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The Colony

Update
The Colony Update is
written and published by
Velouria Perez and
company. Publishing date:
20 February 1781.
John Andr: An Honored
Spy
By William Davidson
John Andr, age 30, has been
hanged in Tappan, New York on 2
October 1780. He was arrested
for spying, although if Benedict
Arnold had turned himself in,
Andr would not be dead. Andr
was born on 2 May 1750 in
London, but the exact location is
lost. His parents are Antoine
Andr and Marie Louise Girardot.
He had 3 sisters and 1 brother;
names unknown. Andrs father
sent him to Geneva, Switzerland
for school. To support his family,
he joined the family business,
which is unknown. He proposed
to Honora Sneyd, who agreed,
but her father would not let her. It
is rumored that Andrs broken
heart drove him to join the British
Army when he was 20. Some of
Andrs hobbies were drawing,
painting, playing the flute, and

From the United


States of America

Benedict Arnold: A
Revolutionary General
By Thomas Merriman
The Battle of Saratoga begins with a loud bang. Patriots climb up
trees for sneaky shots at the British. The redcoats havent a clue
on what is going to happen. Fighting for about a month, the Battle
of Saratoga ends, with one the vanquisher and one the
vanquished. The results? A victory for America! But who lead the
Continental Army to triumph? Our remarkable general Benedict
Arnold.
Who is this amazing leader? As a young boy, Benedict Arnold was
a rebel and thrill-seeker, making it easy for him to take his position
as leader. He teamed up with Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain
Boys in May of 1775, to take over the British Fort Ticonderoga,
which they succeeded. Later, in September through December of
1775, he led part of the Continental Army to try to take Quebec, but
unfortunately his plan failed. Much of the army he had taken had
died from fatigue, disease, or had gotten wounded in battle. They
barely made an escape with few soldiers left and little ammunition.
After that horrible clash, he came up to greatness in the Battle of
Saratoga. Although Arnold was supposed to be under the
command of Horatio Gates, he begged to take a part of the army to
fight the British, who were on their way to take over Fort Stanwix.
Gates refused to let them attack, but Arnold did it anyways. Their
unplanned attack caused chaos and confusion in the British army,
making it easier for Arnolds army to defeat them. Arnold did get
injured in battle and had to be carried away, but he encouraged his
soldiers to fight on. The Redcoats did not have enough supplies to
keep fighting, so they surrendered. Now because of Arnolds strike,
America has taken the lead in the war!

reading and writing poetry. He


spoke fluent English, French,
German, and Italian. As a
prisoner of war, he met young 17
year old Peggy Shippen, whom
we can infer he fell in love with.
Peggy later married Benedict
Arnold, who asked Andr to help
him defect to the British side.
They had a talk, and when Andr
was leaving (with plans for an
attack on West Point), he got
caught by American bandits, who
turned him in. In his trial, Andr
was found guilty, meaning that
Washington had to execute him.
Andr asked if he could die more
honorably by getting shot, but
Washington did not grant this
wish. Not much is known about
Andrs family. We do know that
he has been survived by his
mother, three sisters, and brother.
He has been predeceased by his
father, but we do not know any
others. Andr will be sorely
missed not only by his family, but
his fellow soldiers and army.

The Notorious Benedict


Arnold by Steve Sheinkin
Article by Edward Cole
The Notorious Benedict Arnold
is a delightful read about the
accomplishments of the brave
Benedict Arnold. Throughout the
book, there is humor, first-person
accounts, and surprises, showing
the true Arnold. If you are looking
for some background history on
this hero, this is the ideal place to
look. Not only does it tell his
story, it informs us a bit on his
family tree and all five Benedict
Arnolds before him. Steve
Sheinkin has, once again, wrote a
fantastic book.

The Boston Massacre: A


Bloody Beginning
By John Greenwood

Bang! Bang! Bang! A bloody fight occurred on March 5, 1770,


and because of this vicious harassment, my closest friends life has
been stripped from this world. Watching my best friend fall to the
snowy ground, injured, made me wish that a revolution didnt need
to be this hard. My dear mate Samuel Maverick was just in the
wrong place at the wrong time. He wasnt a part of the mob; when
we heard the street bells ringing, we thought there was a fire. So
we rushed out of the house to where the angry crowd had gathered
around those Redcoats, who ended up killing five people, including
Samuel. He never deserved to die, nor did any of the others who
did. As much as I am against the Britishs actions, I am angered
that Edward Garrick had to announce to all of the passersby that
officer John Goldfinch wouldnt pay Garricks master for dressing
his hair. They could have kept it a private conversation, and then
no one would have died and Boston would somewhat be in peace.
Samuel and the others would still be here with us today. This
massacre was a bloody one, one that shouldnt have happened.
And definitely not to innocent people. If it had to happen at all, the
Boston Massacre shouldnt have been as dramatic and violent as it
was.