You are on page 1of 34

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 1

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY


MONTEREY BAY

Technology and the Common Core Standards:


A Training for Teachers

CAPSTONE REPORT

Submitted in partial satisfaction of requirements of the degree of

MASTER OF SCIENCE in
Instructional Science and Technology

Christina Freeman-Canavan

May 15, 2015

Capstone Approvals: (At least one advisor and capstone instructor should approve)

___________________________ ___________________________ _____________


Advisor Name

Signature

Date

___________________________ ___________________________ _____________


Capstone Instructor Name

Signature

Date

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ 3


INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 5
Background and History ...................................................................................................... 5
Problem Description ............................................................................................................. 6
Target Audience .................................................................................................................... 8
Literature Review ................................................................................................................. 8
Environmental Scan ............................................................................................................ 10
SOLUTION DESCRIPTION .................................................................................................... 12
Proposed Solution ............................................................................................................... 12
Goals and Objectives .......................................................................................................... 12
METHODS AND PROCEDURE ............................................................................................. 19
Design, Development, and Implementation ...................................................................... 19
RESOURCES ........................................................................................................................... 21
Time ..................................................................................................................................... 21
Money ................................................................................................................................... 21
Hardware/Software ............................................................................................................. 21
External Expertise .............................................................................................................. 21
Budget .................................................................................................................................. 21
TIMELINE/PROGRESS REPORT .......................................................................................... 22
FORMATIVE EVALUATION ................................................................................................ 23
Formative Evaluation Plan ................................................................................................ 23
Functional Testing .............................................................................................................. 23
SUMMATIVE EVALUATION ............................................................................................... 24
Usability Testing ................................................................................................................. 24
Data Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 24
SUMMARY .............................................................................................................................. 26
REFERENCES ......................................................................................................................... 27
APPENDIX ............................................................................................................................... 30
Google Forms Survey ......................................................................................................... 30

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 3

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The goal of this project is to provide training for middle school English Language
Arts teachers who need to acquire the appropriate technological skills and digital
confidence in order to implement the Common Core State Standards in their classroom.
According to a recent study by Education Week Research Center, teachers feel they are
not prepared for the implementation of the Common Core (Gewertz, 2014). The goal is
to train teachers in digital literacy including student privacy and protection laws. The
goal is also to train teachers in the International Society for Technology in Education
standards so these standards can be easily implemented. Finally, teachers will be trained
which Common Core State Standards ELA Grade 6-8 are connected to technology and
provide resources for implementation.
As states continue the process of implementing the Common Core State Standards
in schools across the nation, districts have been busy providing professional development
for teachers. This instructional design project seeks to create an eLearning module that
will act as a supplement to current professional development and prepare teachers with
the necessary skills, tools, and ideas to successfully teach technology-integrated lessons
in the context of the Common Core State Standards. This eLearning module will:

provide an overview of digital literacy and how to keep kids safe online, in
particular knowledge of the Child Online Privacy Protection Act

introduce the learner to the International Society for Technology in Education


Standards for Teachers

illustrate the technology connections embedded in the ELA Grade 6-8 Standards

include tools and ideas for implementation that are relevant to the current needs of
teachers

allow teachers to go through the module at their own pace, repeating lessons as
necessary to ensure comprehension

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 4

provide assessments and knowledge checks as part of the learning experience

The Common Core Standards are a nationwide set of educational standards that have
been widely adopted this 2014/2015 school year. In California, this years students will
be the first to use the new online assessment system, Smarter Balanced, to test students
content knowledge according to the new standards. To be successful during this
transition, districts have been actively attempting to prepare teachers for these changes by
providing professional development. This eLearning module will focus on technology
training for teachers including digital literacy, the ISTE Standards for teachers, the
technology connections within the ELA Grade 6-8 Common Core Standards, and
implementation resources.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 5

INTRODUCTION
Background and History
In 2010, more than 40 states adopted a new set of educational standards for
students called the Common Core State Standards (CDE, 2013). These standards provide
a clear and consistent understanding of what students are expected to learn at each grade
level, regardless of the state in which they live.

