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  • I. Identifying Information

Report Date: October 22, 2014 Completed by: Susan Barry

Assessment Dates: September 15, October 9th, 29th, 2014

Examiner’s Name: Susan Barry Teacher’s name: Mrs.

School: Sample School

Student: Lima D.O.B: 6/21/2005 Age: 9-4 years Grade: 3.2 Gender: Female

Parents: Al Jaz Address: 123 Main St. City: Tiburon Phone: (415)123-4567

II. Reason for Referral

Lima was previously assessed for special education services in May 2012. There had been concerns regarding her academics and her receptive and expressive language skills. Due to limited English proficiency, she did not qualify. She was retained in 2013. During her second year in second grade, Lima was referred again for testing by the Student Study Team as part of an intervention plan to determine eligibility for special education and related services on 12/11/2013. The initial meeting to determine eligibility was held on

2/25/2014.

III. Background Information Family History:

Lima is an eight year old girl from Yemen who has been here in the United States since she

was five. Her original language is Arabic and her parents speak Arabic and English (father) at home. Her mother only speaks Arabic. Lima speaks English at school and refuses when asked to say an Arabic word at school. Lima’s father is a taxi driver (this might be relevant when it comes to doing homework since the mother only speaks Arabic and the father may be working), she has an older brother in middle school, a younger baby sister and her mother is currently pregnant.

Medical History:

Lima has health concerns which include weak muscles causing her to move slower than other children her age. She walks slowly down stairs holding the rail. This condition makes it hard for her to do physical activity that requires her to move up and down. Her hands shake when she performs fine motor tasks. Her initial IEP team recommended that she receive Occupational Therapy Services because her motor development and daily living skills appear to be below her age level. Since Lima has come to the SDC class, she is receiving OT services in small group sessions and is also receiving Physical Therapy services one on one since October, 2014. Her father has been taking her for tests and scans at SFU recently, but we do not know the results yet. Lima was tested for vision by the school nurse who found her left eye for far vision tested at 20/40 (borderline for referral) and her right eye for far vision tested at 20/30.The results of her vision testing did not affect the results of the assessment scores. Lima wears glasses now.

Social/Emotional History:

Lima is generally happy, and excited to be in school. She engages in her work readily, but sobs and cries unexpectedly throughout the day about social issues and unexpected issues such as not wanting to listen to herself read on a school reading program, or thinking everyone is looking at her eat her lunch. She will cry and say she is afraid when she is asked to do something new such as play a new game in P.E. She speaks up easily and is aware of events around her and she complains or tattles when someone bumps her, yet she will get too close to others trying to be friendly. She is learning how to interact appropriately.

Academic History:

Lima’s California Standards Test score showed that she was below basic in English/Language

Arts and far below basic in Math (February 2014). The results of DIBELS reported: read 46 words correctly with 5 errors, able to retell 5 words about the passage (2 nd grade middle target is 72WPM). In Accelerated Reader (reading) she received a 1.5 grade equivalent and in AR (math) a .8 grade equivalent. The results of this assessment showed that Lima was in the below average range for reading, writing and math and stated that she would benefit from additional support in these areas. Her cognitive level presented with a standard score of 91, as reported by the Speech and Language Pathologist (M.S. CF-SLP). Lima’s California English Language Development Test (CELDT) scores from this year in September 2014 were: Listening-intermediate; Speaking-

early intermediate, Reading-beginning; Writing-beginning. Lima’s strength in communication development are in basic concepts and sequencing as well as semantic understanding of early vocabulary words. She has difficulty with listening comprehension and formulation of spontaneous language. Lima did not qualify for Speech and Language Services at this time, even though her receptive and expressive language skills are in the below average range when compared to her same-aged peers. The evaluator recommended that she be re-assessed once her English has improved to at least basic proficiency.

Lima’s parents had expressed concerns regarding her academic progress. She was retained in

  • 2 nd grade, 2013, because she was not ready for 3 rd grade. The 2 nd grade teacher, Ms. M., reported that Lima was well behaved in class, but had trouble with socialization with her peers and is

behind her peers academically. This is Lima’s first year at this school. At the beginning of the year, she was put into a regular third grade classroom and was struggling academically and socially. The teacher requested a SST meeting and they decided she would be best served in the SDC class. At first she missed having more students in her class, but now that she is familiar, she is happy to be there.

