerous. It should not be attempted
without the very careful supervision of a qualified sensei (trained in the intricacies of Stanchions Kiko).
Many styles do not use dynamic tension and simply use a light connective "stretching" while performing
the movements. Although this method produces results slower it is considered safer by many sensei.

L. A. Kane

Page 70 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
30.0 Kiso Kumite (Prearranged Sparring)
30.1 Introduction
Kiso Kumite is a set of attack and counter attack sequences designed to teach self-defense skills without
the dangers inherent in free sparring. Techniques are pulled from a variety of Katas and grouped by
theme (such as evasion, nerve strikes, short techniques, etc.). Ippon Kiso Kumite uses only the last
attack and defense from each set, followed by an additional set of freeform attacks by the original
defender. Be sure to start slightly out of range. Attacker makes a long first step, while defender makes a
short one to execute techniques in the proper range.
30.2 Kiso Kumite Shodan (#1)
Theme: get out of the way. Start in Sanchin Kumai. Both attacker and defender use Sanchin Dachi
stances. Attacker always attacks until the last movement. Blocks are basic closed-hand. The pattern is
always Head, Chest, Down, followed by a final attack to the:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

Head
Chest
Down
Head
Chest
Down

Drop to Shiko Dachi and punch solar plexus


Punch arm pit
Hammer fist to temple
Punch solar plexus
Punch eye
Uppercut to throat

30.3 Kiso Kumite Nidan (#2)


Theme: stand your ground. Start in Sanchin Kumai. Both attacker and defender use Sanchin Dachi
stances and alternate strikes. The final attack should be done in Shozenkutsu Dachi. Blocks are basic
closed-hand. The pattern is variable, so all movements are listed:
1) Head, Down, Down, Down
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

Chest, Chest, Chest, Chest


Down, Head, Head, Head
Head, Chest, Chest, Chest
Chest, Head, Head, Head
Down, Head, Head, Head

Shuffle lunge forward and punch groin (aim at Obi knot with
downward force)
Grab, punch chest
Press forward, punch throat
Grab, uppercut to chest
Shuto to neck
Grab, uppercut to throat

30.4 Kiso Kumite Sandan (#3)


Theme: open your hands. Start in Sanchin Kumai. Both attacker and defender use Sanchin Dachi
stance for head and chest attacks, and Shiko Dachi for downward attacks. Head blocks are Koken Uke;
chest blocks are Hiki Uke (open hand, fingers up), down blocks are Gedan Uchi Barai (open hand).
Attacker always attacks until the last movement. The pattern is always Head, Chest, Down, followed by a
final attack to the:
1) Head
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

Chest
Down
Head
Chest
Down

L. A. Kane

Drop to Shiko Dachi execute leg takedown, back fist to groin. Be sure to control the legs
so that you dont get kicked
Grab, punch arm pit
Grab, Shuto to the neck
Press forward, punch solar plexus
Grab, punch eye
Grab, uppercut to throat

Page 71 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
30.5 Kiso Kumite Yodan (#4)
Theme: shifting/moving out of the way. Start in Migi Heiko Dachi (natural stance right foot forward) with
both hands forward and ready. Attacker uses Sanchin Dachi stance for head and chest attacks and
Shiko Dachi for downward attacks. Defender uses Renoji Dachi for head and chest defense and Shiko
Dachi for downward defense. Head blocks are Koken Uke; chest blocks are Ura Uke (open hand, fingers
down), down blocks are Gedan Uchi Barai (open hand). Attacker always attacks until the last movement.
Defender moves off 45-degrees as attack is performed in addition to blocking. The pattern is always
Head, Chest, Down, followed by a final attack to the:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

Head
Chest
Down
Head
Chest
Down

Press forward, punch solar plexus


Grab, uppercut ribs
Grab, uppercut throat
Attacker kicks to groin; defender sweeps the kick aside with Sukui Uke (scoop block)
Marote Tsuki (double punch) ribs
o
Grab, step forward 45 and Kensetsu Geri (joint kick) front leg

30.6 Kiso Kumite Godan (#5)


Theme: break them down. Start in Migi Heiko Dachi (natural stance right foot forward) with both hands
forward and ready. Attacker uses Sanchin Dachi stance for head and chest attacks and Shiko Dachi for
downward attacks. Defender uses Neko Ashi Dachi for head and chest defense and Shiko Dachi for
downward defense. Head blocks are Koken Uke; chest blocks are Hiki Uke (open hand, fingers up),
down blocks are Gedan Uchi Barai (open hand). Attacker always attacks until the last movement.
Defender moves off 45-degrees as attack is performed in addition to blocking. The pattern is always
Head, Chest, Down, followed by a final attack to the:
1) Head
2) Chest
3) Down
4) Head

5) Chest
6) Down

Attacker kicks to groin; defender sweeps the kick aside with Sukui Uke
Arm bar, Kensetsu Geri (joint kick) to back leg
Block with right hand, shift in while switching hands (like a second down block or
swimming), Grab with left hand, Right uppercut to throat
Block in Kosa Uke (X cross block), throw (crocodile spin/arm-break throw), lift up on their
arm so that they cannot roll and Kakato Geri (stomp heel kick) to their ribs. Defender
kick-off with their left leg and roll over their left shoulder to avoid injury (since the right leg
is forward, this is backward from normal Ukemi break-falls). This seems impractical in
real life self-defense situations.
Palm strike their elbow then shift in and execute Yoko Hiji Ate (side elbow strike) to their
ribs
Arm bar, Sumi Gashi (sit throw). Slide into Shiko Dachi with down block. Strike their
face with your right hand to distract, while grabbing the right wrist with your left hand.
Shift into Shiko Dachi while at the same time striking down with the right elbow then
thrusting your right hand under their right thigh and dropping your butt to the floor to
throw your opponent backwards. While still holding their left wrist, attack their eyes with
fingers of your right hand while on the floor. Defender must tuck their chin and throw
themselves to avoid injury.

30.7 Kiso Kumite Rokudan (#6)


Theme: locks/throws. Start in Migi Heiko Dachi (natural stance right foot forward) with both hands
forward and ready. Attacker uses Sanchin Dachi stance for head and chest attacks and Shiko Dachi for
downward attacks. Defender uses Nissin Dachi. Head blocks are Koken Uke; chest blocks are Ura Uke
(open hand, fingers down), down blocks are Gedan Uchi Barai (open hand). Attacker always attacks until
the last movement. Defender moves off 45-degrees as attack is performed in addition to blocking. Th e
pattern is always Head, Chest, Down, followed by a final attack to the:
1) Head

L. A. Kane

Drop, take down leg, block returning kick from attacker, Kakato Geri (stomp heel kick) to
the groin
Page 72 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2) Chest
3) Down
4) Head

5) Chest
6) Down

Saipai arm break (pivot elbow out, lift/pull scissors left hand, slap ear as step in front)
Chudan Osai Uke (middle press block); Jodan Ura Uchi (back fist) from Saifa
Block in Kosa Uke (X cross block), start throw (crocodile roll), when defender spins under
to escape the throw, Kiri Kaeshi (grab elbow spin throw, holding elbow as they drop) with
back take down, punch ribs.
Push arm, Osotogari (foot sweep throw), punch ribs
Pull arm, spin take down (arm lock throw grab own wrist), punch ribs

30.8 Kiso Kumite Nandan (#7)


Theme: elbows/closing; dont give ground. Start in Migi Heiko Dachi (natural stance right foot forward)
with both hands forward and ready. Each set begins with the attacker stepping in Sanchin Dachi and
executing a chest punch. Defender steps back into Sanchin Dachi and executes an Ura Uke (open hand,
fingers down) chest block.
1) Attacker
Defender

Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, head punch, chest punch (5
attacks, 2 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, head Koken Uke, chest
elbow block, chest side elbow strike to the left side

2) Attacker
Defender

Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, head punch (4 attacks, 2 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, head Koken Uke, pivot to
Zenkutsu Dachi and chest punch to the center of chest

3) Attacker

Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, step Sanchin Dachi and reverse
punch chest (4 attacks, 2 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, head Koken Uke, pivot to
Shiko Dachi (switch feet in-place) and side elbow strike to the ribs right side of chest

Defender
4) Attacker
Defender

5) Attacker
Defender

6) Attacker
Defender

Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, step Sanchin Dachi and reverse
punch chest (4 attacks, 3 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, step Neko Ashi Dachi and
block Chudan Hara Uke, immediately shifting to Zenkutsu Dachi with back to attacker,
arm bar over shoulder, elbow strike to solar plexus
Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, step Sanchin Dachi and reverse
punch chest (4 attacks, 3 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, step Neko Ashi Dachi and
block Chudan Hara Uke, immediately shifting to Zenkutsu Dachi with back to attacker,
arm bar over shoulder, elbow strike to solar plexus followed by slap open palm to groin
Step Sanchin, lunge punch head, reverse chest punch, step Sanchin Dachi and reverse
punch chest (4 attacks, 3 steps)
Step Nissen Dachi, block Koken Uke head, chest elbow block, step Neko Ashi Dachi and
block open hand chest (Hiki Uke), shift to Zenkutsu Dachi (switch feet in-place) and strike
to the chest with a front elbow strike (Chudan Mai Hiji Ate)

30.9 Kiso Kumite Hachidan (#8)


Theme: kicks/throws. Step forward in Sanchin Dachi before each punch, step back in Sanchin Dachi
before each block. The pattern goes Chest, Head, Chest, followed by:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

Head
Chest
Down
Kick
Kick
Kick

L. A. Kane

Nissin Dachi, Chudan Gyaku Tsuki (middle reverse punch)


Nissin Dachi, Arm Bar (Shisochin)
Nissin Dachi, Grab, Uppercut to ribs
Sanchin Dachi, Grab, Counter kick
Sanchin Dachi, Grab, Counter kick takedown
Sanchin Dachi, Gedan Harai Otoshi Uke, Grab leg from underside, Shuto, Sweep to take
down and Punch
Page 73 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
7) Head

Shift to Sanchin Dachi, Open opponent with Koken Uke, Grab groin and over right
shoulder, pull groin for takedown. (Mawashi Guruma) double strike

30.10 Kiso Kumite Kudan (#9)


Theme: throws. Attacker and defender both use Sanchin Dachi. Block Koken Uke
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Down
Chest
Head
Chest
Head

6) Head

Shift to Shiko Dachi, Grab around back, Right uppercut to solar plexus
Step diagonally across with left leg, Shuto to neck and Osotogari
Sift to Zenkutsu Dachi, Grab head, Crush throat and pull while dropping to Shiko Dachi
Palm heel strike to floating ribs
Shift to Zenkutsu Dachi, Grab head with both hands, Knee strike to face, Pull head back
and punch throat
Uppercut to throat. Attacker punches again to chest, Left Chudan Uke, Right check,
Koken Uchi to throat

30.11 Kiso Kumite Judan (#10)


Theme: Atemi Waza (pressure point attacks). Attacker and defender start in Heiko Dachi. Attacker steps
back with right leg into left Sanchin Dachi then forward into right Sanchin Dachi executing the specified
technique:
1) Head
2) Chest
3) Head
4) Right (round house)
5) Chest
6) Down

L. A. Kane

Step back 45-degrees left into left Neko Ashi Dachi, Jodan Koken Uke, Shift
into Zenkutsu Dachi, Ippon Ken to arm pit
Step forward 45-degrees into left Zenkutsu Dachi, left hand push block, right
middle knuckle strike to right ribs around outside
Shift to right into Neko Ashi Dachi, Pivot into Zenkutsu Dachi, Chudan Ippon
Ken
Hold ground, Left Jodan Koken Uke, Middle knuckle punch strike to temple
with same hand
Step forward into Zenkutsu Dachi, Left push block, Simultaneous bear claw
to throat
Shift back to your right into left Neko Ashi Dachi, Block grab, Middle knuckle
strike to underside of wrist, Pivot to Zenkutsu Dachi, Middle knuckle strike
under nose, Kote Gaeshi straight down

Page 74 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
31.0 Self-Defense Techniques (Bogiyo Waza or Goshin Do)
31.1 Introduction
Even if you have trained in the martial arts for several years, real fights are best avoided. There are
serious dangers, both of serious personal injury and of debilitating legal liability, inherent in any physical
confrontation. If you find yourself in a dangerous situation that you are unable to avoid, use any tactic
possible to get away without a fight. For example, if a mugger wants your money give it to him by
throwing your wallet one direction while running the opposite way. Money is replaceable. Your life is not.
The best defense is to avoid a fight altogether. Once you are committed to a physical conflict, you have
no choice but to see it through to completion.
Street fighting is not martial arts. It is between you and an enemy, who is trying to injure, maim, rape, or
kill you. Whoever is attacking you has probably done it before and more than likely enjoys it. He or she
has probably been hit hard before and has learned how to shrug off pain. You need to hurt him in a way
that impairs his bodys ability to function and takes him out of the fight. Utilize pressure point and vital
area attacks whenever possible to enhance your chances of success. In order to deliver blows with
maximum force aim attacks through your opponent, rather than at him.
According to Massad Ayoob, director of the Lethal Force Institute, a seasoned street fighter will usually
beat a karate expert who has never been in a real fight. In order to survive, you must be prepared to
ignore the pain while mercilessly counter-attacking your assailant. Remember that if it hurts, you are still
alive.
Apply techniques from your training that fit your personality, physique, and general physical condition.
Focus on being offensive. Do not try to get fancy simply think him, down, now. To escape from holds
o
o
and throws, try to cross the T. In other words, if the attacker is at 90 , escape 45 . Similarly, if they are
o
o
at 45 , escape 90 .
There are no rules in a real fight. Do not believe anything your attacker says. Do anything to survive. Do
not stop until your attacker has been disabled and you can safely get away.
Once a confrontation escalates into combat, adrenaline rushes through your system. This dramatically
increases your pain tolerance and helps you survive in fighting mode. This fight or flight reaction
instantly supercharges your body for a short period of time, increasing pulse rate and blood pressure,
while making you faster, meaner, and more impervious to pain than ever before. Embrace your fear in a
fight; it can help you win.
In a real fight, karate training can take over automatically. You can literally watch your body perform what
it has been trained to do, with your fists and your feet or with a makeshift weapon or even a gun, without
really having to think about it that much. That is why we practice repetitiously and realistically. When real
danger arises, pre-programmed responses can take over.
31.2 Eighteen Commandments of Street Combat (by Willie Johnson)
1.

