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MIAA360: Lesson Study

This lesson is to introduction to the concept of Perimeter through the use of literature.
The Main objectives in this lesson were as follows:
A. Introduce the concept of Perimeter
B. Apply a mathematical formula for perimeter
C. Use these formulas in a real world situation.
Objectives and Standards: In lesson 1 students will apply what they know about Perimeter in a real world situation using square and
rectangles. 4MD.3 Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles and real-world and mathematical problems. Students will use
materials such as a 1x1 large square for tables and 1x1 inch tiles for chairs and work collaboratively in pairs to find ways that 32
people can sit at 8 tables comfortably. (each guest at a side) They are to record at least one way that works and one way that does
work. MP.1, MP.3 & MP.4 They will use technology (i-Pad) to record their findings to present to the class on the Apple TV. MP.5 .
Reflection:
This lesson was pretty effective and we felt as if the students had a good understanding of perimeter from the start, which made it very
simple to engage them into the lesson. We felt the engage part was very successful and the story caught the students attention and they
wanted to know how it end. We think not finishing the story is good way to peak their interest. Most of the student’s responses were
what was expected so it made for a great start. Students were able to follow the direction for the explore portion of the lesson and they
were able to work cooperatively with great comments and observations. This part of the lesson was smooth and easy, it required little
help from teacher during the explore portion of the lesson. We were also very impressed with their ability to figure out the formula for
perimeter and introduce some area concepts during the debrief part of the lesson. Students had no difficulty with explaining perimeter
and applying in another problem with the check for understanding.
Some of the roadblocks experienced with this lesson, were, the explanation of comfortable. We wanted students to have an
understanding that having their own side was being confortable, this was important to relay that when looking at perimeter of a shape
you are counting the side to add of the distance you have available. Leading students in this was challenging, where is at times they
understood that meant one side. In hindsight asking the students to do show one way that worked and another way that did not work
might have been guiding them too much.
Overall the students did have a firm grasp perimeter and we felt that we were able to move on to area, especially during the first lesson
it had come up from the students in the explain stage of the first lesson. You will see the second lesson start off in the explain portion
of the lesson, because it was felt that they had prior knowledge and could make connections to it. We felt like finishing the story the
second day and asking them the question of having the same perimeter, does that give the same area was a great way to start with area.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

1

Team Members: Tiffany Fuhrmeister Amy Schmerer Katie Chock
Teaching Dates: 5/12/15
Concept for this lesson: Perimeter Grade Span Fourth Grade
Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Engage

Teacher activated students’ prior knowledge on
perimeter. Helped students complete the activity
more efficiently.

Students will listen to story.
Make comments or pose questions of what
is happening in the story.

Intro the story Spaghetti and Meatballs for All! A
Mathematical Story. By Marilyn Burns
Let students know they will be applying what they
know about perimeter to the story I will read to them.
Read the first part of the story up to when Mrs.
Comfort says “ But their won’t be room”
Questions
How many guests will the Comforts be expecting?
How many tables & chairs will they need?

Expected Responses

How might Mrs. Comfort solve her problem of
missing one chair?

As tables are pushed together you lose
seats.

4MD
Measurement
and Data
3. Apply the area
and perimeter
formulas for
rectangles in realworld and
mathematical
problems. For
example, find the
width
of a rectangular
room given the
area of the
flooring and the
length, by
viewing the area
formula as a
multiplication
equation
with an unknown
factor.
Represent and
interpret data.

Time:
10_ minutes
Materials:
The book Spaghetti and
Meatballs for All by
Marilyn Burns.

Why do you think Mrs. Comfort says there will not
be room when they push the two tables together?

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Video observation emphasized the definition of
“comfortable”; however, students did not completely
demonstrate knowledge of this in the Explain.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

30, 30 plus the comforts 32;
8 tables and 4 chairs each for a total of
32 chairs
She might borrow a chair from her own
table to use. She might borrow one from a
neighbor.

P21: Core
Subjects

2

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Explore:

Tell students that they will use what they know about
perimeter to design seating arrangements that will
comfortably seat all 32 guests.

Students will partner up and will get one
baggie with materials to begin the activity

Time:
__25_ minutes
Materials:
Per group
8 post- its
32 inch tiles
1 iPad mini for taking a
picture of their
configurations.