Present Levels of Achievement:

Lima is a bright girl and puts noble effort in her school work. She is at first grade level in her

reading and her math. She feels successful in the small group that she is in, but is sloppy in her work since she thinks faster than she writes and makes mistakes sometimes. She knows all the first hundred sight words and demonstrates ease in decoding, but lacks the vocabulary to comprehend the literature. She understands the simple concepts such as baby or puppy, but when she attempts to relates a story plot, she leaves out essential details. She can tell partial facts about a story. She doesn’t’ tend to read with expression and doesn’t make personal connection with what she is reading. Vocabulary and reading/rereading would be good tools for her. Lima is learning money. She is at the beginning level of identifying coins and learning how much they are each worth. She does not identify the coin worth the most amount of cents yet even though she can recognize each coins and its amount. In addition, she is adding single digit numbers to 20 and using manipulatives to learn carrying.

IV. Observations Classroom observation:

Lima was involved in a comprehensive program this week at the school called Dive Deep. She and all the students from the SDC were in the Animal Ambassadors group. The group had about 40 students from grades 3-5 and met together every day to study domesticated animals and non-domesticated animals. The curriculum included videos, class discussions and handouts to complete, a painting project, visitors from the wild care center and SPCA came, there was a field trip to the Marine Mammal Center, and included give-back projects and other crafts. When Lima first heard about Dive Deep week she cried and said she did not want to do it, that she was scared. After discussions of what to expect and explanations that she did not have to go in the water to dive deep, she was willing to participate. Lima enjoyed the week and participated in all the activities with interest, except she made it clear she did not want to pet the wild animals (a stuffed spotted owl and a pelican). She did not interact with the other students during the videos or completing the handout sheets, she worked on her packet independently. When she did get up to get a drink of water, she walked through the most congested part of the room, interrupting and bumping other students, then complained they were being mean to her. She loved the painting and craft projects and was positively engaged socially. Lima has said, “What does that mean?” often in class, indicating her difficulty with language reception. When given a chance to say a number in Arabic during Physical Education class, she looked frightened and said she was only supposed to speak English at school. When Lima worked in small group instruction for reading and math, she was the first one finished and was ready to move on. She worked quickly, using messy writing and did not notice if she had made a mistake. She engaged her work readily and happily. She was motivated to do well. When one of her classmates was not working, she often tattled and became involved in a negative social interaction crying.

V. Formal Assessment Results

Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Second Edition (KTEA-II) The KTEA-II is a battery of comprehensive academic test used to test a student’s acquired knowledge in the areas of reading, math, written language, and oral language.

Lima and the examiner sat in a quiet room with no distractions. Lima was tested over two days and the tests were broken into manageable parts. Lima was attentive and cooperative during testing most of the time. She was confident when given the Letter and Word Recognition subtest and expressed, “I’m smart”. However, the Written Expression subtest was particularly difficult. Lima verbalized, “I don’t know” and “I don’t want to do it”. This completed Lima’s assessments. Lima attempted all other tasks that were presented and these scores appear to be a valid assessment of her academic skill. The Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, second edition was used to assess Lima’s skills in reading, math, writing and oral expression.

Grade Norms: Fall, Grade 3

Subtests

Standard Scores*

Percentiles

Grade Equivalents

       

Letter and Word Recognition

90

25

 

2.1

Reading Comprehension

80

9

 

1.7

Reading Composite

84

14

Below average

       

Math Concepts and Applications

58

0.3

 

K.7

Math Computation

66

   

1.2

Math Composite

62

1

Lower extreme

       

Written Expression

49

<0.1

 

K.7

Spelling

83

13

 

1.7

Written Language Composite

66

1

Lower extreme

       

Oral expression

49

<0.1

Lower extreme

<K.0

       
       

Nonsense Word Decoding

80

9

Below average

1.3

       
       

Decoding Composite*

85

 
  • 16 Average

       

Word Recognition Fluency

89

 
  • 23 <3.0

Average

       
       

*100 is average

     
       
       
       

Age Equivalent Scores

Subtests

Standard Scores*

Percentiles

Age Equivalents

       

Letter and Word Recognition

83

13

Below average

7:9

Reading Comprehension

75

5

Below average

7:0

Reading Composite

77

6

Below average

       

Math Concepts and Applications

58

.3

Lower extreme

6:0

Math Computation

68

2

Lower extreme

6:9

Math Composite

60

0.4

Lower extreme

       

Written Expression

57

0.2

Lower extreme

6:3

Spelling

78

7

Below average

7:0

Written Language Composite

67

1

Lower extreme

       

Oral Language composite

     

Oral expression

53

0.1

Lower extreme

<4:6

       

Nonsense Word Decoding

79

8

Below average

6:3

Sound-symbol Composite

     
       

Decoding Composite*

80

9

Below Average

       

Word Recognition Fluency

81

10

Below average

<8:0

       

