You are on page 1of 8

SP15

Chadd Engel

1

Assessment Commentary
Write the Assessment Commentary (no more than 8 single-spaced pages, including prompts) by
providing your response to each of the prompts below. 

1. Analyzing Student Learning
a.

Identify the specific standards/objectives from the lesson plans measured by the
assessment chosen for analysis. 


Below is an image of the rubric used to evaluate student completion of the summative project.
This rubric addresses the following standards and learning objectives through these grading
criteria categories:
Accurateness of 2-Point Perspective:
• Addresses the learning objective of students demonstrating understanding of the 2-point
perspective process.
Standards Addressed:
• VISUAL ARTS - Creating
• Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
• HS Proficient VA:Cr1.1.Ia Use multiple approaches to begin creative endeavors.
• STATE GOAL 26: Through creating and performing, understand how works of art are
produced.
• A. Understand processes, traditional tools and modern technologies used in the arts.
• 26.A.3e Visual Arts: Describe how the choices of tools/technologies and processes are
used to create specific effects in the arts.
Craftsmanship:
• Addresses the overarching learning objective of students developing artist integrity by
demonstrating care for their work produced.
Standards Addressed:
• Craftsmanship in my classroom applies to all standards, because when producing
artwork with great care students learning potential and mastery of the standards are
maximized.
Participation:
• Addresses the overarching learning objective of providing all students with a positive working
environment via daily participation throughout the unit.
Standards Addressed:
• STATE GOAL 25: Know the language of the arts.
• A. Understand the sensory elements, organizational principles and expressive qualities
of the arts.
• 25.A.3d Visual Arts: Identify and describe the elements of value, perspective and color
schemes; the principles of contrast, emphasis and unity; and the expressive qualities
of thematic development and sequence.
Critique:
• Addresses the overarching learning objective of students demonstrating the ability to analyze,
interpret, and describe their work and others work in a formal setting.
Standards Addressed:
• VISUAL ARTS - Creating

SP15

Chadd Engel

2

• Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
• HS Advanced VA:Cr3.1.IIIa Reflect on, re- engage, revise, and refine works of art or
design considering relevant traditional and contemporary criteria as well as personal
artistic vision.
• STATE GOAL 25: Know the language of the arts.
• A. Understand the sensory elements, organizational principles and expressive qualities
of the arts.
• 25.A.3d Visual Arts: Identify and describe the elements of value, perspective and color
schemes; the principles of contrast, emphasis and unity; and the expressive qualities
of thematic development and sequence.
b.

Provide the evaluation criteria you are using to analyze student learning.

I will be using the rubric pictured below for my summative evaluation of student learning.
Summative Project Rubric:

c.

Provide a graphic (table or chart) or narrative summary of student learning for
your whole class. Be sure to summarize student learning for all evaluation criteria
described above. 


I begin every unit with a pre-assessment that I will use for direct comparison data detailing
student growth at the end of the unit. I achieve through the use of a tracking tool that allows me
to measure the individual students as well as the whole class. This data is tracks every student

SP15

Chadd Engel

3

participating in the class, and my 3 focus students are chosen for evaluation that extends
beyond the numbers into measuring great successes as well as missed opportunities.
Example of Student Progress Tracker (Students highlighted in green are my focus students:

d.

Use evidence found in the 3 student work samples and the whole class summary
to analyze the patterns of learning for the whole class and differences for groups
or for individual learners relative to their abilities to create or respond to visual art
concepts incorporating

I chose my three focus specifically to universally represent the needs of the whole class.
Including in this focus group are my only two students with diagnosed IEPs, and the other
students was chosen to represent the average learner of the classroom. Evidence of their

