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Instructional Plan Report

Connecting with others using LinkedIn
Instructional Plan Report
Tim LaPlant, Stacie Prater, Suzanne Rossi, Jasmine Hill, and Bridget W. Rude
Walden University
August 2013

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Table of Contents

Analysis
Design
Development
Implementation Plan and Facilitator Guide
Evaluation Plan

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Instructional Plan Report
Analysis - Phase 1
Team Member A: Tim
Project description:
The primary purpose of this project is to provide recent college graduates instruction on how to
effectively use LinkedIn, a popular professional network site (PNS), to find employment after
graduation. This learning module will demonstrate how to build and maintain an optimized
profile; network with people and organizations, domestically and internationally; and use
LinkedIn features, such as performing company searches and using Job search.
More than just a place to add your resume and search job listings, LinkedIn is the largest PNS
with more than 225 million members located across 200 countries and territories (Hempel,
2013; LinkedIn, 2013). LinkedIn provides over 30 million experienced professionals from around
the world and is currently the PNS used most by employment recruiters (LinkedIn, 2013). Since
its introduction in 2003, LinkedIn has proven to be a valuable resource to locate ideal job
opportunities and to connect with employers (LinkedIn, 2013; Cartelli, as cited in Choi, 2013).
LinkedIn is a tool that can help graduates build a network and gain access to industry insiders.
Needs analysis:
According to Hall (2013), unemployment is still a major problem in the United States, especially
for new college graduates. Recent surveys show over half of recent college graduates are
unemployed or underemployed (Choi, 2013). Despite this, over 50% of those surveyed have
never used LinkedIn (Choi, 2013). According to a recent study, students in higher education are
avoiding LinkedIn, in part because they are not comfortable with the platform or are not sure
how to use LinkedIn for career exploration or even as a means of job searching (Choi, 2013).
Park, Kee, and Valenzuela (2009), found two-thirds of college juniors and seniors interviewed
do not have a LinkedIn account, or have one but never use it; despite acknowledging they are
aware that LinkedIn could be used to secure internships and to gain employment after
graduation. Harper (2011), states college students comprise the lowest demographic on
LinkedIn; opining many students do not see any value in joining LinkedIn.
A needs assessment can identify a problem to reflect one or more categories, normative needs,
comparative needs, felt needs, expressed needs, anticipated or future needs, and critical
incident needs (Morrison, Ross, Kalman & Kemp, 2013). Based on research, surveys, and
stakeholder input it was determined felt need, expressed needs, and anticipated need seem to
be priority needs, although all listed needs do play a role why this instruction is needed.
Instructional intervention will provide current college students, and recent graduates the
information and details needed to build to build an optimized profile, a professional network of
connections and associations, connect with employment recruiters and develop skills using
LinkedIn’s many available tools to seek and gain ideal career employment.

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The training/instruction module will demonstrate how to use LinkedIn effectively as a networking
and job search tool. The instructional design will provide generative strategies for using
LinkedIn effectively, facilitated by an experienced staff. Instruction will also offer high definition
visual cues of examples with step-by-step instructional training. In today’s rapidly changing and
increasingly competitive environment, graduating and sending resumes is just not enough to
land the ideal job.
Choi, G. (2013, April 30). Many students still not using LinkedIn survey finds. The Daily Free
Press. Retrieved from http://dailyfreepress.com/2013/04/30/many-students-still-not-usinglinkedin-survey-finds/
Hall, B. (2013, April 23). Why aren’t college students using LinkedIn to find jobs?. Retrieved
from http://readwrite.com/2013/04/23/why-arent-college-students-using-linkedin-to-find-jobs
Harper, R. (2011, Feb 7). Why you should use LinkedIn BEFORE graduation. Retrieved July 17,
2011, from USA Today College:http://www.usatodayeducate.com/staging/index.php/blog/whyyou-should-use-linkedin-before-graduation
Hempel, J. (2013, June 13). LinkedIn: How it's changing business (and how to make it work for
you) CNNMoney. Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/2013/06/13/technology/linkedin-socialnetworking.pr.fortune/index.html
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Park, N., Kee, K., & Valenzuela, S. (2009). Being immersed in social networking environment:
Facebook groups, uses and gratifications, and social outcomes. Cyberpsychology & Behavior:
The Impact Of The Internet, Multimedia And Virtual Reality On Behavior And Society, 12(6),
729-733. doi:10.1089/cpb.2009.0003
LinkedIn. (2013). What is LinkedIn?. Retrieved from http://www.linkedin.com/static?
key=what_is_linkedin&trk=hb_what

eam Member D1: Stacie
Learner Analysis:
General Characteristics and Academic Information
Our primary target learners are current college students and recent college graduates, but
anyone with an interest in learning the basics of LinkedIn will benefit. The average college
undergraduate is a young adult under 23 years old. They are usually inexperienced within the
job market. This age group qualifies as “adult learners,” so they will appreciate self-directed
learning focused on specific, practical outcomes.
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Specific Entry Characteristic and Learning Styles
Because our main target is current and post graduate college students (including adult learners)
that are or have attended an accredited post-secondary school in the United States, we expect
that attendees will have attained proficiency in the English language and are familiar with
workshop-style instruction. In addition, we expect those attending to be comfortable with
learning in an environment that incorporates visual elements and technology in the instruction.
Personal and Social Characteristics
For the audience to get the most out of this course, they should have some general knowledge
of their preferred industry interests and be comfortable with internet-related technology such as
surfing, blogging, and media sharing. This generation has many unique characteristics:
Coming of age in the deepest recession in 70 years, yet eager for the economic
opportunities their parents enjoyed. In a hurry to be grownups, but more dependent on
the adults around them than any modern generation. Global citizens in theory, but
ignorant of other cultures. Always in touch, but hampered in face-to-face communication.
And perhaps most importantly, digital natives, but maneuvering in a still-largely-analog
world. Observations from Inside Higher Ed. (ICEF Monitor, 2012).
Diversity and Disabilities
Because the learners are mostly American college graduates, there will not be many language
barriers or vast social differences to overcome. Design will be sure that the instructional
environment and training tools are ADA compliant, for both in-person and online sessions. For
example, using alternate text tagged into our images and audio to accompany text on the
screen.
Performance gap analysis:
The gap in their performance lies specifically in working with LinkedIn. Studies have shown twothirds of college students do not have a LinkedIn account, and many of those who do are
unaware of how to utilize it (Park et al., 2009). Although over 95% of current undergraduate and
93% of graduate students surveyed are home broadband users, college students comprise the
lowest demographic on LinkedIn (Harper, 2011; Smith, Rainie, and Zickuhr, 2011). In addition,
82% of undergraduate students belong to social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter
(Smith et al., 2011; Park et al., 2011). So, our students have access to the internet and are
familiar with how to navigate social networking sites in general. Understanding how to use
LinkedIn and why it is relevant to them as jobseekers will bridge the gap.
ICEF Monitor. New insights on characteristics of US college students. (2012). Retrieved from
http://monitor.icef.com/2012/12/new-insights-on-characteristics-of-us-college-students/
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Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Park, N., Kee, K., & Valenzuela, S. (2009). Being immersed in social networking environment:
Facebook groups, uses and gratifications, and social outcomes. Cyberpsychology & Behavior:
The Impact Of The Internet, Multimedia And Virtual Reality On Behavior And Society, 12(6),
729-733. doi:10.1089/cpb.2009.0003
Smith, A., Rainie, L., and Zickuhr, K. College Students and technology (2011). Pew Internet &
American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Collegestudents-and-technology.aspx
The Chronicle of Higher Education. Who are the undergraduates? (2010). Retrieved from
http://chronicle.com/article/Who-Are-the-Undergraduates-/123916/