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Teacher will pass out materials to each pair of
students.

They can spread the tables out, or they can
or push them together.
They are to take a picture of 2
configurations, one that does not work and
one that works.

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century
MP 1,4, and 5.
P21: Learning
and Innovation &
Information,
Media and
Technology

Students need to be able to explain why
their example either worked or didn’t
work.
Questions:
How many people can comfortably fit at one table?
Explain why 4 people can fit comfortably at a table.

The activity could be more effective if pairs were not
sitting right across the table from each other.
Students were tempted to look at the other groups’
configuration.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Expected Responses
4
4 people each have their own side
Each person has their own side
You can fit up to 4 people at a table.
Each table sits four people, as you push a
table together you lose two seats.
Example, two separate tables’ sits 8 but
when pushed together they only sit 6.
As you push the tables together you lose
more seats.

3

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Explain:

Students will prepare to share out their findings.

Some students will display their 2 pictures
of the configurations they came up with
one that did not work with explanation.
One that did work.

MPS 1, 3,5, 6

Time:
15 minutes
Materials:
Ipad mini’s
Apple T.V
Stylus

Teacher Questions
What happen when you pushed all the tables
together?
Why does this not work, if there is enough room to
seat all 32 guests?
We call the distance around something the perimeter.
Turn to your partner and repeat that statement.
What do you think is the perimeter of one table is?
How do you know that?
So if we know that this, what would be the perimeter
of 8 tables?
How did you come to find that answer?
What happens to the perimeter when we push the
table together?
How can I relate that change to what I know about
perimeter?
Suggested Question for explanation
How does having your own side relate to perimeter?

PS21:
Information,
Media and
Technology

Expected Responses
It only sat 18 guests.
Every time you add put a table together
you lose a seat to the side that are push
together.
Students repeat phrase to partner.
4.
It is the amount of people who can fit
comfortably around the table.
The perimeter of 8 tables would be 32?
If you have 8 tables and 4 people could sit
at them then you must have a perimeter of
32.
It changes, because now we have
eliminated a side.
When the sides change it changes the
measurement of the perimeter.
Each person needs to have a side so you
can add up all the sides to calculate the
perimeter

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Student Does

Standard
4

Directions or Teacher Questions

Extend:
Time:
___20 minutes
Materials:Worksheet

for drawings.
Time:
30-40 Minutes
Math Journals
Baggies-8 post-its
32 1x1 tiles
6 Photo copies of
the story
Worksheet to
record
configurations
with area and
perimeter.

Students will use a drawing to model what they have
learned about perimeter.

Expected Student Responses
Student Activities
Students will work independently to
produce 5 different ways they can use 1
unit by 1 units to seat 36 people

Drawing squares or 1 unit by 1 units use as many as
needed to figure out how many configurations you
would need to comfortably seat a group of 36 guest
at your dinner party.
Day 2:
Students will be asked to reflect on yesterday’s
lesson and will be given the question: If shapes
have the same perimeter can they have the same
area?
Have them record their answers in Math Journal
This time students will work together to re-read
the story and arrange the seats as each guest
comes and record what the perimeter and area of
each configuration is when each guest arrives.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century
MPS. 1,2, and 4

PS 21: Core
Subjects

Day 2:
Students will write in their journal.
Expected responses:
Yes, they will have the same perimeter
as area.
No, they will not we discovered this
yesterday when trying to find the most
confortable way to seat 32 guest.
Students will use the materials to record
Each of the arrangements as the guest
arrive and compare the area and
perimeter to come to a conclusion about
question presented.

5

Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

Evaluate:
Exit Ticket

Exit ticket on perimeter

Complete the exit ticket

MPS 2,7

Day 2

Day 2

Students will take the information and re-visit the
question asked at the beginning of the lesson.

Students will analyze their information
and come to a conclusion on whether or
not if a shape as the same perimeter will it
have the same area

Time:5 minutes
Materials:

Time
10 minutes

Expected responses.

Materials
Worksheets with
calcuations.
Math Journal

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

You can have 2 tables pushed together and
the perimeter is 6, but the area it is 2
square units.
You can have 3 tables pushed together and
the perimeter is 8 but the area is 3 square
units.
No if you have the same perimeter you
will not have the same area.

6

Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

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