SP15

Chadd Engel

4

learning related to form and structure, production, art context, and personal perspective is in the
following:
-form and structure
Student 1- Referencing image “Student_1” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of form and structure related to specifically
2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the
student accurately rendered and drew a castle in 2-point perspective. Additionally, the student
clearly used the castle as a compositional tool to organize the illustrations in the work.
Student 2- Referencing image “Student_2” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of form and structure related to specifically
2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the
student accurately drew and rendered their dream tree house in 2-point perspective for their
project. Additionally, the student clearly used a gradation technique for the background to
provide depth to their project.
Student 3- Referencing image “Student_3” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of form and structure related to specifically
2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the
student accurately rendered and drew a city scape using 2-point perspective as the base to
begin their work, and then added a third vanishing point to create a 3-point perspective.
Furthermore, the student used scale as a way to create a sensation of the prominent figure in
the foreground of the work falling.
-production
Student 1- Referencing image “Student_1” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of production related to specifically 2-point
perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the student
produced an accurate 2-point perspective castle.
Student 2- Referencing image “Student_2” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of production related to specifically 2-point
perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the student
produced an accurate 2-point perspective tree house.
Student 3- Referencing image “Student_3” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of production related to specifically 2-point
perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, the student
produced accurate 2-point perspective city scape tops to buildings, and then added a third
vanishing point to create a unique perspective for the viewer.
-art context
Student 1- Referencing image “Student_1” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of art context related to specifically 2-point
perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, this student
created an unique context to their work by allowing the viewer inside their inner personality
through the implementation of the figures composed around the castle.
Student 2- Referencing image “Student_2” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of art context related to specifically 2-point

SP15

Chadd Engel

5

perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, this student
created an unique context to their work by developing a surreal setting where it appears this
artist travels to for calm and serenity.
Student 3- Referencing image “Student_3” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of art context related to specifically 2-point
perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For example, this student
created an unique context to their work by illustrating a falling figure, with an eye for a head, into
a city scape. This planned juxtaposition provides an unique contextual experience for the
viewer.
-personal perspective
Student 1- Referencing image “Student_1” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of personal perspective related to
specifically 2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For
example, this student demonstrated their personal perspective on this work by choosing their
own process for rendering their 2-point perspective line drawing.
Student 2- Referencing image “Student_2” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of personal perspective related to
specifically 2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For
example, this student demonstrated their personal perspective on this work by choosing their
own process for rendering their 2-point perspective line drawing.
Student 3- Referencing image “Student_3” in the Task 3 folder “Part A-Student Work Samples”
provides clear indications of students understanding of personal perspective related to
specifically 2-point perspective, and more broad visual arts concepts are apparent. For
example, this student demonstrated their personal perspective on this work by choosing their
own process for rendering their 2-point perspective line drawing.

2.

Feedback to Guide Further Learning

Refer to specific evidence of submitted feedback to support your explanations.
a.

In what form did you submit your evidence of feedback for the 3 focus students?
- In work samples or in a separate document; 

- In audio files; or 

- In video clip(s) from the instruction task (provide a time-stamp reference) or in a
separate video clip?

I submitted my evidence of feedback as an document in Task 3 Part B: Evidence of Feedback.

b.

Explain how feedback provided to the 3 focus students addresses their individual
strengths and needs relative to the standards/objectives measured. 


Student 1- Referencing image “Student_1_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of
Student Feedback” provides clear indications of feedback relative to standards/objectives
measured. For example, my handwritten notes and student responses are notated directly on
and throughout the rubric document: “Student_1_Feedback”. Additionally, the student and
myself wrote on the back of the page where we thought they should be going for their next
project.

SP15

Chadd Engel

6

Student 2- Referencing image “Student_2_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of
Student Feedback” provides clear indications of feedback relative to standards/objectives
measured. For example, my handwritten notes and student responses are notated directly on
and throughout the rubric document: “Student_2_Feedback”. Additionally, the student and
myself wrote on the back of the page where we thought they should be going for their next
project.
Student 3- Referencing image “Student_3_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of
Student Feedback” provides clear indications of feedback relative to standards/objectives
measured. For example, my handwritten notes and student responses are notated directly on
and throughout the rubric document: “Student_3_Feedback”. Additionally, the student and
myself wrote on the back of the page where we thought they should be going for their next
project.
c.

How will you support students to apply the feedback to guide improvement, either
within the learning segment or at a later time?

Student 1- I will support student 1 to apply feedback with in their next concentration work,
because as a whole class we are always looking to complete our next work to a higher degree
than our prior work. For example, referencing the second image in “Student_1_Feedback” in the
Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student Feedback” the student and my notes for where they
are heading can be seen.
Student 2- I will support student 2 to apply feedback with in their next concentration work,
because as a whole class we are always looking to complete our next work to a higher degree
than our prior work. For example, referencing the second image in “Student_2_Feedback” in the
Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student Feedback” the student and my notes for where they
are heading can be seen.
Student 3- I will support student 3 to apply feedback with in their next concentration work,
because as a whole class we are always looking to complete our next work to a higher degree
than our prior work. For example, referencing the second image in “Student_3_Feedback” in the
Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student Feedback” the student and my notes for where they
are heading can be seen.
Whole class- I will support the whole class to apply feedback with in their next concentration
work, because as a whole class we are always looking to complete our next work to a higher
degree than our prior work. For example, and as stated above, the student and I both notated
on the back of their rubric where they should be heading for their next project.

