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Published by Mian Umair "An Introduction to Phonetics"

Published by Mian Umair "An Introduction to Phonetics"

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Published by Mian Jibran Khalid
You could quench your thirst of about the study of Phonetic. In this book, the writer has very vividly explained all the aspects of Pronunciation. It is the updated one edition.

you can also find it helpful for the articulation of a word. It is the book with pictographic illusturation. A humble request to whosoever download this book; remember me in his or her prayers. Any question about this knowledge you could ask me. To the best of my knowledge I will try to answer you with arguments.

Thansk.

yours sincerely.
You could quench your thirst of about the study of Phonetic. In this book, the writer has very vividly explained all the aspects of Pronunciation. It is the updated one edition.

you can also find it helpful for the articulation of a word. It is the book with pictographic illusturation. A humble request to whosoever download this book; remember me in his or her prayers. Any question about this knowledge you could ask me. To the best of my knowledge I will try to answer you with arguments.

Thansk.

yours sincerely.

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Published by: Mian Jibran Khalid on Feb 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/23/2011

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All native speakers of a language know, unconsciously of course, that the
phonemes of their language cannot be strung together in any random order to
form words. In fact, the phonological system of their language determines
which phonemes can begin a word, end a word, and follow each other. Very
often, sequential constraints are biologically-driven. That is, there is a biological
explanation for them. Since breathing is the primary function of human vocal
organ, speech is considered to be its subsidiary function. Therefore, any form
of speech that can interfere with breathing is impossible; hence, sequential
constraints.

CHAPTER SIX

130

Native speakers of English, for example, tacitly know that English words can
begin with such sequences as sp, sk, dr, tr, and str but not with such
sequences as bp, pb, lbk, etc. This unconscious knowledge tells them that no
English word will ever begin with a sequence that is phonologically constrained
in their language. New words enter the language but they all conform to the
sequential constraints of the language. Wog is phonologically possible and may
be added to the English language in future as a new word but *wgo is
phonologically impossible and will never enter the English language as a new
word. In fact, it can safely be argued that wog is a potential word (a word to
which no meaning has been assigned yet). Such potential words are
sometimes called accidental gaps.

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