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INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN

ASSIGNMENT 3
EDFD 221
SHANNEN MAY
SARAH VELLA
HEIDI GABRYS
TUTORIAL: WED / 1PM
TUTOR: GERALDINE LARKINS

Attention
William enjoys working
with his hands, however
he has difficulties sitting
still and keeping his
Characteristics hands to himself during
floor time.
William has great ideas
but he often forgets to
put his hand up to
express them.
William works well on his
own but when he is
unsure or doesnt know
what to do he becomes
anxious, doesnt
participate and is afraid
to ask for help.

Impact

Strategies

Often behind
compared to other
students
Interrupts the
learning in the
classroom
Work isnt
completed
Interrupts his own
learning
Chooses not to
participate due to a
fear of failure

Visual cues to
communicate when a
negative behaviour has
occurred
Cushion to sit on
Something to hold in
hand

ILP Matrix
Language
William understands
instructions if they are clear
and concise, however he has
difficulty when there are more
than two parts to an
instruction he finds it hard to
follow.
William can communicate
well verbally, however he
finds it difficult to express his
needs and feelings and finds
it hard to stay on track during
conversation.

Motor Functions
William enjoys drawing
and writing however he
finds it difficult to correctly
hold a pen or pencil.
Bad hand eye
coordination
Illegible hand writing

Conflicts between
William and his peers
Williams needs arent
always being met
Classes are interrupted
Conversations are
jumpy and sometimes
confusing
Work isnt completed

Flashcards to express
feelings
Buddy system with someone
he trusts
Timetable on the wall that can
be changed easily
Whole class activities around

William loves to work in a


partnered environment but
when he works in a group
environment he becomes
shy and anxious.
William is a very friendly
and kind boy, however he
has difficulty understanding
the personal space of
others.

William can visualise his


thoughts but finds it difficult to
see things from other
perspectives.
Doesnt understand rules of
conversation

Social Functions
William is aware of his
feelings, however he is
prone to emotional
meltdowns and finds it hard
to control his impulses when
angry or upset.

Williams
handwriting is
illegible
His work isnt
completed
He cant read his
writing and forgets
what he was trying
to communicate
Participates in as
little physical
activities as he can
get away with

Having the rubber thing on


pencils
Using a computer/ipad to
complete work
Tailor homework tasks to
focus on motor functions
Activities that improve

Often involved in
verbal and physical
fights
Doesnt get along with
many students
The needs of other
students are
sometimes overlooked
Bullying
Chosen last doesnt
get along with many
students

Visual cues
Cool down space
Putting him in teacher led
groups (aide in classroom)
Buddy system
Class activities about
certain issues

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN


I.L.P. 1 / 1

(No. of ILPs in current year / Total number ILPs)

Review Date: 22/11/2014


Date Devised: 22/05/2014
Student: William Walters
Year Level: 3
D.O.B. 28/04/2005
Age: 9 yrs. 1 months
Program Support Group Members consulted in devising this plan:
Class Teacher: Shannen May
Parents: Mrs and Mr Walters
Principal Rep(PSG Chair): Sarah Vella
Consultants to the PSG: Heidi Gabrys
Additional Reports: William was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome as an infant and has had a difficult time throughout his school life,
particularly with social functions, communications skills, some physical development issues such as fine motor functions and a short attention span.
William has strong communication skills when it comes to areas of interest and is very sociable when he is in a comfortable or familiar environment,
but small changes have very large effects on him. He suffers from anxiety in times of change and situations in which he is not engaged in or doesnt
understand which often causes problems. William is happy to work independently and in a paired situation but struggles with working in a group
environment; this can bring on the feelings of anxiousness.
Overall William is a happy and excitable student who in the right environment will strive for success.

Entry Skills (What the student has achieved)


Social Functions: William works very well individually and paired with one other student. He is calm when is engaged in class tasks that involves
computers, drawing and videos. He can read and write to level 2 standards, he is able to write descriptive texts from first person point of view.
Attention: William is an independent kinaesthetic learner, and can hold his attention for 5-10 minutes during class time. William becomes highly
engaged and focused if involves a topic of his interest such as cars and computers.
Language: William is a vocal student who enjoys communicating with his peers and is able to hold a conversation for 5-10 minutes. He can follow
instructions if they are directed at him one instruction at a time.
Motor Functions: William can draw pictures using large pencils, he can also write letters of the alphabet at foundation level.