Reading Fluency Composite

     
       

*100 is average

     
       
       

Subtests

Standard Scores*

Percentiles

Age Equivalents

       

Letter and Word Recognition

83

13

Below average

7:9

Reading Comprehension

75

5

Below average

7:0

Reading Composite

77

6

Below average

       

Math Concepts and Applications

58

.3

Lower extreme

6:0

Math Computation

68

2

Lower extreme

6:9

Math Composite

60

0.4

Lower extreme

       

Written Expression

57

0.2

Lower extreme

6:3

Spelling

78

 
  • 7 Below average

7:0

Written Language Composite

67

 
  • 1 Lower extreme

       

Oral Language composite

     

Oral expression

53

0.1

Lower extreme

<4:6

       

Nonsense Word Decoding

79

 
  • 8 Below average

6:3

Sound-symbol Composite

     
       

Decoding Composite*

80

 
  • 9 Below Average

       

Word Recognition Fluency

81

10

Below average

<8:0

       

Reading Fluency Composite

     
       

*100 is average

     
       
       
The KTEA-II is structured into four comprehensive composites, each containing two subtests. Reading: Letter and Word

The KTEA-II is structured into four comprehensive composites, each containing two subtests. Reading:

Letter and Word Recognition: the student identifies letters and pronounces words of gradually

increasing difficulty. Most words are irregular to ensure that the subtest measures word recognition (reading vocabulary) more than decoding ability. Reading Comprehension: For the easiest items, the student reads a word and points to its corresponding picture. In following items, the student reads a simple instruction and responds by performing the action. In later items, the student reads passages of increasing difficulty and answers literal or inferential questions about them. Finally, the student rearranges five sentences into a coherent paragraph, and then answers questions about the paragraph.

Math:

Math Concepts & Applications: The student responds orally to test items that focus on the application of mathematical principles to real-life situations. Skill categories include number

concepts, operation concepts, time and money, measurement, geometry, data investigation, and higher math concepts. Math Computation: The student writes solutions to math problems printed in the Student Response Booklet. Skills assessed include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division operations; fractions and decimals; square roots, exponents, signed numbers, and algebra.

Written Language:

Written Expression: Kindergarten and pre-kindergarten children trace and copy letters and write

letters from dictation

At Grades 1 and higher, the student completes writing tasks in the context

.. of an age-appropriate storybook format. Tasks at those levels include writing sentences from dictation, adding punctuation and capitalization, filling in missing words, completing sentences, combining sentences, writing compound and complex sentences, and starting at Spring of Grade 1, writing an essay based on the story the student helped complete. Spelling: The student writes words dictated by the examiner from a steeply graded word list. Early items require students to write single letters that represent sounds. The remaining items require students to spell regular and irregular words of increasing complexity.

Oral Language:

Listening Comprehension: The student listens to passages played on a CD and then responds orally to questions asked by the examiner. Questions measure literal and inferential comprehension. Oral Expression: The student performs specific speaking tasks in the context of a real-life scenario. Tasks assess pragmatics, syntax, semantics, and grammar. The KTEA-II contains four further assessing composites formed by the reading-related subtest. The composites and subtests are: Sound-Symbol-Phonological Awareness, Nonsense Word Decoding; Decoding-Letter & Word Recognition, Nonsense Word Decoding; Oral Fluency-Associational Fluency, Naming Facility (RAN); Reading Fluency Word Recognition Fluency, Decoding Fluency. This report contains:

Nonsense Word Decoding: The student applies phonics and structural analysis skills to decode invented words of increasing difficulty. Word Recognition Fluency: The student reads isolated woards as quickly as possible for one minute.

VI. Informal Assessment Results

Testing observation: Lima willingly participated in testing. She was assessed in a quiet environment with minimal distractions and was provided breaks when necessary. She was polite and cooperative throughout testing.

Lima was given the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey. Her answers indicated that she enjoys reading and has a positive attitude toward reading most of the time, although given the choice to play or read, she would rather play. She was not able to answer two of the questions because she did not know what they were and asked, “What’s that?”. One was a bookstore and the other was a dictionary. In the Interest Inventory Interview, Lima’s identified her favorite book at home as Noisy Breakfast which she said while giggling. Her interests are mostly home related having to do with food and playing. When asked why she thinks people read and write she said, “Because it makes you think.”