Be aware of your surroundings at all times


Because of the vicious nature of the typical street attack, awareness and avoidance are you best
options for staying safe.

2.

Walk your post in the perfect manner


When you are out in public, be conscious of your body language and your attitude. Safety on the
street requires vigilance. Keep your head in the game at all times and keep your body prepared to
act.

3.

Take charge of your body language and your attitude


Make sure everything you do is expressed with confidence yet in a humble and positive manner. All
street predators look for prey. Like animals, they will often choose targets that appear weak, thus

L. A. Kane

Page 75 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
maximizing their changes of success. Be confident in everything you do, but do not present a
challenge or threat.
4.

Never underestimate your opponent


By definition, an attacker is dangerous. Do not assume that you know what he will do or that you are
more skilled than he is. Be prepared for anything.

5.

Talk
Words can enable you to stall until help arrives or until the attacker leaves. Use conversation as a
psychological weapon to increase your chances of surviving and to create openings for your physical
defenses.

6.

Always be ready for a physical response


Never let your guard down. Be mentally and physically prepared to fight at a moments notice.

7.

Deceive him
Shout for nonexistent friends. There is strength in numbers and in making the attacker believe you
are not alone. Be convincing and use any distraction you can create to your advantage.

8.

Dont get fancy


Once the fight begins, keep it simple. Use well-directed, effective techniques. On the street you dont
get points for executing a move with perfect form.

9.

Do something that is out of place, unexpected, or disgusting.


Try to disorient the assailant and cause him to let down his guard. Make yourself unattractive as a
target or surprise him. That will make your physical defense much easier to initiate.

10. Stay balanced when you deliver a technique


Keep your weight centered over your feet. That will ensure that you stay upright and mobile. Good
balance is also needed if you are to generate powerful, effective strikes.
11. Dont hesitate to use dirty techniques
There are no rules in street fights. Anything goes, including hair pulling, eye gouging, biting, and
scratching. You must understand that brutal reality before you become involved in conflict. Once you
know what you are up against, your resolve to do whatever it takes to survive will increase
dramatically.
12. Never lose sight of your opponent
Even if he goes down, remain alert for possible continuation of the attack so that you are not caught
by surprise. Street attacks often involve multiple opponents and seasoned fighters who know how to
take a punch. Be prepared to continue your defense as long as necessary.
13. Deliver your strikes to your opponents vital areas
Predators will target your weaknesses, so you should respond in kind. The most effective way to
keep yourself safe is to damage him immediately and make him incapable of continuing his assault.
Aim for his knees, eyes, groin, throat, and nose.
14. Shout when you execute a technique.
This action, which is often called a Kiai, will momentarily distract and alarm your attacker. A loud,
forceful yell empowers you, distracts him, and may call attention to your situation. Use it to you
advantage and make it part of your regular practice.
15. Use anything to subdue your opponent
Attackers often carry edged and blunt-force instruments, so you must be prepared to use real and
makeshift weapons as well. Whenever violence is about to erupt, take not of the potential weapons
that exist in the environment and in your pockets: pencils, pens, books, rocks, bottles, briefcases,
garbage can lids, and so on... Be prepared to use them at a moments notice.
16. Use all your strength
To defend yourself effectively, you have to give it everything youve got the first time. Predators will
not give you a second chance.

L. A. Kane

Page 76 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
17. Fight as if your life depends on it
You can never tell what the attackers intentions are. The sad truth these days is that criminals
sometimes kill for the thrill of it or for no apparent reason. You cannot assume that they will limit their
actions voluntarily. You must make them stop.
18. Never stop trying to improve your skills
Join a martial arts school with an instructor who has real street-combat experience. Consistent highquality training is the only way to guarantee that you will have the skills and confidence to prevail
when an attack occurs.
31.3 The Fearlessness of No Fear
In a self-defense situation you must commit yourself emotionally and physically to winning, as any other
outcome may mean your death. Nothing should enter your mind but the automatic impulses of attack and
defense. Failing to devote all your concentration to the conflict will prove your undoing. The story of the
Tea Master and the Ronin sheds some interesting insight on this concept.
31.3.1 The Tea Master and The Ronin
At the insistence of Lord Yamanouchi of Tosa Province, a reluctant Tea Master was taken to Yedo
(Tokyo) on an official trip attired in samurai garb, including the traditional two swords (Katana and
Wakizashi). While taking a stroll by himself in the city he was accosted by a Ronin (a masterless
Samurai, often a criminal), the very thing he feared would happen.
At first he was so scared that he was unable to speak, but was finally able to admit that he was not really
a Samurai. Upon discovering that his opponent was merely a tea master, the Ronin was determined to
take his money. He replied that it would be an insult to the tea masters province if he did not defend his
honor. The Tea Master replied, if you so insist, we will try out our skills, but first I must finish my masters
errand. Then I will return.
The Ronin agreed and the Tea Master rushed to talk with the master of a fencing school, asking how he
might die in the manner befitting a Samurai. The Sword Master, taken aback by the question, said, you
are unique. Most students come ask me how to use a sword. You come to me asking how to die.
Before I teach you the art of dying, please serve me a cup of tea.
Forgetting about the impending catastrophe, the Tea Master prepared tea in the manner he always did
as if there were nothing else in the world that mattered except serving the tea. Deeply moved by the Tea
Masters intense, but natural concentration, the Sword Master exclaimed, Thats it! That very state of
mind is what you need tomorrow when you go to meet the Ronin. First think of serving tea to an honored
guest and act accordingly. Draw your sword and close your eyes. When you hear a yell, strike him with
your sword. The contest will probably end with a mutual slaying.
The Tea Master thanked the Sword Master and went on to meet the Ronin. Following the Sword
Masters advice to the letter, the Tea Master boldly stood before his opponent. The Ronin, who had
previously seen a coward, now faced a person who was the very embodiment of bravery. Instead of
advancing to attack, the Ronin retreated, cowed with fear inspired by the superior concentration of his
adversary.
31.4 Selected Self-Defense Techniques from Kata Applications
The following is a sampling of self-defense techniques drawn from various Kata applications. This is by
no means a complete list. As Kiso Kumite and Bunkai are prescribed and performed by the numbers,
self-defense techniques are a foundation on which to build creativity, spontaneity, and to define multiple
applications from any given technique. Size mismatches, unexpected actions by your opponent, and
other variables need to be considered and compensated for. There is no magic bullet technique to fit all
situations. In short do whatever works

L. A. Kane

Page 77 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
31.5 Hookiyu Kata Self-Defense Techniques
1) Rear Bear Hug
Step forward in right Sanchin Dachi (hourglass stance); simultaneously strike with a left elbow to the
ribs while bringing right hand into a chest block position to create room. Step across with right foot
turning 180 degrees while lifting left hand into a head block. Standing in Sanchin Dachi and facing
your attacker grab their left arm with your left arm. While pulling downward with your left, punch their
temple with your right hand.
2) Left Lunge Punch (chest)
As attacker lunges with a left lunge punch use a right inward chest block to deflect the punch while
stepping back with left foot to a right Sanchin Dachi. Simultaneously raise your left fist to your ear in
preparation for a hammer fist strike to the temple. As you strike to the temple, the right fist returns to
chamber. Grab the attackers left arm at the wrist with your left hand. Drop back with the left foot to
Shiko Dachi (straddle or Sumo stance) pulling the attacker just above the elbow with your right elbow
bending them over. With the right hand strike the face with an upward swinging back fist.
3) Right Lunge Punch (head)
As attacker lunges with right punch to your head, shift in right Sanchin Dachi while executing a right
head block. Grab their right arm and pull it to your right chamber as you punch their floating ribs with
your left fist. Step forward in Shiko Dachi behind attackers right leg. Strike with a left hammer fist to
the groin. With the left foot, step back into a right Neko Ashi Dachi (cat stance) with hands at ready
position.
31.6 Gekisai Kata Self-Defense Techniques
1) Right Hook Punch (head)
As attacker throws a right hook punch to your head; shift slightly back while executing a left head
block. Immediately kick with the right foot to the attackers groin. Stomp down with the right foot and
execute a right elbow to the solar plexus (the attackers face should come down, but the strike should
be no higher than the solar plexus). With the right hand deliver a back fist to that attackers face.
Step back to Sanchin Dachi guard position.
2) Left Lunch Punch (chest)
As attacker throws left lunge punch to your chest, turn your body into the strike, right side leading, like
a swinging door. Simultaneously bring your right arm up and block the strike with an outside to inside
chest block. Be sure that your right leg is behind the attackers left leg. Bring your left hand under
your right elbow in a blocking manner so that you can grab the attackers left arm at the wrist. Right
Shuto into the attackers throat. Sweep them down in a spinning motion over your right leg using the
throat as leverage. While holding the attackers left arm with both hands, stomp-kick their head.
Throw the arm across their body and step back to ready position.
3) Left Lunch Punch (head)
As the attacker punches shift in Sanchin Dachi blocking head. Grab the attackers left arm and pull it
down while simultaneously striking their eye with a right punch. Grab the attackers hair or clothing
with right hand and step forward to Shiko Dachi. Left hammer fist strike to the back of the left knee
then execute a take down by sweeping the knee with the hammer fist and pulling on the hair (or
clothing). Staying in a low Shiko Dachi and using left tiger claw fist, push your right thumb into the
attackers eye while pinning their head to the ground.
31.7 Gekiha Kata Self-Defense Techniques
1) Right Punch (head)
As attacker steps in with a right punch to your head, drop back into Nissin Dachi (side defense
stance) while using your left hand to slap the punch away. Execute a wrist block (Koken Uke) closing
your attacker. With your right hand, grab the attackers arm rotating over to Zenkutsu Dachi and
punching ribs with your left hand.
L. A. Kane

Page 78 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2) Front Two Handed Choke
As attacker grabs your throat, hook your left hand over the crook of their right wrist (Koken Uke).
With your right hand, slap the attackers left ear to break the eardrum. Continuing the motion with
your right reach across both attackers arms and turning left into Nissin Dachi execute a right open
hand down block to free/clear your throat. Rotate over to Zenkutsu Dachi and slap the head again
with our left hand.
3) Double Chest Grab
As the attacker reaches to grab, use your open hand to slap their ears. Immediately drop both hands
into open hand inside blocks to the upper forearms pulling them toward you while dropping into right
Neko Ashi Dachi. Shift up into Sanchin Dachi and thrust both thumbs into the attackers eyes.
4) Right/Left One-Two Punch
As the attacker right punches, right press block across your body to their forearms (open palms)
opening your attacker. Immediately mirror opposite to the other side (left punch; right block).
Continue the Mawashi Uke (wheel block) motion and Marote Tsuki (double punch) to the attackers
abdomen (left hand on top, right on bottom). After the double strike, push the attacker away, using
your fists to push.
5) Right Punch (face)
As the attacker punches, turn your body 90 degrees into the attacker. At the same time grab with our
left hand and deliver a right Shuto to the attackers right arm. Immediately strike the right side of the
attackers neck with a Shuto while hanging onto their arm. With your right foot, sweep the attackers
leg out from under them. After the attacker falls, stomp their knee with a right heel kick.
31.8 Saifa Kata Self-Defense Techniques
1) Left to Right Wrist Grab
After the attacker has grabbed your right wrist with their left hand, cover your right fist and step up
and beside the outside of the attackers arm, pulling your hand free. Immediately reach over with your
left hand grabbing the attackers left arm. While dropping back into Shiko Dachi strike the attackers
forearm with elbow and back fist to the face. Step across the attackers right side while executing a
wristlock throw (Kotai Giashi).
2) Tackle (double leg takedown)
As attacker lunges in with a double leg takedown, step back into a right Zenkutsu Dachi raising both
arms in preparation to strike. With the left hand open and right hand closed, simultaneously deliver
an ear slap and hammer fist strike to opposite sides of the head. Step forward with left foot to Shiko
Dachi while rotating the attackers head to the face up position. Finish with a head slam to the
ground, and then drive your thumbs into both eyes.
3) Left Lunch Punch (head)
As attacker lunges in with left punch, shift in executing a left open hand chest block (Hike Uke). Grab
the attackers arm with the left hand and as you pull downward strike ridge hand to the kidneys,
followed instantly by another ridge hand to the back of the neck. Reach up with the left hand to chin
while keeping right hand on back of the neck. Step back in left Shiko Dachi and twist the neck so that
your hands end-up left above right.
4) Double Push
As attacker begins to double push, step back into left Zenkutsu Dachi and reach over the top of their
arms. Forcefully slap the push down and toward yourself. Immediately strike with both hands to the
collarbones (clavicles). Step in with a right Zenkutsu Dachi and push the attacker away from you.
5) Right Punch (chest)
As attacker punches, turn to your right immediately 90 degrees while blocking with your right arm held
at your side. Reach over with the left hand grabbing the attackers right hand. In an upward swinging
motion, circle your right arm up and then down with a hammer fist to the top of the head. Grab their
L. A. Kane

Page 79 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
head with your right hand and uppercut to the face with your left. With the right hand on the
attackers forehead, push them away.
31.9 Seyunchin Kata Self-Defense Techniques
1) Right Punch
Step in using a right Sanchin Dachi and block with a right hooking block (Hike Uke). Grab the
attackers arm and step back with your right foot into Shiko Dachi, pulling their arm down (sliding your
grip to their wrist). Using your left hand, strike your palm heel to the attackers right elbow
damaging the elbow and bending them over. Reach down with both hands and grab the attackers
knees. Lift and rock back pulling/throwing the attacker backwards. Execute a left heel kick (Kakato
Geri) to the groin and step away.
2) Left Grab to Right Shoulder
As the attacker steps forward grab their arm from the underside with your left hand while driving your
left thumb into the nerve on the inside of the elbow. Immediately reach up and grab the attackers
hair (or ear or clothing as necessary) with your right hand. Pull and twist the attacker down to your
right knee. Left elbow to the face.
3) Right Grab to Left Shoulder
As attacker steps forward, grab their arm from the underside with your right arm while driving your
right thumb into the nerve on the inside of the elbow. Immediately back fist the attackers face with
your left hand. Place your left hand behind the attackers head and pull/twist the attacker to the right.
Right elbow to the head.

