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ePortfolio Revision Document

Title of my narrative piece:


Nameless

Writers Memo for my narrative piece:

This piece of writing was not as good as it could have been. However, after using the RADaR method,
I was able to fix and improve the writing as a whole. I also submitted the edited version of my short
story too Fairview ellipses because I thought it turned out much better the second time and was
ellipses material (My email was bounced back though). Using the RADaR method, I was able to use
more descriptive words to make something that was unrealistic into something that was more realistic.

Version #1 of my narrative piece:

It was starting to get cold. I had better find somewhere to sleep. I walked down the street
hugging myself. As I walked, small snowflakes began to fall. This was a situation I was used to; cold
fall night on the street. Usually by this time though I was too hopped up on crack to notice that I was
beginning to lose feeling in my fingers. Ever since I left my mother Ive been alone. I loved my mother
like anyone would, but when I turned 18 I knew I had to go. Anywhere was better than with her. She
turned me into what I am. She was never much of a mother. She just layed around the house drunk or
stoned. The only thing she ever did for me was was hook me on drugs. I walked down under a bridge
and looked around. This will do. I curled up with a tattered blanket and fell asleep.

That night I dreamed about my mother. I dreamed about her smoking meth in the living room,
not noticing me watching. I would try to get away, as the drugs made her aggressive. Every now and
then shed get to me though. She would hit me and yell and throw things. It scared and saddened me,
but I never let it show. I just bottled up my emotions. Someday that bottle was bound to overflow.
The next morning I woke up to a rough voice, "Get up! Scumbag. I rolled over and moaned.
The hard toe of a shoe connected with my ribs.
I grunted. "Alright, God. I'm getting up." The police officer spat on me and walked away. I
flipped him off but he wasnt looking. I got up and grabbed my blanket. I stood there for a minute
before moving on. I followed the sidewalk for a good time until I came across a park. I had never seen
it before. My mom never took me to parks. It was nice. There were two big oak trees, an open field, a
sandbox and a bright red play structure. This was supposed to be a happy place, full of joy and fun.
But not for me. The laughing kids and smiling parents were like a dagger to the heart. I stayed out of
view because I knew the parents would stare in disgust and move just a little closer to their kids. A tear
fell down my face and turned and ran. I had never had a childhood, a happy family. And now I was
alone. I had nothing to call my own, nobody to love, nobody to love me. I had been using drugs and
alcohol to escape from the brutal nightmare that was my life, and it had only made things worse. Tears
now streaming down my face I sprinted. I ran as hard as I could back to the bridge where I slept. Only
this time I didnt go under. I ran to the top and looked over the ledge. It was at least a 40 ft drop. I
pushed myself on top of the railing. This life has nothing left for me, I thought. I took a deep breath.
3...2
Hey man, you alright?
The voice behind me made me jump and I almost fell.
Whoa man, be careful. Why dont you come down and we can talk. The man talking looked to
be in his mid-thirties. He was wearing a business suit and looked to be on his way to work. He had
small bags under his eyes and I could tell he wasnt getting much sleep. But he had kind eyes. I let
him talk. Hey dude, I know it might feel pretty bad right now but its gonna get better. Youre gonna be
okay.

You dont know what its like. What it feels like to be who I am. I said
Youre right. I dont know what youve been through. But I know that there is something or
someone out there thats gonna help you out. It will get better.
Crying, I stepped down from the ledge. The man hugged me and pulled out his wallet.
I can tell you dont have a lot. He placed a wad of bills in my hand, Use this wisely. I believe
in you. The man turned and continued on his way. I was speechless. I couldnt even manage a thank
you. But I knew that I couldnt let this man down. He had cared more for me in two minutes than
anyone else had in my entire life. And I never learned his name.