According to a report issued by

Education First, the majority of states reported that they have at least begun the process
of developing plans to align their systems to CCSS by: providing professional
development to teachers changing or devising curriculum guides and other instructional
materials, and revising the teacher-evaluation system (Porter, 2012). However, according
to the most recent survey by Education Week titled From Adoption to Practice: Teacher
Perspectives on the Common Core, most teachers say they are attending more
professional development, but theyre giving the sessions low marks for quality
(Gewertz, 2014).
The new standards include rigorous academic expectations at the highest levels
and are designed to ensure that high school graduates are prepared to go to college. They
also incorporate a new set of digital skills students must learn in order to be successful in
the 21st century workforce, nationally and globally. The International Society for
Technology of Education (ISTE) created a list of technology standards in 2008 for both
teachers and students in which many schools have adopted. The ISTE argue that if
teachers want to be effective, they should incorporate technology in all of their
lessons. Kids today have access to many different forms of technology, from gaming
devices to handheld tablets, but the question remains how much teachers actually know.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 6

Teachers need to be prepared to use technology effectively and safely in order to meet the
rigorous learning goals embedded in Common Core Standards by providing access to
tools and resources that personalize instruction and creat(e) rich, engaging and relevant
learning environments (ISTE, 2012). This project will design an eLearning module that
will give teachers the appropriate technology skills and tools needed to successfully
implement the Common Core State Standards. First, it will train teachers to become
digitally literate. Teachers will learn about internet safety, including the Childrens
Online Privacy and Protection Act (COPPA), and be able to create guidelines for the
proper use of technology in their classroom. Next, the module will provide an overview
of the ISTEs set of standards for teachers. Finally, the module will introduce teachers to
the Common Core State Standards that have connections with technology and be
provided with ideas for implementation in the classroom.
Problem Description
The problem is that teachers lack proper training in technology. If teachers have a
better understanding of technology, implementing the Common Core State Standards in
the classroom will be a success. Kids today are born with access to smart phones, tablets,
and computers. Their knowledge of technology may far exceed that of some of their
teachers. It is important to be aware that if students are expected to learn while using
technology, teachers need to know how to teach using technology. And it is not just the
technology itself that teachers need to know how to use. Teachers need to be digitally
literate in student privacy and protection laws as well as have the skills to implement the
standards to create a 21st century classroom.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 7

In 2001, Marc Prensky, best known for coining the term digital native warned
us, "Our students have changed radically. Today's students are no longer the people our
educational system was designed to teach (Wylie, 2013). The Common Core State
Standards were developed to create equity in education across states and provide a clear
and consistent understanding of what students are expected to learn. Technology is a
challenge faced by many teachers because of their lack of knowledge and/or access.
According to a report released by Consumer Electronics Association, the majority of
classrooms have limited access to technology (Meyer, 2012). There is a considerable
performance gap between current teaching practices and the new expectations that
require teachers to have the skills required to effectively incorporate technology in the
classroom.
New Brighton Middle School in Capitola is a top-rated middle school in Santa
Cruz County. After observing staff meetings over the last year, including individual
conversations with teachers and administrators, it was evident there is a positive outlook
on the ability for the Common Core to improve overall student achievement. However,
many teachers expressed concerns that their limited knowledge in technology will not
enable them to create the rich and engaging classroom environments needed for students
to be successful.
The school district has enlisted different ways to support teachers during the
implementation phase. Districts have mandated professional development and
encouraged teachers to participate in outside trainings; however, the overall consensus
amongst teachers is that their confidence in technology is lacking. Other districts are
seeing the same challenges. Many cannot support the financial requirements to bring