L. A. Kane

Page 80 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
32.0 Self-Defense from Knife Attacks
32.1 Introduction
An estimated 70 percent of adult males in the United States legally carry some form of folding knife. The
threat of attack by a knife-wielding assailant is much greater than that of one carrying a firearm. Knifes,
due to their high availability and near silent application, are often the weapon of choice of rapists,
muggers, and robbers. Many criminals have some knife fighting experience, especially if they have spent
time in prison where edged instruments are the weapons of choice. Even an untrained person wielding a
sharp blade can do serious, even lethal damage.
The most common tactic employed in knife fighting is surprise. An attack will typically occur at close
range, unexpectedly, and will be quick and very violent. Many such attacks are made from behind.
Consequently avoidance is the best defense. You must be aware of everything happening around you at
all times. Look not only toward the front and to the sides, but frequently glance behind you as well.
Listen as well as look.
Take special care to avoid potential ambush areas such as building corners and ornamental foliage.
Keep sufficient distance between you and a potential assailant to give you time to react. Minimum
distance is generally considered 21 feet. I recently read an article about a knife defense course where
even highly trained police officers were unable to draw their guns before being cut by a knife-wielding
opponent moving toward them from a distance of 15 feet. If you have an avenue of escape, your best
course of action is to run. If not, use any available weapon (e.g. a garbage can lid, rock, stick, your belt, a
shoe, etc.) to even your odds.
Unlike a gunfight where a bullet can miss, and a fistfight where you can use karate to avoid being hit, you
can pretty much count on being injured in a knife fight. Footwork is the most important fundamental of
knife defense. Your ability to move quickly in any direction will not only help you avoid being cut, but will
open windows of opportunity for counterattack. Knife fights are typically short and brutal. These types of
encounters are extremely aerobic. If you have been cut and are bleeding, you will weaken rapidly and
must end the fight as soon as possible.
There are two kinds of attacks with a knife cuts and thrusts. Cuts generally produce more bleeding
while thrusts can cause more serious damage. Cuts can include slashes, chops, hacks, snap cuts, and
vertical whips. Thrusts can include rakes, jabs, hooks, fencing thrusts, hooks, and loops. Cuts and
thrusts are often combined as an opponent can feint with a thrust then switch to a cut in half a second
with a simple flip of the wrist. In addition to the blade, the pommel of a knife can be used for strikes,
blocks, and pressure point techniques.
32.1.1 Nikkyo technique
Nikkyo is a type of wristlock. We do some wrist exercises as part of warm-up. For instance (referring to
the R wrist) the R fingers are pointing down with the R elbow out. The L hand is placed on the top of the
R (L fingers up) and the R fingers are forced back towards the R elbow. This is essentially Nikkyo. This
is applicable to knife work because when the fingers are pressed back in this fashion it's impossible to
make a grip and hold anything.
32.2 Rules of Engagement
1) Get space and draw attention
Back away and get away from corners, move to open area.
Yell KNIFE! to draw attention.
2) Even the score
Get off belt and use as a whip.
Get off coat and use as padding or shield.
Get shoes off and use as paddles or throw.
L. A. Kane

Page 81 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Throw sand, rocks, or anything else you can.
Use natural barriers such as park benches, trees, or trashcans.
3) Control the situation
Do not allow cuts that go upward. Gravity works to make the cut worse.
Do not enter until they cut. Make them make the first move.
Once you engage do not stop until you know they are out of action.
Strike low with shin sweeps.
Once you make contact, do not let go of the knife and allow it to get back in action.
32.3 Augmented Exercises

Tori
Uke
Uke
Uke
Uke

Approach with knife and attempt jabs and slashes.


Yell Knife, remove belt and attack with whips.
Yell Knife, remove shoes, and hit back.
Yell Knife, throw rocks or sand first, then remove belt and attack with whips.
Combine all of the above.

32.4 Open Hand Exercises


Tori
Uke
Uke
Uke
Uke
Uke
Tori
Uke
Uke

Forward stab.
Step outside, turn and wrap arm. Set in Shiko Dachi and apply arm bar. When the pull, step
around with Nikkyo to disarm. (Saipai)
Step outside, sweep arm inward with cross-block, and grab arm. Shuto to thumb with closest
hand.
Step to outside and sweep arm in with closest arm. With the other hand come down hard on
arm to bend. Grab knife and drive back into Tori. (Seisan)
Step to outside and pivot and hook over arm. Continue to turn and dislocate the shoulder.
Step outside and use closing Hiki Uke block and grab. Pivot and use other arm to ally arm
bar followed by kick to closest knee. (Shisochin, Kiso #4)
Downward stab.
Intercept hand before strike using Jodan Kake Uke and grab. Bring other arm up to control
the elbow. Pivot and drive shoulder to the ground. Use Nikkyo to get knife. (Aikido)
Intercept knife using Jodan Juji Uke, grab and sweep arm down and around, locking grip at
bottom or arc. Step under to apply Sankyo-type lock then throw. (Kurunfa, Kiso #5)

Tori
Uke

Side stab.
Step away and block using forearm in Hiki Uke motion. At the same time Shuto or ridge hand
strike to neck. Slide your arm down and secure Toris arm. Step back and apply Nikkyo to
secure the knife.

Tori
Uke

Upward strike.
Cross-block with Juji Uke and grab anything. Do not let them get another strike. Do
whatever it takes to control the knife and take them out of action.
Cross-block with Juji Uke and continue opening Gedan Kake Uke, circle and raise arm up.
Step in and come down hard on the elbow while moving into Shiko Dachi. Haito Uchi to
groin. Control knife. (Seisan, Kiso #5)

Uke

L. A. Kane

Page 82 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
33.0 Vital Areas (Kyushu)
33.1 Introduction
Crown of Head

Every movement in Kata has


practical self-defense applications.

Temple

Ears

Eyes

Neck
Mandible
Throat
Wrist
Elbow Joint
Kidneys
Coccyx

Solar Plexus
Floating Ribs
Groin

Knee Joint

If you accurately strike or grab an


attackers vital area you can elicit
pain, temporary paralysis,
dislocation of a joint, knockout, or
possibly even death.
The Kata will demonstrate the
proper angle and direction of attack
for each application.
Some of the various vital areas are
drawn on the figure to the left. A
more complete listing follows below
with both Japanese names and
English descriptions.

Ankle Joint
Instep

33.2 Vital Area Descriptions

Tendo
Tento
Komekami
Mimi
Miken
Seidon
Gansei
Jinchu
Gekon
Mikazuki
Dokko
Keichu
Sonu
Hichu

Danchu
Suigetsu
Kyoei
Ganchu
Denko
Inazuma
Myojo
Soda
Katsusatsu
Kodenko
Wanshun
Hijizume
Udekansetsu
Kote
Uchijakuzawa
Sotojakuzawa
Shuko
Kinteki
Yaku

L. A. Kane

Crown of the head at the coronal suture


At the fontanel or space between the crown of the head and the forehead
Temple
Ears
Summit of the nose in the center of the forehead
Circumorbital region above and below the eyes
Eyeballs
Intermaxillary suture just under the nose
Center of the lower jaw just beneath the lower lip
Base of the jaw or mandable
Mastoid process behind the ears at the side of the neck
Back or nape of the neck
Spot between throat and top of the breastbone or sternum
Base of the throat, Adams apple or projection of the thyroid cartilage of
the larynx or suprasternal notch
Summit of the breastbone or sternum
Solar plexus
th
th
Below the armpits, approximately the spot between the 5 and 6 ribs
Spot below the nipples
th
th
Hypochondriac region between the 7 and 8 ribs
Lumbar region at the side of the body slightly above the hips
Approximately one inch below the naval
Between the shoulder blades
th
th
Between the 5 and 6 thoracic vertebrae
Base of the spine
Back of the arm, top of the outside edge of the upper arm
Elbow Joint
Arm joint
Wrist
Inside of the wrist where the pulse can be felt
Outside of the wrist
Back of hand
Testicles
Inguinal region inside the upper thigh
Page 83 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Fukuto
Hizakansetsu
Kokotsu

Uchikurobushi
Kori
Kusagakure
Bitei
Ushiro Inazuma
Sobi

L. A. Kane

Lateral part of the lower thigh


Knee joint
Center point of the tibia (shin bone) and fibula (splint bone on the outside
of the leg)
Inside of ankle joint
Upper surface of instep
Outside edge of the top of the foot
Coccyx (small triangular bone at the base of the spinal column)
Gluteal fold just below the buttocks
Inside the lower leg at the base of the calf

Page 84 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
34.0 Pressure Point Techniques (Atemi Waza)
34.1 Introduction
According to acupuncture theory, there is a definite flow of energy in the human body. The energy starts
in the lung meridian and flows to the large intestine, stomach, spleen, heart, small intestine, bladder,
kidney, pericardium, triple warmer, and gallbladder, ending with the liver. The process is then started
again and continually makes this circuit through the body over a twenty-four-hour period. Techniques
from our various Kata strike, rub, or press these points to help disable an opponent.
Traditional Chinese medicine divides the world into five elements that interact with each other: wood (liver
and gallbladder), fire (heart and small intestine), earth (stomach and spleen), metal (lung and large
intestine), and water (bladder and kidney). Wood destroys earth, earth destroys water, water destroys
fire, fire destroys metal, and metal destroys wood.
Within this cycle of destruction, wood destroys earth as a trees roots burrow into the ground. Earth
destroys water as a clay pot can contain liquids. Water extinguishes fire. Fire destroys metal as in a
forge. Metal destroys wood as a saw cuts through a board. Although pressure points do not work
against everyone, you can usually cause maximum damage using the least amount of force using this
theory.
For example, the lung meridian is considered metal, while the Gallbladder meridian is considered wood.
Since metal destroys wood you would want to strike a metal point first, then a wood point. Grabbing Lung
9 on an opponents wrist followed immediately by striking Gallbladder 20 at the side of the neck can result
in a knockout. Crossing the sides of the body is especially powerful.
Pressure points are rarely manipulated with a straight motion. In most cases you will attack pressure
points at a 45-degree angle. As a general rule, the larger the person or the larger the bone, the larger the
vital point will be. When done properly, most people (more than 80 percent) will react strongly to
pressure point techniques. Some, perhaps 15 percent, will react to some, but not all pressure points.
There are also a small number of individuals who do not respond at all, so do not rely solely on these
areas to stop an attacker. Think of them as an extra bonus
34.2 Diagram
Bladder 3
Bladder 2
Bladder 1

Front

Conception 24
Stomach 5
Small Intestine 17
Large Intestine 17
Lung 2
Triple Warmer 10
Triple Warmer 13
Conception 15
Conception 6

Lung 1
Liver 14
Liver 13

Large
Intestine 4
Large
Large
Intestine 5
Stomach
Intestine 2
Lung 9
9
Large Intestine 1
Large
Pericardium 9
Intestine 11
Heart 8
Heart 9
Pericardium 7
Heart
7
Heart 3
Heart 6
Heart 2
Heart 5
Heart 1
Heart 4
Large
Intestine 14

Back

Gall Bladder 20
Triple Warmer 19
Triple Warmer 18
Triple Warmer 17

Liver 12
Liver 11
Liver 10
Gallbladder 31

Spleen 12
Spleen 11
Spleen 10
Stomach 34
Bladder 40 (back)

Liver 9
Liver 8
Liver 7
Kidney 10
Liver 6
Liver 5
Spleen 6
Liver 4
Liver 3

L. A. Kane

Kidney 3
Kidney 1
(bottom of foot)

Spleen 1

Bladder 7
Bladder 8
Bladder 9

This is not a complete list. Since


Im not much of an artist, all points
are approximate. The following
pages contain more precise details.