Team Member D2: Suzanne
Contextual analysis:
The learners in this course are either trying to find their first professional job after finishing their
degree, or are seeking to make a career change. In both cases, the goal is likely to increase the
probability that they will achieve success in the job search. For the first-time job seekers, they
might not see mastering LinkedIn as very useful. In fact, they might be overconfident that they
will find a job easily. But for those who have experienced the difficulty of this job market, any
tool that has proven successful and can increase job prospects would seem extremely useful.
The target audience may or may not have any external forces holding them accountable for
mastering the content. It is not a required workshop and the material will not be tested for a
grade. And, as the course is initially designed to be given online, the learners will face additional
motivational challenges to actually participate; whereas in person, the facilitator would be
walking around helping attendees implement strategies. In light of these factors, it may be
helpful to start a LinkedIn, Facebook, or other online group for the class members so they can
help and encourage one another to become proficient in the use of LinkedIn and persist until
they find a position.
Instructional Context:
This course will be facilitated online through a synchronous platform (i.e. - BBC, GoToMeeting).
As the technology is widely used, technical issues should be minimal. With these platforms,
digital handouts can be uploaded to the online meeting room, and the facilitator can incorporate
student interaction and control the demonstration pace. Any factors that would normally distract
learners could be an issue here, depending on the environment where each participant chooses
to log on: kids, dogs barking, coworkers milling about, poor lighting, etc. Other interfering factors
include the reliability of the learner’s internet connection and the quality of his or her computer
equipment. For students finishing up their degree in May, we should conduct the workshop early
in the fall semester. For new graduates, it should be as soon as possible, and for adults with
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families, we may want to consider holding the course in the early fall or spring. Weekday nights
or Saturdays during the day may work well for all of these groups.
The course could also easily be adapted to fit an asynchronous environment. Recorded
demonstrations, online quizzes to check for understanding, and additional text may be required.
The advantage to asynchronous delivery is that scheduling would be less of a concern. For
students who just graduated from college (or are about to graduate), it would be easy enough to
hold an in-person course in a computer-equipped classroom. If the workshop were given as a
community service outside of the college setting, it might be held in a library meeting room with
Wi-Fi. In this case, students would be required to bring a laptop. Ideally, a projector would be
available in either scenario. Hard copies of screenshots and slides should be available as
backups. Ideal environmental factors include: the ability to adjust lighting near the screen
separate from the rest of the room, a quiet room, a temperature cool enough so the participants
are comfortable but not so cold that they hibernate, and flat tables for laptops (if needed).
Transfer Context:
As for application of the knowledge and skills learned in this course, students will be able to put
the strategies to use on any computer with internet access. Most new graduates have access
to a computer. If the course is delivered effectively, students will see how essential LinkedIn is
to their professional futures and be motivated to act on what they have learned. The online
group we set up to promote follow through should help provide the support needed to master
these skills. We might also consider sharing information about outside groups and
organizations that promote networking and career advancement.
Unit Goals:
Overall goal: Learners will recognize the power of LinkedIn for career management and possess
the skills and confidence to use it successfully. Participants will learn how to:
1. Create an optimized profile.
● Completing basic sections.
● Adding video, images, and documents.
● Structuring / organizing information.
● Wording titles, summary, etc.
● Giving and soliciting recommendations.
2. Build effective networks.
● Making basic connections.
● Using advanced search options to expand appropriate connections.
● Using your alumni network.
● Joining and creating groups.
3. Use multiple features to actively search for jobs.
● Using the Jobs Home page.
● Connecting with recruiters and other principals using Advanced People Search.
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Performing company and employee searches: informational interviews, research,
etc.
Using groups to locate job openings.
Choosing a paid subscription to Job Seeker Premium.

4. Maintain and update profile, networking, and search activities.
● Updating the profile.
● Creating interesting status updates.
● Developing goals: What do you want to get from LinkedIn?
● Making routines for activities that will help you achieve your goals.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Team Member I: Jasmine
Topic analysis:
Topics
Creating account
Creating profile
Navigating
Usage

Topics Outline
1. Creating Account
a. setting up email account
b. password tips
2. Creating Profile
a. Uploading photo
b. Editing experience, skills, achievements etc.
c. Tips for best profile
3. Navigating
a. Account and Settings
b. Networking
c. Messages/Notifications
d. Job Search
4. Usage
a. Graduating HS seniors
b. College portfolio
c. Networking
d. General job search

Details
1. Creating Account
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a. Setting up email account
a.i. This should be basic suggestions as to e-mail setup if person does not already
have one. I do not think any major tutorial is needed here.
b. Password tips
b.i. Here should just give tips on what a strong password looks like and the
requirements for a password.
2. Creating Optimized Profile
a. Uploading photo
a.i. Tutorial should start here. Once the user is on the profile page they should be
prompted to ask questions to complete profile.
b. Editing experience, skills, achievements etc.
b.i. Tutorial on how to edit profile once created. Especially how to add more pictures,
skills and education.
c. Tips for best profile
c.i. No tutorial, simple tips on how to have an impressive profile for networking and
jobs.
3. Navigating(Tutorial Using Live Demonstration, supplemented by Prezi slides & Short
Videos)
a. Account and Settings
b. Networking
c. Messages/Notifications
d. Job Search
d.i. All of these topics should be demonstrated live. A short tutorial video or a
screencast would be helpful as a supplement or backup. Jing, Camstudio or any
other screen capturing will work. These tutorials should be no longer than 2
minutes at the most.
4. Usage(Live demonstration and Prezi slides)
a. College Portfolio
b. Networking
c. General job search
Team Member E: Bridget
Procedural analysis:
1. LinkedIn – How to Create a User Profile
a. What does the learner do?
● Sets up an account with an uploaded picture
● Complete different sections within profile
● Revises profile utilizing tips shared during tutorial to optimize
b. What does the learner need to know to do this step?
● Learner will need an email address and an internet connection
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Learner should know how to find LinkedIn using preferred internet browser
Learner will need to set up a LinkedIn account if does not have one already
Learner will need to know how to upload a picture when prompted to browse
Learner will need to know how to follow on-screen prompts to complete profile
Learner will need to have resume to either upload or utilize as a starting point

c. What cues inform the learner that there is a problem, the step is done, or a different
step is needed?
● User receives and confirms email account with LinkedIn
● Picture is visible on profile
● Upon logging in to LinkedIn, user will be able to see what parts of profile need to
be added and can do so by utilizing the ‘Edit Profile’
2. Navigating LinkedIn
a. What does the learner do?
● Log into LinkedIn
● Views videos on topics such as: networking, messages/notifications, status
updates, job search
● Practice after each segment to check for mastery and note performance gaps
b. What does the learner need to know to do this step?
● Learner will need username and password for LinkedIn account
● Learner will need to know how to view Jing (or other) videos for training including
pausing to take notes or to practice and then resume (this is assuming user is in
control of viewing segment – online, if in-person training this section is null)
● Learner will need to know how to edit profile to update
c. What cues inform the learner that there is a problem, the step is done, or a different
step is needed?
● User cannot access his/her LinkedIn account
● User cannot access Jing (or other) videos for training (this is assuming user is in
control of viewing segment – online, if in-person training this section is null)


3. Usage of LinkedIn
a. What does the learner do?
Sign in to LinkedIn account
View demonstrations and Prezi presentation on: LinkedIn for the graduating HS senior; LinkedIn
for the College Graduate; Maintaining your Network; Job Search
b. What does the learner need to know to do this step?
● Learner will need username and password for LinkedIn account
● Learner will need to know how to view demonstration for training (this is
assuming user is in control of viewing segment – online, if in-person training this
section is null)
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c. What cues inform the learner that there is a problem, the step is done, or a different
step is needed?
● Learner cannot access his/her LinkedIn account
● User cannot access online demonstration or Prezi for training (this is assuming
user is in control of viewing segment – online, if in-person training this section is
null)
Instructional objectives:
1. The learner will be able to describe the main components of an optimized LinkedIn profile.
2. The learner will navigate and use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn each for 1) networking and 2) job
search.
3. The learner will be able to list at least 2 ways they will use LinkedIn to manage careers.

