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Running head: CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK

Boy Scouts of America: Path to Eagle Scout


MSG James V. Southern
Southern New Hampshire University
7 December, 2014

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Unit Cover Page

Unit Title: Path to Eagle Scout


Subject/Topic Area: Boy Scouts of America
Key Words: Eagle Scout, Boy Scout
Designed By: James V. Southern
School District:El Paso

Grade Levels: 9-12


Time Frame:
School:

Brief Summary of Unit (including curricular context and unit goals)


This unit is designed to prepare Eagle Scout candidates for the arduous task of planning out
milestones in reaching the highest rank in Scouting. Candidates will thouroughly understand the six
BSA requirements to earn the rank, how to request recommendations, how to construct a personal
statement of ambition and life purpose, how to plan and conduct an Eagle Scout project, how to
perform well on the Eagle Scout Board of Review, and how to prepare and assemble the
appropriate documentation during the application process.
Unit Design Status:
Completed template pages Stages 1, 2, and 3
Completed blueprint for each performance task
Completed rubrics
Directions to students and teachers
Materials and resources listed
Suggested accommodations
Suggested extensions
Status:
Initial draft (date 27 January, 2015)
Revised draft (date )
Peer reviewed
Content reviewed
Field tested
Validated
Anchored

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Stage 1 Identify Desired Results


Establish Goals:
Using BSA approved material and following criteria established by the National Council of Boy Scout,
Life Scouts working toward the next rank will gain a thorough understanding of BSA Eagle Scout
requirements, assess current personal progress, and map a path to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout prior to
turning 18, and pass the Eagle Scout board of review.

What understandings are desired?


The life-long value of achieving the rank of Eagle Scout and characteristics inherent in those who make
it. Only 1% of all Boy Scouts achieve the rank of Eagle Scout, mostly due to age restrictions and lack of
proper planning; the longer a Scout waits to begin, the less likely he will be to achieve the rank.
There are a total of 21 merit badges required before submission of an Eagle Scout application, some of
which are very time consuming and must be planned well in advance. Leadership positions and exact
durations are milestones linked to attaining the rank of Eagle Scout and can directly impact the whether or
not the rank is achieved within the required timeframe. Eagle Scout projects are planning intensive and
designed to measure a Scouts leadership abilities; improper planning can lead to failed execution and
ultimately an inability to earn the rank. Letters of recommendation and the Scout's personal statement of
ambition and life purpose take time, effort, and a great deal of self-relection to complete and make a great
impact on board members who decide whether or not the rank should be awarded. Communication skills,
both verbal and written, play an important part in the determination whether or not you will be awarded
the rank of Eagle Scout. The rank of Eagle Scout is a prestigious award both in the scouting commnuity
and in American society. The rank is not awarded lightly and therefore considerable rigour has been
purposely incorporated into the process in order to insure only the most deserving Scouts are bestowed
with the honor.

What essential questions will be considered?


How can planning ahead help prepare me to earn the rank of Eagle Scout?
How does meeting BSA Eagle Scout requirements demonstrate that a Boy Scout is ready to wear the rank
of Eagle Scout?
What would you describe a person who has earned the rank of Eagle Scout?
Where am I currently in the process?
What do I need to do in order to reach my goals?
Who am I and what do I want to do with my life? (self reflection for written personal statement)
Am I a good communicator, and if not how can I get better?

What knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?
Students will know.
The six BSA requirements to earn the rank of Eagle Scout.

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Time contraints that impact successful completion of the rank of Eagle Scout.
Documentation necessary to complete the application process.
The process for submission of the application.
How to prepare for and successfully pass the oral board of review.
Students will be able to
Requirement 1 -- Demonstrate that they have been active in your troop for a period of at six months after
having achieved the rank of Life Scout. (By building a personal portfolio with advancement reports,
leadership roles and dates) (Scouting, 2015).
Requirement 2 -- Demonstrate that they live by the principles of the Scout Oath and Law in thir daily life.
(Through written recommendations by individuals selected by themselves who know them personally i.e.
church leaders, employers, parents, neighbors, teachers, etc.(Scouting, 2015
Requirement 3 -- Show that they have earn a total of 21 merit badges (required badges are listed on the
application). List the month, day, and year the merit badge was earned on the application and show proof
in portfolio by including original merit badge blue cards.(Scouting, 2015
Requirement 4 -- While a Life Scout, serve actively for a period of six months in a position of
responsibility. (Demonstrated in the advancement report that includes dates in position.(Scouting, 2015)
Requirement 5 -- Plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project. (Demostrated through
completeion of the project workbook.(Scouting, 2015)
Lesson 1 - Getting to Know Your Project
Requirement 6 -- Complete a statement of ambitions and life purpose; and conduct a Scoutmasters
conference.(Scouting, 2015)
Formulate a plan of action and timeline to complete the Eagle Scout milestones.
Complete the Eagle Scout rank application accurately.
Perform well on the Eagle Scout Board of Review (self reflection, speaking skills)
Create a personal portfolio to chronicle Boy Scout history (service project/community service hours,
leadership positions and dates, merit badges earned and required, camping history, etc).