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 8

classrooms up-to-date with current technological trends. There is an immense gap


between overall vision and overall tools (Schwartz, 2013) available to teachers. Since
teachers lack confidence in their digital knowledge, many stay away from computer labs,
mobile devices, online publishing, production, and collaboration, video production,
online presentations, and many other technology tools currently available.
Target Audience
The learners for this design project are middle school English Language Arts
teachers, in particular at New Brighton Middle School in Capitola, California. The
learners are credentialed teachers ranging from one year teaching experience to 25
years. Their educational backgrounds range from having a Bachelors degree to a
Masters degree. Every teacher has a personal computer in their classroom, with a
minimum of two computers available for student use. There are two computer labs and
one class set of laptops that are available to classrooms on a sign-up basis. The learners
have a basic knowledge of technology which includes word processing, internet searches,
and email but will participate in an extensive technology survey to gather the data needed
to guide the design and development of the eLearning module. Some teachers employ a
Bring Your Own Device classroom, but many admit not feeling confident in the issues
regarding the appropriate use for many of these devices. And, most were not familiar
with COPPA, the Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act.
Literature Review
After conducting a literature review on technological trends and recent studies on
technology in the classroom, there still seems to be a missing link between technological
training for teachers and implementation of technology in the classroom. Technology is

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 9

an exciting new trend in education and the Common Core Standards have made learning
technology a standard for students. Studies are continuing to emerge that show links
between the use of technology and student motivation and achievement. One such study
at the Abilene Christian University focused on a mobile app used for Statistics. Students
reported that using the app helped them understand the content better, and were more
motivated to do welland the instructors agreed with this observation (Wylie, 2013).
In another study by Kent State University, researchers looked at students from
four elementary school and two middle schools. These classes were provided with tablets
and were observed for several months. These students were able to use their devices 24
hours a day, seven days a week. The researchers collected their data through classroom
observations, student and teacher interviews, and student work samples. The findings of
their research showed, that the use of mobile computing devices can increase student
motivation and engagement in learning, especially their motivation to complete written
assignments (Swan, 2005).
Technology in the classroom is one of the most prominent technology trends
expected to influence the consumer electronics industry in the years ahead, according to
the report by the Consumer Electronics Association (Meyer, 2012). The unfortunate
reality is that schools today have limited access to technology yet research confirms that
technology motivates student learning and achievement.
Lisa Nielson, the author of The Innovative Educator blog poses the question,
When the world inside schools looks so different from the world outside of schools,
what are we really preparing students for?" she asks. "When we ban, rather than embrace,
real-world technologies, we leave students (1) ill-equipped to know how to harness the

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 10

power of technology for learning, (2) unprepared to develop a respectable digital


footprint and, (3), without adequate knowledge to safely navigate the social web.
With the proper training, teachers will be able to embrace technology and provide
a safe learning environment that will help students prepare for the 21st century. Although
professional development has increased according to teachers surveyed by the Education
Week Research Center, their confidence in the quality of training sessions fell to 53%
compared to two-thirds a year earlier (Ed Week, 2014). The report also states that, very
few teachers feel their students are highly prepared to master the common standards or
the assessments linked to them (Ed Week, 2014). It is imperative to present training
solutions to teachers so they can have the technological knowledge, skills, and support
needed to create engaging lessons that enhance student motivation, learning, and
achievement.
Environmental Scan

Currently, there are several main websites that offer digital literacy training.

Microsoft offers an online training module in digital literacy to help people learn basic
computer skills. Google, partnered with iKeepSafe, offer an online safety class that
focuses on managing your digital footprint, checking sources, and ways to identify
tricks and scams. The Northstar Digital Literacy Project also offers a digital literacy
module where students can learn basic computer skills and earn a certificate of
completion.
Fresno County Office of Education has been the front-runner in California as far
as identifying technology links within the Common Core State Standards. Many districts
in California have followed Fresnos lead and use their website as a source for their

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 11

teachers. The Fresno County site includes a detailed chart of the technology connections
within the Common Core, recommended student skills chart, a technology selfassessment for teachers, connections to ISTE and sample learning modules. However, an
eLearning module that provided basic digital literacy along with technology connections
within the Common Core was not to be found.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 12