Direct Reading Assessment 2

The DRA2 produced by Pearson is a reading assessment that scores reading engagement, oral reading fluency and comprehension. The assessment includes a teacher analysis that contains a continuum for assisting in scoring the result which was particularly useful. The reverse side of the directions for filling out the continuum listed focused instructions for early readers separating each category into areas of need. The assessment chosen by the SDC teacher was a Level I, an appropriate level for Lima was administered on 9/15/14. Her accuracy rate was at an independent level of 96%. She had 5 miscues including one self-correct. No words were prompted. Her miscues did not change the inferred meaning of the text and contained similar visual and blending letter sounds as the actual words in the text, such as talkingfor takingand letfor left. Her score for reading engagement was at the developing level because she could not identify books that she likes or topics of interest. Her oral fluency was low, but within an independent reading level range indicating that she reads in short phrases most of the time and that she self-corrected once, but not on other miscues. Her comprehension score was at the developing level even though her strengths was in identifying characters by name, and recounting and connecting three events in

the story, her reflection to the story was unrelated with no reason for her response and she made no connections personally.

Qualitative Reading Inventory 5

Lima was administered the QRI5 from Level I, on 10/8/14. Prior to Lima reading the story, the examiner and Lima discussed concept questions. Lima knew what a puppy was and thought that a child should get everything they wanted for their birthday (she mentioned things like cake, ice cream, party hats). When asked what an animal care center was, she did not know. This could have affected her understanding of the story and I would have changed that description for her as a pet store so she would have a better understanding of the story. This concept was difficult for her to understand and when she retold the story, this part was left out. Lima read with 95% accuracy. She had 10 miscues, she skipped over a short phrase and inserted

two words. This put her in an instructional level for total accuracy and total acceptability. She did not self-correct and completely skipped over the work PlayStation. The concepts that were familiar to her were: birthday, the age of the boy, the red bike, the puppy, the father going to the store and not having enough money, singing Happy Birthday and the best birthday ever. She did

not know the word “worker” and said “walk?” which was out of context. She knew that everyone

sang Happy Birthday at the end but did not know where that took place. Lima was able to recall 11 of the 44 ideas listed in the assessment. She was able to answer 3 out 6 explicit questions indicating a frustration level. The drawback of not knowing the animal care center made key

elements in this story difficult for Lima to comprehend, but she did enjoy the story because the topic of birthdays and puppies elicited a delightful response from her.

VII Assessment Results and Interpretation

Reading:

Letter and Word Recognition subtest of the KTEA-II Lima was asked to read a series of real words. Her score was at the 13 th percentile. She was able to read words such as: chalkboard, hours, cent, magazine, and tongue. Her errors included: unwelcome, leftover, chain, pleasure and bought. Comprehension subtest: Lima was asked to read and follow simple directions such as : close eyes, turn around, smile, and lick ice cream, all of which she was able to do. Lima was then asked to read a short passage and answer comprehension questions. Lima responded without

pause whether she was correct or not. The examiner must follow a specific script and is not able to prompt Lima to look back in the passage. Her score was in the 5 th percentile. Word Recognition Fluency: Lima scored in the 10 th percentile in this subtest. She was asked to read rows of words with increasing difficulty for one minute. Lima was able to read words such as: shoes, stove, late, watch and behind. She was not able to read kneel, understood, guess, and heard. Nonsense Word Decoding: Lima score was at the 9 percentile. Errors occurred reading short vowels as long vowels and adding letters that were not there. Lima’s Reading Composite Score on the KTEA-II was in the 6 th percentile and a standard score of 77. Her Decoding Composite was in the 9 th percentile. This score is based on the sum of her scores in Letter and Word Recognition and Nonsense Word Decoding. Math:

Math Concepts & Applications: The KTEA-II asked Lima to use reasoning and math concepts and their application to meaningful problem solving. Lima was able to look at a picture and determine if there were more teddy bears than people, she was able to show 4 out of 7 teddy bears, and look at a simple graph and correctly answer more bananas were ordered. She was not able to identify in a row of four flowers which one was the shortest, in a grouping of four items (feather, lamb, airplane or banana) when asked which was the heaviest, she said the lamb. Lima could not identify the subtraction symbol. Lima’s scored at the 3 rd percentile. Computation: On the KTEA-II Math Computation subtest Lima was asked to write the number of cookies in the picture, she was asked to fill in the missing number 8 in a line of numbers 4-9, write the number 6 and 14 and complete 4 one-digit addition problems. Lima was not able to do any one-digit subtraction problems and asked, “What is that?” She attempted to add two digit addition problems with carrying. Lima scored in the 2 nd percentile. Limas score on the Math Composite of the KTEA-II was at the 0.4 percentile and a standard score of 60. Lima has not learned subtraction yet, and is learning how to carry but was not able to complete a 2 digit addition problem correctly even though she tried.