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Stage 2 Determine Acceptable Evidence


What evidence will show that students understand?
Performance Tasks* (summary in GRASPS form):

Goal:
Your challenge is to juggle increasingly demanding academic requirements, social commitments,
and athletic obligations while attempting to meet requirements to earn the single most time
consuming and personally challenging rank in all of Boy Scouts, the coveted Eagle. The goal is
to pass the Eagle Scout board of review before turning 18 years of age.
Role:
As a boy scout who has achieved the rank of Life Scout and now considering all of the actions
that must take place in order to complete requirements necessary for the award of Eagle Scout,
you must actively develop and execute a plan to achieve your goal. You will be required to
follow your plan and ultimately participate in an Eagle Scout Board of Review.
Audience:
You will prepare yourself and your documentation according to BSA standrards in order to
complete tasks that require personal portfolio presentations and dialogue with your Boy Scout
Troop members, parents, community organizations, your Scoutmaster, and a Board of Review
panel comprised of local community leaders.
Situation:
You will be challenged with planning an achievable plan to meet BSA requirements,
coordinating with local community and civic leaders in order to complete a service project. You
will also be required to perform effective oral and written communication in front of your peers,
adult leaders, and National Council Executives during the Eagle Scout board of review, the final
step in your long journey.
Product Performance and Purpose:
You will create an personal action plan with milestones and timeline. You will lead your peers in
the execution of a service project and create a service project workbook for written presentation
of your performance to the board of review panel and National Council executives. You must
present yourself in front of a board of review both orally and through a personal scouting history
portfolio that includes leadership positions held with dates of service, service project hours,
community service hours, camping history, merit badges earned, and unit advancement report.
Standard and Criteria:
1) Your performance on the board of review needs to demonstrate your knowledge of BSA
requirements from all previous ranks. You must communicate your knowledge through effective
oral presentation skills and detailed written products (portfolio, service project binder, personal
biography and goals statement andvancement report). 2) Your service project must provide a
service to the community and be supervised in its entirety by you alone (Boy Scouts of America,

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2009)(The only media used to judge your performance will be the service project binder and oral
presentation). 3) You must demonstrate leadership skills expected of an Eagle Scout, judged by a
panel of community leaders and the National Council of Boy Scouts (Again, oral and written
presentaions). 4) You must meet have held a leadership position for the required 6 month period
after becoming a Life Scout. 5) You must deomonstrate that you have successfully earned the
required number of merit badges including the mandatory Eagle Scout merit badges (total of 21)
(Scouts, 2015). 6) You must demonstrate that you live by the scout oath and scout law (written
evaluations based on worksheet provided to recommenders)(Scouts, 2015). 7) You must
demonstrate that you are an active member of your troop. (Scoutmaster recommendation from
Scoutmaster conference based on participation in troop activities).
Other Evidence (quizzes, tests, prompts, observations, dialogues, work samples):
1) Mock Board of Review (Formative Assessments)
a) Observations/Dialogues with Feedback (peers as boards members)
b) Jigsaw Groups
c) Listening (Teacher Observations)
d) Mazur's Concept Test and Think-Pair-Share
e) Peer Uniform Evaluations
f) Service Project Checklist Self Assessment (near beginning phase of service project summative)
g) Statement of Ambition and Life Purpose
2) Board of Review (Summative Assessments)
a) Oral Presentation and Appearance Rubric
b) Uniform/Appearance (BSA uniform guide)
c) Service Project Rubric
d) Advancement Report
e) Letters of Recommendation

Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:


Personal Portfolio
Eagle Scout Application

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Performance Task Blueprint


What understanding and goals will be assessed through this task?
Scouts will demonstrate readiness to earn

the rank of Eagle Scout through oral and


written performance, presentation of their
service project, personal/uniform
appearance, and portfolio submission during
a board of review.
What criteria are implied in the standards and understandings regardless of the task specifics?
What qualities must student work demonstrate to signify that standards were met?