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Design - Phase 2
Team Member A: Tim
Sequencing description:
According to Morrison, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp (2013), sequencing is simply efficient ordering of
instructional content in a way to help the learner achieve the objectives. Creating appropriate
sequencing can provide learners with more meaningful content, which then makes the topics
easier to learn, resulting in more effective instruction (Morrison et al., 2013).
Our target audience will consist of current and post graduate college students (including adult
learners) that are or have attended an accredited post-secondary school in the United States.
Learner analysis has shown students have proficiency in the English language, are computer
literate and are familiar with the internet and web-based instruction. Module will promote the
sequence in Table 1, beginning with simpler tasks and proceeding to more complex ones as
additional concepts and procedures are covered. With the online instruction, there will be less
control over how the learner accesses information, but will still rely on learner knowledge and
content relationships. There are several possible sequence schemes, all of which are equally
effective. We considered two schemes based on module objectives: a) the Posner and Strike
Sequencing Schemes; and b) the Elaboration Theory.
The Posner and Strike sequencing schemes are comprised of learner-related, world-related and
concept-related sequencing schemes (Morrison et al., 2013). Learner-related sequencing (LRS)
is done first, based on results of the learner analysis done in the Analysis phase. LRS
considers, in part, the difficulty of the material, learner interest, and the learner’s cognitive
development (Morrison et al., 2013). Content is then identified to be either world-related (i.e.
spatial and physical relationships), or concept-related sequencing. While both schemes offer
tangible benefits, the Posner and Strike sequencing is more aligned with our objectives and task
analysis. The Elaboration Theory seems too structured on following an exact sequence in order
with the ultimate goal of mastering the task or content. With Posner and Strike’s scheme learner
interest becomes immediate satisfaction as instruction is hands-on. For example, creating an
account and immediately be able to join their college alumni group.
Design of the module will be based on learner-related and concept-related sequencing. While
learner-related sequencing is based on learner analysis, Posner and Strike’s concept-related
sequencing consists of four sub-sequences based on logically organizing conceptual content,
class relations, propositional relations, sophistication, and logical pre-requisitions (Morrison et
al., 2013). Based on information gathered in the Analysis phase, the following sequencing
applies (Table 1: Task Sequencing):
a)
Class relations: Grouping concepts that are similar in a sequence from general to
specific (i.e. setup initial user account to creating an optimized profile)
b)
Sophistication: From simple to complex (i.e. simple connections to building a
professional network, including using 3rd party applications)
c)
Propositional relations: Providing examples first, then the proposition (i.e.
facilitator using visual aids prior to learner on-hand practice) (Morrison et al., 2013).

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Table 1. Task Sequencing
Task
Overview of LinkedIn (e.g. navigation, site features, and
functionality)
Creating personal account (e.g. setting up user profile,
email, password)
Establishing a professional profile (e.g. uploading photo,
resume)
Building network connections and contacts
Search and apply for jobs
Joining professional and alumni groups
Adding notes and contacts to profile
Using premium search filters and auto alerts

Sequencing scheme
Class Relations
Class Relations
Class Relations
Class Relations
Class Relations/Sophistication
Sophistication
Sophistication/Propositional Relations
Propositional Relations

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2013). Designing effective
instruction (7th ed.). [Kindle version]. Retrieved from www.Amazon.com
Team Member D1: Stacie
Instructional Message:
The pre-instruction strategy that we will use is the overview, which is a short summary of the
course, written in prose (not as a list). We chose this strategy because it is the best match for
our course based on the course’s content structure, tasks, and who our learners are. According
to Morrison, Ross, Kalman, and Kemp (2011), using an overview as a pre-instruction strategy is
appropriate for loosely-structured content, which accurately describes the content of our
LinkedIn class. While there are certainly specific steps to be followed within each task that we
will present, the overall order of the tasks is not as important as simply making sure they are all
accomplished in the end.
Morrison, Ross, Kalman, and Kemp also suggest that overviews are a good pre-instruction
strategy when the tasks are related to facts and concepts (2011). Therefore, an overview is
also a good fit for our class’s pre-instruction because we will be presenting facts and concepts
that guide our learners to be able to register for and use LinkedIn.
Finally, this class targets students who have completed or will soon complete their bachelor’s
degree, a (typically) four-year commitment. Their success as college students supports an
assumption that they have adequate study skills and habits – they are high-ability students.
Because overviews are suited to both lower-ability and higher-ability students (Morrison et al,
2011), this pre-instruction strategy will be a good fit for our learners.
Besides summarizing the course, overviews can also present a potential problem that the
course will solve and communicate the relevance of a course. Both of these strategies serve to
enhance motivation (Morrison et al, 2011) which an important aspect to our LinkedIn class. As
previously mentioned, “a majority of current students are not using LinkedIn as a source to find
jobs,” (Choi, 2013). Therefore, the overview will include the problem to be solved (joblessness)
and its relevance to our students (you’re graduating college and need to support yourself).
Choi, G. (2013, April 30). Many students still not using LinkedIn survey finds. The Daily Free
Press. Retrieved from http://dailyfreepress.com/2013/04/30/many-students-still-not-usinglinkedin-survey-finds/
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Hall, B. (2013, April 23). Why aren’t college students using LinkedIn to find jobs?. Retrieved
from http://readwrite.com/2013/04/23/why-arent-college-students-using-linkedin-to-find-jobs
Team Member D2: Suzanne
Strategies table:
Task
Provide an
overview of
LinkedIn and its
functionality.

Category
Concept
Procedure

Strategy
Model
Organization

Initial Presentation & Generative Strategy
Present an example of an optimized profile with
connections, groups, saved job searches,
updates, etc.
After viewing the model, students are asked to
identify features that might be helpful with
career management.
Creating an
Fact
Recall
Present main profile example page: A profile
optimized profile.
should be a targeted set of information related
to the field in which you are mainly involved
and the career you want.
Students will explain which focus they have
chosen and why.
Procedure Demonstration Present the key procedures of creating a profile
through visual images, guiding the students
through each section.
Organization
Students will be asked to develop a mental
Elaboration
image of how each procedure would look given
their own situation.
Practice
Students will practice adding information to
their own profiles. (Students who do not
already have an account will perform this step
additionally.)
Principles & EGRUL
Present students with an appropriate and
Rules
Integration
inappropriate example of both offering and
requesting recommendations.
Students will provide their own examples of
what they think appropriate and inappropriate
recommendations would be.
Building a network. Principles & EGRUL
Present students with a scenario of a useful
Rules
Integration
connection and a wasted connection.
Students will provide examples of people who
would fit each category.
Procedure Demonstration Present the key functions required to make
connections using visual images, guiding the
students through each method: basic and
advanced search options; alumni networks;
searching, joining, and creating groups.
Organization
Students will be asked to develop a mental
Elaboration
image of how each procedure would look given
their own situation.
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Practice
Searching for jobs. Procedure

Maintaining a
profile, networks,
and job search.