SOLUTION DESCRIPTION
Proposed Solution

In order to provide the necessary training for teachers in an already busy school
schedule, an eLearning module will be developed. During the analysis phase, a
technology survey will be given to the prospective learners to adequately determine their
knowledge of technology and how often they provide technological opportunities to their
students. The design and development of the training module will be created based on
three content areas: digital literacy, ISTE Standards for Teachers, and the ELA Common
Core State Standards that are connected to technology. Lessons will be in the form of
video lectures and Adobe Captivate demonstrations and simulations. The learners will be
able to interact with the content with no more than five slides going by without some
form of interaction in order to engage the learner. Assessments in the form of quizzes
will be given after each lesson and will provide immediate feedback to help guide the
learning.

By the end of the eLearning module, teaches will be able to safely and

effectively implement the required technology embedded in the Common Core State
Standards to enhance student engagement and learning.
Goals and Objectives
The goal of this project is to provide training for middle school English Language
Arts teachers who need to acquire the appropriate technological skills and digital
confidence in order to implement the Common Core State Standards in their classroom.
The goal is to train teachers in digital literacy including student privacy and protection
laws. The goal is also to train teachers in the International Society for Technology in
Education standards so these standards can be easily implemented. Finally, teachers will

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 13

be trained which Common Core State Standards ELA Grade 6-8 are connected to
technology and provide resources for implementation. It will complement or supplement
current curriculum and allow teachers to go through the module at their own pace,
repeating lessons as necessary to ensure comprehension. Finally, it will provide
assessments and knowledge checks as part of the learning experience. The three main
objectives for this project are:
1. Given examples of how to comply with the Childrens Online Privacy Protection
Act (COPPA), (Condition), the learner (Audience) will be able to accurately
match each example of compliance with the rule (Behavior) with 100% accuracy
(Degree).
2. Given the five standards of the International Society for Technology Education
(ISTE) (Condition), the learner (Audience) will be able to accurately match each
substandard to its standard (Behavior) with 100% accuracy (Degree).
3. Given the Common Core State Standards with connections to technology
(Condition), the learner (Audience) will be able to identify the technology tools
appropriate for each standard (Behavior) with 100% accuracy (Degree).
Learning Theories
Adult learning theory, combined with the instructional design model of Gagnes
nine events of instruction, will guide this instructional design project. The theoretical
framework that is applicable to this eLearning module is based on adult learning theory
while the instructional method used will be based on Gagnes nine events of instruction.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 14

Malcolm Knowles is one of the principle experts in adult learning theory and
created a set of six principles that explain how adults learn. Each of the following
principles include a description on how adults learn and how this eLearning module will
meet the needs of the adult learner:

Adult learners need to know why they need to learn something. Adults want to
understand the importance of the learning which means the learning experience
needs to be relevant and needs help them achieve their goals (The Clinical
Educators Resource). This eLearning module will include objectives and
background information to explain to the learners the reasons for participating in
the training.

Adult learners are self-directed and want to be seen as capable learners. Adults
believe they are responsible for their lives (Knowles et al, 205 as cited in
Fidishin). They want to be a part of the planning and evaluation of their own
education. The learners taking part of this eLearning module will be able to
control the pace of their training and fast forward over training that is not relevant
to them.

Adult learners have life experiences. Adults are prepared to learn when they
experience a need to learn in order to cope more satisfyingly with real-life tasks or
problems (Knowles, 1980 p 44, as cited in Clinical Ed Res). They are selfmotivated and bring life experiences and knowledge to new learning experiences
that are different than young people. (Fidishin, circa 2005). The module will be
based on the technological survey given before the design and development phase
that will guide instruction.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 15

Adult learners are ready to learn (Adult Learning Theories). They are ready to
learn when the training is relevant to their work or personal lives. They are ready
to learn when it connects to their life in a meaningful way and if it is expected to
help them cope with real-life situations (Ota, 2006). The module will make
connections to current teaching practices and strategies. The module will be
meaningful and connect the learners to real-life solutions implementing
technology in their classroom in a safe and effective way.