Leadership

Oral and Written Communication


Scout Spirit
Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate understanding?
Your challenge is to juggle increasingly demanding academic requirements, social commitments, and
athletic obligations while attempting to meet requirements to earn the single most time consuming and
personally challenging rank in all of Boy Scouts, the coveted Eagle. The goal is to pass the Eagle Scout
board of review before turning 18 years of age. As a boy scout who has achieved the rank of Life Scout
and now considering all of the actions that must take place in order to complete requirements necessary
for the award of Eagle Scout, you must actively develop and execute a plan to achieve your goal. You will
be required to follow your plan and ultimately participate in an Eagle Scout Board of Review. You will
prepare yourself and your documentation according to BSA standrards in order to complete tasks that
require personal portfolio presentations and dialogue with your Boy Scout Troop members, parents,
community organizations, your Scoutmaster, and a Board of Review panel comprised of local community
leaders. You will be challenged with planning an achievable plan to meet BSA requirements, coordinating
with local community and civic leaders in order to complete a service project. You will also be required to
perform effective oral and written communication in front of your peers, adult leaders, and National

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Council Executives during the Eagle Scout board of review, the final step in your long journey. You will
create an personal action plan with milestones and timeline. You will lead your peers in the execution of a
service project and create a service project workbook for written presentation of your performance to the
board of review panel and National Council executives. You must present yourself in front of a board of
review both orally and through a personal scouting history portfolio that includes leadership positions
held with dates of service, service project hours, community service hours, camping history, merit badges
earned, and unit advancement report. 1) Your performance on the board of review needs to demonstrate
your knowledge of BSA requirements from all previous ranks. You must communicate your knowledge
through effective oral presentation skills and detailed written products (portfolio, service project binder,
personal biography and goals statement andvancement report). 2) Your service project must provide a
service to the community and be supervised in its entirety by you alone (Boy Scouts of America, 2009)
(The only media used to judge your performance will be the service project binder and oral presentation).
3) You must demonstrate leadership skills expected of an Eagle Scout, judged by a panel of community
leaders and the National Council of Boy Scouts (Again, oral and written presentaions). 4) You must meet
have held a leadership position for the required 6 month period after becoming a Life Scout. 5) You must
deomonstrate that you have successfully earned the required number of merit badges including the
mandatory Eagle Scout merit badges (total of 21) (Scouts, 2015). 6) You must demonstrate that you live
by the scout oath and scout law (written evaluations based on worksheet provided to recommenders)
(Scouts, 2015). 7) You must demonstrate that you are an active member of your troop. (Scoutmaster
recommendation from Scoutmaster conference based on participation in troop activities).

What student products and performances will provide evidence of desired understandings?
Board of Review
Peer Uniform Evaluations
Oral Presentation and Appearance

Service Project Checklist

Service Project

Statement of Ambition and Life Purpose

Advancement Report
Letters of Recommendation

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By what criteria will student products and performances be evaluated?


National Council of the Boy Scout of

America approved Eagle Scout rank


requirements.

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Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction


