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MIAA360: Lesson Study

Team Members: Katie Chock, (Amy Schmerer, Tiffany Fuhrmeister- observers)
Teaching Dates: May 11, 2015

Concept for this lesson: Reinforcing reading, writing, solving linear word equations- Grade Span: 8th Grade
In Module 4, students extend what they already know about unit rates and proportional relationships (6.RP.A.2, 7.RP.A.2) to linear
equations and their graphs. Students understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations in this
module (8.EE.B.5, 8.EE.B.6). Also, students learn to apply the skills they acquired in Grades 6 and 7, with respect to symbolic
notation and properties of equality (6.EE.A.2, 7.EE.A.1, 7.EE.B.4) to transcribe and solve equations in one variable and then in two
variables.
In Topic A, students begin by transcribing written statements using symbolic notation. Then, students write linear and non-linear
expressions leading to linear equations, which are solved using properties of equality (8.EE.C.7b). Students learn that not every linear
equation has a solution. In doing so, students learn how to transform given equations into simpler forms until an equivalent equation
results in a unique solution, no solution, or infinitely many solutions (8.EE.C.7a). Throughout Topic A, students must write and solve
linear equations in real-world and mathematical situations.
Days prior to this lesson we learned lesson 3 and lesson 4. Lesson 3 was linear equations in x and solving linear equations. The lesson
then progresses to lesson 6, which is solutions of a linear equation.
Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Engage
Time:
10 minutes
Materials:

-

Warm up/quick write: “Explain the main
differences between lessons 3, 4, 5.”
Explanation of explore given here, could just
go right into the engage with activating prior
knowledge.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

-

Students answer (write answers) to
the warm up individually

-

Students volunteer answers

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-

binder paper
pencil

-

Write students answers/responses on the
board
Some of the students had some difficulty
remembering the objectives of lesson 3, but
most could recall lesson 4 & 5. Could
indicate re -teaching/reviewing of lesson3

Expected student responses:
- Lesson 3: “x” was given
- Substitute the number for
x
- Lesson 4: solve for x
- Find out what x is
- Lesson 5: write out the
problem in numbers, and
solve for x

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Explore:

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

-

“We are going to play a game. I have two sets
of cards. One card has a word problem on it,
the other has a number equation. Your job is
to find your pair, solve the equation, and be
able to present your findings.”

-

Ask questions to peers to see if
they are a match or not

-

“How did you know you were
pairs/partners?”

-

-

“What did you notice about this problem?”

Once they found their partner, each
student is expected to solve the
problem on their own piece of
paper

-

“What strategy did you use when finding your
pair/partner?”

-

Compute steps, solve problem

-

“How did you know what step to do first?”

-

“What is your first step in solving your
problem?”

Time:
40 minutes
Materials:
- index card
with either the
word problem
or number
problem
- binder paper
with quick
write already
on it
- pencil

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

“What property justifies that?”
Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Get out of their seats to find their
pair

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century
8.EE.7a
8.EE.7b

Expected student responses:
- I matched the word
numbers with the actual
numbers
- We identified certain

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Lots of great questioning here for students to
justify how they found their pair.
There was some re-teaching done here for the
students who were having real trouble
figuring out who their pair was, so it might of
made this portion a little longer. Further
reviewing or re-teaching on solving the
equation.

-

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

-

Presentations, “Please read the problem, tell
us how you solved the problem, and what
properties you used”

-

“Why did you do that step first or next?”

-

“Why are those terms considered ‘like
terms’?”

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

vocabulary terms to help
us decode the numbers
We saw there were three
terms and the numbers
matched up
Combine “like terms”
Match the x’s with the
other x’s
Addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division
property of equality

Expected student responses:
- I want all the x’s on one
side
- I need to apply the
addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division
property of equality

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Explain:
Time:
15 minutes

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century
8.EE.7a

-

“Tonight’s homework is page 16-17, problems
1-6.”

-

Complete homework
8.EE.7b

Materials:

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

3

-

binder paper
homework
packet

Day 2:
- Warm up:
- 1. What was challenging about
yesterday’s activity?
- 2. What would have helped you be more
successful at yesterday’s activity?
- 3. What questions do you have about
solving linear equations?
-

Walk around to check (give credit) for
completing homework

-

Answer warm up questions, write out the
proper steps to solving an equation.

