You are on page 1of 6

Lesson Plan Form - LBS 400

Revised 08/05/14

Candidate:

Subject:

Grade level(s):

Date:

Serena Hoang

Math

7th

April 3, 2015

Standard: Standard 7AF1.3 Simplify numerical expressions by applying properties of rational numbers
(ex identity, inverse, distributive, associative, commutative) and justify the process used.
I. DESCRIPTION OF CONTENT & CONTENT TYPE (Fact, Procedure, Concept, or Principle):
Students will learn about commutative and associative properties of addition and multiplication and will be
able to apply this concept in higher-level math courses to problem solve.
II. LEARNING OUTCOME (Objective):
Given a worksheet, students will investigate the commutative properties for addition and multiplication
and identify examples of the commutative properties for addition and multiplication of rational numbers by
completion of assignment with 85% accuracy.
DOK/Cognitive Rigor Level:
DOK 3
Language Demands:
Students will be engaged in the following form of communications for the lesson in listening for
directions, reading a piece of text, answering a question out loud, and discussing with a class member. All
students, including English-language learner students, will explain alternative solutions to a problem orally
to the class and to one another using academic math language such as names of mathematical symbols and
terminologies. Visual aids will assist ELL students as well as visual learners in deeper understanding of
content.
III. CURRICULUM CONNECTION (How lesson fits into larger unit sequence):
Prior to learning about commutative and associative properties, students should have a clear understanding
of solving open inequalities, able to define and recognized: identity (additive and multiplicative), zero
product, inverse operation, and properties. After this lesson, students will be introduced to distributive
properties of rational numbers. These properties enable the mathematician to manipulate the numbers in a
problem, which comes in handy when the learner continues onto more advanced math.
IV. INSTRUCTION
A. ENGAGEMENT (Motivational Activity):
Introduce the commutative and associative properties by teaching the Properties Song to the students
as a preview of today lesson. This will enable deeper understanding of content knowledge through an
informational rich song.
Student friendly objective: By the end of our lesson, you should be able to distinguish and show
examples of commutative and associative properties by completing the balance equation worksheet.
Purpose: Learning these properties will allow students to operate numbers in more advanced math
such as matrix algebra and calculus.

B. INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE (Teaching Methodology With Student Activities):


Step #1: Essential Question
a. T input: Take out math journals and write down the essential question of the day
Essential question: How can commutative and associative properties be used to simplify
numerical expressions?
a. T model: Read out the essential question. Will answer this question at the end of the lesson.
b. Student response: write down essential question
Step #2: Property
a. T input: Define property
Property: a statement that is true for all numbers
a. T model: write out the definition on board, read definition, give examples for the definition of
property
b. Student response: Copy down definition, listen attentively
Step #3: Commutative Property of Addition
a. T input: Define commutative property of addition
Definition: changing the order of addends does not change the sum
Symbol: for any numbers a and b, a + b = b + a
a. T model: Draw a picture as a visual example of this property

b. Student response: Copy down notes, listen attentively, answer proposed questions by raising of
hands
Step #4: Commutative Property of Addition
a. T input: Complete each equation using the commutative property and solve
7 + 3 = 3 + _?_
2 + 9 = 9 + _?_
5 + 4 = 4 + _?_
4 + 7 = _?_ + _?_
a. T model: Write out each problem one by one and explain this property, after 2 examples have
students independently work on the next two
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, do example problems independently,
and check for understanding from the rest of the class by having students raise their thumbs up if the
lesson was understood thus far, or thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #5: Commutative Property of Addition
a. T input: Create sample problems of commutative property of addition
a. T model: Work with a shoulder partner to create 5 examples of the commutative property of
addition. If you say 3 plus 5, then your partner says the commutative property of addition for
your example
b. Student response: Listen attentively to directions and to their partners example, working with one
another through oral communication only.

Step #6: Commutative Property of Multiplication


a. T input: Define commutative property of multiplication
Definition: the order in which two numbers are multiplied does not change their product
Symbol: for any numbers a and b, a x b = b x a
a. T model: Draw a picture as a visual example of this property

b. Student response: Copy down notes, listen attentively, answer proposed questions by raising of
hands
Step #7: Commutative Property of Multiplication
a. T input: Complete each equation using the commutative property and solve
7 x 3 = 3 x _?_
2 x 9 = 9 x _?_
8 x 4 = 4 x _?_
5 x 6 = _?_ + _?_
a. T model: Write out each problem one by one and explain this property, after 2 examples have
students independently work on the next two
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, do example problems independently,
and check for understanding from the rest of the class by having students raised their thumbs up if
the lesson was understood thus far, or thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #8: Commutative Property of Multiplication
a. T input: Create sample problems of commutative property of multiplication
a. T model: Work with a shoulder partner to create 5 examples of the commutative property of
multiplication. If you say 3 times 5, then your partner says the commutative property of addition for
your example
b. Student response: Listen attentively to directions and to their partners example, working with one
another through oral communication only.
Step #9: Commutative Property of Subtraction & Division?
a. T input: Subtraction is not commutative over real numbers, neither is division!
a. T model: Give examples of why we cannot say that for any numbers a and b, a b b a
9 5 5 9, since -4 does not equal to 4, thus subtraction is not commutative
Give examples why we cannot say that for any numbers a and b, a b b a
10 5 5 10, since 2 does not equal to 0.5, thus division is not commutative
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, check for understanding from the
rest of the class by having students raised their thumbs up if the lesson was understood thus far,
thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #10: Commutative Property in Expression Form
a. T input: (a + b) + c = a + (b + c)
a. T model: (2 + 3) + 5 = 2 + (3 + 5)
5+5=2+8