Version #2 of my narrative piece:

It was starting to get cold. I had better find somewhere to sleep. I walked down the street
hugging myself. As I walked, small snowflakes began to fall. This was a situation I was used to; cold
fall night on the street. Usually by this time though I was too hopped up on crack to notice that I was
beginning to lose feeling in my fingers. Ever since I left my mother Ive been alone. I loved my mother
like anyone would, but when I turned 18 I knew I had to go. Anywhere was better than with her. She
turned me into what I am. She was never much of a mother. She just layed around the house drunk or
stoned. The only thing she ever did for me was was hook me on drugs. I walked down under a bridge
and looked around. This will do. I curled up with a tattered blanket and fell asleep.
That night I dreamed about my mother. I dreamed about her smoking meth in the living room,
not noticing me watching. I would try to get away, as the drugs made her aggressive. Every now and
then shed get to me though. She would hit me and yell and throw things. It scared and saddened me,
but I never let it show. I just bottled up my emotions. Someday that bottle was bound to overflow.
The next morning I woke up to a rough voice, "Get up! Scumbag. I rolled over and moaned.
The hard toe of a shoe connected with my ribs.
I grunted. "Alright, God. I'm getting up." The police officer spat on me and walked away. I

flipped him off but he wasnt looking. I got up and grabbed my blanket. I stood there for a minute
before moving on. I followed the sidewalk for a good time until I came across a park. I had never seen
it before. My mom never took me to parks. It was nice. There were two big oak trees, an open field, a
sandbox and a bright red play structure. This was supposed to be a happy place, full of joy and fun.
But not for me. The laughing kids and smiling parents were like a dagger to the heart. I stayed out of
view because I knew the parents would stare in disgust and move just a little closer to their kids. A tear
fell down my face and turned and ran. I had never had a childhood, a happy family. And now I was
alone. I had nothing to call my own, nobody to love, nobody to love me. I had been using drugs and
alcohol to escape from the brutal nightmare that was my life, and it had only made things worse. Tears
now streaming down my face I sprinted. I ran as hard as I could back to the bridge where I slept. Only
this time I didnt go under. I ran to the top and looked over the ledge. It was at least a 40 ft drop. I
pushed myself on top of the railing. This life has nothing left for me, I thought. I took a deep breath.
3...2
Hey man, you alright?
The voice behind me made me jump and I almost fell.
Whoa man, be careful. Why dont you come down and we can talk. The man talking looked to
be in his mid-thirties. He was wearing a business suit and looked to be on his way to work. He had
small bags under his eyes and I could tell he wasnt getting much sleep. But he had kind eyes. I let
him talk. Hey dude, I know it might feel pretty bad right now but its gonna get better. Youre gonna be
okay.
You dont know what its like. What it feels like to be who I am. I said
Youre right. I dont know what youve been through. But I know that there is something or
someone out there thats gonna help you out. It will get better.
Crying, I stepped down from the ledge. The man hugged me and pulled out his wallet.
I can tell you dont have a lot. He placed a wad of bills in my hand, Use this wisely. I believe
in you. The man turned and continued on his way. I was speechless. I couldnt even manage a thank
you. But I knew that I couldnt let this man down. He had cared more for me in two minutes than

anyone else had in my entire life. And I never learned his name.

______________________________________________________________________

Title of my informative/explanatory piece:

Life in the Slammer

Writers Memo for my informative/explanatory piece:

This essay was very good initially in my mind. However, using the RADaR method, I was able
to improve my writing further and add more details. For example, I changed 'bad language to 'horrid
language, which is a much more appropriate word.This piece of writing, successfully demonstrates
and meets the common core standards because I was able to inform the readers about how English
prisons were in the 1800s. I used many examples of textual evidence from the book, and was able to
inform the readers about the conditions that prisoners had to endure.Therefore, this piece of writing
successfully exceeds the common core standards for informative writing.

Version #1 of my informative/explanatory piece:

From 1839 onwards, all physically fit criminal prisoners had to work in their cells for up to ten

