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Kelsey Mercadante

Unit Plan Phase 3
Unit Scope & Sequence
Week 1
Math
(1
hour)

Lesson Topic/
Essential
Question

Unit Learning
Objectives
Addressed
Math Task(s)

Monday
Relating
perimeter and
area to the real
world- Spaghetti
& Meatballs for
All!
U2, U3, K2, K3,
D3, D4, D5, D6,
D7
 Do Graffiti
activity to
activate prior
knowledge.
 Read the
book,
Spaghetti and
Meatball for
All by Marilyn
Burns.
Discuss the
problems
faced during
the family
reunion in the
book. Review
the facts

Tuesday

Wednesday

Experimenting
with Polygons

Comparing
lengths of
rectanglesFocusing on
Perimeter

K1

Give students
an assortment
of shapes on
cards.
Students will
sort the
shapes into 2
categories
based on
characteristic
s/ attributes
they see.
Students will
end up
coming up
with 2
categories.

Thursday

Friday
Perimeter
Practice

U2, K2

Comparing and
exploring
perimeter by
using physical
models of
standard units.
K2, K8, D1


Have students
participate in a
classroom walk
around the
border of the
room and use
their hands to
explore the
borders of their
desk to
discover the
concept of
perimeter.
Go over the
meaning of
perimeter.
Give students

Go over unit
tiles and
explain how
each tile = I
square unit.
Explain how
we can use
the sides of
tiles to
measure
perimeter.
Centers:
 1. Have
students use
tiles to
compare the
perimeter of 2

K1, K2, K4, D1
Perimeter
Peel and
Pinch Activity
with Sliced
Bread.
Students take
crust off of
bread and
measure
crust to find
perimeter
using a tape
measure.
Emphasize
the shape of
the bread
(rectangular).

presented in
the book. Ask
students
questions
about the
book.
Re-read the
book while
each student
has 8 tiles
(representing
the amount of
tables the
family in the
book has)
that they can
manipulate as
we read the
story.
Students
rearrange the
tiles each
time
company
comes and
records data,
while the
teacher
models and
records the
process on
the doc cam.
The perimeter

Have students
explain their 2
categories
with a partner
and explain
how they
chose to sort
them.
Tell students
that half of
the shapes
they sorted
are called
polygons. The
other halves
are not
polygons. Sort
the shapes on
the doc cam
as a class and
have students
check their
work.
Ask students
from sorting
based on
certain
attributes, if
they can
come up with
a definition of
a polygon. Go
over definition

a
mathematical
task of
comparing
lengths of dog
pens for
different size
dogs using
direct
comparison.
Describe what
a dog pen is.
Give visuals to
support
students who
may not know
what a dog pen
is.
Give each
student at
least 4
different sized
pictures of dog
pens with a
different size
dog in it,
according to
pen size. Have
students order
the dog pens in
order from
least to
greatest

different
books. Have
them find the
perimeter of
the book with
largest
perimeter and
record. Then
have them
record the
other book’s
perimeter.
Lastly, have
them subtract
so they can
find the
difference of
the two books.
2. Tile Task:
Have students
use 8 color
tiles to find
how many
shapes they
can make with
a different
perimeter.
3. Pentomino
Task: Have
students find
the perimeter
for each
pentomino.

Tell students
how this
matches the
way you find
perimeter of
a rectangle.
Perimeter is
here, there,
everywhere:
Use tape to
craft 7 large
polygons on
floor in
classroom.
Mark each
side with a
letter.
Working in
groups,
students will
use
yardsticks
and tape
measures to
record the
length of
each side,
and then add
them
together.
Students will
record in
math

and area of
each
arrangement
will be
recorded.
Ask, “ How
can you seat
12, 16, 24,
etc. people?”
Ask students
if they have
ever
experienced
perimeter and
area
situations like
this one, in
real life?
Ask students
to come up
with
examples in a
think-pairshare, of how
perimeter and
area can be
used as
measuring
tools to help
us work
efficiently in
our daily lives
(Perimeter:

as a class.
Show the
class an
enlarged set
of cards. Hold
up one card at
a time and
have students
explain
whether the
figure on the
card is or is
not a polygon.
Students will
recognize
objects that
are polygons
around the
classroom and
in real life.
Direct
students to
draw a
polygon on a
piece of
paper. Have
them explain
in writing
their own
definition of a
polygon. Have
students
share their

perimeter.
Go over order
of dog pen
perimeters as
a class.

Have them
arrange 2
pentominos
together to
create a shape
with the
smallest
perimeter
possible. They
can draw a
picture of that
shape and
record the
perimeter.
Then students
will use 2
pentominos to
relate a shape
with the
largest
perimeter
possible
(conceptual
understanding
of perimeter).
4. Estimate
then Measure
Task: Students
estimate the
perimeter and
then count the
perimeter of
the shape

journals. After
measuring
the floor
polygons,
students
move about
the room
measuring
perimeter of
everyday
items such as
rugs, cabinet
doors, desks,
etc., as they
record
measurement
s of items in
their math
journals.
Describe how
units are
smaller
measures if
you use more
of them
(inverse
relationship)
– students
can compare
a centimeter
ruler to an
inch ruler.