Adult

learners

want

problem-centered

rather

than

content

oriented

training. (ala.asn.au) Adults want to see how what they will be learning will
apply to their life or a problem that needs to be solved. They want the content
presented to them to be in the context of their real-life (Knowles et al., 2005, as
cited in Ota, 2006). The module will provide examples of how to use the
technology in a safe and productive way when teachers return to the classroom.

Adult learners are motivated to learn. Intrinsic motivation drives the adult
learner. Adult learners see the importance of a better quality of life, increased
salary, or heightened self-esteem as motivators to participate in training. The
learners will be motivated to create a more engaging classroom environment for
their students when they have knowledge and confidence to do so.

Instructional Strategies
Gagnes Nine Events of Instruction will be the instructional strategy guiding the
design of the module. The University of Florida Center for Instructional Technology and
Training provide examples of how each of the nine events can be applied to

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 16

eLearning. The nine events, with their possible application to the lessons in this module
are as followed (2014):

Gain attention: show slide-shows using Flickr, videos using YouTube, images

Inform learners of objectives: include objectives in lecture slides, simulations, or any


instructional activity, narrated with character

Stimulate recall of prior learning: give polls and surveys, drag and drop questions, other
interactions

Present the content: use variety of methods including demonstrations, simulations,


YouTube, games, interactions

Provide learner guidance: include rubrics, create hint and help buttons

Elicit performance: participate in simulations and other interactions such as Drag and
Drop

Provide feedback: provide immediate feedback (success or failure) on online


assessments, let learners retake module

Assess performance: include assessments following each tutorial

Enhance retention: allow learners to use their skills within a similar context to their
workplace
Media Solutions
The module will be created using Adobe Captivate 7. Learners will be able to
complete the modules in computer labs during professional development time or on their
own time at home. Digital literacy will be taught in a fun and interactive game-like
environment and include video tutorials. Interactive lessons using human characters and
audio narration will be used to teach the ISTE Standards. Instructional videos on how to

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 17

implement technology in the classroom will be included to enhance learning. There will
be demonstrations on how to navigate some useful websites and additional video tutorials
including but not limited to Google, Prezi, Storyboard That, Spelling City, Weebly,
blogs, document uploading sites, and social media sites.
Challenges
There are several challenges that could present themselves during the design and
implementation of this eLearning module. In order to create such an extensive eLearning
module, Adobe Captivate must work effectively and the designers knowledge must be at
advanced levels. There will be many interactions, quizzes, widgets, and buttons used that
will be time consuming if the knowledge of these features is lacking. Also, technology in
education is constantly evolving. New research and studies are coming out weekly and
the designer must be aware of the current research out there. The actual components of
technology are changing as well and the relevancy of this module may not be time
resistant. The technology ideas presented in this eLearning module will be relevant for
todays learners, but there will be new technology advancements that may make some of
these lessons archaic to future 21st century learners. New apps, websites, devices, are
being added to the digital world daily and it is difficult to keep up with the technological
trends. Finally, teachers have to be willing to participate in the training. Teachers, due to
a lack of confidence or willingness, may not want to participate in this training. If the
school district adopts this training and makes it mandatory, then there wouldnt be a
challenge. During the design and development phase, there are several teachers who have
expressed their willingness to participate in the pre-assessment and usability testing. The

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 18

willingness of some to participate in the early stages of the process will help make the
design project even that more effective.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 19

METHODS AND PROCEDURE


Design, Development, and Implementation
This project began with a literature review and subsequent research paper on
technological trends in the classroom. Taking a closer look at technological trends
brought about the issue that although technology was readily available for classrooms,
teachers didnt have training therefore it was not accessible to students. The vision of the
project began with the idea that teachers need the additional training in order to give
students access to the 21st century skills they needed. Research than began with most of
it being online. There were several communications with current teachers about what
they felt was lacking in current professional development. The next phase of the design
was the creation of a single lesson within the module. With that single lesson in mind, a
storyboard was created for the eLearning module.
During the development phase, the module had to be scaled back several times
because the overarching theme was very large.