hours a day. 19th century English prisons forced all inmates to do extraneous work with no end result.
Not only that but, english prisons in the 19th century were dirty, cramped, and just plain horrible.
Crimes were broad and prisons were filled. Punishment in prisons was brutally hard work and even
caused some to go insane. The prisons themselves were dirty and far overcrowded. In attempt to
combat this, along came the large use of hulks, or prison boats. There is no doubt that a prison is
never a desirable place, but just how undesirable were these specific ones?
Crime in the 1800s in england were very broad and crime ran rampant. Many people were
extremely poor and work and food were scarce. In addition, most children didnt receive an education.
Unsurprisingly, stealing was by far the most common crime. Not only this, but it was a crime
punishable by death, as specified in the bloody code. Many judges felt sympathy for criminals and
instead of sentencing them to death, sent them to prison. Many believe the bloody code was the main
cause for overcrowded prisons in England. In the early 19th century, Prisons filled rapidly and the
need for more became apparent. In attempt to combat this, prisons were often housed in old buildings,
unsuited to long term sentences, with prisoners massed together. They were damp, insanitary and
overcrowded. There was no privacy or protection from others. Every type of criminal was held
together, -men, women, children, mentally-ill(insane), serious and petty criminals, even those awaiting
trial. Later in the century a 'new model prison' was built. Men, women and children were separated.
The rules stated that prisoners were made to wash regularly and wear a uniform. This was to keep
them clean and make it more difficult to escape. They were taught to read and write and had their
health checked regularly. They were fed a basic diet, and no longer had to rely on their families for
food or clothes. Prisoners slept, ate and worked in their cells and were only allowed out for exercise
once a day or to go to the washroom. The typical cell was provided with a hammock, mattress,
blankets, sheets, a pillow, towel, comb, spoon and salt cup. Each cell had a stool, box and chamber
pot with lid. At around the middle of the century, many felt that prison life had become too easy. To
make the stay less comfortable, wooden beds and wooden pillows were introduced. Prisoners were
required to (try) to sleep on them for the first thirty days of their sentence.
On top of the horrid conditions of these prisons, was punishment. Punishment was brutal for

all, but the severity of the punishment corresponded to that of the crime. Many people disagreed about
whether prisons were to punish offenders or to reform them as well. Throughout the century, different
systems were tried. An example of this was the 'separate system' where prisoners were kept in
isolation. Another was the 'silent system' in which prisoners were not allowed to talk to one another.
These purpose of these was to give prisoners with time to reflect on their actions away from the
influence of other inmates. On top of this, all prison sentences involved work or hard labour. There
were additional punishments for those caught breaking the rules and reward systems for model, or
well-behaved, prisoners.
Work was meant to punish and break the prisoners will. Therefore the tasks were hard,
monotonous and often pointless. One such form of labor was the tread wheel. The tread wheel was
similar to the elongated wheel of a paddle steamer but instead of paddles, had 24 steps. Hanging onto
a strap or handrail, prisoners stood in individual compartments over these steps. The weight of the
convict caused the wheel to turn. Prisoners had to keep climbing or fall off and it was exhausting and
utterly unproductive work. Another similar activity was the crank. The crank. The Crank consisted of a
large handle with a counter. Sand was simply churned around a drum. The crank handle was attached
to a set of cogs, which pushed a paddle through sand, and Warders could tighten up the crank,
making it harder to turn. Every turn of the crank was recorded. On average, prisoners had to complete
about 10000 turns a day. Meals depended on an interval number of turns being performed. For
example, a prisoner might need 2000 to get breakfast, 3000 for lunch, and 3000 more for dinner. They
then had to perform another 2000 before they could go to bed. The work created nothing and it was
thought to drive some mad.
Another very interesting part of the English prison system was hulks. Hulks were large prison
ship originally meant to transport prisoners. In 1776 an Act of Parliament allowed the use of floating
prisons, hulks, for two years as a temporary solution to the problem of overcrowded jail. 50 or more
were brought into service until the middle of the century. These ships served as temporary prisons for
nearly 100 years. There is doubt that life on the prison hulks was awful. Inmates were chained in irons,
rising daily at 5am, then doing ten hours hard labour in the summer, seven in the winter, and finishing