Procedure

Students will practice adding a connection and
searching for relevant groups.
Demonstration Present features to assist in active job
searches: Jobs Home, Advanced People
Search, Company Search, Groups, and Job
Seeker Premium.
Organization
Students will be asked to develop a mental
Elaboration
image of how each procedure would work
given their own situation.
Practice
Students will practice using the Jobs Home
page, Advanced People Search, and Company
Search.
Students will be encouraged to practice the
other features on their own.
Demonstration Provide the if-then statement examples for
knowing when to update the profile.
Organization
Elaboration

Students will be asked to develop a mental
image of how each procedure would work
given their own situation.
Practice
Students will be asked to write a series of ifthen statements to guide them in keeping their
own profiles updated.
Principles & EGRUL
Present examples of effective and ineffective
Rules
Integration
status updates.
Students will provide examples of how they
might update their status.
Procedure Demonstration Present the sequence of establishing a goal for
LinkedIn and then creating a routine to support
that goal.
Organization
Students will be asked to paraphrase the
Elaboration
procedure and apply it to their own lives.
Practice
Students will be encouraged to practice
establishing their own goals and routines.
Table based on concepts from:
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Team Member I: Jasmine
Text design:
According to Morrison, Ross, Kalman and Kemp (2011), the importance of signaling throughout
a text can cause the learner to misunderstand the material. Global signals work together and
are a part of the design, such as a heading on each page which states the beginning of a
chapter or section name and page number. The heading and page numbers are on each page,
which makes them global in nature. Five common text structures a designer can use to signal
include:
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List of Items/Ideas
Compare/Contrast
Temporal Sequence
Cause/Effect
Definition/Example

First, second, third, etc.;
subsequent; another
in comparison, however, while, to differentiate, a distinguishing
beginning with, after, next
consequently, as a result, if/then, the reason, one explanation
for example, include, another

As these words are used for signaling, there is also a certain structure of general text design.
Text design has three critical elements. One is to have distinctive words that signal the structure
of the text to the learner. Second, coherence of the text structure that aids in recall of
information. Third, there needs to be a match between the content and the background of the
learner for better comprehension (Morrison, Ross, Kalman and Kemp, 2011, p. 180).
Instructional Text:
Typographic Signals:
Title Page – Title only, centered, 36 point Arial font
Pre-instructional Strategy Page – First page of the presentation will outline the preinstructional strategy. 12 point Arial font. Use Italics to emphasize words.
Content Pages
Standard Footer/Header – Page number on the lower right hand side, logo for Ideal Solutions
on the upper left hand side.
Checking Questions – Left justified, in italics, 14 point Georgia font.
Headers- Center aligned. Bold 20 point Arial font
Sub Headers- Left justified. Underlined 14 point Arial
Student Exercise Prompt – Left justified, in bold, 24 point font.
Summary Page – Each module will contain a summary page, outlining the key points of the
module. The summary points will be presented in a numbered list. 12 point Bold Arial.
Reference Page – The last page will contain the references for the module, listed in APA
format.
Pictures:
Media- Pictures, charts and video tutorials will be aligned to its related material. Charts will be
numbered accordingly. Pictures will be above or below the main text only for decoration.
However, instructional pictures relating to the text will be placed between text accordingly.
Interface- Will design accordingly
Buttons- Will design accordingly
Materials:

Materials for Introduction
Script for each section/page
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Guiding questions
Media (video, audio, pictures) input related to content




Materials for Content Pages
Headings
Signal text
Media related to content
Footer
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Team Member E: Bridget
Multimedia Design:
Some considerations for message design using multimedia:
It is important to keep the following 10 principles in mind for multimedia design.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Coherence – remove extraneous information to avoid distractions
Signaling – include cues for learner to focus on important information
Redundancy – avoid presenting the same information in multiple formats at the same time
Spatial contiguity – label illustrations instead of providing a caption
Temporal contiguity – present narration and animation at the same time
Segmenting – divide up animations to be controlled by learner instead of one long
animation
7. Pre-training – present steps before demonstration
8. Modality – animations with voice over in lieu of animations with text
9. Personalization – use conversational style, and lastly
10. Voice – use human voice rather than computer-generated voice. (Morrison, Ross, Kalman
& Kemp, 2011).
An additional insight provided by Jack Treuhaft is: “If a feature stands out by distracting the
viewer from the message it doesn't belong there ... no matter how cool it is!” (1995)
Prezi (www.prezi.com) – Prezi is ideal to use for presenting information for many reasons.



Collaboration is easy to do within Prezi as you set up access and allow others to edit.
Multiuse – it can be self-paced or used in Presentation style for a large group. Even if you
initially use it for a presentation, you can send the link to all learners so they can access it on
their own for a self-paced lesson or review. You can also have learners view the Prezi on their
own, first, and then present it as part of a formal lesson. This can make tricky concepts less
daunting because learners can get into the material beforehand. (Shattuck, 2013)
It is controllable for presentation purposes – your audience sees only what you want them to
see throughout.
It is easy to embed audio and video. This enables the learner to have a lower load on working
memory according to Baddely’s model of working memory (Morrison, et al, 2011).
It is translatable! Anyone can change the language in Prezi to make it readable to them,
therefore, reaching a larger audience and eliminating the language barrier.

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Jing – Jing is a free screencasting program that was launched in 2007 by TechSmith
Corporation. Jing records everything you see and do and limits this to five minutes for short,
focused segments of information. “Jing is the perfect way to enhance your fast-paced online
conversations. Create images and videos of what you see on your computer screen, then share
them instantly.” (Techsmith, 2013). Snagit and Camtasia are also products released by
Techsmith that can be used for screen recording and video editing. There are free trials
available for the last two but they have to be purchased for use longer than 30 days. Snagit is
similar to Jing but allows the user to create videos longer than the 5 minute Jing limitation.
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Shattuck, Suzannah. (2013, June 5). Throwing out the textbook with David Knuffke. [Blog
message]. Retrieved from: http://blog.prezi.com/latest/2013/6/5/throwing-out-the-textbook-withdavid-knuffke.html
Truehaft, J. (1995, January). Multimedia Design Considerations. Retrieved from:
http://www.algonquincollege.com/edtech/mmdesign.html
Techsmith Corporation. (1995-2013) Retrieved from: http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html

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Development – Phase 3
Team Member A: Tim
Instructional materials
Learning is an active process in which the learner constructs meaningful relationships between
his or her existing knowledge with the new knowledge presented in the instruction (Morrison,
Ross, Kalman, & Kemp, 2013).
To meet instructional objectives, the course will include both a conceptual component and a
hands-on component, delivered in a web-based synchronous platform. The course will use
static instructional slides containing high definition graphics and text to convey the conceptual
component, such as the overview and instruction on LinkedIn features. The hands-on
component will include instructor-led tutorials, using interactive training software, to show
students how to strategically use LinkedIn features. This will include demonstration on how to
create a basic LinkedIn account, how to use LinkedIn to build strong professional relationships,
and how to build a searchable, optimized profile.
Instructional slides and course transcripts will also be available in PDF or DOC format for
download by participants. All the online activities will be based on the generative strategies
developed in the design phase. The mixed choice of instructional delivery and materials reflect
the learning analysis to address the diverse learning styles of participants.
To measure course effectiveness, feedback from course participants will be gathered using a
survey tool. Two programs being evaluated are Survey Monkey (www.SurveyMonkey.com) and
Zoomerang (www.Zoomerang.com).
Based on Instruction methodology, presentation will be balanced among the three delivery
patterns, group presentation, small -group format, and self-based learning. This aligns with
Morrison et al. (2013), who suggest in many situations, instructional activities fall into all three
patterns; combining orientations yield more benefits than limiting instruction to one method
alone.
Material needs include an internet connected computer, where the instruction is delivered via a
web interface. Plus interactive learning software (ILS) is needed such as Blackboard
Collaborate (BBC). BBC allows instructors to upload other materials including PowerPoint
slides, images, video or audio sources. Instructors can annotate over their content by using
tools to point out/highlight specific aspects of their slides to present the overview. BBC allows
real time class discussions which can be added right onto the slides using a text editor for
download by students. BBC also meets the needs of those students who choose to participate
in the session from their mobile device (iPhone/iPad) using a free mobile app such as the
Blackboard Mobile Learn app (Cabrera, 2012).
Cabrera, D. (2012, Oct. 26). Facilitating web conferencing, interaction, and collaboration using
blackboard collaborate. Retrieved from http://facdevblog.niu.edu/usingbbcollab
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2013). Designing effective
instruction (7th ed.). [Kindle version]. Retrieved from www.Amazon.com
*Throughout, learner, student and participant will be used interchangeably.
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Team Members D1: Stacie & D2: Suzanne
Developing sample instructional materials (draft form)
Example #1
Below is a storyboard draft for a portion of the Live demonstration that will be implemented by
the facilitator. It will be supplemented by Prezi or PowerPoint presentation pieces where
appropriate. Handouts will include visual step-by-step guides for certain demonstrations, as well
as, worksheets for learners to apply the concepts to their own situations. Examples of the
former are also provided here. (actual PDF docs have been uploaded to Wiki)
Handout #1
https://docs.google.com/document/d/10Kfg0yCsTkrmhj3ts01kn2NUEESPfV5f_orO3stH0mU/pu
b
Handout #2
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hhjjB0Pn9Zm5jdYx67r2JVYQwodrSs1IUdC18hGB8kM/p
ub