There were multiple phases in

development in which the original storyboard had to be adjusted in order to create a


project that fitted the needs of the user. A website was also created in which the
eLearning module could be linked.

Both the eLearning module and website were

assessed routinely for usability issues and accuracy of content.


During the Implementation phase, teachers gained access to the training module.
Arrangements were made with the school principal to present the training module to
teachers during a staff meeting. Teachers were introduced to the module in separate
pieces due to initial technical difficulties during development of the project. Teachers
were then sent a link via email so they can go through the training on their own time.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 20

Finally, teachers were sent a link to an online survey where they critiqued the module and
offered feedback as to its content and usability.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 21

RESOURCES
Time
The design process will take approximately five months with an expected completion in
April 2015. The module will be implemented and evaluated in April 2015. Final
adjustments based on user-feedback will be finished in May 2015.
Money
The cost for the school district will be approximately $4200 for professional training
(see the figure under Budget for detailed breakdown of costs). There will be no costs
for the learner.
Hardware/Software
Adobe Captivate 7, FileZilla, Adobe Photoshop, iMovie, video cameras
External Expertise
There are two English Language Arts and Computer Technology teachers at New
Brighton: myself and Amy Lukic. We will be the subject matter experts. The vision of
the principal will be incorporated in the training.
Budget
Type
Cost for subs for ten teachers
Cost for paid work-days for teachers
Access to computer lab
Total Expenses

Cost
$1200
$3000
$0
$4200

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 22

TIMELINE/PROGRESS REPORT
Deliverable
Field Research
Literature Review
Instructional
Design Proposal
Storyboard and
Script writing
Website
Development
Captivate
Evaluation
Capstone Report

Task
Search for technological
trends and trainings for
teachers
Review current studies
regarding the importance of
technology in the classroom
Create proposal

Date
Sept 2013-Dec
2013

Hours
30

Dec 2013-Feb 2014

20

Dec 2013

20

Create initial storyboard and


script for module
Create website for Digital
Literacy for Teachers
Create initial project/ fix
glitches
Usability testing with
teachers
Finish Capstone

Feb 2014-Mar 2014

April 2014-July
2014
April 2014-April
2015
April 2015-May
2015
Sept 2013-May
2015

40
200
10
80

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 23

FORMATIVE EVALUATION
Formative Evaluation Plan
Formative evaluation was designed to obtain specific errors in the eLearning
module in order to fix them and revise instruction. Three learners were selected to
participate in the formative evaluation.

The learners participated in one-to-one

evaluation. The designer sat with the learners while they navigated the eLearning module
and focused on the following three criteria: clarity, impact, and feasibility (Dick, Carey,
2009). After the data from the one-to-one evaluation was analyzed, the learners
participated in a small group evaluation. These three users provided feedback on three
separate occasions.
Functional Testing

Throughout the formative evaluation, the project was tested by three users on

three separate occasions. The eLearning module was also tested by numerous professors
and detailed feedback was provided. Initial issues were mainly technical. There were
many broken links, the course navigation was not logical, and users had the inability to
return to a home page. Two users were unable to open the course due to their internet
connection and/or the size of the project. The project size was ultimately reduced to two
Captivate projects to decrease the file size. In addition, it was published in a flash
version and not HTML5. Other technical issues included users not feeling engaged in
the course. Feedback included it felt like a glorified PowerPoint and many users
complained of not wanting to complete the course. Additional interactions were added in
order to engage the learner. When the functional testing was over, and the majority of
technical glitches were fixed, usability testing began.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 24

SUMMATIVE EVALUATION
Usability Testing
In order to analyze the effectiveness of this module, a questionnaire was given
to the participants. The module provided an overview of digital literacy including
online safety, online privacy, and online research. It introduced the learner to the
International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Teachers.