work at 7pm. This appears in Great Expectations within the first pages. Magwitch orders Pip to get him
a file. With said file he saws through the chains on his legs. Despite the fact that the hulks were
supposed to be a solution to overcrowding for prisons on land, these ships were also very overcrowded. Prisoners slept, ate and passed time in a below deck space. Sleeping conditions were less
than ideal and lead to the spread of diseases like typhoid fever and tuberculosis. Clothing and diet
were adequate, although at times people became concerned about the lack of fruit, vegetables and
bread and the freshness of the meat. Death rates were high. In the early years, on average, one in
four inmates died on the hulks. This later dropped to about one in every ten. Not only were they
physically unfit as prisons, but psychologically as well. Hulks had a reputation so bad that some men
preferred to be hanged rather than take their place on board. Prisoners were almost always brought
aboard suffering from depression, only to be made worse by being put to work for hours on end.
Prison life was a large part of the life of Charles Dickens, as his father was imprisoned for debt.
Charles spent Sundays at the prison visiting his father. This no doubt led to the use of prisons in many
of Dickens works. It is my belief that dickens made the character of Magwitch as a way to say that
people in prison are still people, not animals. And just because you have wronged in some way,
doesnt mean youre any less of a person.
It becomes clear, the more we look at it, why Magwitch and many others wanted to escape
from the hell that prisons are. Prison life is obviously always difficult, as it is punishment, but we must
know where to draw the line. Thankfully, since the 19th century prison conditions have improved. No
more do we force prisoners to work for 10 hours a day yielding no result. No more do we require
inmates to sleep on wooden beds. And no more do we have the awful hulk. Prisoners deserve to lose
freedom, but we cannot take away their humanity. It should be clear that if a man would rather be
hanged than go to prison, basic human rights are being stolen. Again, prisons have a purpose, but we
must realise that the purpose is not to strip other people of their very basic necessities.

Bibliography:

"An Overview of Hard Labour - Victorian Crime and Punishment from E2BN." An

Overview of Hard Labour - Victorian Crime and Punishment from E2BN. N.p., n.d. Web.
12 Dec. 2014.

BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.

"Http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/resources/19th-century-prison-ships/."
The National Archives. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 12.

Birkbeck, Nikolaus Wachsmann, Dr. "Oxford History of the Prison: The Practice of
Punishment in Western Society." Oxford History of the Prison: The Practice of
Punishment in Western Society. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.

Version #2 of my informative/explanatory piece:

From 1839 onwards, all physically fit criminal prisoners had to work in their cells for up to ten
hours a day. 19th century English prisons forced all inmates to do extraneous work with no end result.
Not only that but, english prisons in the 19th century were dirty, cramped, and just plain horrible.
Crimes were broad and prisons were filled. Punishment in prisons was brutally hard work and even
caused some to go insane. The prisons themselves were dirty and far overcrowded. In attempt to
combat this, along came the large use of hulks, or prison boats. There is no doubt that a prison is
never a desirable place, but just how undesirable were these specific ones?
Crime in the 1800s in england were very broad and crime ran rampant. Many people were
extremely poor and work and food were scarce. In addition, most children didnt receive an education.
Unsurprisingly, stealing was by far the most common crime. Not only this, but it was a crime
punishable by death, as specified in the bloody code. Many judges felt sympathy for criminals and
instead of sentencing them to death, sent them to prison. Many believe the bloody code was the main
cause for overcrowded prisons in England. In the early 19th century, Prisons filled rapidly and the
need for more became apparent. In attempt to combat this, prisons were often housed in old buildings,

unsuited to long term sentences, with prisoners massed together. They were damp, insanitary and
overcrowded. There was no privacy or protection from others. Every type of criminal was held
together, -men, women, children, mentally-ill(insane), serious and petty criminals, even those awaiting
trial. Later in the century a 'new model prison' was built. Men, women and children were separated.
The rules stated that prisoners were made to wash regularly and wear a uniform. This was to keep
them clean and make it more difficult to escape. They were taught to read and write and had their
health checked regularly. They were fed a basic diet, and no longer had to rely on their families for
food or clothes. Prisoners slept, ate and worked in their cells and were only allowed out for exercise
once a day or to go to the washroom. The typical cell was provided with a hammock, mattress,
blankets, sheets, a pillow, towel, comb, spoon and salt cup. Each cell had a stool, box and chamber
pot with lid. At around the middle of the century, many felt that prison life had become too easy. To
make the stay less comfortable, wooden beds and wooden pillows were introduced. Prisoners were
required to (try) to sleep on them for the first thirty days of their sentence.
On top of the horrid conditions of these prisons, was punishment. Punishment was brutal for
all, but the severity of the punishment corresponded to that of the crime. Many people disagreed about
whether prisons were to punish offenders or to reform them as well. Throughout the century, different
systems were tried. An example of this was the 'separate system' where prisoners were kept in
isolation. Another was the 'silent system' in which prisoners were not allowed to talk to one another.
These purpose of these was to give prisoners with time to reflect on their actions away from the
influence of other inmates. On top of this, all prison sentences involved work or hard labour. There
were additional punishments for those caught breaking the rules and reward systems for model, or
well-behaved, prisoners.
Work was meant to punish and break the prisoners will. Therefore the tasks were hard,
monotonous and often pointless. One such form of labor was the tread wheel. The tread wheel was
similar to the elongated wheel of a paddle steamer but instead of paddles, had 24 steps. Hanging onto
a strap or handrail, prisoners stood in individual compartments over these steps. The weight of the
convict caused the wheel to turn. Prisoners had to keep climbing or fall off and it was exhausting and

