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VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE

Issue #

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE Issue # Voting 101 A Guide to Help131,144,000 Americans voted in the 2012 Presidential election. Were you one of them? If so, what kind of voter do you think you are? Are you the type who looks at all the information a candidate has to offer and weigh the pros and the cons? Or are you the type of person that just kind of goes with the flow? Time Magazine put together an article describing different styles of voters. Ask yourself if any of the following describe you to find out what type of voter you are. The Rational Voter You What Type of Voter Are You? by Milade Rivas don’t research the facts about each of the candidates and just look at their party affiliation. The information you retain about the candidate is just to reinforce your existing beliefs. The passive voter maintains mental consistency. They don’t really look into or care about the opposition. You make sure to know all the information about all the candidates. You weigh the pros and cons and evaluate them against your personal interests. Since you’ve thoroughly researched both sides, you are more likely to vote across party lines. The Frugal Voter You only research the candidates’ stand on topics you’re passionate about and ignore everything else. These people are often referred to as “single-issue voters”, even if they have multiple concerns. The Intuitive Voter The Passive Voter You stop seeking information once you come to a decision. This is sometimes called “low- information rationality” but the process seems to be almost unconscious. " id="pdf-obj-0-7" src="pdf-obj-0-7.jpg">

Voting 101

A Guide to Help You Vote

March 2015

HELPING AMERICANS VOTE SINCE 2002

IN THIS ISSUE
IN THIS ISSUE

A total of 131,144,000 Americans voted in the 2012 Presidential election. Were you one of them? If so, what kind of voter do you think you are? Are you the type who looks at all the information a candidate has to offer and weigh the pros and the cons? Or are you the type of person that just kind of goes with the flow? Time Magazine put together an article describing different styles of voters. Ask yourself if any of the following describe you to find out what type of voter you are.

The Rational Voter

You

What Type of Voter Are You?

by Milade Rivas

don’t research the facts about each of the candidates and just look at their party affiliation. The information you retain about the candidate is just to reinforce your existing beliefs. The passive voter maintains mental consistency. They don’t really look into or care about the opposition.

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE Issue # Voting 101 A Guide to Help131,144,000 Americans voted in the 2012 Presidential election. Were you one of them? If so, what kind of voter do you think you are? Are you the type who looks at all the information a candidate has to offer and weigh the pros and the cons? Or are you the type of person that just kind of goes with the flow? Time Magazine put together an article describing different styles of voters. Ask yourself if any of the following describe you to find out what type of voter you are. The Rational Voter You What Type of Voter Are You? by Milade Rivas don’t research the facts about each of the candidates and just look at their party affiliation. The information you retain about the candidate is just to reinforce your existing beliefs. The passive voter maintains mental consistency. They don’t really look into or care about the opposition. You make sure to know all the information about all the candidates. You weigh the pros and cons and evaluate them against your personal interests. Since you’ve thoroughly researched both sides, you are more likely to vote across party lines. The Frugal Voter You only research the candidates’ stand on topics you’re passionate about and ignore everything else. These people are often referred to as “single-issue voters”, even if they have multiple concerns. The Intuitive Voter The Passive Voter You stop seeking information once you come to a decision. This is sometimes called “low- information rationality” but the process seems to be almost unconscious. " id="pdf-obj-0-38" src="pdf-obj-0-38.jpg">

You make sure to know all the information about all the candidates. You weigh the pros and cons and evaluate them against your personal interests.

Since you’ve thoroughly researched both sides, you are more likely to vote across party lines.

The Frugal Voter

You only research the candidates’ stand on topics you’re passionate about and ignore everything else. These people are often referred to as “single-issue voters”, even if they have multiple concerns.

The Intuitive Voter

The Passive Voter

You stop seeking information once you come to a decision. This is sometimes called “low- information rationality” but the process seems to be almost unconscious.

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Article Title

Before voting, one must know if they are eligible. The requirements are:

What Type of Vote Are You?

Page 1

Preparing to Vote

Page 2

How to Vote

Page 2

Political Candidate Profiles

Page 3

Why Vote?

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You must be a U.S. citizen

You must be a resident of the

state you are voting in (each state has different residency requirements, so make sure that you meet them in advance) You cannot be currently serving

a prison term, be on parole, or in another form of post-release supervision You must be 18 or older (some states allow 17-year-olds who will be 18 on election day to vote. Check your state’s requirements)

If you meet these requirements, then you can proceed to registering to vote. There are some states that give you a form to register when you apply for your driver’s license, so you might already be registered. Visit canivote.org to figure out if you are already registered. If you are not yet registered, then there are four main ways to do it. You can send in a National Voter Registration From, register in person, fill out an absentee ballot, or in some states,

Preparing to Vote

by Milade Rivas

you can register online. Be sure to

be aware of your state’s deadline for registration.

Registering in person is simple and can be done at

The DMV

Election offices

Your state’s voter

registration office The Armed Service

recruitment centers Public assistance facilities

State-funded disabilities centers

20 states allow online registration. All you have to do is visit the Federal Election Assistance Commission site to find your state’s registration forms.

To mail in your registration, simply print, fill out, and mail in a National Mail Voter Registration Form. However, residents of Wyoming, North Dakota, or the U.S. territories cannot register this way.