-

Write out a problem, solve it for the students
to give them a model/expectation of what I
am looking for in their homework
presentations

Day 2:
- Take out last night’s homework
-

Complete warm up
Expected student responses:
- I wasn’t sure how to solve
the equation
- I didn’t know I had to resubstitute the value of x
to answer the question
- I didn’t know what the
question was asking me
to do
- I didn’t know which step
to complete first

-

Write out steps to solving an
equation, write down teacher
example

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Extend: (Next
Day)
Time:
30 minutes

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Day 2
- “You will have 15 minutes to check your
homework answers with people at your table.
I will be calling on one student per table to

Day 2
- Check homework with table groups
- Write down answer to problem
on chart paper

8.EE.7a

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

8.EE.7b

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answer a problem.” Each person should read
and justify their answer to last night’s
problem

Materials:

Challenge

-

Each table will present a problem from last
night’s homework (on chart paper)
- Write out the problem; show all work and
steps used to solve it. Add properties of
equality used
-

Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Evaluate:

-

Practice presenting answer

Expected student responses:
- 3x + 17 (seventeen more
than three times a
number)
- Complementary means
that the sum of the angles
have to be equal to 90
degrees
- I subtracted 3x from both
sides- subtraction
property of equality

When presenting the problem use the
sentence starter, “Our group agreed the
equation to the problem is __________
because ________. We know this because
the question says _______________,
which is represented by the
expression_________.
These are excellent sentence starters to
use and were used during presentations.

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

-

Listens to students presentations

Time:
15 minutes

-

Ensure the problem was completed
correctly

Materials:
Exit Ticket

-

Listen to student’s reasons for justification

-

Ask other students in their group to
answer questions as well
- Why did you have to subtract 17 from
both sides?

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities
-

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Reads the problem
Addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division property
of equality
Expected student responses:
- You could add/subtract
the x’s from both sides
- You need to combine the
like terms by cancelling
them out
5

-

Could you have done another step
instead?

Exit Ticket:
- Pass out exit ticket for completion (5
point assignment)

- Complete exit ticket

Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Reflection:
We love the collaboration process. Working with peers especially in the district is so beneficial for our teachings. It is always
nice to collaborate with teachers who are experiencing similar situations. We planned this lesson with the idea that students were
already practicing lessons 3 and 4 and could already demonstrate mastery. We thought the students would be slightly challenged, but
not as much as we anticipated. My group knew lesson 3 and 4 were taught and reviewed for the past week. In planning for this lesson,
the warm-up was to activate the students’ prior knowledge with lessons 3 and 4, and that was not enough. After executing this lesson,
we noticed through the video that the students did not understand the concepts well enough to continue on to lesson 5. The notes we
took together while watching the video were very helpful. It makes such a different to have three pairs of eyes, rather than one.
Watching the video really helped us plan for day 2 in addition to all the assessments. I believe if I were to implement day two, students
would have a better grasp on the topic.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

6

Supporting documents:
Engage activity questions:
1. Mike Trout hit a 60 homeruns in 3 years. Find out how many homeruns he hit per year if one year he hit 20, another year he hit
five less than four times the last year.
2. Kim and Kat jump rope the same amount of times. If Kim jumps nine more than six times a number, and Kat jumps 9 times
that number plus 2, how many does each girl jump?
3. One angle is one less than six times the measure of another. The two angles are complementary angles. Find the measure of
each angle.
4. The measure of one angle is described as twelve more than four times a number. Its supplement is twice as large. Find the
measure of each angle.
5. A pair of congruent angles are described as follows: The measure of one angle is three more than twice a number, and the other angle’s 
measure is 55 less than three times the number. Determine the size of the angles.

Exit Ticket Questions:
1. Given a right triangle, find the measures of all the angles if one angle is a right angle and the measure of the second angle is six
less than seven times the measure of the third angle.
2. In a triangle, the measure of the first angle is six times a number. The measure of the second angle is nine less than the first
angle. The measure of the third angle is three times the number more than the measure of the first angle. Determine the
measure of each angle.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

7