utterly unproductive work. Another similar activity was the crank. The crank. The Crank consisted of a
large handle with a counter. Sand was simply churned around a drum. The crank handle was attached
to a set of cogs, which pushed a paddle through sand, and Warders could tighten up the crank,
making it harder to turn. Every turn of the crank was recorded. On average, prisoners had to complete
about 10000 turns a day. Meals depended on an interval number of turns being performed. For
example, a prisoner might need 2000 to get breakfast, 3000 for lunch, and 3000 more for dinner. They
then had to perform another 2000 before they could go to bed. The work created nothing and it was
thought to drive some mad.
Another very interesting part of the English prison system was hulks. Hulks were large prison
ship originally meant to transport prisoners. In 1776 an Act of Parliament allowed the use of floating
prisons, hulks, for two years as a temporary solution to the problem of overcrowded jail. 50 or more
were brought into service until the middle of the century. These ships served as temporary prisons for
nearly 100 years. There is doubt that life on the prison hulks was awful. Inmates were chained in irons,
rising daily at 5am, then doing ten hours hard labour in the summer, seven in the winter, and finishing
work at 7pm. This appears in Great Expectations within the first pages. Magwitch orders Pip to get him
a file. With said file he saws through the chains on his legs. Despite the fact that the hulks were
supposed to be a solution to overcrowding for prisons on land, these ships were also very overcrowded. Prisoners slept, ate and passed time in a below deck space. Sleeping conditions were less
than ideal and lead to the spread of diseases like typhoid fever and tuberculosis. Clothing and diet
were adequate, although at times people became concerned about the lack of fruit, vegetables and
bread and the freshness of the meat. Death rates were high. In the early years, on average, one in
four inmates died on the hulks. This later dropped to about one in every ten. Not only were they
physically unfit as prisons, but psychologically as well. Hulks had a reputation so bad that some men
preferred to be hanged rather than take their place on board. Prisoners were almost always brought
aboard suffering from depression, only to be made worse by being put to work for hours on end.
Prison life was a large part of the life of Charles Dickens, as his father was imprisoned for debt.
Charles spent Sundays at the prison visiting his father. This no doubt led to the use of prisons in many

of Dickens works. It is my belief that dickens made the character of Magwitch as a way to say that
people in prison are still people, not animals. And just because you have wronged in some way,
doesnt mean youre any less of a person.
It becomes clear, the more we look at it, why Magwitch and many others wanted to escape
from the hell that prisons are. Prison life is obviously always difficult, as it is punishment, but we must
know where to draw the line. Thankfully, since the 19th century prison conditions have improved. No
more do we force prisoners to work for 10 hours a day yielding no result. No more do we require
inmates to sleep on wooden beds. And no more do we have the awful hulk. Prisoners deserve to lose
freedom, but we cannot take away their humanity. It should be clear that if a man would rather be
hanged than go to prison, basic human rights are being stolen. Again, prisons have a purpose, but we
must realise that the purpose is not to strip other people of their very basic necessities.

Bibliography:

"An Overview of Hard Labour - Victorian Crime and Punishment from E2BN." An
Overview of Hard Labour - Victorian Crime and Punishment from E2BN. N.p., n.d. Web.
12 Dec. 2014.

BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.

"Http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/resources/19th-century-prison-ships/."
The National Archives. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 12.

Birkbeck, Nikolaus Wachsmann, Dr. "Oxford History of the Prison: The Practice of
Punishment in Western Society." Oxford History of the Prison: The Practice of
Punishment in Western Society. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.