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1 2 Article Title Before voting,canivote.org to figure out if you are already registered. If you are not yet registered, then there are four main ways to do it. You can send in a National Voter Registration From, register in person, fill out an absentee ballot, or in some states, Preparing to Vote by Milade Rivas you can register online. Be sure to be aware of your state’s deadline for registration. Registering in person is simple and can be done at  The DMV  Election offices  Your state’s voter  registration office The Armed Service  recruitment centers Public assistance facilities  State-funded disabilities centers 20 states allow online registration. All you have to do is visit the Federal Election Assistance Commission site to find your state’s registration forms. To mail in your registration, simply print, fill out, and mail in a National Mail Voter Registration Form . However, residents of Wyoming, North Dakota, or the U.S. territories cannot register this way. Once you have made sure you are registered and have educated yourself on all of the candidates and follow any instructions you are given. While you are there, obtain a ballot. Be prepared for a wait; there How to Vote by Milade Rivas their stand on issues, you are ready to vote! Start by locating your polling place. Once you know where it is, go and will most likely be a line ahead of you. So I suggest taking a book or an iPod. Make sure to bring identification. It is best to have a " id="pdf-obj-1-144" src="pdf-obj-1-144.jpg">

Once you have made sure you are registered and have educated yourself on all of the candidates and

follow any instructions you are given. While you are there, obtain a ballot. Be prepared for a wait; there

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1 2 Article Title Before voting,canivote.org to figure out if you are already registered. If you are not yet registered, then there are four main ways to do it. You can send in a National Voter Registration From, register in person, fill out an absentee ballot, or in some states, Preparing to Vote by Milade Rivas you can register online. Be sure to be aware of your state’s deadline for registration. Registering in person is simple and can be done at  The DMV  Election offices  Your state’s voter  registration office The Armed Service  recruitment centers Public assistance facilities  State-funded disabilities centers 20 states allow online registration. All you have to do is visit the Federal Election Assistance Commission site to find your state’s registration forms. To mail in your registration, simply print, fill out, and mail in a National Mail Voter Registration Form . However, residents of Wyoming, North Dakota, or the U.S. territories cannot register this way. Once you have made sure you are registered and have educated yourself on all of the candidates and follow any instructions you are given. While you are there, obtain a ballot. Be prepared for a wait; there How to Vote by Milade Rivas their stand on issues, you are ready to vote! Start by locating your polling place. Once you know where it is, go and will most likely be a line ahead of you. So I suggest taking a book or an iPod. Make sure to bring identification. It is best to have a " id="pdf-obj-1-150" src="pdf-obj-1-150.jpg">

How to Vote

by Milade Rivas

their stand on issues, you are ready to vote!

Start by locating your polling place. Once you know where it is, go and

will most likely be a line ahead of you. So I suggest taking a book or an iPod. Make sure to bring identification. It is best to have a

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1

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picture ID like a driver’s license or a passport.

After that, you are ready to fill out the ballot as you wish. Then you turn your ballot in to the designated person or, in some cases, feed it into a machine. There are four types of counting you may run into:

Optical Scan Paper Ballot

Systems. These make voting similar to a multiple choice test.

Direct Recording (DRE)

Systems. This is a touchscreen computer that records your vote.

Ballot Marketing Devices.

This is reserved for disabled voters. It combines the first two methods. The Punch Card Ballot. This version is not very popular anymore. It lead to two weeks of discrepancy.

Once you have finished, review your ballot to make sure you cast your vote correctly.

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Jerry Gergich

Community Service

Background

Born and raised in Chicago, Illinois

Age 53

Married, with 3 daughters

Education

Graduated from Thornton

Fractional South High School

Graduated from the

University of Pawnee Indiana with a Master’s of Social Work

Work Experience

While attending college, he worked at the Pawnee

Parks and Recreation Department.

Worked for 20 years as a licensed clinical social

Volunteer soccer coach

for the Pawnee Parks and Recreation

Elected Mayor of the city of Pawnee

Issue Positions

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1 4 Community Service Background 

Supports the 2 nd Amendment right to bear arms, but would enact background checks on all gun purchases – including private party and gun show sales and would ban all clips that hold more than 10 rounds.

Supporrts immigration

reform, but opposes any amnesty for undocumented persons. Supports increased federal spending to fund mass-transit projects.

Donna Meagle

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1 4 Community Service Background 

worker in Pawnee

Background

Born and raised in New Jersey

Age 45

Married, with no children

Education

Graduated from Allentown High School

Graduated from Duke

University with a Master’s in Sociology

Work Experience

Worked at several

restaurants while attending Duke University Founded and currently directs the Essex County Social Services Network

Community Service

Elected member of the Trenton City Council

Appointed member of

the Duke University Board of Trustees

Issue Positions

Would cap interest rates

on student loans at 4% and delay the start of repayment until the loan recipient has full-time employment after graduation

Supports the Patient

Protection and Affordable Care Act Would repeal all No Child Left Behind federal testing requirements, and return assessment authority to individual states.

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Why Should You Vote?

 
 

Voting

voice?

when you have a

A Guide to Help You Vote

opposite of you

it ever feel like

West Jordan, Ut

84084

you? Do you want

Voting lets you decide.

Why let others decide

It is your 101 right. Women

and underrepresented

groups all fought hard

for the right to vote.

To cancel out a vote of

someone you know

who might vote the

Representation – does

politicians don’t “get”

someone in office who is willing to represent your needs and concerns? Then vote. If you don’t vote, someone else will. Our government was built

vote, other people will be making the decisions for you

Schools matter. Local

and state school board members who set public education policies and budgets are chosen by you Some adults think, “Young people are lazy, they don’t care about their communities, they don’t vote.” Bust the stereotype and prove them wrong!

Make the

VOTING 101 A GUIDE TO HELP YOU VOTE | Issue #1 5 Why Should You Vote?