It

illustrated the technology connections embedded in the ELA Grade 6-8 Standards. It
included tools and ideas for implementation that are relevant to the current needs of
teachers. It allowed teachers to go through the module at their own pace, repeating
lessons as necessary to ensure comprehension. This analysis provided a significant
amount of information related to the efficacy of this module.
When users completed the module, they were instructed to complete an online
questionnaire.

The questionnaire was a survey created with Google Forms.

The

questions included the users previous knowledge, ease of navigation, clarity of the
objectives, and their overall satisfaction with the course. The survey was a five point
scale which included the following: Strongly Agree, Agree, Neither, Disagree, and
Strongly Disagree. Users were also allowed to provide comments which provided even
more thorough feedback.
Data Analysis
According to the survey, 78% of users agreed they had the technological skills to
take the eLearning module, while only 11% felt they did not have the knowledge or skills
to complete the module. Therefore, it was imperative that teachers have some basic
computer skills before they attempted to take the course. In terms of the objectives being

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 25

clear, 39% strongly agreed and 44% agreed that the course objectives were clear. This
was important because the course was broken up into three modules. In early test-runs,
there was a concern that the objectives werent clear and the course was confusing to the
user. However, only 16% found the course objectives to be unclear.
Another concern during functional testing was meeting the objectives, however
only 11% felt the objectives were not met during usability testing. An overwhelming
72% felt the course met its objectives. However, the majority of users made comments
that although the objectives were clear and the course met the objectives, users were
hoping for more depth in content. Most users commented they had wished each module
had gone into more detail. They found the content interestingexcitingimportant,
but the content lacked depthwanted more Users reported they preferred taking the
course in an online format and felt it was an effective way for them to learn (83%). They
also showed strong support for the length of the module and responded with a 66%
approval rate for the amount of time it took to complete the course.

Every user

responded they either strongly agreed or agreed the course was logically organized.
These results contradicted earlier test-runs in which users reported feeling confused when
navigating through the course. Overall, 72% of users reported their knowledge had
increased and they were generally satisfied with the course.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 26

SUMMARY

The intended goal of this course was to create an eLearning module that would

prepare teachers with the necessary skills, tools, and ideas to successfully teach
technology-integrated lessons within the context of the Common Core State Standards.
This course is intended to compliment and supplement current curriculum by giving
teachers the opportunity to take the course at their own pace. The module is intended to
be relevant to the current needs of teachers.
This analysis demonstrated the importance of technology training in order to give
teachers the technological knowledge to be able to teach engaging lessons that enhance
student motivation. The evaluation phase of this project generated effective feedback for
the eLearning module. Most users generally agreed that the objectives were clear and
were ultimately met. In addition, all users either strongly agreed or agreed that the
course was logically organized. However, recommendations had a positive effect on the
course. The general consensus was that teachers wanted more; they wanted more
content. With these results, we can assume that teachers are eager and willing to receive
technology training in order to effectively teach to the Common Core State Standards.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 27

REFERENCES
Adapted from Knowles, M. (1996). Adult Learning. In R. L. Craig, (Ed.), the ASTD
Training and Development Handbook NY, McGraw-Hill.
Dick W., Carey L., & Carey J.O. (2009) The Systematic Design of Instruction. Pearson:
Saddle River, New Jersey.
Fid shun, Dolores. (no date, circa 2005). Andragogy and Technology: Integrating Adult
Learning Theory As We Teach With Technology
From Adoption to Practice: Teacher Perspectives on the Common Core . (n.d.).
Education Week. Retrieved September 15, 2014, from http://www.edweek.org
/media/ewrc_ teacherscommoncore_2014.pdf
Gewertz, C. (n.d.). Teachers Say They Are Not Well-Prepared for Common Core.
Education Week. Retrieved September 15, 2014, from http://www.edweek.org
/ew/articles/2014/08/20/01teachers.h34.html
Gredler, M. E. (1986). Learning and Instruction: The New York, Macmillan.
H, Hsiu-Mei. (2002). Constructivism for Adult. British Journal of Educational, 33 (1),
pp. 27-37.
ISTE, (2012). In ISTE position Statement on the Common Core State Standards.
Retrieved Mar. 9, 2014, from https://www.iste.org/standards/common-core
(no date) In Adult Learning Theories and Principles. Retrieved May. 11, 2014, from
http://www.qotfc.edu.au/resource/?page=65375

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

(no

date)

In

Adult

Learning

Australia.

