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Kelsey Mercadante

ELED 533
Formative Assessment Analysis Assignment
Product 1: Assessment Tool and Anticipation
1. Mathematical Focus
a. Third Grade Measurement: Perimeter and Area: Math Connections Unit
2. Learning Objectives (UKDs from Unit Planning Project)
Understand

Know

Do

U1: Students will understand that smaller
parts of area can be used to find the whole
area of a polygon and smaller parts of
perimeter can be used to find the entire
perimeter of a polygon.
U2: Students will understand that
perimeter and area can be used as
measuring tools to help us work efficiently
in our daily lives.
U3: Students will understand that polygons
with the same area can sometimes have
different perimeters.

Vocabulary:
What students will measure:
K1: Polygon- A closed geometric figure
with at least three straight-line segments that
do not cross. (Kid-friendly definition)
(All of the edges are segments, every vertex
is the endpoint of two sides, and no two
sides cross each other. Polygons are
classified according to the number of sides
they have, which equals the number or
vertices.)
K2: Perimeter- measures the distance
around a polygon. Measured in units.
K3: Area- The number of iterations of a
two-dimensional unit needed to cover a
surface.

D1: Students wi
variety of polyg
the sides to dete
polygon.
D2: Students wi
(add) or multiply
of square units n
to determine the
D3: Students wi
that involve area
D4: Students wi
multiplication an

Students will measure perimeter and area
using:
K4: Units- A quantity used as a standard of
measurement. Used for perimeter. (cm, m,
in, ft)
K5: Square units- The unit of measure for
area. (Square cm, square m, square in,
square ft, and improvised units)
K6: Area model- A model for math
problems where the length and width are
configured using multiplication to figure out
the size of an area.
K7: Additive area- Finding areas of straightlined figures by decomposing them into
non-overlapping rectangles and adding the
areas of the non-overlapping parts.
K8: Tools: graph paper, tiles

K9: Symbols: the symbol for square units.

3. Assessment tool: Performance Based Assessment
Name: ___________________________________
Helping Principal Kelly Measure the School Garden
Principal Kelly has decided to turn part of the playground into a
vegetable garden. She has divided the garden into different patches
where she is growing a certain type of vegetable.
The School Vegetable
Garden

1 square unit = 1 foot.
1. How would you measure the area and perimeter of each type of
vegetable patch? How would you measure the perimeter and
area of the entire vegetable garden? Explain and solve your
answer.

2. Estimate the area of the patch of green grass that is beside the
playground. Then, find the perimeter.

1 square unit = 1 foot.

3. Estimate the area of the flower patch that is beside the
playground. Then, find the perimeter.

1 square unit = 1 foot

4. Can polygons with the same area sometimes have different
perimeters? If so, prove it by illustrating an example.

5. How can perimeter and area help us work efficiently in our daily
lives?

4. Anticipatory Mistakes
 Students may not answer every part of the task. For example, they may just find
the total area or the total perimeter, instead of the perimeter and area of each
vegetable patch. Students may forget to explain how they got their answers.
Students may forget to show their work.
 Students may not correctly find the perimeter and area of each of the vegetable
patches and the entire garden. Students may add or multiply incorrectly. If
students choose to count, they may miscount the unit squares.
 Students may get the perimeter and area concepts confused and they may mislabel
them as they show their work and record their answers.
 Students may use the wrong unit of measurement when they write their answers.
For example, they may not remember to put “feet squared or square feet” when
they find the areas.

For question 2 and 3, students may not know how to determine the area of a
triangle or a trapezoid by counting and estimating to find out how many square
units make up the area. Students may not realize that they need to add the unit
square halves to make a whole. Students may not know how to determine the
length of the slant of the triangle and trapezoid. They may add incorrectly for both
perimeter and area, which could cause them to have the incorrect answer.
Students may not have grasped the concept of how polygons with the same area
sometimes have different perimeters. When students answer question 4, they may
answer it wrong by answering “no” to the question. Students may answer “yes”
but they could potentially provide an incorrect example or illustration.
Students may have difficulty applying perimeter and area to a real life task. They
may provide an incorrect example of how they would use perimeter and area in
their daily lives.