Stomach 41
Stomach 42
Bladder 67

Page 85 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Pressure point attacks are extremely dangerous and should not be practiced without supervision from a
trained instructor. Many of the following points are found in acupuncture. This is not a complete list:
34.3 Lung Points
Lung 1

Lung 2
Lung 5
Lung 6

Lung 7

Lung 8
Lung 9
Lung 10
Lung 11

Chungfu or Zhonfu. Measure two inches from the nipple in the direction of the arm.
Count up three ribs. Between the first and second rib from the top, one inch below the
middle of the clavicle. One inch below Lung 2 in the first intercostal space.
Yun Men. Below the acromial extremity of the clavicle in the depression lateral to the
triangle of major pectoralis, roughly six inches lateral to the midline of the chest.
Chitse/Chihtse. On the cubital crease on the radial side of the biceps brachii tendon.
There is also a Lung 5a located one inch down in the valley of the biceps muscle.
Kungtsui/Kung Tsai/Kongzui. Between the brachioradial muscle and flexor carpi
radialis on the radial side of the front of the forearm, roughly seven inches above the
wrist. There is a Lung 6a one-inch below found on the edge of the bone where the
muscle curve meets the straight line of the radial bone.
Liehchueh/Lieque. Open your thumb and index finger and slide your other hand into
the space between them. Your index finger should meet the point on the other wrist.
Lung 7 is roughly one and a half inches above the wrist fold.
Chingchu/Jingqu. One inch above Lung 9 on the radial side.
Make a fist and bend at the wrist. Lung 9 is in the indentation of the first fold on the
thumb side of the wrist where a small pulse can be felt.
Yuchi/Yuji. In the middle of the palmar surface of metacarpal one by the thumb pad at
the center of the first metacarpal volaris.
Shaoshang. On the radial side of the thumb, about one inch posterior to the corner of
the nail.

34.4 Large Intestine Points


L. Intestine 1

Shangyang. On the radial side of the index finger, one inch posterior to the corner of
the nail.
L. Intestine 2
Erchien. In the radial depression in front of the index finger joint.
L. Intestine 3
Sanchien. In the depression on the radial side of the index finger posterior to the small
head of metacarpal two.
L. Intestine 4
Hoku or Hegu. At the midpoint of a line drawn from the web to the thumb to the
confluence of the first and second metacarpal or at the proximal point of the crease
formed by approximating the thumb and index finger.
L. Intestine 5
Yangshi or Yangxi. With the thumb hyperextended, the point is located in the center
of the depression bordered by the tendons of the extensor pollicius longus and brevis,
and immediately distal to the styloid process of the radius.
L. Intestine 10 Shousanli. Measure three fingers width down the forearm from the tip of the elbow
crease on the outside.
L. Intestine 11 Chuchin or Quchi. On the outside of the upper arm just below the elbow, this point is
found at the lateral end of the transverse cubital crease.
L. Intestine 14 Pinao: or Binao. On the lateral aspect of the upper arm, slightly anterior to the
insertion of the major deltoid.
34.5 Stomach Points
Stomach 5
Stomach 9
Stomach 34
Stomach 41

L. A. Kane

Daying. Midline of the jaw in the facial artery groove.


Jengying or Jen Ying. One third of the way up the side of the neck, located on both
sides of the neck (where you can feel a pulse along side the Adams apple).
Liangchiu. In the muscle that runs outside the thigh, two inches up from the kneecap.
Chiehhsi or Jiexi. In the center of the dorsal crease of the ankle joint, between the
tendon of the major extensor hallncis longus and the tendon of the major extensor digit
longus.
Page 86 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Stomach
Stomach
Stomach
Stomach

42
43
44
45

One and a half inches distal to Stomach 41 at the highest spot of the dorsum of the foot.
Hsienku. In the depression between the second and third metatarsals.
Neiting. One half inch to the rear of the seam between the second and third toes.
Litui. On the lateral side of the tip of the second toe posterior to the corner of the nail.

34.6 Spleen Points


Spleen 1
Spleen 2
Spleen 3
Spleen 5
Spleen 6

Spleen 10

Spleen 12
Spleen 21

Yinpai. On the medial side of the large toe slightly posterior to the corner of the nail.
Tatu. On the medial side of the large toe anterior and inferior to the first metatarsiphalangeal joint.
Taipai. Below the posterior of the capitellum of the first metatarsal bone.
Shangchiu. In the depression at the anterior-inferior border to the malleolus medialis.
Sanyinchaio or Yin Ling Quan. Below the knee joint on the medial margin of the
musculus gastrocnemius, one finger width below the inner ankle of the tibia, where there
is a depression.
Hsuehhai or Xue Hai. Two inches above the kneecap on the inside of the leg. Bend
your leg at a 90-degree angle. Catch the center of the kneecap with the center of your
palm. The tip of your thumb will touch Spleen 10.
Chungmen. On the lateral side of the femoral artery, roughly three and a half inches
lateral to the midpoint of the superior border of the pubic symphysis.
Tapao or Dabao. In the sixth intercostal space on the midaxillary line.

34.7 Heart Points


Heart 2
Heart 3
Heart 4
Heart 7
Heart 8

Heart 9

Chingling. Above the elbow, anterior three inches above the elbow in the grove medial
to the major bicpes brachia.
Shaohai. Medial end of the elbow crease. Heart 3a is located between Heart 4 and
Heart 5 and opposite Lung 6a along the ulnar nerve.
Lingtao or Lingdao. Anterior of the wrist, approximately one inch above the crease of
the wrist.
Shenmen. In the crease of the side of the wrist nearest the little finger. The small
indentation below and slightly to the inside of the wrist bone.
Shaofu. In the palm of the hand, toward the little finger, off-center. In the palmar
surface between the fourth and fith metacarpal bones just between the ring and small
fingers when making a fist.
Shaochung. On the radial side of the tip of the small finger, posterior to the corner of
the nail.

34.8 Small Intestine Points


S. Intestine 1
S. Intestine 2
S. Intestine 3
S.
S.
S.
S.

Shaotse. At the ulnar side of the small finger slightly posterior to the corner of the nail.
Chienku.
Houhsi or Houxi. Between the fourth and fith fingers metacarpals, on the fold that
appears when the hand is making a fist behind the little finger.
Intestine 4 Wanku. At the ulnar side of the border of the palm in the depression between the base
of the fifth metacarpal bone and the trigonal bone.
Intestine 5 Yangku. At the ulnar side of the wrist in the depression between the styloid process of
the ulna and the pisiform bone.
Intestine 8 Hsiaohai or Shiao Hai. At the elbow in sulcus ulnar between the olecranon of the ulna
and the epicondylus medialis of the humerus. Flex the elbow to locate this point.
Intestine 17 Tienjung. At the mandible (base of the lower jaw). Located at the edge of the jaw in
front of the ears.

34.9 Bladder Points


Bladder 40

L. A. Kane

Weichung or Weizhong. Located on the back of the knee in the exact midpoint of the
popliteal transverse crease.
Page 87 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Bladder 57
Bladder 60
Bladder 65
Bladder 66
Bladder 67

Chengshan. In the distal margin of the gastrocnemius (calf) muscle, between its medial
and lateral heads.
Kunlun. At the back of the ankle at the middle point of the tip of the malleolus lateralis
and the tendo calcaneus.
Shuku. Posterior and inferior to the small head of the outside metatarsale.
Tungku. In the depression anterior and inferior to the fifth metatarsophalangae.
Chinhyin. On the lateral side of the tip of the small toe proximal to the corner of the nail.

34.10 Kidney Points


Kidney 1
Kidney 2
Kidney 3
Kidney 10

Yungchuan. At the boundary between the anterior one-third and the posterior twothirds of the centerline of the sole of the foot.
Janku or Rangu. In the depression at the bottom of the knee in the inferior border of
the tuberositas ossis navicularis.
Taihsi. On the inside of the anklebone, one-half the distance between the Achilles
tendon and the tip of the ankle.
Yinku. Medial side of the knee joint between the two tendons at the medial edge of the
inner knee crease.

34.11 Pericardium Points


Pericardium 3
Pericardium 4
Pericardium 5
Pericardium 7
Pericardium 8
Pericardium 9

Chutse or Quze. In the transverse cubital crease, at the ulnar side of the tondon of
major biceps brachia. A slight flexion of the elbow helps to locate this point.
Hsimen. Approximately five inches above the transverse crease of the wrist, between
tendons major palmaris longus and major flexor carpi radialis.
Chienshih. Roughly three inches avove the transverse crease of the wrist between
tendons major palmaris longus and major flexor carpi radialis.
Taling or Daling. At the midpoint of the transverse crease of the wrist between
tendons major palmaris longus and major flexor carpi radialis.
The point between the tips of the middle and ring fingers when they are bent to touch the
palm.
In the center of the tip of the middle finger.

34.12 Triple Warmer Points


T. Warmer 1
T. Warmer 2
T. Warmer 3
T. Warmer 5
T. Warmer 6
T. Warmer 10
T. Warmer 13
T. Warmer 14
T. Warmer 16

T. Warmer 17

Kuachung or Guanchong. On the ulnar side of the ring finger slightly posterior to the
corner of the nail.
Yemen. In the web between the ring and the small finger.
Chungchu or Zojngzhu. Between metacarpal four and five in the depression one inch
above the metacarpophalengeae.
Waiguan. Between the ulna and the radius, approximately one inch below Triple
Warmer 6.
Chihkou or Zhigou. In the center of the arm between the ulna and the radius.
Tienching or Tianjing. Superior to the olecranon (elbow bone), in the depression when
the elbow is flexed.
Naohui. In the posterior border of the major deltoideus.
Jianliao. Approximately three inches above Triple Warmer 13.
Tienyu or Tianyou. Behind the ear and down one inch. Posterior and inferior to the
mastoid process, on the posterior border of the sternoclei-domastoideous, at the level of
the angle of the mandible.
Yifeng or Ersha or Tianzon. In the mastoid cavity below the ears.

34.13 Gallbladder Points


Gallbladder 20 Fengchih. One inch above the hairline on both sides of the big muscles in the neck,
next to the occipital nerve where it arches over the occiput.

L. A. Kane

Page 88 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Gallbladder 31 Fengshih. On the upper thigh outside, halfway up the external side of the thigh. When
your arms hang straight down at your sides, your middle finger is just above this point.
Gallbladder 32 Chungtu or Femur-Zhondu. Two inches below Gallbladder 21.
Gallbladder 38 Yangfu. Four inches above the tip of the external malleolus, on the anterior border of
the fibula.
Gallbladder 41 Linchi. Between the fourth and fifth metarsal in the middle, approximately two fingers
up from the bridge between the fourth and fifth toes.
Gallbladder 42 Tiwuhui or Diwuhiu. Half an inch anterior to Gallbladder 41.
Gallbladder 43 Hsiahsi or Xiaxi. On the cleft between the fourth and fifth metarsal bones, a half inch
proximal to the margin of the web.
Gallbladder 44 Chiaoyin or Qiaoyin.
34.14 Liver Points
Liver 1
Liver 2
Liver 3
Liver 4
Liver 8
Liver 13

Tatun. On the lateral aspect of the dorsum and the terminal phalanx of the big toe,
midway between the lateral corner of the nail and the interphalangeal joint.
Hsingchien or Xingjian. Half an inch proximal to the margin of the web between the
first and second toes.
Taichung or Taichong. Between the first and second toe, two inches proximal to the
margin of the web.
Chungfeng or Zhongteng. Halfway between the front edge of the anklebone and the
stringy muscles at the top of the foot.
Chuchuan or Quguan. Approximately four inches above the medial epicondylus of
the femur, between the vastus medialis and the sartorius muscle.
Changmen or Zhangmen. Between the eleventh and twelfth floating ribs at the lower
border of the free end of the eleventh rib.

34.15 Conception Vessel Points


Conception 6 Chihai or Daintien or Tan Tien. One and a half inches below the navel.
Conception 15 Chiuwei or Jiuwei or Hsinkan. At the solar plexus half an inch inferior to the xiphoid
process.
Conception 24 Below the lip and above the chin, one index fingers width inferior to the mucocutaneous
line of the lower lip at the symphysis menti below the midpoint of the lower lip.

