You are on page 1of 5

Runninghead: PORT VIEW PREPARATORY

Non Public School: Port View Preparatory


Gerardo Sanchez
April 24, 2015
Pedro Olvera, PsyD, LEP

PORT VIEW PREPARATORY


Port View Preparatory
Port View Preparatory is a non-public school in the City of Yorba Linda. This school is
ran by co-principals, Dr. Melaura Erickson Tomaino and Edward Miguel. Port View Preparatory
has a mission to create a collaborative educational community that caters to the individual needs
of students with disabilities incorporating evidenced-based practices to ensure, above all,
personal and educational growth (Port View Preparatory, 2015). Most of the students in the
school had a diagnosis of a severe Autism spectrum disorder, but there was also a student
enrolled who had a formal diagnosis of Emotional Disorder (ED) and another suspected of ED,
but without the formal diagnosis. It appeared that students were placed by chronological and
developmental age and/or functional abilities. The Port View Preparatory staff is trained in
Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and how to apply ABA to a school setting. The ratio of
student to teacher was one to one.
Port View Preparatory provides personalized education for all of its students. To help
facilitate with academic and behavioral learning, each student is issued with a tablet of his or her
own. The tablets contain academic activities and they are also used as reinforcers for the
students to earn play time. The students were also placed in different educational environments
based on developmental age and/or functional abilities. The students followed a strict daily
routine that was broken up in half hour increments. This routine was posted on the whiteboard in
the classroom for all to see. The students had an outside area where they ate their lunch and an
occupational therapy room where the students could play and release energy while satisfying
their sensory needs. The occupational therapy room contained a basketball hoop, a trampoline,

PORT VIEW PREPARATORY


bouncy balls, treadmills, and three types of swings. As with all other activities, each student had
a certain amount of time allotted to play there.
One of the ED students observed was an adolescent in a room with nine other students
who were severely autistic. Each student receives individualized attention and this includes the
recording of behavioral data and academic progress throughout the day. Students had to be
redirected frequently throughout each lesson. Redirections were quick and usually involved a
reminder about what the goal was, whether it was playtime on the tablet or earning time to do
something specific in the OT room. Learning in this environment appears to be difficult because
students were being loud, they were yelling, crying, and basically dealing with their own issues
while working one-on-one with their instructional aide.
The student with ED that I was observing was working on his number recognition. He
was shouting out his answers in an angry manner. After completing this assignment, the
instructional aide started to prepare the next activity. While waiting for the instructional aide, the
student took off his shoe and sock and began picking at his toes and ripping off pieces off skin.
The next activity involved working with coins. The student was asked to identify a quarter,
dime, nickel, and penny. The student answered correctly fifty percent of the time. This activity
involved a lot of repetition. The student became frustrated and was starting to lose interest. At
this time, the instructional aide reminded the student about his reinforcer which helped the
student focus his attention back on task. It was evident that many of the students including the
student I was specifically observing benefited and preferred learning with manipulatives. The
classroom had a variety of manipulatives centrally located. The instructional aides would

PORT VIEW PREPARATORY


consistently return manipulatives they were using and grab another manipulative to use for
another lesson.
To be completely honest, at one point during my observation my eyes began to well up
with tears because of young girl who was about nine or ten. However, I made sure I gained
composure immediately. This child was having a difficult time. She began to through her books
violently across the room, and then began to pull out her hair. Her behavior was extremely
erratic. One moment she was fine and the next she was crying and ripping out her hair. Other
students were hitting themselves repeatedly. Although the instructional aides were trying to
prevent this, it appeared the students could not control their self-injurious behaviors. I was
affected by this so much that when I returned to my car I had to pray for the students and thank
the Lord for blessing my children with health. I was surprised that I became that emotional
during the observation, but at the same time I was grateful for the exposure to children who have
severe disabilities because I had not experienced this before in this type of setting.

PORT VIEW PREPARATORY

References
Port View Preparatory, (2015). Retrieved from: http://portviewpreparatory.com/our-mission/