Consider the WHERETO elements.
W - Assess current personal progress; Map a path to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout prior to turning 18;
Create a personal portfolio of Boy Scout history including merit badges earned; Annotate leadership
positions held with exact dates; Complete a service project; Build an advancement report; Create a service
project report binder; Write a personal statement of ambition and life purpose; Write generic letter of
introduction and request for recommendations; Pass the Eagle Scout board of review; Attain the rank of
Eagle Scout; All candidates will have earned the rank of Life Scout prior to attendance; Understand
alternate plans for learning impaired; Conduct themselves in accordance with BSA standards at all times.
H - Only 1% of all boys who enter into scouting will earn the rank of Eagle. Those who achieve the rank
will be among a select few who have gone on to become corporate executives, presidents, astronauts,
inventors, and other great Americans who have a significant impact in their communities and nation;
Presentation of famous Boy Scouts; Interviews with CEOs who attribute their success to Scouting;
Personal experiences from Adult Eagle Scouts.
E - Voluteer for service projects; Reflect and share Experiences; Take part in mock boards- as participant
and board member - critique performances; Conduct uniform inspections - provide feedback; Lead
classes; Conduct homework projects and excercises; Self-Reflection excersices.
Experiential and Inductive learning will occur through having Scouts participate as volunteers in the
execution of at least one sevice project. Experiences should be recorded and shared during next classroom
opportunity. Scouts will plan and conduct mock boards for one another and critique performances based
on their understandings. Scouts will perform uniform inspections of peers while being observed by
current Eagle Scouts who will provide feedback. Direct Instruction should be conducted by the Scouts
themselves whenever possible with oversight by an adult leader. The adult instructor should only give
instruction when re-direction is required or required levels of understanding are not being achieved in a
particular area of focus. Homework and other out of class experiences are the main sources of learning
based on limited classroom opportunities associated with Scouting. Homework should be in the form of

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completing personal tasks such as portfolio management, plans of action, documentation preparation, etc.
Other forms of homework include research and preparation for conducting classes assigned to them from
the lesson content.
R - Conduct self-reflection, personal assessment and associated writing activities - will generate products
that will feed into portfolio, personal statement, and action plan; Organize past activities (i.e.
advancement report, merit badge history, leadership roles and timeframes, etc.) into a single product - will
support board of review appearances; Participate in various stages of other Scout's process (i.e. service
projects, board appearances, etc.) - will stimulate continual rethinking elements of their own products and
performance; Continual revision - also occurs through consistent peer feedback during participation in
teaching classes, boards, inspections, projects, etc.
E - Encourage self-evaluation is the cornerstone of Scouting and occurs throughout each phase of every
learning event. The instructor should use every opportunity to observe Scouts as they progress through
peer to peer learning. At appropriate point, the instructor should ask questions that prompt self-evaluation.
T- Provide alternate learning activities with diverse delivery methods; Create individual learning plans
according to BSA policy; Incorporate flexibility into the lesson; Conduct routine assessments of student's
understanding and performance;
A great deal of flexibility is incorporated into every Eagle Scout requirement in order to accommodate
diverse learning abilities and/or physical and mental disabilities. Adult leaders and instructors are chosen
based on their acute awareness of Scouting requirements and the richness of available techniques to help
boys of all types to reach their goals. Resources are readily available to design individual learning plans
and provide alternate learning paths for those who require it, to include content material, products, and
specific processess. These resources should be incorporated whenever it becomes necessary.
O - Use hands-on experiences; Design a logical progression through course material; Ensure flexibility by
producing modularized lesson.
The overall goal of this program is to participate in and sucessfully pass the Eagle Scout board of review.
The board of review is a final opportunity to insure that cummulative requirements have been adequately

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achieved by the Scout. It is comprised of a mutlitude of stand-alone activities that together form an
interwoven foundation embodying all of the values of Scouting. All components can, and should in most
cases, be completed independent of the others. Therefore, linear instruction is not necessary. Individual
learning events should however be conducted in a traditional crawl, walk, run fasion moving from
individual task to group activites or parts to whole concepts.

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References

Boy Scouts of America. (2009). Boy scout handbook (12th ed.). New York: Author.
Harvey, C. (2013, November 21). Eagle scout board of review studyguide. Retrieved January 9,
2015, from http://www.bsatroop883.com/wordpress/eagle-scout-board-of-review-studyguide/
Scouting. (2015). Retrieved January 8, 2015, from http://www.scouting.org/

Possible Appendixes (currently stored files):


Reference_Board of Review_Guidelines
Reference_Board of Review_Study Guide
Reference_Filling out the Application
Reference_Overview of Path to Eagle (Requirements)
Reference_Recommendation Letters
Reference_Requirement 1_Being Active
Reference_Requirement 2_Live by Scout Oath&Law
Reference_Requirement 3_Merit Badges
Reference_Requirement 4_Serve in Leadership Positions
Reference_Requirement 5_Service Project
Lesson 1(9.0.2.0-9.0.2.3 and 9.0.2.8)
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Reference_Requirement 6_Statement of Ambition
Reference_Service Project Guidelines
Rubric_Board of Review_Oral Presentation & Appearance
Rubric_Board of Review_Service Project