L. A. Kane

Page 89 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Section 2 Matayoshi Kobudo
1.0 Matayoshi Kobudo General History
Kobudo was used in ancient Okinawa for self-defense by turning common, everyday items into weapons.
In times of political strife, war faring weapons such as swords and spears were forbidden to the general
populace, which left farmers and fisherman easy prey to armed bandits and pirates. To counteract
decrees that rendered them weaponless, the Okinawans (as well as inhabitants of the other islands within
the Ryukyuan chain) became highly proficient in the use of implements such as water-bucket carrying
poles, boat oars, and gristmill handles as means for self-protection.
Kata were eventually developed, usually named after a founder or village of origin, codifying the various
Kobudo styles. One of these traditional systems, Matayoshi Kobudo, comes from a family that has one of
the oldest lineages on Okinawa and is distinctive in that every member has been involved in martial arts
to some degree. The main differences between this system and others are due to strong Chinese
influences. Overall, the movements in the Matayoshi system are more relaxed and flowing; with both
linear and circular strikes forming a smooth, fluid style. Movement and stances are similar to those found
in Goju Ryu.
The Matayoshi Kobudo system was formed by the work of two remarkable instructors, father and son,
who dedicated their lives to leave us the legacy of their style. Matayoshi Shinko Sensei and his son,
Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei created a system which influenced many other Kobudo schools, and which is
practiced today.
1.1

Kobudo Gi and Logo

The Gi worn at Kobudo training at the Matayoshi Kobudo Kyokai USA is the characteristic Kuro-Shiro Gi
(black jacket with white pants). This combination of black & white Gi is the official uniform worn at MKKU
Honbu Dojo in Okinawa, the Kodokan. It represents the balance in nature illustrated in the eastern
cultures as the Ying and Yang the opposed forces in life.
This interpretation of balance of forces is found in many different lines of martial arts or styles that
emphasized in such simple but deep concepts. Without looking too far away that is the principle or
foundation of the style of Karate Goju Ryu. Go represents the concept of hardness, earth, meanwhile Ju
express the oppose concept of softness, heaven.
The Matayoshi Kobudo patch is very distinctive, characterized by the gold color. The
logo is based in the flower of Kiku or chrysanthemum, which represents the Japanese
Imperial Crest. Matayoshi Sensei is the only Okinawan martial artist honored by the
Emperor of Japan to use the Imperial Flower as a symbol of his organization. The inside
of the logo contains the symbol Mitsu Domoe that represents the Imperial Okinawan Sho
dynasty crest. With this, the Matayoshi Kobudo logo represents the blend of the
Japanese and Okinawan cultures.
1.2

Matayoshi Shinko Sensei

Matayoshi Shinko Sensei or "Kama nu Matehi" (Matayoshi the Kama) as he was often called, was born in
the city of Naha, Okinawa in 1888. As the third son of Matayoshi Shinchin, a wealthy businessman,
Shinko was the only member of the family to become involved in the martial arts. Although Matayoshi
Shinko Sensei grew up predominantly in Okinawa, he traveled later on in his life around different areas of
Japan and China. It was in Okinawa, Hokkaido, and China that Matayoshi Shinko Sensei received the
majority of his exposure and training in various weapon arts. Matayoshi Shinko Sensei would later
incorporate many of the weapons and styles of his instructors to form the foundation of what we know
today as Matayoshi Kobudo System.
Matayoshi Shinko Sensei had the opportunity to experience the art of weapons from many different
instructors. During his teens, Matayoshi began his training in Kobujutsu, under the instruction of Agena
L. A. Kane

Page 90 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Chokuho Sensei of Gushikawa Village. From Agena Sensei, Matayoshi learned Bojutsu, Saijutsu,
Kamajutsu, and Lekujutsu.
Matayoshi Shinko Sensei then became the student of Irei Sensei of Nozato, Chatan Town, from whom he
learned the arts of Tonkuajutsu and Nunchakujutsu. Not long after, at the age of 22, Matayoshi Shinko
Sensei left on an adventure to Manchuria where he joined a mounted nomadic tribe, from whom he
gained exposure in the arts of Bajutsu (bow and arrow while riding a horse), Shurikenjutsu, and
Nagenawajutsu (rope throwing).
Shinko Sensei continued in his travels to expand his knowledge of the art of weaponry, arriving in
Shanghai where he learned the arts of Nuntijutsu, Tinbeijutsu, and Suruchinjutsu. While in Shanghai, he
began to develop interests outside of Kobudo, yet still within the realm of the martial arts. Matayoshi
Shinko Sensei became involved in the study of Chinese acupuncture and herbal medicine under the
instruction of Kinkoroushi. He furthered his studies in China, learning Chinese boxing and Shorinji
Kempo in Fuchow, China.
Because of his abilities and knowledge, windows of opportunity were opened to Matayoshi Shinko
Sensei, and he was able to participate in two very notable moments in the history of the martial arts. In
1915, during the Imperial Memorial Budo Demonstration Festival at the Meiji Shrine in Tokyo, Shinko
Sensei demonstrated Tonkuajutsu and Kamajutsu, while Funakoshi Gichin Sensei (the founder of
Shotokan) demonstrated karate. This was the first time that Okinawan Kobudo was publicly
demonstrated in mainland Japan, and remains a very important event in the history of Kobudo. Later, in
1921, during the honorable visit of Prince Hirohito (Showa) to Okinawa, Matayoshi Sensei demonstrated
Kobudo and Miyagi Chojun Sensei (the founder of Goju Ryu) Karate for the distinguished guest. It was
not until 1935 when Matayoshi Shinko Sensei returned to Okinawa, settled in the city of Naha, and
shaped his experiences to the point of developing the Matayoshi style of Kobudo.
Matayoshi Shinko Sensei passed away in 1947 at the age of 59.
1.3

Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei

Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei, son of Matayoshi Shinko Sensei and successor to the Matayoshi line of
Kobudo, was born in Okinawa in Yomitan Village, located in the Kina District on December 27, 1921. His
father introduced Shinpo Sensei to the martial arts at the very young age of 6. However, Matayoshi
Shinko Sensei did not limit his son to the practice of Kobudo; he also exposed Shinpo Sensei to Kingai
Ryu, a White Crane open hand system. In 1937, Shinpo Sensei's father also introduced him to the open
hand system of Hakaku Kempo, which he learned from Gokenki Sensei. Although Shinpo Sensei would
have various instructors throughout his life, his father remained his lifelong instructor and mentor.
Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei remained in Okinawa until 1938, when he moved to Kawasakishi in
Kanagawaken. He spent 19 years in the city of Kawasaki teaching and training. The year 1957 brought
Shinpo Sensei back to Okinawa, where he taught Kobudo predominantly in Goju Ryu Dojos, namely that
of Higa Sensei. While teaching Kobudo in various karate Dojos, Matayoshi Sensei realized that karate
was growing in popularity, where as Kobudo was not. Matayoshi Sensei wanted to increase the exposure
of Kobudo among the people of Okinawa, so he decided to form his own dojo.
In 1960, Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei founded his Kobudo dojo in the city of Naha, and he called it the
"Kodokan" in memory of, and as a dedication to his teacher and mentor Matayoshi Shinko Sensei. The
significance of "Kodokan" is based on the kanji "Ko" (meaning "Light"), and is a tribute to the "Ko" from
Shinko; for what Kodokan translates to the "Hall of the Enlightened Way".
Once Matayoshi Sensei opened his dojo, he focused on contacting Kobudo instructors and students all
over Japan. His intention was to unite Kobudo practitioners under one goal -- to not only to spread the art
of Kobudo, but also to try to maintain the traditions that had been passed down from Kobudo Senseis of
earlier days. Matayoshi Sensei had a strong interest in promoting Kobudo among young students to help
make them better citizens and contributors to society.

L. A. Kane

Page 91 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
As a result of this interest, Matayoshi Sensei formed the Ryukyu Kobudo Association in 1960. This
association became the foundation of the Zen Okinawa Renmei or All Okinawa Kobudo League, which
formed in 1972 and still exists today.
Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei passed away in Okinawa on September 7, 1997, at the age of 76.
1.4

Matayoshi Yasushi Soke

After the passing of Matayoshi Shinpo Sensei in 1997, his second son Matayoshi Yasushi inherited the
leadership of the Kodokan Dojo to continue the work of his father. His title of Soke of the Dojo reflects the
wish of his father. His function as head of the Kodokan it is very important since he provides guidance
and spiritual support for the Dojo to enable it to operate under the same guidelines that Matayoshi Shinpo
Sensei established. His work is directly related to support Gakiya Sensei since he is the technical
director of the Kodokan.
Matayoshi Yasushi's involvement with the martial arts is always notorious. Currently he is a member of
the Board of Directors of the Okinawa-Ken Karate-Do Renmei and President of the Okinawa Prefecture
branch of the Dai Nippon Butokukai.
1.5

Gakiya Yoshiaki Sensei

Gakiya Sensei was born in 1950. He began his practice in the martial arts at early age. Initially he was
involved with the practice of Karate, earning his black belt in Shorin Ryu. Gakiya Sensei began his
practice Kobudo under the guidance of Matayoshi Shinpo with whom he remained for over 25 years until
the passing of Matayoshi Sensei in 1997. During those years Gakiya Sensei became the closest
collaborator of Matayoshi Sensei, and naturally, was appointed as the successor of Matayoshi Sensei by
the Matayoshi Family.
At the present Gakiya Sensei is a Hachi Dan (8th Degree Black Belt) and he is the current technical
director of the Kodokan Honbu Dojo. In accordance with the dedication of Matayoshi Sensei, Gakiya
Sensei is as committed to promoting the art through the world as Matayoshi was, and often teaches
Gasshukus and Seminars in different countries. Gakiya Sensei visited the USA for the first time in 1998
when he came sponsored by the MKKU to teach at the 1st Annual MKKU Gasshuku.

L. A. Kane

Page 92 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2.0 Kobudo Weapons
Kobudo was used in
ancient Okinawa for selfdefense by turning
common, everyday
items into weapons

Kama
Kuwa

Suruchin

Nunti

Sai

Timbe

In times of political strife,


war faring weapons such
as swords and spears
were forbidden to the
general populace, which
left farmers and
fisherm an easy prey to
armed bandits and
pirates.
To counteract decrees
that rendered them
weaponless, the
Okinawans became
highly proficient in the
use of implements such
as water-bucket carrying
poles, boat oars, and
gristmill handles as
means for selfprotection.
Some of the lesserknown Kobudo weapons
forms are pictured here.

Ueku

Tonfa

A more complete list


with additional insight
into each weapon is
described below.

Sansetsu Kon

2.1

Bo-Jutsu (staff)

It is said that officials (policemen) wielded Bo-Jutsu. According to "The Okinawa Language Dictionary",
Bo is described as "for carrying loads or for martial arts". Bo was one of the necessities of life for
townsmen and fishermen. This art was studied and practiced for self-defense, and excellent techniques
have been handed down.
There are also techniques introduced from China. It is presumed that Sapposhi (high-ranking Chinese
missions) from Fuchow province brought Bo-Jutsu with him. Also, Okinawans went to Southern China or
Shanghai and learned Bo-Jutsu. These Okinawans studied and developed Bo techniques after they
came home. The Bo techniques described in the Chinese war tactics book called "Bubishi" and
"Kikoshinsho" are very similar to ones we are practiced today. Both books say that Bo Jutsu is the
essence and foundation of all martial arts using weapons. After researching various documents on
Okinawan Bo-Jutsu, it seems to be combined with Chinese Bo-Jutsu and evolved to fit the physical
features of the Okinawan people and the political situation of the islands
The Bo-Jutsu forms practiced by the Samurai (warriors) have names ending in "Kon". These art forms
were presented to the king and are distinct from "Son-Bo", the common people's Bo-Jutsu. In ancient
times, the Kuba (Chinese Palm tree) was used as material for Bo. The grain of this hard tree is wavy-like,
the same as oak. Kuba was an ideal material for Bo. It is not easily broken or bent in actual fighting and,
in case it is broken, it's still an effective weapon as the broken point is quite sharp. However, in recent
years, oak has been used as a Bo material. Other hardwoods include ash, Jatoba (Brazilian cherry
L. A. Kane

Page 93 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
wood), and Purple Heart. Although it is somewhat springier than ideal, rattan is sometimes used as well
since it is lightweight and very resilient.
Bo is commonly called 6 feet Bo (Roku Shaku Bo), simply because its usual length is 6 feet. However,
the Bo used by warriors at Shuri Castle was 5 feet 8 inches. This Bo was shortened to fit inside the
house to avoid any disadvantage in case of a fight indoors. Besides 6 feet Bo, there are 3 feet, 4 feet Bo
as well as long ones ranging from 8 feet to 9 feet to 13 feet.
2.2

Sai-Jutsu (Sai)

Chinese officials brought this weapon, shaped like a man, into Okinawa in a trading era. Officer's Chiku
and Saji, who acted as both judge and police at the same time, carried Sai in order to protect the King,
control crowds, and catch criminals. There was a similar weapon called "Jutte" which was used by police
officers in mainland Japan. However, Sai is usually used in pairs with a third sometimes carried as a
back up. It is good for both defense and attack. Sometimes it can even be thrown to stab a runaway
criminal.
Sai implies an ornamental hairpin and it was mentioned in Chinese war tactics book "Bubishi". It has
been actively practiced in Okinawa as a martial art for a long time. Mr. Higa (Gushikawa Tiragwa) who
came to Gushikawa village from Shuri handed down this technique to the late Grand Master Shinko
Matayoshi.
2.3

Tonkua-Jutsu (Tonfa)

First of all, this weapon is known by other names such as Tonfa or Tuifa. According to old Okinawan
documents, Tuifa seems to have been the right name.
This weapon originated from an ordinary household utensil, a handle for a mortar (or a hand mill). Its
main purpose is defense. Attacking with Tonkua can also be powerful with the proper use of the wrist.
This art descended from martial artist Master Irei in Nozato Chatan village.
2.4

Nunchaku-Jutsu (Nunchaku)

It is thought that women invented Nunchaku to defend themselves after Satsuma's subjugation of the
Ryukyu Kingdom about 380 years ago. The idea of making this weapon originated with the tool, which
peels off the bark of Abaca (banana tree) for weaving. However, in Fuchow China, there was a weapon
called "Nisetsu Kon" or "Ryosetsu Kon" but pronounced "Nunchaku" in dialect. Its technique has a long
history and is similar to Sansetsu Kon. Therefore, this Nunchaku Jutsu seems to be influenced from
Fuchow China.
Also called "Sosetsu Kon", Nunchaku is a pair of wooden sticks, usually made of oak, together at one end
by two strings. The art of Nunchaku was developed for self-defense. Easily concealed, similar weapons
are still used today in guerrilla war in Korea and around Southeast Asian countries.
2.5