3.

Evidence of Language Understanding and Use 


You may provide evidence of language use with your video clip(s) from Task 2 AND/OR through
the student work samples analyzed in Task 3.
Refer to examples from the clip(s) (with time stamps) and/or student work samples as evidence:
-Explain the extent to which your students were able to use language (selected function,
vocabulary, and additional identified demands) to develop content understandings.
Webb’s (1997) DOK model is used to structure the cognitive rigor throughout all components of
the unit as well as the language demands. Examples for this from all three focus students, and
the whole class are as follows:

SP15

Chadd Engel

7

Student 1- Student 1 demonstrates language demand use through level 4 extended thinking of
Webb’s (1997) DOK model by stating where they are going in their next work. This statement is
located on the back of the summative project rubric which can be seen by referencing the
second image in “Student_1_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student
Feedback”.
Student 2- Student 2 demonstrates language demand use through level 4 extended thinking of
Webb’s (1997) DOK model by stating where they are going in their next work. This statement is
located on the back of the summative project rubric which can be seen by referencing the
second image in “Student_1_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student
Feedback”.
Student 3- Student 3 demonstrates language demand use through level 4 extended thinking of
Webb’s (1997) DOK model by stating where they are going in their next work. This statement is
located on the back of the summative project rubric which can be seen by referencing the
second image in “Student_1_Feedback” in the Task 3 folder “Part B-Evidence of Student
Feedback”.
Whole Class- The whole class demonstrated language demands through Webb’s level 4
extended thinking in the closure learning segment of the unit. An exceptional example of this
can seen in video clip #2 from minute 0:00 to 1:50 and minute 4:10 to 6:10. 

Using Assessment to Inform Instruction

a.

Based on your analysis of student learning presented in prompts 1c–d, describe
next steps for instruction
-for the whole class

Whole Class example: The next steps of instruction for the whole class will be to take this newly
learned process of creating 2-point perspectives and applying it to their future works.
-for the 3 focus students and other individuals/groups with specific needs
Student 1- The next steps of instruction for Student 1 will be to take this newly learned art
process of 2-point perspective and apply it to their concentration theme of “human portraiture”.
Additionally, I want this student to take this imaginary world and move away from then
inspiration of “Alice in Wonderland” and start creating their own characters.
Student 2- The next steps of instruction for Student 2 will be for to take this newly learned art
process of 2-point perspective and apply it to their concentration theme of ‘human anatomy".
Additionally, I want this student to explore using gradation as a way finding tool in their
concentration works just like they did in their 2-point perspective project.
Student 3- The next steps of instruction for Student 3 will be will be for to take this newly learned
art process of 2-point perspective and apply it to their concentration theme of “stories of the
universe”. Additionally, I believe this student should create a series of works based around their
2-point perspective work. There is a story within this work and want the student to discover and
tell it.
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support (e.g.,
students with IEPs, English language learners, struggling readers, underperforming students or
those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted students).

SP15

Chadd Engel
b.

8

Explain how these next steps follow from your analysis of student learning.
Support your explanation with principles from research and/or theory.

I believe that these next steps directly follow the formatting and structuring of my units around
Webb’s (1997) DOK model, because the plan for further and continued instruction directly
relates to extended thinking, level 4 of the model. Additionally, I would foster this extended
thinking through pushing students to use their newly learned art process of 2-point perspective
in their concentration works, as well as the other artist techniques they unknowingly discovered
while completing this unit. I believe by continuing to follow the Webb’s (1997) model I can
always expect student success along with plenty of surprises in terms student production,
because the model naturally allows for students to make and develop their own creative
process. This is evident, because as seen in the student work samples, there are no
reproductions of works I showed students, nor of their peers. For an AP Visual Arts class, I could
not be more proud of my students accomplishments, and look forward to their next work.