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Lesson Plan Two

Specialized Methods and Practicum


Ottawa University
Amy Beckis
Brent Seager
March 29, 2015

LESSON TWO
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The Use of the Second Atomic Bomb
In this lesson, the students will be introduced to use of the second atomic bomb against
Japan to end the Second World War, which the students will debate on. To begin this lesson, the
students will review primary source documents from the Presidential Library of President
Truman. These documents include warnings sent to Japan, a petition by scientists of the
Manhattan Project, and the official statement used by the White House after the atomic bombs
were dropped. The next activity is a cooperative group project in which the students will count
off between one and two, and be assigned to cooperative groups. One group will find evidence
to support the use of the second atomic bomb, and the other group will find evidence against the
use of the second atomic bomb. The students will then move to the classroom debate, in which
each group will present their findings and support their positions with facts. This will allow the
students to gain a better understanding of the controversies surrounding the use of the second
atomic bomb. The wrap up activity will be a video showing the dropping of the second atomic
bomb, which will allow the students to understand the implications of the use of the second
atomic bomb. The lesson will help the students to identify the major reasons for and against the
use of a second atomic bomb against Japan, as this knowledge will prepare students for future
lessons in this content area.
This lesson incorporates cooperative group learning, as the students will work together to
gather information supporting their assigned positon on the topic of the use of the second atomic
bomb. However, differentiated instruction could be used in the form of allowing students who
do not wish to participate in cooperative groups to work individually and select a position of
their choice. Students could also be assigned to a third group, which supports the use of even
more atomic bombs on Japan. Even though these elements could be included in the lesson, I
believe that using two positions on the use of the second atomic bomb will allow more enriching
discussions and debates amongst the students. This will enhance their knowledge and

LESSON TWO
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comprehension of the material contained in the lesson, thus preparing them for the next unit over
the Cold War.

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY
TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
LESSON PLAN OUTLINE
Level 1
Name: Brent Seager
Date: 4/7/2015
School: Lansing High School

Grade Level: 11th


Approximate length of time: 50 min.
Subject: AP American History

Title: The use of the second atomic bomb


Unit Goal: The students will be able to identify and describe the reasons for and against the use

of the second atomic bomb against Japan during World War II.

LESSON TWO
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STANDARD, BENCHMARK, INDICATOR(S):

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting
insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate
summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3
Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best
accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how
an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison
defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media
(e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a
problem.
(Common Core Standards, 2015)
WHAT IS (ARE) THE LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S) FOR THIS LESSON?

The student will be able to identify the reasons for and against the use of the second atomic
bomb on Japan. The student will analyze primary source documents and then be assigned into
two different debate groups, one supporting the use of the second atomic bomb and the other
against the use of the second atomic bomb. The students will then participate in a classroom
debate and defend their assigned position using previously learned facts and information from
the primary source documents. The student will also watch the dropping of the second atomic
bomb, thus allowing them to understand the significance of this event and how it would signal in
the beginning of the Cold War.
HOW WILL YOU ASSESS STUDENT LEARNING?

Formative Assessment will be used by the student responses and positions during the classroom
debate and questions asked by the students during the group debate worksheet activity.
Formal Assessment will be used in the debate worksheet portion of this unit.
Informal Assessment will be used in observing students and classroom debate.
WHAT MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT, AND RESOURCES ARE NECESSARY TO TEACH THIS
LESSON?

The students will need the support or opposition to the use of the second atomic bomb blank
worksheet, which the students will use to describe their assigned position on the topic.
The students will begin this lesson by reviewing the primary source documents. Students will
then move into two groups and complete the debate worksheet activity that will be used in the
classroom debate. Students will then watch the dropping of the second atomic bomb video.
White board with overhead projector, computer, paper, pencils.
Some questions to check for understanding are: Why was the use of the second atomic bomb
necessary? What could have President Truman done instead of using the second atomic bomb?