Sansetsu Kon-Jutsu (three-sectional staff)

Sansetsu Kon, properly called Chinese Shorin Temple Sansetsu Kon, is a historical weapon, which
appears in the Chinese book "Sangokushi". Its distinctive feature is three 70-cm sticks chained together
making it much longer than a Bo. It can be swung around, or as a Bo, using one's whole body space to
fend off an attacker. This weapon developed at the same time as Nunchaku in China. There is also a
smaller Sansetsu Kon, which was developed as a concealed weapon.
2.6

Suruchin-Jutsu (weighted chain or rope)

The development of this weapon goes back as far as the Stone Age. It is said that it was originally used
to chase away lions and tigers. This weapon is a stone tied to a palm fiber rope, which can be 90-cm,
150-cm, 180-cm, or 240-cm in length. Shorter Suruchin can be used to hit an attacker and Suruchin with
L. A. Kane

Page 94 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
a long rope can be swung around and then wrapped around the attacker to bring him down. This martial
art was practiced in Okinawa for a long time, and its technique was perfected by the influence of the
Chinese martial art "Muchi" (rod art). The technique is also similar to the weapon used in "Ryusei" in
Chinese martial arts. Similar weapons are found throughout the world.
2.7

Nunti-Jutsu (spear)

Nunti means Nuchidi (thrusting hand). This Ming-era weapon is called "Sabu" in the Chinese war tactics
book "Bubishi". It is similar to Japanese "Yari" (spear) and was probably brought into Okinawa about 600
years ago when trading between China and Okinawa started. Nunti was originally used as fishermen's
tool. As a martial art, Nunti Jutsu resembles Bo Jutsu, which was performed on Tsuken Island. Two or
three Nunti are used in fighting; one attached to the Bo as well as two at the side or one in the hand for
throwing. The late Grand Master Shinko Matayoshi learned this art from Master Kingai in Shanghai
China.
2.8

Kama-Jutsu (sickle)

Kama Jutsu is also called "Kama Nu Ti". About 700 years ago, in King Eiso's reign, agricultural tools such
as hoes and sickles began to be made of iron. Along with these farm tools, many weapons were
imported from mainland Japan and China in that era. Kama were first used as weapons by farmers
around 1314 when warriors and farmers rose up against King Tamagusuku's oppression. As a result,
three chieftains were established.
Today's Kata came into being after Chinese martial art were brought into Okinawa. In this Jutsu, a pair of
Kama are used separately or connected with a string. There was also a Kama attached to a 150 cm Bo.
The effect of a Kama increases when used in a pair. In fighting, another Kama is hidden behind the back
for throwing. The angle of the Kama to its handle is 90 degrees, but it can be 30, 45, or 60 degrees when
used in a pair, increasing its killing efficiency. It is said that even sword masters avoided fighting Kama
masters. Our Grand Master, the late Shinko Matayoshi, was so skilled at this Kama-Jutsu that he was
referred to as "Matayoshi the Kama".
2.9

Kuwa-Jutsu (hoe)

Kuwa-Jutsu developed in the same way as Kama-Jutsu. Both are edged weapons in Okinawa classical
martial arts. Kuwa was the weapon used mostly by farmers, and it has a sharp edge and handle for
defense and attack. Kicking up mud at an attacker is one of its unique moves. Kuwa-Jutsu was studied
by martial artists and upgraded with the influence of Chinese martial arts before becoming an actual
warfare weapon. Outside of Okinawa, in Fuchow and Shanghai, there are martial artists who are still able
to use this Jutsu.
2.10 Ueku-Jutsu (oar)
This martial art was derived and developed from the art practiced in Shanghai China. There is a legend
in Tsuken Island that in the Ryukyu Kingdom era, a samurai (warrior) called Chikin Uekata Masanori was
defeated in contention for the throne. He was to be executed by being sunk in the sea. However, since
he was a Bo expert, the executor couldn't bring himself to carry out the sentence. So he asked a
fisherman named Asato to take care of this samurai in secret. Asato learned Bo techniques from Uekata
but soon surpassed him and became a Bo expert. Asato was called "Chikin Akachu" because he had a
red sun burnt face.
Ueku is an oar for a boat. Fishermen created these techniques to defend themselves from attackers who
had swords, spears, or Bo. The blade becomes a tremendously powerful weapon. This is a weapon well
suited for Me-Tsubushi (to blind) kicking up beach sand. Ueku is a sword to fishermen.

L. A. Kane

Page 95 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2.11 Timbe-Jutsu (hatchet and shield)
This martial art is derived from Shorin Ken (Kenpo) of China. The late Grand Master Shinko Matayoshi
learned this technique from the Master Kingai. Timbe carries a long history, and in Okinawa it had
already been used in actual warfare in the warring states period. Timbe is a hatchet and shield set. The
shield was made of the bark of palm coated with oil or weaved bamboo covered with hide. The shield
carried the symbol mark of the Ryuha and was used to intimidate the enemy.
2.12 Kurumanbo-Jutsu
This agricultural implement was used to thrash barley or soybeans. In the same line of weapons as
Nunchaku and Sansetsu Kon, its technique is similar. It appears to have been used as a weapon since
olden times. In Okinawa classical martial arts, only this Kurumanbo Jutsu has Keri (kicks) in its Kata.

L. A. Kane

Page 96 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Section 3 Supplemental Information
1.0 Self-Defense and The Law
The classic rule is that self-defense begins when deadly danger begins, ends when the danger ends, and
revives if the danger returns. Neither a killing that takes place after a crime has already been committed,
nor a proactive violent defense before an attack has taken place is legitimately self-defense. You can
only resort to deadly force in order to escape imminent and unavoidable danger of death or grave bodily
harm. An attacker must not merely have made a threat to attack you, but must be in a position where he
or she is obviously and immediately capable of carrying out that threat and/or has begun to do so.
A cornerstone of a legitimate claim of self-defense is the innocence of the claimant. You must be entirely
without fault. If you begin a conflict you cannot claim self-defense. If you allow a conflict to escalate into
a lethal situation when it could have been avoided, you share some degree of culpability and, once again,
cannot claim self-defense.
Depending on the circumstances, almost any form of physical assault can be considered deadly force,
which is defined as, any form or intensity of attack that can be expected to jeopardize or terminate the
life of whoever was attacked. Any blow delivered powerfully and deliberately to a vital part of the body
may be construed as deadly force so long as it can be shown that it was struck with the intention, or
predictable likelihood, of killing. The courts are more likely to interpret such as blow as deadly force if the
person delivering it is:

Physically much stronger than the victim


A professional fighter
A trained martial artist, or
An assailant who attacks with extreme savagery

An example of extreme savagery would be gratuitously raining blows upon a fallen opponent or one who
has obviously given up a conflict, even if they started the fight. While a great majority of deadly force
cases involve the use of weapons, karate students stand a good chance being charged with a crime
resulting from an unarmed confrontation.
Equal force doctrines require law-abiding citizens to respond to an attack with little or no more force than
that which he or she perceives is being directed against him or her. Disparity of force between unarmed
combatants is measured in one of two ways: it exists if the victim is being attacked by someone who is
physically much stronger or younger than he or she, or by two or more attackers of similar or equal size.
Nowhere can a person legally respond to an assault of slight degree with deadly force. In some places,
the law clearly specifies that equal force must be exactly that: the attacked can respond with no more
force than that by which he or she is threatened slap for slap, kick for kick, deadly weapon for deadly
weapon. Practically, you will usually want to respond to an assault with a degree of force sufficiently, but
not greatly, superior to that with which you were threatened. There are two advantages to a slightly
greater degree of force: (1) it places the defender in a more secure tactical position, and (2) it
discourages the assailant from continuing his attack and escalating into a situation where lethal force is
warranted.
A great majority of states require that you avoid a conflict whenever possible. It is best to withdraw,
leaving the scene entirely. At the very least, you are expected to retreat from a belligerent party who
threatens you unless the attack is so savage that there is no time to escape or if turning your back (or
leaving cover during a gunfight) to escape would increase your vulnerability. The only exception to this
rule is within the confines of your own home (and in some places your business). In most cases, if
someone breaks into your home and assaults you, you do not legally need to attempt to retreat.
If you are cornered and have to fight, you must also be in reasonable fear for your life prior to applying
countervailing force. For example, if an armed assailant threatens you, shout something like, Oh my

L. A. Kane

Page 97 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
god, dont kill me with that knife! Not only may this attract the attention of a possible rescuer, but it also
demonstrates for potential witnesses that you are, indeed, in reasonable fear for your life.
1.1

Washington State Laws

The following quotations are from the Revised Code of Washington criminal statutes:
1.1.1 RCW 9A.16.010 Definitions.
In this chapter, unless a different meaning is plainly required:
(1) "Necessary" means that no reasonably effective alternative to the use of force appeared to exist and
that the amount of force used was reasonable to effect the lawful purpose intended.
(2) "Deadly force" means the intentional application of force through the use of firearms or any other
means reasonably likely to cause death or serious physical injury.
1.1.2 RCW 9A.16.020 Use of force When lawful.
The use, attempt, or offer to use force upon or toward the person of another is not unlawful in the
following cases:
(1) Whenever necessarily used by a public officer in the performance of a legal duty, or a person
assisting the officer and acting under the officer's direction;
(2) Whenever necessarily used by a person arresting one who has committed a felony and delivering him
or her to a public officer competent to receive him or her into custody;
(3) Whenever used by a party about to be injured, or by another lawfully aiding him or her, in preventing
or attempting to prevent an offense against his or her person, or a malicious trespass, or other
malicious interference with real or personal property lawfully in his or her possession, in case the
force is not more than is necessary;
(4) Whenever reasonably used by a person to detain someone who enters or remains unlawfully in a
building or on real property lawfully in the possession of such person, so long as such detention is
reasonable in duration and manner to investigate the reason for the detained person's presence on
the premises, and so long as the premises in question did not reasonably appear to be intended to be
open to members of the public;
(5) Whenever used by a carrier of passengers or the carrier's authorized agent or servant, or other
person assisting them at their request in expelling from a carriage, railway car, vessel, or other
vehicle, a passenger who refuses to obey a lawful and reasonable regulation prescribed for the
conduct of passengers, if such vehicle has first been stopped and the force used is not more than is
necessary to expel the offender with reasonable regard to the offender's personal safety;
(6) Whenever used by any person to prevent a mentally ill, mentally incompetent, or mentally disabled
person from committing an act dangerous to any person, or in enforcing necessary restraint for the
protection or restoration to health of the person, during such period only as is necessary to obtain
legal authority for the restraint or custody of the person.
1.1.3 RCW 9A.16.030 Homicide When excusable.
(1) Homicide is excusable when committed by accident or misfortune in doing any lawful act by lawful
means, without criminal negligence, or without any unlawful intent.
1.1.4

RCW 9A.16.040 Justifiable homicide or use of deadly force by public officer, peace officer,
person aiding.
(1) Homicide or the use of deadly force is justifiable in the following cases:
(a) When a public officer is acting in obedience to the judgment of a competent court; or
(b) When necessarily used by a peace officer to overcome actual resistance to the execution of the
legal process, mandate, or order of a court or officer, or in the discharge of a legal duty.
(c) When necessarily used by a peace officer or person acting under the officer's command and in the
officer's aid:
(i) To arrest or apprehend a person who the officer reasonably believes has committed, has
attempted to commit, is committing, or is attempting to commit a felony;
(ii) To prevent the escape of a person from a federal or state correctional facility or in retaking a
person who escapes from such a facility; or
L. A. Kane

Page 98 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
(iii) To prevent the escape of a person from a county or city jail or holding facility if the person
has been arrested for, charged with, or convicted of a felony; or
(iv) To lawfully suppress a riot if the actor or another participant is armed with a deadly weapon.
(2) In considering whether to use deadly force under subsection (1)(c) of this section, to arrest or
apprehend any person for the commission of any crime, the peace officer must have probable cause
to believe that the suspect, if not apprehended, poses a threat of serious physical harm to the officer
or a threat of serious physical harm to others. Among the circumstances which may be considered
by peace officers as a "threat of serious physical harm" are the following:
(a) The suspect threatens a peace officer with a weapon or displays a weapon in a manner that could
reasonably be construed as threatening; or
(b) There is probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed any crime involving the
infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm.
(c) Under these circumstances deadly force may also be used if necessary to prevent escape from
the officer, where, if feasible, some warning is given.
(3) A public officer or peace officer shall not be held criminally liable for using deadly force without malice
and with a good faith belief that such act is justifiable pursuant to this section.
(4) This section shall not be construed as:
(a) Affecting the permissible use of force by a person acting under the authority of RCW 9A.16.020 or
9A.16.050; or
(b) Preventing a law enforcement agency from adopting standards pertaining to its use of deadly
force that are more restrictive than this section.
NOTES: Legislative recognition: "The legislature recognizes that RCW 9A.16.040 establishes a dual
standard with respect to the use of deadly force by peace officers and private citizens, and further
recognizes that private citizens' permissible use of deadly force under the authority of RCW 9.01.200,
9A.16.020, or 9A.16.050 is not restricted and remains broader than the limitations imposed on peace
officers." [1986 c 209 3.]
1.1.5 RCW 9A.16.050 Homicide By other person When justifiable.
Homicide is also justifiable when committed either:
(1) In the lawful defense of the slayer, or his or her husband, wife, parent, child, brother, or sister, or of
any other person in his presence or company, when there is reasonable ground to apprehend a
design on the part of the person slain to commit a felony or to do some great personal injury to the
slayer or to any such person, and there is imminent danger of such design being accomplished; or
(2) In the actual resistance of an attempt to commit a felony upon the slayer, in his presence, or upon or
in a dwelling, or other place of abode, in which he is.
1.1.6 RCW 9A.16.110 Defending against violent crime Reimbursement.
(1) No person in the state shall be placed in legal jeopardy of any kind whatsoever for protecting by any
reasonable means necessary, himself or herself, his or her family, or his or her real or personal
property, or for coming to the aid of another who is in imminent danger of or the victim of assault,
robbery, kidnapping, arson, burglary, rape, murder, or any other violent crime as defined in RCW
9.94A.030.
(2) When a person charged with a crime listed in subsection (1) of this section is found not guilty by
reason of self-defense, the state of Washington shall reimburse the defendant for all reasonable
costs, including loss of time, legal fees incurred, and other expenses involved in his or her defense.
This reimbursement is not an independent cause of action. To award these reasonable costs the trier
of fact must find that the defendant's claim of self-defense was sustained by a preponderance of the
evidence. If the trier of fact makes a determination of self-defense, the judge shall determine the
amount of the award.
(3) Notwithstanding a finding that a defendant's actions were justified by self-defense, if the trier of fact
also determines that the defendant was engaged in criminal conduct substantially related to the
events giving rise to the charges filed against the defendant the judge may deny or reduce the
amount of the award. In determining the amount of the award, the judge shall also consider the
seriousness of the initial criminal conduct.
Nothing in this section precludes the legislature from using the sundry claims process to grant an