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StoryBoard of Live Demo
LinkedIn Overview

Components of an Optimized Profile
When introducing the components of an optimized profile, we will emphasize that the
keywords are professional and career-focused.

Profile Page
We will describe elements of the profile page: photo, Activity, Experience, Education,
and Skills. In each area, it will be noted that the sample profile describes professional
information that is linked to a specific career direction.

Network Page
This page will be described as a place where students list their professional contacts.
Facilitator: “Choose connections wisely. It’s okay to include family and friends in your
Network, but make sure that their profiles are as professional as yours. Great
resources for new college graduates are professors, fellow students, and current and
previous coworkers and bosses – ideally, these are people who can describe your skills
and expertise and know your career goals.”

Jobs Page
We will describe this section as a tool for job-seeking and explain that LinkedIn
members can not only look for jobs on LinkedIn but apply for them as well.

Advanced People Search
This section will be described as another way for college graduates who are new to the
workforce to find professional contacts who support future career path.
Facilitator: “Request that people join your network because they are credible references
for you or because they are respected members of your professional community.”
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Advanced Company Search
This page will be described a way for students to learn more about the businesses
behind their career choices.
Facilitator: “By researching important companies in your field of work, you will know who
the trendsetters are in your field and which companies you would be most interested in
working for. You’ll be able to add them to your page to follow their developments and be
notified when job opportunities are available at those companies.”

Groups
The overview concludes by introducing Groups as a section in LinkedIn for students to
read about and discuss trends and events in their career field, as well as find additional
connections to add to their Network pages.
Example #2
This is a sample presentation supplement to teach learners to discriminate between good and
bad recommendations, and to learn how to give and request recommendations themselves.
Both a Prezi and PowerPoint of the same content are provided as samples.
Prezi Link:
http://prezi.com/t3lofe2wjdkn/present/?auth_key=vs93nzp&follow=xyvx1omqerc5
PPT link (actual PPT doc has been uploaded into Wiki):
mhtml:file://C:\Users\suzanne\Documents\EIDT6100\LinkedInRecsWEB.mht!
LinkedInRecsWEB_files/frame.htm
Team Member I: Jasmine
Delivery methodology
Based on Instruction methodology, group presentations can be balanced among the three
delivery patterns, group presentation, small group format and self-based learning. Morrison,
Ross, Kalman, & Kemp (2013) articulates “combining orientations to fit instructional conditions
and individual needs is a sensible approach that can potentially yield benefits much greater than
could be attained by using any one method alone (p.235).” Below are pros and cons presented
by Morrison et al. (2013) on how each method can enhance or hinder a presentation.



Group Presentation:
Pros
Lecture setting puts presenter in control and in authority position. In some cases this helps the
teacher achieve the objectives.
Adding and deleting content can be easily modified. Adapting to group size can also be easily
modified in this situation as well.
Conventional learning for both instructor and student
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Cons
Learning is sometimes passive and allowing little room to exchange ideas with instructor.
Instruction can stop if questions are permitted while the teacher is lecturing. This can cause
others to lose focus and they never fully recover.
In a large setting, individual feedback is critical and in most cases it is doomed. This will cause
others to may leave the lecture with wrong information.
Small Group Format:
Pros:
Promotes active learning and social skills while working with others.
This type of presentation can engender synthesis of content by allowing individuals to discuss
materials, share ideas and problem solve.
Enhance listening skills and oral expression by collaborating with others. This allows them to
open up and express ideas, points and principals.
Cons:
Group activities should be a supplement to the teaching rather than replace any other form of
instruction.
Not being prepared for small group discussion may fall back on lecturing or may provide too
much information for them to process.
Grouping others may result to individual work and individual groups require more feedback on
their progress and prompting to keep them on task.



Self-Paced Learning:
Pros:
Learning conditions can be ideal for both slow and advanced learners.
Individual learners can receive more attention from the instructor.
For the instructor the activities and responsibilities are spent more on helping group sessions,
consulting individuals and managing the learning environment. In return less time is spent on
actually making the presentations.