LESSON TWO
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How did the dropping of the second atomic bomb influence modern day nuclear legislation?
How did the use of the second atomic bomb push the United States into the Cold War with the
Soviets?
(Melissa LaGree, my cooperating teacher, on the video presentation)
WHAT ADAPTATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED?

Students will be allotted extra time to complete the debate worksheet activity. Students who are
absent or choose to work independently will be allowed to do so. For the video, students will be
allowed to access this information from the schools website.
WHAT EVIDENCE-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES WILL BE USED?

Technology integration will be used in the form of a video showing the dropping of the second
atomic bomb and discovery learning in the reviewing of primary source documents and in
completing the support and opposition work pages in the two debate groups.
WHAT QUESTIONS NEED TO BE CONSIDERED DURING THE LESSON?

Pre-requisite skills: Familiarity with American history and World War II.
Independent practice and verbal response will be used to check for student comprehension of the
materials in this lesson.
From here on, write as if you are talking to the children/students.
FOCUSING EVENT (BASED ON THE PRE-REQUISITE SKILLS AND/OR KNOWLEDGE)

After reviewing the primary source documents, you will split into two groups and defend the
assigned position of supporting or opposing the use of the second atomic bomb. You will then
debate the opposing side with the information that your group has gathered.
PURPOSE (THE WHY OF THE LESSON)

During this lesson, you will learn how to locate and identify the reasons why the use of the
second atomic bomb was necessary and why it was unnecessary. You will then use the
information to support your ideas and debate against the opposition; this will allow you to gain a
better perspective surrounding the evidence that was used to decide whether or not to use the
second atomic bomb.
DELIVERY OF INFORMATION

The students will read five primary source documents, which will draw on previous skills and
knowledge. The information in the primary source documents will be used to introduce you to
the debate questions. You will then be divided into two groups, one for the use of the second
atomic bomb and the other against the use of the second atomic bomb. You will gather evidence
to support your groups position and then your group will debate the other group on points and
positions.
MODELING/DEMONSTRATION/SKILL CUES

The primary source documents will be reviewed and this will prepare the students for the debate
group activity worksheet and the actual debate.
GUIDED PRACTICE

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Small group learning will take place during the debate worksheet activity, and students will be
able to work in conjunction to identify and describe their position surrounding the use of a
second atomic bomb on Japan, the students will then debate the opposing group.
INDEPENDENT PRACTICE/EXTENSIONS AND REFINEMENTS

Students will independently work as they review the primary source documents, students will
also work independently while viewing the dropping of the second atomic bomb video. During
the debate worksheet activity, students will work cooperatively in two large groups, and will
debate their views and opinions with the opposing side.
CLOSURE/WRAP-UP (ENDING THE LESSON)

The wrap up dropping of the second atomic bomb video will allow the students to see why
dropping the second atomic bomb was controversial. This will allow the students to consider the
significance this event and its implications. This will also allow the students to transition into the
next lesson, which will cover the Cold War Era.
REVIEW, EVALUATE, AND REFLECT
Based on the information obtained from planning, teaching and assessing this lesson, respond to
the following questions:
What data do you have to support the instruction?
What indications do you have, in addition to the data, that your instruction was
successful?
What do you perceive as the strengths of your instruction?
What would you change when teaching this lesson again?
What have you learned about content, teaching and learning from teaching this lesson?

References
Common Core Standards. (2015). Retrieved from: http://www.corestandards.org/ELALiteracy/RH/6-8/
Petition to the President of the United States. (1945). Retrieved from:
http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/bomb/large/index.php
Press release by the White House. (1945). Retrieved from:
http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/bomb/large/index.php

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Ricsil2037. (2012). This 1946 film shows actual footage of the atomic bomb destruction of
Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan [Video file]. Retrieved from:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3oSS_FP-cA
Translation of leaflet dropped on Japanese. (1945). Retrieved from:
http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/bomb/large/index.php