L. A. Kane

Page 99 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
award where none was granted under this section or to grant a higher award than one granted under
this section.
(4) Whenever the issue of self-defense under this section is decided by a judge, the judge shall consider
the same questions as must be answered in the special verdict under subsection (4) [(5)] of this
section.
(5) Whenever the issue of self-defense under this section has been submitted to a jury, and the jury has
found the defendant not guilty, the court shall instruct the jury to return a special verdict in
substantially the following form:
Answer yes or no
1. Was the finding of not guilty based upon self-defense?
2. If your answer to question 1 is no, do not answer the remaining question.
3. If your answer to question 1 is yes, was the defendant:
a. Protecting himself or herself?
b. Protecting his or her family?
c. Protecting his or her property?
d. Coming to the aid of another who was in imminent danger of a heinous crime?
e. Coming to the aid of another who was the victim of a heinous crime?
f. Engaged in criminal conduct substantially related to the events giving rise to the crime with
which the defendant is charged?
1.1.7 RCW 9A.32.010 Homicide defined.
Homicide is the killing of a human being by the act, procurement, or omission of another, death occurring
at any time, and is either (1) murder, (2) homicide by abuse, (3) manslaughter, (4) excusable homicide, or
(5) justifiable homicide.
1.1.8 RCW 9A.36.011 Assault in the first degree.
(1) A person is guilty of assault in the first degree if he or she, with intent to inflict great bodily harm:
(a) Assaults another with a firearm or any deadly weapon or by any force or means likely to produce
great bodily harm or death; or
(b) Administers, exposes, or transmits to or causes to be taken by another, poison, the human
immunodeficiency virus as defined in chapter 70.24 RCW, or any other destructive or noxious
substance; or
(c) Assaults another and inflicts great bodily harm.
(2) Assault in the first degree is a class A felony.
1.1.9 RCW 9A.36.021 Assault in the second degree.
(1) A person is guilty of assault in the second degree if he or she, under circumstances not amounting to
assault in the first degree:
(a) Intentionally assaults another and thereby recklessly inflicts substantial bodily harm; or
(b) Intentionally and unlawfully causes substantial bodily harm to an unborn quick child by
intentionally and unlawfully inflicting any injury upon the mother of such child; or
(c) Assaults another with a deadly weapon; or
(d) With intent to inflict bodily harm, administers to or causes to be taken by another, poison or any
other destructive or noxious substance; or
(e) With intent to commit a felony, assaults another; or
(f) Knowingly inflicts bodily harm which by design causes such pain or agony as to be the equivalent
of that produced by torture.
(2) Assault in the second degree is a class B felony, except that assault in the second degree with a
finding of sexual motivation under RCW *9.94A.835 or 13.40.135 is a class A felony.
1.1.10 RCW 9A.36.031 Assault in the third degree.
(1) A person is guilty of assault in the third degree if he or she, under circumstances not amounting to
assault in the first or second degree:
(a) With intent to prevent or resist the execution of any lawful process or mandate of any court officer
or the lawful apprehension or detention of himself or another person, assaults another; or
(b) Assaults a person employed as a transit operator or driver, the immediate supervisor of a transit
operator or driver, a mechanic, or a security officer, by a public or private transit company or a
L. A. Kane

Page 100 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
contracted transit service provider, while that person is performing his or her official duties at the
time of the assault; or
(c) Assaults a school bus driver, the immediate supervisor of a driver, a mechanic, or a security
officer, employed by a school district transportation service or a private company under contract
for transportation services with a school district, while the person is performing his or her official
duties at the time of the assault; or
(d) With criminal negligence, causes bodily harm to another person by means of a weapon or other
instrument or thing likely to produce bodily harm; or
(e) Assaults a fire fighter or other employee of a fire department, county fire marshal's office, county
fire prevention bureau, or fire protection district who was performing his or her official duties at the
time of the assault; or
(f) With criminal negligence, causes bodily harm accompanied by substantial pain that extends for a
period sufficient to cause considerable suffering; or
(g) Assaults a law enforcement officer or other employee of a law enforcement agency who was
performing his or her official duties at the time of the assault; or
(h) Assaults a nurse, physician, or health care provider who was performing his or her nursing or
health care duties at the time of the assault. For purposes of this subsection: "Nurse" means a
person licensed under chapter 18.79 RCW; "physician" means a person licensed under chapter
18.57 or 18.71 RCW; and "health care provider" means a person certified under chapter 18.71 or
18.73 RCW who performs emergency medical services or a person regulated under Title 18 RCW
and employed by, or contracting with, a hospital licensed under chapter 70.41 RCW.
(2) Assault in the third degree is a class C felony.
1.1.11 RCW 9A.36.041 Assault in the fourth degree.
(1) A person is guilty of assault in the fourth degree if, under circumstances not amounting to assault in
the first, second, or third degree, or custodial assault, he or she assaults another.
(2) Assault in the fourth degree is a gross misdemeanor.
1.2

Selected Case Law

The following is some information from selected court cases found in the annotated RCW (where it lists
court cases and articles related to the sections) and the Corpus Juris Secundum (a compilation of law,
mostly common law [court -derived], across the US).
The following is not a legal opinion and should not be used in any way as one. The citation formats are
not particularly correct, but done to help find the original documents. Here is how to read the references:
The first reference is from is the Washington Reports, 2nd series, from the Washington State Supreme
Court - volume 76, page 557, from the year 1969. State v Hill is the name of the case. In the other
citations, Wash.App. is Washington Appellate Reports, from the Washington State Court of Appeals,
which is basically a rung down from the Supreme Court.
1.2.1 Reasonable Force and Self-Defense
"Amount of force which may be lawfully used in self-defense is such force as reasonably prudent man
would use to protect himself under circumstances appearing to him at the time." State v. Hill (1969)
76 Wash 2d 557.
"Degree of force used in self-defense is limited to what reasonably prudent person would deem
necessary under conditions as they appear to the defendant." State v Walden (1997) 131 Wash 2d
469
"...when defendant is about to be injured and when force used is not more than necessary." State v
Hendrickson (1996) 81 Wash.App. 397
"When self-defense is asserted, necessity must be considered by the jury standing in the shoes of the
defendant." State v Bailey (1979), 22 Wash.App. 646.
"Whether force was reasonably necessary...was measured by the standard of a reasonable man in
the circumstances and position of the persons involved in the particular case." State v Madry (1974),
12 Wash.App. 178

L. A. Kane

Page 101 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
"Whether an individual acted in self defense is typically a question for the trier of fact." [That means
it's the jury if a jury trial or a judge if it's a bench, or judge-only, trial] McBride v Walla Walla County
(1999) 95 Wash.App. 33
1.2.2 Assault
Self-defense is a defense, or excuse, for assault. Essentially, if you assault somebody but it's selfdefense, it doesn't count as assault. Assault has an element of a mental state that has to be met.
"...the mens rea [broadly, the mental state or intention necessary for it to be a crime] of assault is the
intent to commit a battery or to create apprehension of harm." "A criminal assault requires intent,
which is defined as acting with the objective or purpose to accomplish a result which constitutes a
crime, and accordingly requires that defendant act unlawfully." "Person acting in self-defense is
acting lawfully, and thus lacks requisite criminal intent to support assault conviction." All from State v
Brown (1999) 94 Wash.App. 327

L. A. Kane

Page 102 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
2.0 The Aftermath of Violence
In the unlikely event that you have been compelled to kill or maim someone in defense of yourself, your
family, or other innocent persons, your first priority should be to obtain medical assistance should it be
required (for you, the person you were defending, and/or the bad guy). Your second priority should be to
call the police.
Even in clear-cut cases of self-defense, expect to be arrested and charged with murder, aggravated
assault, maiming, or similar offenses. Explain to the arresting officer that you are not some punk taking
the Fifth, but that you would rather wait until you have spoken with your attorney before making any
official statement. Call your attorney as soon as you have notified the police and emergency units. Make
no statements to the press for any reason. Not only does the press tend toward a left wing bias, but also
stories about murderers sell more advertising and more newspapers than stories about justifiable
homicide. Always have your attorney make statements to the press for you.
2.1

Medical Assistance

If you have been injured you may have to take care of yourself until professional help can arrive. If you
have been stabbed or shot, your most immediate concern is hemorrhage and the traumatic shock that
results from it. It is a very good idea to carry a first aid kit in your vehicle. Be sure to include rubber
gloves to protect against blood borne pathogens (such as Hepatitis and HIV) if you have to treat others.
Try to stay calm and rational when you are injured. Panic wont do anything but kill you faster as it raises
your blood pressure increasing the impact of shock and hemorrhaging. If you are still in the grip of an
adrenaline rush from your fight or flight reflex, the pain will be significantly dampened. Take advantage of
this time to begin treating your wounds.
Heavy bleeding is controlled first through direct, firm pressure on the injury site. If it is a limb, it will bleed
less if it is elevated so that the wound is above the heart. If hemorrhage persists, use pressure points.
Only in the worst cases should you consider use of a tourniquet, which if improperly used could cause
gangrene or death. One of the most street-proven trauma dressings is a sanitary napkin or a box of
Kleenex.
If you think you might pass out, especially if you are bleeding heavily or it is very cold, you have to get
help if you do not, it will most likely prove fatal. Take a moment to gather your wits and locate the
nearest cell phone, payphone, or source of friendly human beings. If you are alone and bleeding badly,
you need to decide whether to stay or attempt to go for help. Physical activity will make your heart race
faster, increasing blood loss. You are likely to get dizzy and collapse, thereby losing your pressure hold
on the wound and causing even more blood flow. Uncontrolled hemorrhage will cause you to
exsanguinate (bleed to death).
If there is a reasonable chance that a rescuer will happen along soon, you may be better off to put
yourself in shock position and wait for assistance. This is done by lying on your back with your legs
elevated on something or with your legs bent sharply and your toes locked against a wall or similar object
to keep them in position if you pass out. Wrap some garment around you to help keep yourself warm.
This insures that as much blood as possible will remain available to your vital organs.
Pneumothorax is a condition that occurs with a sucking chest wound where the chest wall has been
punctured and its internal vacuum violated. Outside air pressure squeezes the lungs empty and
eventually presses down on the heart causing death. Try to seal a sucking chest wound with plastic. A
plastic drivers license is adequate if you are going to be awake enough to hold it in position. Something
more flexible like plastic wrap or the cellophane from a pack of cigarettes is ideal. The sticky blood will
bond this flexible substance to the wound causing an airtight seal even if you pass out.
If you have suffered a piercing wound on one lung, roll over onto the injured side. This may sound
illogical, but it will actually prevent the good lung from being shut down from the pressure of blood spilling

L. A. Kane

Page 103 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
into the chest cavity. Press your cheek to the ground and turn your head so that if you lose
consciousness blood or vomit will flow out of your mouth without causing suffocation.
If you have suffered a broken bone, basic traction can dramatically reduce the pain and lesson the
likelihood of going into shock. If it is compound fracture with bone splinters driven through the flesh,
traction will slide the bone ends back into place and allow you to more effectively stop the bleeding with
direct pressure.
If a break occurs at a joint, do not try to straighten it. Immobilize the wounded joint with a rolled
magazine, newspaper or similar splint. Lifting the injured hand with your good hand until you can firmly
grasp your lapel best treats a broken collarbone. This holds the affected limb at an angle that
considerably reduces pain.
Postvention includes surgery, physical therapy, and oftentimes requires psychological counseling.
2.2