Written Language:

Spelling: Lima was asked on the KTEA-II to write words that were dictated. She was able to correctly spell words such as: came, she, all, with, they, and went. Her error included:/wen/

Written Expression: On KTEA-II subtest for written expression, Lima was asked to add for/wind/,/drov/ for /drove/ and /cohuld/ for /could/. Her score was at the 7 th percentile. Punctuation marks, words, complete sentences, and compose complex sentences using correct spelling, grammar and rules of punctuation and capitalization. She was also asked to write a retell of the story. The writing activities were part of a story called “The Amazing Scrapbook”. Lima was able to write her first and last name, but when asked to write the first sentence, she wrote two words not capitalizing “I”. On the next page she put in a question mark. The following page asked her to combine two sentences into one and she rewrote the two sentences as she saw them omitting the punctuation. When asked to list countries whose names were spelled out already, using punctuation, she wrote China? This subtest appeared to be the most

challenging for Lima. Throughout the subtest Lima stated, “I can’t do this”, “I don’t want to”. Lima’s scores were at the 0.2 percentile. Lima’s score on the Written Language Composite of the KTEA-II was at the 1 st

percentile and a standard score of 67. She was able to write her first and last name using correct capitalization. Lima had the most difficulty with this subtest.

Oral Language:

Oral expression: On the KTEA-II subtest for oral expression, Lima was asked to look at pictures and to complete a sentence using the pictures. Lima was able to complete sentences using two or three words or simple phrases. To find out if the flowers were daisies Lima said she would say,

“May I have some daisies, please?” When asked to tell why people should put their trash in the trash can, she said, “It makes clean”. Showing a picture of a store window with a scooter she was

asked what she would say to get the storekeeper to get him to show the scooter to her. Lima said,

“I need a scooter”. Asked to describe the girl getting off the bus and saying hello using the word and, Lima said, “She said hello”. Lima score was at the 0.1 percentile. Listening Comprehension: unable to give the give this assessment due to not having the CD.

VIII Transition:

Lima is presently a third grader in the SDC classroom. This will serve her well since she needs the extra help, individual attention, and can work and learn at her actual learning level. She will be there for two more years and hopefully by the time she ends fifth grade will be able to attend a middle school with help from the Learning Center. This is the first year in school for Lima where

she has been given what she needs. In the opinion of the reporter, Lima will do well and blossom in this circumstance.

IX Recommendations:

To improve Lima’s reading skills:

Provide Lima with instruction in root words, prefixes and suffixes

To help increase Lima’s vocabulary, use talking flash cards and build a vocabulary bank.

Directly teach Lima comprehension strategies such as reading for a purpose: finding the

main character, finding references to the setting, finding the problem in the story. When applicable, have Lima read the questions at the end of the chapter or story before

she reads the story to give Lima guide and purpose for reading. Check for understanding frequently. Ask Lima questions at the end of a page or short

passage rather than at the end of the story. Provide direct instruction in developing the phonics skills she has not yet mastered.

To improve Lima’s writing skills:

Use of lists or graphic organizers may help Lima develop and organize her ideas before

starting to write. Use Writing Software programs that help Lima organize her ideas and scaffold the

writing process. Use Word Prediction programs on the computer to help Lima with spelling and to get her

ideas on paper. Have Lima learn to spell the words on the Fry high frequency word list. Since these are the words used most frequently in reading and writing, learning these words should improve her spelling on daily writing activities.

After Lima has written all the sounds in words, have her look at the word to see if it

“looks right.”

Teach Lima to use Spell Check and the dictionary application on the computer.

Encourage Lima to read her writing out loud to identify missing words and word parts.

To improve Lima’s math skills:

Continue to teach single digit and double digit addition using manipulatives

Introduce single digit subtraction using a multi-sensory approach

Teach Lima math vocabulary to understand and solve math problems

Continue to learning coins and their values

Goals:

By 10/29/2015 Lima will be able to accurately add a double digit number by carrying from the ones to the tens with 80% accuracy in 2 out of 3 trials as measured by student work samples. By 10/29/2015 Lima will be able to understand the concept of subtraction using manipulatives and be able to perform a single digit subtraction problem, using manipulatives if necessary with 80% accuracy in 2 out of 3 trials as measured by student work samples. By 10/29/2015 Lima will be able to read at her level and answer questions, verbally or in writing about a story to describe the setting and the problem of the characters in the story with 75% accuracy 2 out of 3 times

Summary: Testing indicated and was conferred by an IEP team that Lima’s disability and academic achievement level were preventing her from fully accessing grade level curriculum due to a Specific Learning Disability.