5. Anticipatory Strategies
 Students may individually count the unit squares that make up the perimeter of
the rectangles, triangle and trapezoid to measure the distance around the polygon.
 Students may individually count the unit squares that cover the surface of the
rectangles, triangle and trapezoid to measure the area of the polygon.
 Students may cross out or mark off each vegetable patch as they complete finding
the perimeter and area of each of the four vegetable patches.
 Students may multiply to find the area of each vegetable patch as well as the
entire vegetable garden. Students could multiply the length times the width.
Students may write out the length and the width for each rectangle as they solve
to find the area.
 After students find the area of each of the four vegetable patches, students can use
additive area, to find the total area of the garden. Students can add up each of the
four areas to find the total area of the garden.
 When students explain how they got their answers, students can write out the
steps as they solve the problem, or they could solve the problem first, and then go
back to explain the steps they took to solve the problem.
 Students may mark off each square unit, as they count the units in the triangle
patch of green grass and the flower garden trapezoid.
 Students may add up the square unit halves to make a whole square unit when
determining the area of the triangle in question 2 and 3. Students may lastly, add
up the half of a square unit to determine the area of the triangular patch of grass
and the trapezoid flower garden.
 Students may use multiplication to help them provide an example for question 4.
For example: Although they have the same area, a rectangle that is 2 by 6 has a
perimeter of 16; but a rectangle that is 3 by 4 has a perimeter of 14. 2x6 and 3x4
both equal 12. Students may draw pictures to help them provide an example to
answer question 4.
 For question 5, students may use the garden problem as an example to how
perimeter and area can help us work efficiently in our everyday lives. Students
may think of past real world problems they have solved in or outside of school to

help them answer this question. Students may think of a personal experience they
have encountered dealing with perimeter and area that helped them complete a
task efficiently.
6. Justification: Why my assessment tool is an example of a quality assessment.
 My assessment tool is an example of a quality assessment because it permits
every student in the class to demonstrate his or her knowledge, skill, and
understanding of the math unit of perimeter and area. My assessment focuses on
the central math concept of perimeter and area and is aligned with the objectives
that are essential for students to know.
o My assessment is reliable because it will work in a similar fashion every
time it is completed. The questions are straightforward and easy for the
students to understand.
o The assessment is valid because it measures exactly what it says it
measures. It assesses each one of my objectives, relating to the third grade
math SOL 3.10.
o My assessment is efficient for students and teachers because the effort the
student experiences when responding to the task is the same amount of
effort it will take the teacher to assess. The assessment is limited to a few
questions, but still assesses the essential content that the students need to
know.
o The assessment is equitable because there are no biases and everyone is
easily accessible to answering the questions as well as completing the
tasks on the assessment. The provided rubric below allows for the
assessment to be equitable when scoring and providing feedback.
o The assessment tool is seamless because it provides snapshots of student
growth over time. The questions in this assessment integrate many
mathematical concepts that the students will have learned throughout the
whole unit, and the assessment allows for me to see the students apply
their knowledge of each mathematical concept. The pre-assessment, the
many formative assessments throughout the unit, and this performance
based assessment will allow me to see each students’ growth throughout
the entire unit.
o Lastly, this assessment motivates students by encouraging them to explore
the topic of perimeter and area. By asking students to help the principal
with the school garden in question 1, they may find this as a motivating
factor by wanting to take part in a project with the school and help the
principal. Question 2 provides students an opportunity to illustrate their
own example. This will allow students to be creative and apply their
knowledge. Question 3 asks students how they can apply perimeter and
area to their daily lives, which is motivating since it is a question where
they can share a personal experience when they have used perimeter and
area in a real life situation.

7. Performance Based Assessment Rubric
Learning
Objectives

Little
Accomplishment
Unsatisfactory
1

Partial
Accomplishment
Marginal
2

Substantial
Accomplishment
Adequate
3

Full
Accomplishment
Excellent
4

U1: Students will
understand that
smaller parts of
area can be used
to find the whole
area of a polygon
and smaller parts
of perimeter can
be used to find the
entire perimeter of
a polygon.

