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Demonstrate

Professionalism
ECE. 5

I adhere to the NAEYC Cod of Ethical


Conduct
As an individual who works with young children, I commit myself to furthering the
values of early childhood education as they are reflected in the ideals and principles
of the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct. To the best of my ability I will
1.Never harm children.
2.Ensure that programs for young children are based on current knowledge and
3.research of child development and early childhood education.
4.Respect and support families in their task of nurturing children.
5.Respect colleagues in early childhood care and education and support them in
6.maintaining the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
7.Serve as an advocate for children, their families, and their teachers in community
8.and society.
9.Stay informed of and maintain high standards of professional conduct.
10.
Engage in an ongoing process of self-reflection, realizing that personal characteristics,
11.
biases, and beliefs have an impact on children and families.
12.
Be open to new ideas and be willing to learn from the suggestions of others.
13.
Continue to learn, grow, and contribute as a professional.
14.
Honor the ideals and principles of the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.

I adhere to professional workplace


behaviors (i.e. attire, preparedness,
confidentiality)

I always dress casual but appropriate for my position, I


am clean and prepared for the day. Now that means
ready for the days activities, and take care of the
children. I also take confidentiality very seriously. My
families personal information is kept just that
Personal. This code of ethics is important for early
childcare educators is because we care for children that
are too young and too vulnerable to protect themselves
so we must protect them. The more powerless the
client is in relation to the practitioner in any profession,
more imperative the professionals ethics becomes. The
code works in many different setting, early childhood
educators, direct service providers, program

I advocate for the early childhood


profession
I always dress casual but appropriate for my position, I
am clean and prepared for the day. Now that means
ready for the days activities, and take care of the
children. I also take confidentiality very seriously. My
families personal information is kept just that
Personal. This code of ethics is important for early
childcare educators is because we care for children that
are too young and too vulnerable to protect themselves
so we must protect them. The more powerless the
client is in relation to the practitioner in any profession,
more imperative the professionals ethics becomes. The
code works in many different setting, early childhood
educators, direct service providers, program

I advocate for all children and


families
You are an advocate like myself, if you have ever did any of these things :
helped a family receive needed services;
stood up for someone who was being treated unfairly;
attended a parent/teacher conference at your childs school;
participated in a city council meeting.
Early childhood professionals have specialized training and education. These standards describe what early childhood professionals are expected to know and do, defining
essential learning outcomes in professional preparation programs and presenting a shared vision of excellence.
These standards offer framework for applying new knowledge to critical issues. They support critical early childhood policy structures including professional credentialing,
accreditation of professional preparation programs, state approval of teacher education programs, and state professional development systems.
Preparation for inclusion and diversity is required to meet each of these standards. Thus, the phrase each child is incorporated to emphasize that every standard included
children with developmental delays or disabilities: children who are gifted and talented; children whose families are culturally and linguistically diverse; children and diverse
socioeconomic groups; and childrens individual learning styles, strengths, and needs.
Each standard includes a key element requiring application of knowledge and skills through field or clinical experiences. Excellent teachers are decision makers, engaged in a
continuous interplay of theory, research and practice.
Students prepared in early childhood degree programs identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession. They know and use ethical guidelines and
other professional standards related to early childhood practice. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical
perspectives on their work, making informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources. They are informed advocates for sound educational practices and
policies.
Using developmentally effective approaches to connect with children and families is one of the elements of professional behaviors. Students know, understand, and use a wide
array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each childs development and
learning. Observing, documenting, and assessing is another element of professional behavior. Child observations, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to
the practice of all early childhood professionals. Building family and community relationships is yet another element of professional behavior. Successful early childhood
education depends on partnership with childrens families and communities. They know about, understand, and value the importance and complex characteristics of childrens
families and communities. While your building family and community relationships, Promoting child development and learning of young childrens characteristics and needs and
of the multiple interacting influences on childrens development and learning to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child. We
use content knowledge to build a meaningful curriculum. With our knowledge of academic disciplines to design implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive
development and learning for each and every young child. Developmental domains and academic discipline play a key role in early childhood curricula. Essential concepts,
inquiry tools, and structure of content areas also play a key role, including academic subjects. We can identify resources to deepen their understanding with our knowledge and
other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula that promote comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for every young child.

I collaborate with others


I am a collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on my
work, making informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources. I am an informed
advocates for sound educational practices and policies.
Building family and community relationships is yet another element of professional behavior. Successful
early childhood education depends on partnership with childrens families and communities.
Early childhood professionals have specialized training and education. These standards describe what early
childhood professionals are expected to know and do, defining essential learning outcomes in professional
preparation programs and presenting a shared vision of excellence.
These standards offer framework for applying new knowledge to critical issues. They support critical early
childhood policy structures including professional credentialing, accreditation of professional preparation
programs, state approval of teacher education programs, and state professional development systems.
Preparation for inclusion and diversity is required to meet each of these standards. Thus, the phrase each
child is incorporated to emphasize that every standard included children with developmental delays or
disabilities: children who are gifted and talented; children whose families are culturally and linguistically
diverse; children and diverse socioeconomic groups; and childrens individual learning styles, strengths, and
needs.
Each standard includes a key element requiring application of knowledge and skills through field or clinical
experiences. Excellent teachers are decision makers, engaged in a continuous interplay of theory, research
and practice.

I use reflective practice


I use reflective practices because it is highly valued in early care and education and important for
leadership in the field for several reasons. First, working effectively with young children requires
skilled observation. Assessment--both formal and informal--in early childhood is done primarily
through observation. Those observations then must be interpreted and decisions must be made
based on those interpretations. Family members, practitioners, and others who know the child will
bring their ideas, their understandings, and their knowledge of the child to the process of decisionmaking. This can happen both in formal team meetings and in the everyday work of adapting
interactions and materials to best fit what is being observed in the child's behavior. Asking
reflective questions of the observations and bringing forth as many perspectives as possible will
generate decisions that lead to more effective interventions.
A second reason that I use reflective practices is that it supports relationship-based practice.
Enfolding the work with infants, toddlers, and young children and their families in relationships at
every level is a practice that is highly valued in the field. It is driven by research that supports the
belief that early development and learning take place in the context of emotionally and cognitively
supportive relationships. It follows that when we work within a cascade of supportive relationships-among the staff, the children, and the families--we increase the possibility of optimal development
for the child. Leaders are charged, therefore, with the task of modeling reflective practice
throughout their ongoing work as staff and family members scaffold one another in developing the
value and habit of reflection.