______________________________________________________________________

Title of my argumentative piece:

The Cyclops vs. Big Dan

Writers Memo for my argumentative piece:

During a limited amount of time, I was able to successfully put together a piece of writing. But,
with the help of the RADaR method, I was able to further improve it. I was able to add more
descriptive verbs as well as a better use of transition words to help the whole thing flow better. I also
edited my intro paragraph to better address the entirety of the essay. Therefore, this piece of writing
can be used to support my achievement of common core standards because I was able to improve my
ability of created a point and sustaining it throughout the essay.

Version #1 of my argumentative piece:

The movie, O Brother Where Art Thou? is based on the epic The Odyssey. But how similar
are they? When we look at it we can see that the two stories are actually very similar. In O Brother,
Where Art Thou?, Big Dan is based on the cyclops from The Odyssey. When we compare the two
side by side we can see how surprisingly similar they are. Not only with appearance, but also with their
actions. Both are one-eyed and large, ferocious, and hungry for the blood of humans. Not only this,
but they have similar mindsets when it comes to the torment of humans.

In both the book and the movie, we can see that they have the same basic appearance. In
The Odyssey, we can see that the beast is stabbed in the eye (9.438-440). This is an example of the
fact that the cyclops only has one eye, much like Big Dan. Obliviously Big Dan wasnt a cyclops, but
with his eyepatch he only had one working eye. This gives the illusion, or is a metaphor for Big Dan
being like a cyclops or monster. In addition, it is pretty obvious that Big Dan is a big man. He is tall
and bulky. In The Odyssey, the Cyclops is described as a man-mountain rearing head and shoulders
over the world. (9.213-214.) He is a monster much larger than any human. But, the two characters
are much more similar than just looks.
In addition, both characters have a desire to hurt humans. In The Odyssey, the cyclops
snatches up two men, killing them instantly, and fixes them up as a meal. (9.321-329.) He has no
regard for life and feels nothing when he ends human life. In addition he keeps the men in his cave
and tortures them, planning to kill and devour them as well. In O Brother Where Art Thou?, Big Dan
does a similar thing. He takes Pete and Delmar up a mountain, alone, only to beat them with a log. He
also kills the toad, who was at the time believed to be Pete, without showing any remorse. This is a
common trait with psychopaths and shows that Big Dan, like the cyclops, has no regard for life.
In conclusion, it is clear that Big Dan and the cyclops are the same character. Obviously,
Big Dan isnt a cyclops, but they characters are much more similar than they appear at first glance.
Both are one-eyed and large, and have no regard for life.

Version #2 of my argumentative piece:

The movie, O Brother Where Art Thou? is based on the epic The Odyssey. But how similar
are they? When we look at it we can see that the two stories are actually very similar. In O Brother,
Where Art Thou?, Big Dan is based on the cyclops from The Odyssey. When we compare the two
side by side we can see how surprisingly similar they are. Not only with appearance, but also with their

actions. Both are one-eyed and large, ferocious, and hungry for the blood of humans. Not only this,
but they have similar mindsets when it comes to the torment of humans.
In both the book and the movie, we can see that they have the same basic appearance. In
The Odyssey, we can see that the beast is stabbed in the eye (9.438-440). This is an example of the
fact that the cyclops only has one eye, much like Big Dan. Obliviously Big Dan wasnt a cyclops, but
with his eyepatch he only had one working eye. This gives the illusion, or is a metaphor for Big Dan
being like a cyclops or monster. In addition, it is pretty obvious that Big Dan is a big man. He is tall
and bulky. In The Odyssey, the Cyclops is described as a man-mountain rearing head and shoulders
over the world. (9.213-214.) He is a monster much larger than any human. But, the two characters
are much more similar than just looks.
In addition, both characters have a desire to hurt humans. In The Odyssey, the cyclops
snatches up two men, killing them instantly, and fixes them up as a meal. (9.321-329.) He has no
regard for life and feels nothing when he ends human life. In addition he keeps the men in his cave
and tortures them, planning to kill and devour them as well. In O Brother Where Art Thou?, Big Dan
does a similar thing. He takes Pete and Delmar up a mountain, alone, only to beat them with a log. He
also kills the toad, who was at the time believed to be Pete, without showing any remorse. This is a
common trait with psychopaths and shows that Big Dan, like the cyclops, has no regard for life.
In conclusion, it is clear that Big Dan and the cyclops are the same character. Obviously,
Big Dan isnt a cyclops, but they characters are much more similar than they appear at first glance.
Both are one-eyed and large, and have no regard for life.