Cons:
Lack of self-discipline
More preparation is involved in developing self-paced units compared to lecture presentations.
Learning can become uninteresting. In contrast there may be too much divergence within
projects.
To meet instructional objectives the course will be presented in a small group format. The
course will also include both a conceptual component and a hands-on component, delivered in
a web-based synchronous platform. This allows the audience to feel more comfortable with
asking questions. If they are not familiar with the tools, it gives them the opportunity to focus
more without extra distractions. There is also enough feedback for them to understand and
formulate their own opinions. The chances for the instructor to not get overwhelmed with
questions is more likely to happen; allowing more time with hands on training and discussion in
this type of setting.
Morrison, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp (2013). Designing Effective Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken,
NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Team Member E: Bridget
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Instructional Plan
Overall goal: Learners will recognize the power of LinkedIn for career management and possess
the skills and confidence to use it successfully.
Learning Objective #1
The learner will be able to describe the main components of an optimized LinkedIn profile.
Content Presentation
Content: The participants will learn how to set up an account with an uploaded picture,
complete the different sections within the profile and revise the profile utilizing tips that are
shared during the tutorial to optimize.
Demonstration:
1. Students will be given a demonstration on how to create a basic profile on LinkedIn step by
step.
2. Students will be given a demonstration on how to upload a picture to the profile on LinkedIn.
3. Students will be given a demonstration on how to add video, images and documents to
LinkedIn.
4. Students will be given a demonstration on how to structure and organize information within
the profile.
5. Students will be given a demonstration on wording titles and summary.
6. Students will be given tips on optimizing profile for reference via a digital handout.
Materials and Media Selection:
Include: facilitator computer, web meeting platform, Prezi presentation, demonstration account
on LinkedIn, and digital handouts with steps on how to complete for reference. Each student
should have his/her own computer for practicing steps in class.
Student Participation
Student Grouping:
The instruction is going to be delivered in a small-group format, but practice will take place
individually.
Practice Items and Activities:
1. Students will watch the demonstration as the instructor models how to set up a basic profile
on LinkedIn.
2. Students will watch the demonstration as the instructor models how to upload a profile
picture.
3. Students will set up a LinkedIn account and upload a photo for profile.
4. Students will watch the demonstration as the instructor models how to add video, images and
documents to LinkedIn.
5. Students will listen to the instruction as he shares structure and organizational tips for
LinkedIn.
6. Students will listen to and read the wording examples for titles and summaries.
7. Students will save the digital handout to computer or USB flash drive.
Feedback
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Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and ask for individualized help throughout
the practice time. The instructor will ask for visual confirmation the students understand utilizing
the online meeting platform tools available. If needed, the instructor can move student into a
private ‘room’ to discuss and issues that arise.
Learning Objective #2
The learner will navigate and use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn each for 1) networking and 2) job
search.
Content Presentation
Content:
The students will learn how to make connections to build a network, use their Alumni network,
join a group, create a group and use the Job Search tools within LinkedIn.
Demonstration:
1. Students will be given a demonstration on finding people and making connections.
2. Students will be given a demonstration on using advanced search options to expand
appropriate connections.
3. Students will be given tips on how to differentiate appropriate vs. inappropriate connections.
4. Students will be given a demonstration of how to locate and connect using Alumni network.
5. Students will be given a demonstration on how to join a group.
6. Students will be given a brief demonstration on how to create a group.
7. Students will be given a demonstration on how to follow a company within his/her field.
8. Students will be given a demonstration on how to locate the Jobs Home page.
9. Students will be given a demonstration on performing job search.
Materials and Media Selection:
Include: facilitator computer, web meeting platform, Prezi presentation, demonstration account
on LinkedIn, and digital handouts with steps on how to complete for reference. Each student
should have his/her own computer for practicing steps in class.
Student Participation
Student Grouping:
The instruction is going to be delivered in a small-group format, but practice will take place
individually.
Practice Items and Activities:
1. Students will watch the demonstration on finding people and making connections.
2. Students will watch the demonstration on using advanced search options to expand
appropriate connections.
3. Students will send invitations to connect with people to establish a network.
4. Students will listen to and read tips on how to differentiate appropriate vs. inappropriate
connections.
5. Students will watch demonstration of how to locate and connect using Alumni network.
6. Students will watch demonstration on how to join a group.
7. Students will join a group of their choice.
8. Students will watch brief demonstration on how to create a group.
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9. Students will watch demonstration on how to locate the Jobs Home page.
10. Students will watch demonstration on performing job search.
11. Students will practice performing one job search utilizing the tools from demonstration.
Feedback
Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and ask for individualized help throughout
the practice time. The instructor will ask for visual confirmation the students understand utilizing
the online meeting platform tools available. If needed, the instructor can move the student into
a private ‘room’ to discuss and issues that arise.
Learning Objective #3
The learner will be able to list at least 2 ways they will use LinkedIn to manage careers.
Content Presentation
Content:
The students will develop goals for LinkedIn use and learn how to give and solicit a
recommendation, update their profile regularly, create interesting status updates and make
routines to otherwise achieve goals within LinkedIn.
Demonstration:
1. Students will learn how to develop goals through a group discussion about LinkedIn.
2. Students will be given a demonstration on how to solicit a recommendation within LinkedIn.
3. Students will be given a demonstration on how to give a recommendation to a person on
LinkedIn.
4. Students will be given examples of interesting and appropriate status updates.
5. Students will be given tips on how to update their profiles on a regular basis.
6. Students will be given a demonstration of a typical daily routine for fitting LinkedIn into busy
schedules.
Materials and Media Selection:
Include: facilitator computer, web meeting platform, Prezi presentation, demonstration account
on LinkedIn, and digital handouts with steps on how to complete for reference. Each student
should have his/her own computer for practicing steps in class. Online survey created and link
to online survey to provide for students.
Student Participation
Student Grouping:
The instruction is going to be delivered in a small-group format, but practice and feedback will
take place individually.
Practice Items and Activities:
1. Students will participate in a group discussion on how to develop goals for using LinkedIn.
2. Students will list their goals for using LinkedIn.
3. Students will watch demonstration on how to solicit a recommendation within LinkedIn.
4. Students will watch a demonstration on how to give a recommendation within LinkedIn.
5. Students will view the examples of interesting and appropriate status updates.
6. Students will write a status update for their profile.
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7. Students will listen to the tips on how to update profile on a regular basis.
8. Students will watch the demonstration of a typical daily routine for fitting LinkedIn into
schedule.
9. Students will list two ways in which they can use LinkedIn to manage their career.
10. Students will click on the link provided to complete the survey at the end of the course.
Feedback
Students will have the opportunity to ask questions after the demonstration concludes. Students
will have the opportunity to have one-on-one instruction with instructor in a breakout room if
required. Students will complete an online survey using a link provided before they leave the
session.

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Implementation Plan and Facilitator Guide – Phase 4
Team Member A: Tim
Section I: Unit Overview
Table of Contents
















I.
Unit Overview
Background and goals of instructional module
Introduction to the unit
Learning objectives
II.
Pre-workshop planning
Facilitator preparation
Preparing participants
Student groupings
Giving participants information in advance
III. Instructional environment, equipment, and materials
Delivery environment / equipment considerations
Materials and handouts
Media support
IV. Instructional Delivery and Sequencing
Overview of lesson
Sequence of activities
Step-by-step process
V.
Assessment of Learning
Pre-assessment strategies (before learning)
Formative assessment strategies (during learning)
Summative assessment strategies (after learning)

Background and goals of instructional module
The primary purpose of this project is to provide instruction on how to effectively use LinkedIn, a
popular professional network site (PNS) to find employment after graduation. LinkedIn is the
largest PNS with more than 225 million members located across 200 countries and territories
(LinkedIn, 2013). Since its introduction in 2003, LinkedIn has proven to be a valuable resource
to locate ideal job opportunities and to connect with employers and other professionals; it is a
tool that can help graduates build a network and gain access to industry insiders. The overall
goal of this instructional module is to ensure learners will possess the skills and confidence to
use LinkedIn features successfully, for career attainment and management, after completing
learning objectives.
Introduction to the unit
To meet the instructional objectives listed, this module will include both a conceptual component
and a hands-on component, delivered in a web-based synchronous platform. The course will
use static instructional slides containing high definition graphics and text to convey the
conceptual component, such as the overview and instruction on LinkedIn features. The handson component will include instructor-led tutorials, using interactive training software, to show
students how to strategically use LinkedIn features. This will include demonstration on how to
create a basic LinkedIn account, how to use LinkedIn to build strong professional relationships,
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and how to build a searchable, optimized profile. External factors that could distract learners
include, kids, dogs barking, coworkers milling about, poor lighting, etc., depending on the
environment where each participant chooses to log on.


Learning objectives
Learning Objective #1: The learner will be able to describe the main components of an
optimized LinkedIn profile.
Learning Objective #2: The learner will navigate and use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn each for 1)
networking and 2) job search.
Learning Objective #3: The learner will be able to list at least 2 ways they will use LinkedIn to
manage careers.
LinkedIn. (2013). What is LinkedIn?. Retrieved from http://www.linkedin.com/static?
key=what_is_linkedin&trk=hb_what

Team Member D1: Stacie
Section II: Pre-workshop Planning
Facilitator Preparation
Because this course focuses on LinkedIn, which is an active and constantly-evolving website,
the facilitator should plan to visit the LinkedIn site in the days leading up to the class to note any
changes to the website format or processes. In addition, the facilitator should also visit the
website before class begins to ensure that it is working and not down for unexpected
maintenance. While not preferable, the class can be conducted without live access to LinkedIn
and a contingency plan should still be prepared for that possibility.
Preparing Participants
Students will need to understand the basics of the web-based learning platform, including
accessing the site and logging in. If this information is not provided by the host learning
organization, the facilitator should include the information in an introductory email to the class.
Contact information for technical support before, during, and after the class should also be
provided to the students before the start of class.
Student Groupings
The instruction will be delivered in a small-group format, but because the students are
accessing the class from different locations through the web, practice will take place individually.
Giving Participants Information in Advance
Along with the introductory email mentioned above, students will also be provided with the
workshop handouts one week before class to review as pre-work. One week will give them time
to review information to reduce the cognitive load during class, but not an excess of time that
might result in them forgetting about the information before the class starts (2005, Piskurch).
Piskurich, G. M. (2005). Rapid instructional design: Learning ID fast and right. San Francisco,
CA: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
Team Member D2: Suzanne
Section III: Instructional environment, equipment, and materials
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Delivery environment / equipment considerations
The course will be delivered via online meeting platform by a facilitator. The facilitator should be
mindful that although technology provides a great opportunity to reach students in different
locations and offers convenience, it also comes with certain challenges. How the delivery is
received depends greatly on student factors such as distractions in the chosen environment, the
quality of the students’ equipment, the strength of their internet connection, and their interest in
the subject.
The factors the facilitator can control include:









Choosing a quiet location with minimal background noise (i.e. - a smaller room with carpeting).
Connecting via Ethernet to your broadband or fiber optic service to ensure a reliable connection.
Making sure your computer is updated with the latest software involved in delivery (i.e. - Flash,
etc.).
Powering the computer using the power adapter instead of the battery.
Making sure the “sleep” and other settings on your computer are adjusted properly.
Using a good quality microphone.
Choosing a solid online meeting platform (BBC, GoToMeeting, Adobe Connect, WebEx).
Preloading all of the handouts and presentation materials into the “classroom.”
Practicing the delivery of the course using this platform; developing a good understanding of its
functionality.
Developing a conversational delivery to keep the learners engaged (Morrison, Ross, Kalman, &
Kemp, 2011).
Another factor to consider is the technological nature of the topic itself: LinkedIn. The interface
is continually changing; therefore, the facilitator must be up-to-date on the latest iteration of the
online tool. He or she must make adjustments to the delivery (demonstration and materials)
accordingly.












Materials and handouts
A somewhat complete LinkedIn profile to use for the live demonstration.
Backup materials in the event of an unforeseen outage on LinkedIn.
Prezi presentation materials for non-live demonstration portions of the course.
Digital handouts in PDF or DOC format: Step-by-step visual guide to main portions of the demo,
and worksheets to apply the concepts learned.
Evaluation survey and link for the end of the course.
Email template to send to learners prior to course that includes:
Link to online course
Instructions for testing equipment/connection on platform
Basic instructions: downloading handouts/presentation, participating within platform.
Technical support information
Facilitator contact information
Digital handouts/worksheets as attachments
Media support
All of the major online meeting platforms offer online, phone and email support. The facilitator
and the participants should avail themselves of the opportunity to test the platform well in
advance of the course delivery date. This way, any problems can be addressed prior to the
course delivery. Additionally, learners may have trouble accessing handouts or other materials
before or during the course. Facilitators should provide both technical support information for
the platform, as well as his or her own contact information should the learner need it. Another
suggestion is to find a knowledgeable assistant to help with managing the logistics and technical
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issues during the course. Contact information can be provided so that learners can talk with
someone directly without disruptions.
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Team Member E: Bridget
Section IV: Instructional delivery and sequencing
Overview of Lesson
The purpose of this lesson is to learn about the power of LinkedIn for career management. By
the end of this lesson it is our goal that the learner will possess the skills and confidence to use
LinkedIn successfully. More specifically, by the end of this lesson the learner should be able to:
·
describe the main components of an optimized LinkedIn profile
·
navigate and use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn each for 1) networking and 2) job search.
·
list at least 2 ways they will use LinkedIn to manage careers.
Sequence of Activities
The below activities are based on the objectives provided for the training module. The activities
are separated by the responsibilities of the facilitator and the students.










Facilitator:
demonstration of how to create optimized profile on LinkedIn
share digital handouts with students
demonstration of establishing network
initiate discussion on goals for joining LinkedIn
demonstration of Job search
demonstration of soliciting and extended recommendations on LinkedIn
demonstration of keeping profile updated and writing appropriate status updates
model typical daily routine to demonstrate ease of fitting into busy schedule
answer questions and offer one-on-one instruction if needed
share survey link for evaluation purposes
collect responses for reflection








Students:
follow along with instruction
create own profile utilizing tips from example provided by instructor
save digital handouts for future reference
connect with people, groups, companies to establish network
write personal goals for LinkedIn
perform job search
create status update
complete survey at end of course
Step-by-step Process
1. Using the example account created, the facilitator will give a demonstration on how to
create a basic profile on LinkedIn, step-by-step, including uploading a picture.
2. Students will set up a LinkedIn account and upload a photo for profile.
3. The facilitator will demonstrate how to add video, images and documents to LinkedIn
including how to structure and organize information within the profile.
4. The facilitator will give a demonstration on wording titles and summary.
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5. The facilitator will share the tips on optimizing profile for reference via a digital handout.
6. Students will save the digital handout to computer or USB flash drive.
7. The facilitator will ask for confirmation that the above has been completed and ask for
questions.
8. The facilitator will give a demonstration on finding people and making connections
including how to use advanced search options to expand appropriate connections.
9. Students will send invitations to connect with people to establish a network.
10. The facilitator will continue to use the example account and screenshots to show how to
differentiate appropriate vs. inappropriate connections, how to locate and connect using Alumni
network and how to join a group, how to create a group, and how to follow a company within
his/her field.
11. Students will join a group of their choice.
12. The facilitator will ask for confirmation that this step has been completed and ask for
examples of groups joined.
13. The facilitator will continue to demonstrate by showing how to locate the Jobs Home page
and how to perform a job search.
14. Students will practice performing one job search utilizing the tools from demonstration.
15. The facilitator will ask for confirmation that this has been completed and ask if there are any
questions before moving on to the next section.
16. The facilitator will initiate a discussion about goals for using LinkedIn. (This can be done
first if instructor prefers to move the sequence around.)
17. Students will write their own goals for using LinkedIn.
18. The facilitator will give a demonstration on how to solicit a recommendation and how to give
a recommendation to a person on LinkedIn.
19. The facilitator will give examples of interesting and appropriate status updates.
20. Students will write a status update for their profile.
21. The facilitator will give tips on how to update profile on a regular basis.
22. The facilitator will model a typical daily routine for fitting LinkedIn into busy schedules.
23. Students will list two ways in which they can use LinkedIn to manage their career.
24. Students will click on the link provided to complete the survey at the end of the course.
25. Students will have the opportunity to ask questions after the demonstration concludes.
26. The facilitator will offer the opportunity to have one-on-one instruction in a breakout room if
required.
Team Member I: Jasmine
Section V: Assessment of learning
This section describes how student learning will be assessed by the facilitator throughout the
instructional module.
Pre-assessment strategies (Before)
Evaluating the learner is essential to the instructional design process. The main goal is to
design effective and efficient instruction that produces reliable results when presented to the
learner. Instructional strategies prompt and/or motivate the learner to actively make connections
between what the learner already knows and what the new information entails. Below are
prompts the ID can do to assess what the learner already knows and what needs to be taught:
1. Students will assess their knowledge on finding people and making connections.
2. Students will assess their knowledge on using advanced search options to expand
appropriate connections.
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3. Students will assess their knowledge on invitations to connect with people to establish a
network.
4. Students will assess their knowledge on differentiating appropriate vs. inappropriate
connections.
5. Students will assess their knowledge on how to join/create a group.
6. Students will assess their knowledge on how to locate the Jobs Home page.
7. Students will assess their knowledge on performing job searches.
Formative assessment strategies (During)
Formative evaluation strategies maintain quality control of the developmental process by
focusing the proper instruction needed to solve. The following cues might be used by designers
to help in the formative evaluation:
1. The instructor will model and guide the student how to setup a basic profile on LinkedIn.
2. The instructor will model and guide how to upload a profile picture.
3. The instructor will model and guide how to set up a LinkedIn account and upload a photo for
profile.
4. The instructor will model and guide how to add video, images and documents to LinkedIn.
5. The instructor will model and guide how to structure and organizational tips for LinkedIn.
6. The instructor will model and guide the student how to find people for groups and job
searches.
7. The instructor will model and guide how to save the digital handout to computer or USB flash
drive.
Summative assessment strategies (After)
The summative assessment will show whether the product teaches what it is supposed to teach,
as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of the learner. This will be done by the use of
evaluations. Within the assessment, we can direct the questions so that the data will reflect the
programs outcome. It will further assist us to decide whether the program is achieving our goals
and objectives. If any deficiencies are noted and/or reported, then they will be addressed and
corrected so our training will be effective and efficient in obtaining the learning objectives. The
following are some of the ways we can determine if the student has effectively achieved our
learning objectives:
1. Students will demonstrate an understanding on finding people and making connections.
2. Students will demonstrate an understanding on how to upload a picture to the profile on
LinkedIn.
3. Students will demonstrate an understanding on how to add video, images and documents to
LinkedIn.
4. Students will demonstrate an understanding on how to use advanced search options to
expand appropriate connections.
5. Students will demonstrate an understanding on how to locate and connect using Alumni
network.
6. Students will demonstrate how to follow a company within his/her field.
7. Students will demonstrate how to locate the Jobs Home page.
8. Students will demonstrate on how to structure and organize information within the profile.
Team Member A: Tim
Evaluation Process
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“Evaluation is an essential component of instructional design . . . . [it] is a continuous process
that should occur early in a design process and then be repeated at different phases”
(Morrision, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp, 2013, p. 273).
Evaluation Process
The overall goal and objectives of the instructional plan will be the foundation and focus of the
evaluation.
The overall goal of the instructional module states: Learners will recognize the power of
LinkedIn for career management and possess the skills and confidence to use it successfully.
There are three objectives to meet that goal:

The learner will describe the main components of an optimized LinkedIn profile;

The learner will navigate and use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn each for networking and
job search; and

The learner will list at least 2 ways they will use LinkedIn to manage careers.

The purpose of the evaluation process is in part, to supply information and insights about the
effectiveness of the instructional module to guide necessary revisions (Patton, 2008).
Effectiveness of this instructional module can be rendered using formative, summative and
confirmative evaluation approaches (Morrison, et al., 2013). Based on instructional objectives,
formative and summative evaluation approaches will be used to gather quantitative and
qualitative data; before, during, and post implementation to evaluate the module. Various tools
will also be employed to gather data used for analysis.
Formative evaluation asks ‘How are we doing?’ and is a measurement of learning outcomes
during all phases of the instructional process. It helps with maintaining quality control to ensure
the instructional process is meeting the instructional objectives. Throughout the instructional
process learners will be ask to complete several formative assessments directly aligned with the
unit goals.
Prerequisite tests will determine whether enrolled learners are fully prepared for starting the
training course. These will be done informally as a means to assess the learner’s prior
knowledge and skills. In addition an information packet will be mailed to each participant to
determine learner experience with LinkedIn and in using web-based synchronous platforms
and/or interactive learning software (ILS). Issues can be addressed prior to the course which
will diminish chances of the facilitator/instructor to get overwhelmed with questions; allowing
more time with hands on training and discussion, important in this type of training platform.
During the actual instruction, direct testing of performance will be done by monitoring learner
skill and behavior as the learner progresses through the task sequence. Facilitators can directly
monitor activity through the ILS. Students will have the ability to ask questions and ask for
individualized help. Both qualitative and quantitative data can be gathered and stored on the
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ILS. Data will also be gathered from the returned student questionnaire and from data gathered
from learner pre-tests on the ILS. Specific tools include: Internet connected computer and
learner software, information packet.
Summative evaluation asks ‘How did we do?’ the primary focus is determining whether the
instructional objectives were achieved. Outcome of module completion is measured rather than
learners’ reaction. Most ILS software has built in ability to track the progress of student activity
or third-party software, such as Captivate can be used. The data received from the summative
assessment will be used to determine the immediate success of the instructional model and to
ensure it has met the instructional goals of the plan. The tools used to measure instruction
effectiveness at completion will be done through an online exit survey and/or link to survey at
the end of the course.
When used, confirmative evaluation asks ‘How are we doing now?’ and is used assesses the
degree to which instructional objectives are being achieved over an extended period of time
after the course, usually six months following course completion (Morrison et al., 2013). A
standard tool to connect with the learner is through an electronic survey. Because LinkedIn is
an active and constantly-evolving website and is continually changing, confirmative evaluation
may prove too costly in terms of resources. Stakeholder knowledge, as well course delivery
(demonstration and materials) may need to be continuously updated. There is also a strong
possibility of threats to data quality and utility. In light of that, confirmative evaluation will not
serve the information needs of the primary stakeholders for this instruction.
References:
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Patton, M. (2008). Utilization-focused evaluation. (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE
Publications.

Team Member D: Stacie
Alignment of Unit Goals to the evaluation process
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Overall goal: Learners will recognize the power of LinkedIn for career management and
possess the skills and confidence to use it successfully.
There will be four methods of evaluation to meet this goal:
Reason for choosing this
Evaluation Component
method
Ongoing feedback will help the instructor develop an
appropriate pace of instruction and slow down or speed up
Informal questions asked
the lesson to match the needs of the learners.
1 by the facilitator during
The information gathered here can also be redirected to the
class
instructional designers to expand or reduce the class’s scope
and timeline as needed.
Because each student’s career path and LinkedIn profile is
unique, they will need to think critically about each element of
this class and generate appropriate content for their own
Final test at the
LinkedIn account. Morrison, Ross, Kalman, and Kemp (2011)
2 conclusion of the course
explain that, “Essay questions are most useful for testing
(short essay)
higher levels of cognitive learning,” (p. 310). Therefore, the
final test will be in an essay format in order to effectively
assess their ability to think critically about their LinkedIn
profile.
It is important not just to understand LinkedIn, but also to
Evaluation and feedback
actually use it effectively. Therefore, students’ achievement
of students’ LinkedIn
will also be measured upon a review of their LinkedIn profile.
3
accounts at the end of
The instructor will use a rubric designed from the main
class
objectives to evaluate each profile and provide feedback to
the students.
A survey that is distributed 2 weeks after the course is
complete will allow students to develop their LinkedIn profile
and begin networking, searching for jobs, and submitting
4 Course Survey
applications. Information gathered from the survey will allow
the instructor and instructional designers to determine if
students have achieved the overall goal.

Here is a detailed description of each evaluation component, aligned with the three objectives of
the class:
Objective

Evaluation Component
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The learner will describe the
main components of an
optimized LinkedIn profile.

The learner will navigate and
use at least 3 tools on LinkedIn
each for networking and job
search

The learner will list at least 2
ways they will use LinkedIn to
manage careers

Formative Evaluation:
Feedback questions asked at the conclusion of this task:
Are there any questions?
Do you understand this task?
Do you need more time to practice?
Summative Evaluation:
Final test will list the components of LinkedIn. For each
component, students will be asked, “What are two things
that you will do to make this section look professional and
attractive to potential employers?”
Confirmative Evaluation:
Instructor will review students’ public profiles to confirm the
lessons have been applied.
Formative Evaluation:
Feedback questions asked after each tool is explained:
Are there any questions?
Do you understand this tool?
Do you need more time to practice?
Summative Evaluation:
Final test will ask students to list three tools for networking
and explain how these tools improve their chances of
finding a job.
Final test will ask students to list three job opportunities they
found on LinkedIn and the elements of their profile that
prove they are qualified for those jobs.
Confirmative Evaluation:
Instructor will review students’ public profiles to confirm
students have begun building networks.
Formative Evaluation:
Feedback questions after this element is explained:
How will you use LinkedIn when you are looking for a job?
Once you find a job, why is it important to keep your
LinkedIn account active?
Summative Evaluation:
Above questions will be repeated in the final test.
Confirmative Evaluation:
Course Survey will ask how often students visit LinkedIn to
network, how often they review and update their profile, and
how many applications, interviews, and job offers have
resulted from the students’ work on LinkedIn.

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective
instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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