Challenges (Areas for Improvement)


Social Functions: William is aware of his feelings, but has difficulty expressing and communicating them. William has a lot of anxiety related to his
academic achievement when he compares himself to other students achievements. William does not have any strategies to cope with his emotions
which can result in emotional meltdowns, this effects his impulse control which consequently results in either angry physical and verbal outbursts
towards fellow students or he will become so overwhelmed that he shuts down and becomes incommunicable and refuses to participate.

Attention: William is a bright student but struggles to focus (cannot sit still or keep his hands to himself), which inevitably distracts other students
from their learning. William struggles to ask for help and becomes anxious when he is unsure of what he needs to do or is stuck with his work.
Language: William is a vocal child who experiences as varied range of feelings, which he struggles to identify and express appropriately and see
things from the perspectives of others, causing outbursts and confrontations between his peers. William has difficulty following instructions when
there are more than two parts to the direction and often becomes side-track during conversations.
Motor Functions: William has low motor function skills, this means that he struggles with his handwriting and therefore becomes disengaged in
writing tasks.

Learning Priorities (Future Learning)

Social Functions: William needs to learn about what emotions look like and feel like. He needs to learn how to express or communicate how he is
feeling. William needs to learn to identify the feelings of other people.
Attention: William needs to learn to control his behavior in the classroom, he needs to learn some strategies to help him keep his hands to himself
and sit still. William needs to ask for help rather than losing focus on the work and getting anxious.
Language: William needs to learn to express his feelings to his classmates and his teachers before he reaches the point of outburst. He needs to
understand how his actions/words affect his peers and learn how to react in these situations. He needs to develop strategies which will help him
retain instructions and build up his procedural memory (Lum, 2006)
Motor Functions: Building up Williams motor functions is of high priority as this will help right throughout the curriculum.

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN


STUDENT NAME:
Semester
Short Term
Goals
Goals
(Long Term)
(WHAT)
William will
William will
learn to
use the
identify
emotion
emotions, what
cards to
they look like
communicate and feel like.
his feelings
about tasks,
situations
and in
general.
William will

Strategies/Methods
(HOW)
William will use applications on the ipad or computer to help him
identify what emotions might look like.
http://www.do2learn.com/games/feelingsgame/
William will complete tasks which ask him to identify and name the
emotion.
http://www.educateautism.com/emotions.html#.U3lzvhBfbxQ
Whole class activities about emotions ran as bounce back
sessions. The activity involves naming and using describing words
for each emotion. From this list, create a word bank to help
describe the feelings.

Devised
00/00/00
Mode of
Mode of Assessment
Delivery
(WHO / WHEN)
Explicit
Observe the
teaching
results of the
about
activities to see
emotions
how accurately
during
William can
bounce back.
identify the
emotions. Repeat
Activities are the activity once a
part of the
month to monitor
ICT program. for improvement.
Keychain of

Keychain of

Evaluation
dd/mm/yy
1
2
3

remove
himself to
calm down
when he is
feeling angry
or upset.

For William create a keychain of emotions, these will have the


word, a face which looks like the emotion and words to describe
what it feels like.
http://mytwohappyhomeschoolers.blogspot.com.au/2011/04/powercards.html
William will
use the
emotion cards
assist him in
communicating
how he is
feeling.

Displayed at his table William will have a blank face, in which he


will update to show how he is feeling. He is encouraged to do this
at the beginning of the day, after recess and lunch or whenever he
has a change in mood. This will give the teacher a good way of
monitoring Williams mood and be able to act before it gets out of
control.
http://www.simplysprouteducate.com/2012/08/the-way-i-feelhelping-your-little-one.html

William will go
to his calm
down spot on
the bean bags
when he is
feeling angry
or upset.