Interfacing with Your Lawyer

You are a moral, law-abiding citizen who will strike your attackers down only when it is legally and morally
and technically proper to do so. Nonetheless, you will most likely have to resort to lawyers to defend you
after surviving an attack. Your lawyer is just as important as your fists or your gun for self-defense.
Even in clear-cut cases of self-defense, expect to be arrested and charged with murder, aggravated
assault, maiming, or similar offenses. If you are not charged for a criminal offense, there is nothing
stopping your attacker (or his/her estate) from suing you in civil court for damages. You can get out of
legal nightmares the same way you get out of street nightmares through intelligent planning, selfcontrol, and by using appropriate weapons you are trained to use.
Your primary weapon in this instance is your legal counsel. Anyone with a concealed weapons permit
and/or significant martial arts training should find an experienced attorney as an insurance policy against
the unlikely occurrence you will need him or her. Just as you shop around to find a good Dojo and karate
instructor, you should invest some time in finding a good lawyer. You should have his or her work, home,
cellular, and pager numbers readily available in case you need them.
Choose an attorney who specializes in this field. You can get a list of prospective lawyers through the
Washington State Bar Associations referral service. Choose carefully. Your future and that of your
family may well depend on the attorney who represents you in our adversarial legal system.
2.3

Your One Phone Call

Once arrested, your phone privileges are limited to a single call that connects. You will want to call
whomever cares about you more than anyone else in the world and will take whatever steps are
necessary to get you the help that you need. Typically this will be a parent or spouse, not your attorney
directly.
Your one phone call should make no reference to the incident itself that could be used against you in
court. The following is an example of what you should say:
Honey, listen. This is not a practical joke. Im being held at Precinct X of X police department in
the custody of Captain X. I have been charged with X. The address is X and the phone number
is X. This is the only call I will be able to make to you.
Please call the best attorney you can get. I cant discuss what happened over the phone, but I
am innocent and I need your help so that I can get out of here as soon as possible. My attorneys
phone numbers are located in X. If he/she is not available right now, ask for a referral that he/she
would trust to represent him/her.
Please take good care of me. I love you...
L. A. Kane

Page 104 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
Section 4 Rank/Grading Information
1.0 Introduction
The founder of judo, Jigoro Kano Sensei, codified a system of wearing colored sashes or belts, which
was subsequently adopted by most martial arts systems and is used today. This Dan/Kyu system
distinguishes between advanced practitioners and different levels of beginning and intermediate students.
The Dan, or black belt, indicates advanced proficiency. Those who have earned it are called Yudansha
(Dan recipients). The Kyu degrees represented the varying levels of competency below Dan, and are
called Mudansha (those not yet having received a Dan).
Kano Sensei felt it particularly important for all students to fully realize that one's training was in no way
complete simply because one had achieved the Dan degree. On the contrary, he emphasized that the
attainment of the Dan rank merely symbolized the real beginning of one's journey. By reaching black belt
level, one had, in fact, completed only the necessary requirements to embark upon a relentless journey
without distance that would ultimately result in self-mastery.
After establishing the Kodokan Dojo, Kano Sensei distributed Black sashes, which were worn around the
standard Dogi (practice Uniform) of that era, to all Yudansha. Around 1907, this Black sash was replaced
with the Kuroi-Obi (black belt), which became the standard still used. Of this standard there was the
white belt and the black belt. Later addition of green and brown belts rounded out the traditional ranking
system.
The ceremony to receive a new belt is called Reishiki. By following a structure of merit, such as the belt
system, an instructor has a way of monitoring the development and progression of skill of students and
can teach them according to set standards.
There are minimum time requirements for each rank. While it is possible after four years of study to
obtain Shodan rank, separation between Dan ranks are based on year equivalent to the next rank. For
example, the minimum time between the first Dan rank, Shodan, and the second Dan rank, Nidan, is two
years.
Goju Ryu karate uses three Kyu belts, white, green, brown, and three Dan belts, black, Akashiro
(red/white), and red. Colored stripes on both ends of a Kyu belt delineate gradations between Mudansha
ranks. These stripes take the color of the next level of advancement such that white belts have green
stripes, green belts have brown stripes, and brown belts have black stripes.
Akashiro (red/white) and red belts are reserved for the highest ranks and are rarely seen. These belts
represent lifetime achievements and are worn by individuals who have devoted their lives to karate.
Using the minimum time between rank formula, a Karnataka who started training at age 20 would be
eligible for Roku-Dan, the first red/white belt at age 45. Ju-Dan, the highest rank attainable, could happen
somewhere around age 70.
It is important to note that ranking systems between styles are in many instances not comparable. For
example, the term Master is rarely ever used in Goju Ryu Karate, yet it is commonly used in other
martial arts. Both terms Master and Grand Master may be part of another styles ranking system. This is
not wrong, only different. Rank belts are used to bring order to the Dojo, assist in training, show merit for
hard work, and keep your Gi closed.

L. A. Kane

Page 105 of 107

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
1.1

Rank Tables

1.1.1

Ranks & Belts Table

The following Table lists ranks and associated belt colors used in Goju Ryu Karate:
Rank
Number
10th Kyu
9th Kyu
8th Kyu
7th Kyu
6th Kyu
5th Kyu
4th Kyu
3rd Kyu
2nd Kyu
1st Kyu
1st Dan
2nd Dan
3rd Dan
4th Dan
5th Dan
6th Dan
7th Dan
8th Dan
9th Dan
10th Dan

1.1.2

Rank Name

Belt

Jyu Kyu
Kyu Kyu
Hachi Kyu
Shichi Kyu
Ro Kyu
Go Kyu
Yon Kyu
San Kyu
Ni Kyu
I Kyu
Shodan
Ni Dan
San Dan
Yo Dan
Go Dan
Roku Dan
Shichi Dan
Hachi Dan
Ku Dan
Ju Dan

Belt Color

Stripe Color

White
White
White
White
Green
Green
Green
Brown
Brown
Brown
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Akashiro
Akashiro
Akashiro
Red
Red

None
Green
Green
Green
Brown
Brown
Brown
Black
Black
Black
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A

Number of
Stripes
N/A
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A

Min. Time in
Prior Rank
N/A
3 Months
3 Months
3 Months
3 Months
3 Months
3 Months
6 Months
6 Months
6 Months
1 Year
2 Years
3 Years
4 Years
5 Years
6 Years
7 Years
8 Years
9 Years
10 Years

High-Level Requirements Table

The following table outlines essential advancement requirements for each rank through Sandan:
Hokusei Yudanshakai Advancement Requirements
9th Kyu
1. Taikyoku Gedan
2. Kiso Kumite Shodan (1)

6th Kyu
1. Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi
2. Kiso Kumite Yodan (4)
3. Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi Bunkai

3rd Kyu
1. Seyunchin Kata
2. Teaching Kiso Kumite (1-6)
3. Seyunchin Kata Bunkai

Shodan
1. Shishochin Kata
2. Kiso Kumite Kudan (9)
3. Shishochin Kata Bunkai

8th Kyu
1. Taikyoku Chudan
2. Kiso Kumite Nidan (2)

5th Kyu
1. Gekisai Kata Dai Ni
2. Kiso Kumite Godan (5)
3. Gekisai Kata Dai Ni Bunkai

2nd Kyu
1. Seisan Kata
2. Kiso Kumite Shichidan (7)
3. Seisan Kata Bunkai

Nidan
1. Kurunfa Kata
2. Kiso Kumite Judan (10)
3. Kurunfa Kata Bunkai

7th Kyu
1. Taikyoku Jodan
2. Kiso Kumite Sandan (3)
3. Te Waza Dai Ichi

L. A. Kane

1.
2.
3.
4.

4th Kyu
Saifa Kata
Kiso Kumite Rokudan (6)
Saifa Kata Bunkai
Sanchin Kata

1.
2.
3.
4.

1st Kyu
Saipai Kata
Kiso Kumite Hachidan (8)
Saipai Kata Bunkai
Tensho Kata

Page 106 of 107

1.
2.
3.
4.

Sandan
Sanseiru Kata
Sanseiru Kata Bunkai
Suparinpei Kata
Suparinpei Kata Bunkai

Karate Notes.doc

Goju Ryu Karate / Matayoshi Kobudo


Notes
1.1.3

Detailed Requirements Table

Note: this section is still under review by Sensei Wilder and may be subsequently revised
Hokusei Yudanshakai Advancement Requirements
Rank

Kata

Kiso Kumite

Stances & Movement

Hand Techniques

Foot
Other
Techniques Requirements

9th Kyu

Taikyoku Gedan ("H"


Pattern)

Kiso Kumite
(prearranged sparring)
Shodan (1), Ippon
Kumite (one-step)
Shodan

Seiza (kneeling), Masubi Dachi (attention),


Heiko Dachi (natural), Zenkutsu Dachi (front),
Sanchin Dachi (hourglass), Shiko Dachi
(Sumo), Shozenkutsu Dachi (half front), Ayuma
Ashi (stepping), Turning in Stance

Jodan (head), Chudan (chest), and Gedan (down)


Uke (block); Jodan, Chudan, and Gedan Tsuki
Stretching, Common
(punch); Tettsui (hammerfist) Uchi (strike), Age
Mai (front) Geri (kick) Phrases, Counting,
Tsuki (uppercut), Oi Tsuki (lunge punch), Gyaku
Dojo Etiquette
Tsuki (reverse punch)

8th Kyu

Taikyoku Chudan

Kiso Kumite Nidan (2),


Ippon Kumite Nidan

Kiba Dachi (side), Kokutsu Dachi (back), Tsugi


Ashi (shifting)

Chudan Uke w/ focus on block/control "double"


technique, Kakai Uke (hooking), Ude Uke
(forearm), Shuto Uchi (knife hand)

Yoko Geri (side),


Beginning & Ending
Mikazuki Geri (hook) Class Formalities

7th Kyu

Taikyoku Jodan

Kiso Kumite Sandan (3), Hachiji Dachi (natural w/ toes out), Stance
Ippon Kumite Sandan
dynamics

Te Waza Dai Ichi, Jodan Uke w/ focus on


block/control "double" technique, Hiki Uke
(pulling/grasping), Open vs. Closed-hand
blocking

Ukemi Waza (breakfall


Ashe Uke (leg block),
techniques), Daruma
Kakato Geri
(exercises), Goju Ryu
(stomping heel)
History

6th Kyu

Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi,


Gekisai Kata Dai Ichi
Bunkai, Sanchin Kata
(pattern)

Kiso Kumite Yodan (4),


Ippon Kumita Yodan

Renoji Dachi ("L")

Mawashi Uke (circular), Koken Uke (wrist), Ura


Uke (backhand), Sukui Uke (scooping), Harai
Uke (sweeping), Marote Tsuki (double punch),
Hiji Ate (elbow strike)

Mawashi Geri
(wheel), Ashi Bari
(foot sweep), Ushiro
Geri (back)

5th Kyu

Gekisai Kata Dai Ni,


Gekisai Kata Dai Ni
Bunkai, Sanchin Kata
(pattern & breathing)

Kiso Kumite Godan (5),


Ippon Kumite Godan

Neko Ashi Dachi (cat), Bensoko Dachi (crossfoot)

Juji Uke (double), Yoko Hiji Ate (horizontal


Konsetsu Geri (joint
elbow), Tate Tsuki (standing fist), Sumi Gashi (sit
kick)
throw)

4th Kyu

Saifa Kata, Saifa Kata Kiso Kumite Rokudan


Bunkai, Sanchin Kata (6), Ippon Kumite
(focus & power)
Rokudan

Nissin Dachi (side defense), Hakusura Dachi


(crane)

Osae Uke (press), Hiji Uke (elbow), Nai Wan


Uchi (dead arm), Uraken Uchi (whipping
backfist), Kiri Kaeshi (bent arm takedown)

Focus , Power, &


Osotogari (leg sweep
Control; First Aid &
throw)
CPR

3rd Kyu

Teaching Kiso Kumite (1Seyunchin Kata,


6), Goshin Do Kumite
Seyunchin Kata Bunkai (self-defense
applications)

Yama Uke (mountain), Hara Uke (archer), Ura


Tsuki (short uppercut), Shime Waza (choking
techniques)

Mai Yoko Geri (frontMethod of Instruction


side)

2nd Kyu

Seisan Kata, Seisan


Kata Bunkai

Kiso Kumite Shichidan


(7), Ippon Kumite
Shichidan, 8-Direction
Kumite

1st Kyu

Saipai Kata, Saipai


Kata Bunkai, Tensho
Kata

Kiso Kumite Hachidan


(8), Ippon Kumite
Hachidan, Jiyu Kumite
(continuous controlled
free sparring)

Shodan

Shishochin Kata,
Shishochin Kata
Bunkai

Kiso Kumite Kudan (9),


Ippon Kumite Kudan

Nidan

Kurunfa Kata, Kurunfa Kiso Kumite Judan (10),


Kata Bunkai
Ippon Kumite Judan

Sandan

Sanseiru Kata,
Sanseiru Kata Bunkai,
Suparinpei Kata,
Suparinpei Kata
Bunkai

L. A. Kane

Evasion, Blending

Combination
techniques, Meditation,
Kyusho (vital areas),
Legal Aspects of Karate

Principles of Goju Ryu

Shotei Uchi (palm-heel), Nukite Tsuki (finger jab),


Konsetsu Waza (joint manipulation techniques)

Student Evaluation &


Testing

Ippon Ken Tsuki (one knuckle fist), Kaikoken


Tsuki (crabshell fist), Atemi Waza (pressure
points)

Seminar/
Demonstration

Research Paper

Mawashe Tobi Geri


(jumping wheel)

Page 107 of 107

Karate Notes.doc