10 = 10
The numbers 2, 3, and 5 appear in the same order on both sides of the equation below.
Parentheses are used to group the numbers differently.
Even though the numbers are grouped differently, each side of the equation (2 +3) + 5 = 2 +
(3 + 5) has a value of 10.
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, do example problems independently,
and check for understanding from the rest of the class by having students raised their thumbs up if
the lesson was understood thus far, or thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #11: Associative Property of Addition
a. T input: Define associative property of addition
Definition: the way numbers are grouped when they are added does not change their sum
Symbol: for any numbers a, b, and c, (a + b) + c = a + (b + c)
a. T model: Draw a picture as a visual example of this property

b. Student response: Copy down notes, listen attentively, answer proposed questions by raising of
hands
Step #12: Associative Property of Addition
a. T input: Complete each equation using the associative property and solve
(15 + 9) + 1 = _?_ + (9 + 1)
(7 + 6) + 1 = 7 + (_?_ + 1)
1 + (_?_ + 3) = (1 + 2) + 3
(_?_ + 2) + 8 = 7 + (2 + 8)
a. T model: Write out each problem one by one and explain this property, after 2 examples have
students independently work on the next two
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, do example problems independently,
and check for understanding from the rest of the class by having students raised their thumbs up if
the lesson was understood thus far, or thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #13: Associative Property of Addition
a. T input: Create sample problems of associative property of addition
a. T model: Work with a shoulder partner to create 5 examples of the associative property of addition.
If you say 3 plus 5, then your partner says the commutative property of addition for your example
b. Student response: Listen attentively to directions and to their partners example, working with one
another through oral communication only
Step #14: Associative Property of Multiplication
a. T input: Define associative property of multiplication
Definition: the way numbers are grouped when they are multiplied does not change their
product.
Symbol: for any numbers a, b, and c, (a x b) x c = a x (b x c)
a. T model: Draw a picture as a visual example of this property

b. Student response: Copy down notes, listen attentively, answer proposed questions by raising of
hands
Step #15: Associative Property of Multiplication
a. T input: Complete each equation using the associative property and solve
8 x (10 x 3) = (8 x _?_) x _?_
(3 x 2) x 5 = 3 x (_?_ x _?_)
7 x (10 x 3) = (7 x _?_) x _?_
(9 x 2) x 5 = 9 x (_?_ x _?_)

a. T model: Write out each problem one by one and explain this property, after 2 examples have
students independently work on the next two
b. Student response: Raise hands to answer example questions, do example problems independently,
and check for understanding from the rest of the class by having students raised their thumbs up if
the lesson was understood thus far, or thumbs down if they need clarification and more examples.
Step #16: Associative Property of Multiplication
a. T input: Create sample problems of associative property of multiplication
a. T model: Work with a shoulder partner to create 5 examples of the commutative property of
multiplication. If you say 3 times 5, then your partner says the commutative property of addition for
your example
b. Student response: Listen attentively to directions and to their partners example, working with one
another through oral communication only
C. APPLICATION ACTIVITY (Practice and/or Reflection): Guided practice
Students are given a balance equation worksheet to be completed and turned in by the end of the period.
Assist students in modeling of question number one on the worksheet.
D. MATERIALS & RESOURCES: The Property Song (one for each student), balancing equation
worksheet (one for each student), colorful expo markers
V. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES (Methods For Obtaining Evidence Of Learning):
Formative:
During lesson, teacher will check for understanding through asking questions, circulating the class to
assist students when appropriate, independent problem solving, work with a partner to create sample
problems through oral communication, signaling of thumbs up or thumbs down to signify
understanding.
Summative:
After collecting worksheet assignment, the class as a whole will take out their Property Song and
sing the song twice. Ask the students if they have a deeper understanding of the content now after their
lesson and the song.

VI. ACCOMMODATIONS and/or MODIFICATIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS (Content,


Instruction, Practice): Having extra time or the ability to help each individual student with one-on-one
instructions can contribute in providing equal access in learning for all students. In having a better
understanding of those that are struggling and the avid students, the signal of thumbs up and thumbs
down will allow the teacher to assess whether or not the class as a whole can benefit in going over the
instruction again or provide a different example in understanding the content. Providing visual aids will
help visual learners and ELL students in attaining deeper understanding of properties.
VII. HOMEWORK (if appropriate): N/A