The teacher will ask William to move to the bean bags if he is seen
to be feeling anxious or angry.
William is also free to move to the bean bags when he is feels like
he might be getting to angry or upset. The bean bags are available
for all students to access as a cool down spot in the classroom.

emotions as
an art task,
as a cross
curricular
activity.

emotions can be
used to assess his
understanding of
emotions and
descriptions.

Explicit
teaching on
the use of
the emotion
face.

A record will be
kept of the
emotions
displayed
throughout the
day. This data can
be analysed to see
when William is in
the best/worst
moods and what
factors that have
effected this.
A record of how
often William
needs to be go the
bean bags and if it
was teacher
directed or selfdirected will be
kept.

Used in
conjunction
with activities

Circle time to
discuss the
use of the
bean bag
area by the
class.
Teacher or
self-directed.

Motor
Function:
William will
be able write
in more
legible
handwriting
with
confidence.

William will
show
improvement
with his fine
motor
functions.

Activities based around building fine motor control, strength and


coordination in his hands. These activities include play dough,
bead threading, cutting and pasting and letter formation practice.
Ipad Apps that William can use to practice and build hand strength
and coordination: Graphisme Maternelle and Dexteria
http://www.scribd.com/doc/24470331/iPhone-iPad-and-iPod-touchApps-for-Special-Education

Free time,
Early finish
time
Discovery
learning

Observation has
he improved?
Book work

2
3

2
3

2
3

He will be
able to
complete
simple
sentences.

William will
use ICT to
build
confidence in
his writing.

Complete
simple
sentences in
legible
handwriting.

Applications that provide handwriting practice.


Iwritewords and ABC pocket phonics
Word processing programs such as Word to complete writing
activities or for publishing work once a draft copy has been
completed.

Use specialist pencil grips to help William hold the pencil correctly.
www.learninglinks.org.au
Allow time for William to practise tracing letters. Gradually reduce
the amount of lines in the letter formation so that he can practise
forming the letters on his own.
http://www.allkindsofminds.org/writing-and-forming-letters-legibleletter-formation

During
writing
activities round robin
style stations
in literacy
block
Work with
aide
In use all the
time

Observation
Participation
Work samples

2
3

Bookwork and
observation

2
3

During the
literacy block

Working in streamed writing groups:


Encourage William to write about topics of interest
Attention:
William will
be able to sit
quietly and
attentively on
the floor
during class
floor time

1
William will be
able to keep
his hands to
himself by
holding a
stress ball
rather than
touching other
students.

Using a stress ball or another fidget toy will help William to keep
focused but give him something to do with his hands at the same
time. This will discourage him from touching and distracting the
other students around him.
http://www.nationalautismresources.com/fidget-toys.html

During floor
time

Observation

2
3

http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioralinterventions/challenging-students/school-wide-strategiesmanaging-hyperactivity
1

William will be
able to sit still
during class
floor time.

Visual cues: http://archives.gadoe.org/DMGetDocument.


aspx/Using_Visual_Cues_to_Improve_Clsrm_Instruction
_for_Young_Child_w_Develop_Delays.pdf
Before using the visual cues in the classroom a discussion will be

During floor
time and
explicit
teaching
times

Observation
Record will be
kept of the amount
of dots each day.

2
3

held with William, his parents and the aide as to what the
expectations are and what the visual cues represent. If William is
able to achieve 5 or less dots in the day he will be rewarded with
15 minutes of free play.
Using visual cues with William will help remind him of the
expectations when sitting on the floor as a class.
The visual cues will be subtle so the class wont notice but William
will realise what he is doing and make a choice to change his
behaviour.
A magnetic dot will be placed on the board when William is
distracted and not sitting still.
1
William will be
encouraged to
write down
questions or
comments
about the
activities while
on the floor.

Language:
William will
develop a
more positive
relationship
with his
peers
through
developing
his language
skills.

William will
remember
instructions
that have 3 or
more parts.

William will be given writing implements to use during floor time so


that he can write down comments or questions that he may not feel
comfortable asking in front of the class and can be asked after
without being forgotten.