Shows some effort
but little or no
understanding of
how multiplication
and addition can be
used to determine
the measurement
of a polygon and
how it is a partpart whole
relationship.

Uses some aspects
of multiplication or
addition but fails to
illustrate an
understanding of
how they can be
used to determine
the perimeter and
area of a polygon.
Shows evidence
that he or she does
not understand how
addition or
multiplication is
connected to
determining
perimeter and area
and how it is a partpart-whole
relationship.

Determines the
correct answer by
using an approach
that uses addition
or multiplication
as a part-part
whole relationship.
Would yield a
correct answer if
not for minor
errors.
Explanations and
reasoning are
weak.

Students will
understand that
perimeter and area
can be used as
measuring tools to
help us work
efficiently in our
daily lives.

Shows some effort
but little or no
understanding of
how perimeter and
area help us work
efficiently in our
daily lives.

Provides some
points that are
partially related to
the concept of
perimeter and area,
but fails to illustrate
an understanding of
how perimeter and
area can be used to
help us work
efficiently in our
daily lives. Shoes
evidence that he or
she does not
understand how
perimeter and area
can be used to help

Determines a
correct answer or
example that
would yield a
correct answer if
not for the minor
errors.
Explanations are
reasoning are
weak.

Determines the
correct answers
to every part of
the problem.
Uses words,
pictures, and
numbers to
explain and
justify the result
and how it is
obtained.
Demonstrates
knowledge of
how
multiplication
and addition can
be used to
determine the
measurement of
a polygon and
how it is a partpart whole
relationship.
Determines a
correct answer or
example of how
perimeter and
area can be used
as measuring
tools to help us
work efficiently
in our daily
lives. Provides a
clear explanation
that
demonstrates
their
understanding of
how perimeter
and area can be

Students will
understand that
polygons with the
same area can
sometimes have
different
perimeters.

Shows some effort
but little or no
understanding of
the relationship
between perimeter
and area. Does not
show evidence of
understanding how
polygons with the
same area can
sometimes have
different
perimeters.

Students will
measure each side
of a polygon and
add the measures
of the sides to
determine the
perimeter of the
polygon.

Shows some effort
but little or no
understanding of
how to measure the
perimeter of a
polygon.

Students will
estimate and then
count or multiply
to determine the
number of square
units needed to
cover the surface
to determine the
area of a given
surface.
Students will use

us in our daily
lives.
Provides some
points that are
partially related to
the concept of the
relationship
between perimeter
and area but fails to
illustrate an
understanding of
how polygons with
the same area can
sometimes have
different
perimeters.

Uses some aspects
of measuring
perimeter, but fails
to illustrate an
understanding of
how to determine
the perimeter of a
polygon. Shows
evidence that he or
she does not
understand how to
find the perimeter
of a polygon.
Shows some effort Uses some aspects
but little or no
of measuring area,
understanding of
but fails to illustrate
how to measure the an understanding of
area of a polygon.
how to determine
the area of a
polygon. Shows
evidence that he or
she does not
understand how to
estimate or find the

Determines a
correct answer that
would yield a
correct answer if
not for minor
errors.
Explanations and
reasoning are
weak.

Determines a
correct answer that
would yield a
correct answer if
not for minor
errors.

Determines a
correct answer that
would yield a
correct answer if
not for minor
errors.

used to help us
with daily tasks.
Determines a
correct answer
that
demonstrates the
understanding
that polygons
with the same
area can
sometimes have
different
perimeters.
Provides a
correct example
that illustrates
the relationship
between
perimeter and
area. Provides an
overall clear
explanation.
Determines the
correct answers
to every part of
the problem,
which shows that
he or she can
measure a
polygon to
determine the
perimeter.

Determines the
correct answers
to every part of
the problem,
which shows that
he or she can
estimate and
measure a
polygon to
determine the
area. The answer

square units in
their answer.
(Example: 45
units squared or
45 feet squared)

area of a polygon.

contained square
units.