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Runninghead: SOCIAL EMOTIONAL IEP II

Social Emotional IEP Presentation I


Gerardo Sanchez
March 02, 2015
Pedro Olvera, PsyD, LEP

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SOCIAL EMOTIONAL IEP II
The triannual IEP for John Smith was held in conjunction with a manifest determination
because John has had multiple behavioral issues that involved aggressive acts of violence.
John is an Emotionally Disturbed (ED) student who has an extensive history of anxiety and
aggression. As a result of the IEP being held in conjunction with the manifest determination,
I was required to observe John for an extensive amount of time. This was important to make
sure I could accurately understand and describe his behaviors to the IEP team. My
observation would be an important factor in describing Johns social emotional behavior and
adaptive skills. The observation would also serve as an essential component for the FBA and
BIP that I created. In addition to presenting my observation, I also presented the results from
the BASC-2 (TRS & PRS), and information provided by johns teachers.
John was observed in various academic and unstructured settings on 2/5/15 from 9:35 am
to 2:25pm. The academic settings included life science, math, academic support core,
physical education, and guitar. The unstructured settings included passing periods and lunch.
In the academic settings, John was observed as having a pleasant demeanor, being attentive,
thoughtful, well behaved, and sociable with the tendoncy to initiate conversations during
class. He communicated with other students whether he was working individually, in a group
format, or in an educational assembly. For the 217 minutes of academic instruction, John was
off task for ten minutes and eight seconds or five percent of the time. In the academic
settings, John exhibited self-control by keeping his hands to himself in four out of five of his
classes. During his guitar class, John was observed pushing another student for no apparent
reason other than he was playing around. The students were filing into class and situating
themselves when John and the other student were talking and smiling as the push occurred.

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The other student did not become defensive and the aggressive behavior ended as quickly as
it started.
During unstructured time such as passing periods and lunch, the observer had difficulty
tracking John's movements, but when he was finally spotted he was usually interacting with
peers socially. At lunch, John sat with a group of students while they were eating their lunch.
John and two other boys left the lunch area after ten minutes and proceeded to the blacktop to
play. The boys played a game where they were kicking a ball back and forth over a
volleyball net. Other children would join in spontaneously and retreat from the game just as
fast. Some older children joined the game and ended up taking the game over by kicking the
ball only to each other. After realizing what the older students were doing, John simply
removed himself from the game and went to the next court to play with other students.
Incidents of physical aggression were not observed during unstructured time.

Interview with teachers on 2/5/15 resulted in similar findings between the teachers.
Teachers agree that John frequently approaches individuals to initiate interaction, he often
engages in annoying behaviors to produce attention, and these behaviors often occur when
the immediate environment is very noisy or crowded. The teachers were also in agreement
that the displays of physical aggression usually occur during unstructured time such as
passing period and lunch.

John was observed in various academic and unstructured settings on 2/25/15 from 8:45
am to 12:45pm. The academic settings included life science, math, academic support core,
language arts, and world history. The unstructured settings included passing periods and

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lunch. In the academic settings, John was sociable with his peers and teachers, he was well
behaved and attentive during instruction. Out of the 182 minutes of instruction, John was off
task for seven minutes or three percent. John's seven minutes of off task behaviors included
talking and joking with the peers that were in close proximity. Again, John exhibited selfcontrol by keeping his hands to himself in four out of five of his classes. At the beginning of
math class as the students were filing in, two students entered the classroom pushing and
shoving in a playful manner. Although John did not initiate this behavior, as soon as he
noticed what his peers were doing he immediately involved himself in the horseplay. John
was observed pushing a female peer while holding onto her at the same time so she would
not fall. John escalated the level of force that was being used because when he became
involved the chairs in the classroom were rearranged as a result of his participation. It is
important to note that the students, including John, did not have a malicious intent, but rather
they were playing.
The outcome of the IEP and the manifest determination resulted in John not being
expelled because his behaviors were determined to be a result of his disability. New
interventions were set in place as a result of the FBA and BIP. Previous interventions were
determined to be ineffective. I worked with the case carrier to assist in implementing the
new interventions with John.