Canavan 28

Retrieved

May.

12,

2014,

from

https://ala.asn.au/adult-learning/the-principles-o
Kruse, K. (no date, circa 2003). In Information is Not Instruction. Retrieved May. 8,
2014, from http://www.wbtdesigner.com/documents/Information%2
McGonigal, Kelly. (2005). Teaching for Transformation:Fr. Speaking of Teaching, 14
(2),
Meyer, L. (2012, Oct. 16 ). In Ed Tech Makes Consumer Electronics Association\'s Top 5
Trends.

Retrieved

Mar.

27,

2014,

from

http://thejournal.com/Articles/2012/10/16/Ed-Tech-Makes-ConsumerElectronics-Associations-Top-5-Trends.aspx?Page=1
Murray, C. (2012, Oct. 9 ). In Hot Trends in Educational Technology. Retrieved Dec. 1,
2013, from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2012/11/6-hot-trendseducational-technology-infographic
Ota, Carrie, and Cynthia. D, and Diane. B, and Robert. L, and Cheri. G. (2006). Training
and the Needs of Adults. Journal of Extension, 44 (6).
Reeves, T. C. (1997). Web Based Instruction. In Badrul. H. Kahn, (Ed.), Effective
Dimensions of Interactive Learning on the World Web Englewood Cliffs, New
Jersey: Educational Technology Publishing.
S, Karen, and Mark. V, and Annette. K. (2005). Uses and Eects of Mobile Computing
Devices in K8 Classrooms. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 38
(1), PP 99-112.

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 29

Schechter, R. (2009, Nov. Day). In Mobile Devices in the Classroom. Retrieved Nov. 25,
2013,

from

http://www.districtadministration.com/article/mobile-devices-

classroom
Snyder, Martha. M. (2009). Instructional-Design Theory to. TechTrends, 53 (1), pp. 4856. University of Florida. (2014, Mar. 5). In Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction.
Retrieved May. 10, 2014, from http://citt.ufl.edu/tools/gagnes-9-events-of-instr
Williams, T. (2012, Oct. 30). In To empower students, lets bring interactive learning
tools

into

the

classroom.

Retrieved

Nov.

30,

2013,

from

http://venturebeat.com/2012/10/30/interactive-learning/#YYszqqe1qYaO82C0.99
Wylie, J. (2013, Month. Day). In Mobile Learning Technologies for 21st Century
Classrooms.

Retrieved

Mar.

27,

2014,

from

http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3754742

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 30

APPENDIX
Google Forms Survey
Question 1:

I had the knowledge and/or skills required


to start course.
11%
11%

33%
45%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Question 2:

I clearly understood the course


objecHves.
6%
11%

39%

44%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 31

Question 3:

The course met all of its objecHves.

11%

22%

17%

50%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Question 4:

The way this course was delivered online


was an eecHve way for me to learn this
subject maNer.
11%
6% 22%
61%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 32

Question 5:

I had enough Hme to learn the subject


maNer in the course.

17% 16%
17%
50%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Question 6:

The course content was logically


organized.

44%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

56%

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 33

Question 7:

I had an opportunity to give input to the


course design or content.

22%
45%
33%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Question 8:

I was saHsed with the instrucHon.

22%

28%

50%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

ANCHOR STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

Canavan 34

Question 9:

My knowldge and/or skills increased as a


result of this course.
11% 22%

17%

50%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Question 10:

Overall, I was saHsed with this course.

28%

0%

22%

50%

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither

Disagree

Strongly Disagree