During floor
time
Back at the
tables

Observation

2
3

Viewed through
Williams work

William can use either paper, a whiteboard or to include his


preference for ICT in his learning, William could use an Ipad; using
an app such as Write Pad to record his ideas and questions.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/24470331/iPhone-iPad-and-iPod-touchApps-for-Special-Education
At the beginning of Williams day, tasks/sessions will be
represented using a Velcro board. Each time of the day will have a
picture to represent it. For example a sandwich for lunch time or a
computer for ICT. The timetable will help make Williams day
predictable for him and therefore reduce anxiety.
William can choose to either pen and paper or iPad app Stepping
Stones to record the steps he needs to take to complete a task.
This way he can refer back to his notes to provide him with the
opportunity to become independent.
Stepping Stones will enable William to use a photo, voice
recordings or words to organise the steps he needs to take. They
can be saved and used again at another time.

At the
beginning of
each day
teacher sets
it up in the
morning and
William edits
as the day
progresses.
During floor
time before
work has
begun to
refer back to

Observe how often


William refers to
his timetable or
instructions.
Record if you
notice he
completes a task
with less than 4
instructions.

2
3

while he
works.
William will
begin to show
empathy
towards other
peers.

Create a box that is intended for William but can be used by all
students in the class. Inside the box will be cut outs with different
scenarios, ranging from I fell over and cut my knee to I won the
raffle today. With a partner (or teacher) William will practise how to
react. He should be picked up when he is reacting inappropriately.
http://autismteachingstrategies.com/
If William finds himself in an interaction where he cant empathise,
teacher will talk with him privately and try and reverse the situation.
Ask How would you feel Incorporate his emotion chart and
word bank if he becomes flustered.

William will
use 2 of 7
rules of
conversation
when
communicating
in the
classroom.

Have a class lesson about the rules of conversation. Have role


plays with the students highlighting good and bad examples of
conversation. Discuss what is a good conversation and develop a
list, ensuring that the following are on there
1. Look the person in the eye
2. Smile
3. Use inside voices
4. Take turns talking
5. Ask questions
6. Stay on topic
7. Turn to the person youre talking to
Display the list and include photos of the students showing good
skills.
Teacher can refer to the chart whenever any student isnt following
one of the rules. This way William isnt singled out.
https://www.boardmakerachieve.com/Activity/1598392/Rules-ofConversation

William can
practice this
skill in class
time twice a
week. This
can also be
taken home
as
homework.

The class
activity is
how the
chart is
created.
Once
developed
the chart is
used as
reference
whenever it
is needed.

Observation
during classroom
interactions with
peers.
Record his
reactions during
the activity. This
can be analysed
further to see what
emotions he has
picked up on and
what he still needs
to work on.
Observe William
during
conversations.
Record when you
notice he has
picked something
new up.

Place William in groups/pairs where he can see good social skills


being modelled.
KEY: 1 = Little or No Progress
2 = Satisfactory Progress
3 = Excellent Progress/

2
3

2
3

Goal Achieved

Below is a list of learning priorities that may be included in the Individual Learning Plan:
Communi
Daily Living Skills
Social Skills
Behaviour
cationMotor Skills
Communication
Literacy
Literacy
Numeracy
Evaluation (Comments pertaining to the students performance/ learning against the set goals).
___________s achievements as of dd/mm/yy
Number of days absent:

Numeracy

References
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Autism Society of Edmonton Area (n.d.). Characteristics of Asperger syndrome. Retrieved from
http://www.autismedmonton.org/what-is-asperger/characteristics-of-asperger
Autism teaching strategies educating children with autism. (2014). Retrieved from http://autismteachingstrategies.com/
Better Health Channel (2012, June). Asperger syndrome and adults | Better Health Channel. Retrieved from
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Do2Learn. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.do2learn.com/games/feelingsgame/
Educate Autism (2014). Free Emotions Printables. Retrieved from http://www.educateautism.com/emotions.html#.U3lzvhBfbxQ
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Intervention Central (n.d.). School-wide strategies for managing... hyperactivity. Retrieved from
http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-interventions/challenging-students/school-wide-strategies-managinghyperactivity
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My two happy home schoolers (2011). Power cards. Retrieved from
http://mytwohappyhomeschoolers.blogspot.com.au/2011/04/power-cards.html
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http://www.nationalautismresources.com/fidget-toys.html
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