Week 2
Math
(1
hour)

Lesson Topic/
Essential
Question

fencing,
frames,
distance
around room,
dog pen,
soccer field,
etc; area:
carpet, paint,
wallpaper,
wrapping a
present tile,
inside of a
garden, etc.)
Tell students
to go home
and ask their
parent’s
if/how they
use perimeter
and area, or
other
measurement
in their job.

work with a
partner.

using tiles.
Students will
complete a
tile
measurement
data sheet.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Perimeter
Benchmarks and
Formula

Comparing areas
of rectangles

Experimenting
with Area and
comparing area of

Exploring area by
using physical
models of

Friday
Relating
Perimeter to
Area

Unit Learning
Objectives
Addressed
Math Task(s)

K2, D6

K3

Ask students
to come up
with personal
benchmarks
they can use
for estimating
the length.
(Something
on body,
fingers, foot).
Have them fill
out graphic
organizer so
they can have
benchmarks
to remember.
Have
students
generate
ways that
perimeter
problems can
be solved.
Discuss the
formula P=
1+w+l+w.
There’s an


Graffiti
activity
involving
area.
Go over
meaning of
area.
Students will
order
rectangles
from least to
greatest by
size using
direct
comparison.
Students will
compare the
sizes of
rectangles by
cutting and
reconfiguring
them.

other polygons

standard units

K1, K3

K5, K9, D2

U3, D1, D2

Activity 16.7:
Two-Piece
Shapes (p.
324-325) –
discuss how
different
shapes can
have the same
area.
Activity 16.8
Tangram
Areas- have
students
compare the
area of
polygons made
of tangram
pieces.
Read
Grandfather
Tang’s Story
(Tompert,
1997) for
additional
investigations.
Ask Students if
all of the

Discuss how
square units
are used to
measure area.
Discuss how
when
providing an
answer for
area, the unit
is always
squared. Show
students the
symbol (2) for
square units.
Have students
explore using
physical
models of
standard units
by practicing
unit iteration
by having
them measure
the area of a
large polygon
drawn with
tape on the



Have
students
watch Brain
pop videos
on Area and
Perimeter.
Ask students
how
perimeter is
related to
area.
Activity
16.11: Fixed
Perimeters
Activity 16.12
Fixed Areas
Have
students cut
out all of the
figures. Label
2 charts on
board with
“perimeter”
and “area”
and have
teams come
up and place

alternative
formula of 2
(l+w).
Discuss how
perimeter is
related to
addition.
Do perimeter
word
problems.

animals are the
same area.


floor. Units
can be
cardstock
squares of the
same size.
Activity 16.9:
Cover and
Compare
Discuss
differences of
measures that
the groups got
when
completing
this activity
since
estimation
was involved.
Activity 16.10:
Rectangle
Comparison –
Square units.

their figures
from the
shortest
perimeter (or
area) to the
largest
perimeter (or
area) on the
appropriate
chart. Ask
students to
state what
they observe
and draw
conclusions.
Students will
find out that
rectangles
having the
same areas
do not
necessarily
have the
same
perimeters,
and viceversa.
(Explain how
its not
restricted to
rectangles).
Students will
notice an

interesting
relationship

Week 3
Math
(1
hour)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Additive Area,
decomposing and
composing
polygons and
estimating area
U1, K7, D2, D4, D7

Working with
more polygons to
estimate area

Additive Area

U1, K7, D2, D4,
D7

U1, U2, K2, K3,
K5, K7, K8, K9,
D1, D2, D3, D4,
D5, D6, D7
 Dream
House: An
Additive Area
Project –
students will
outline their
dream house
on graph
paper. They
will
decompose
the shape/
partition their
house into
rooms. They
will then find
and record

Lesson Topic/
Essential
Question

Strategies for
finding Area

Additive Area and
decomposing and
composing
polygons

Unit Learning
Objectives
Addressed

K3, D2, D4, D5,
D7

U1, K7, D2, D4,
D5, D7

Math Task(s)

Show the
class a
picture of a
polygon on
graph paper
on the doc
cam. Ask how
they would
find the area
of the
polygon.
Have
students write
their
explanation in
their math
journal. Have

Show
students a
shape that
has to be
decomposed
to find area.
Ask students
how you
would find the
area of this
shape. Tell
students to do
a think-pairshare. Have a
student come
to the doc
cam to show

Students will
decompose
shapes to find
the area of the
entire shape.
Crazy Cakes
Activity –
students will
work in pairs to
divide shapes
into two parts
of equal area.
Have students
share their
crazy cakes
and have them
justify their

Students will
decompose
shapes to find
the area of the
entire shape.
Address
parallelogram
s, hexagons,
and octagons.
Students will
estimate the
area of these
polygons
using graph
paper.

Friday

them share
their
strategies.
Discuss the
strategies
students
came up with.
Discuss how
you can find
the area of a
polygon by
counting the
units that fill
up the space
inside the
polygon, or
discuss how
you can
multiply the
sides to find
the area.- Ask
students,
“How is
multiplication
and area
related?”
Show
students an
example of an
area model
and show
students how
to use it.

what they
would do.
Show
students area
is additive by
decomposing
the shape
together as a
class, and
finding the
area of each
of the
decomposed
shapes. Then,
add up the
areas of the
decomposed
shapes to find
the entire
area of the
shape.
Address
triangles,
trapezoids,
and a
pentagon.
Show
students how
they can
estimate to
find area of
these shapes
on graph

answers.
Address
triangles,
trapezoids, and
a pentagon.
Students will
estimate the
area of these
shapes on
graph paper.

the area and
perimeter of
each room.
Lastly, They
will add the
area of all of
the rooms to
find the total
area and
then they will
find the
perimeter of
the entire
house.

(Arrays).
Have
students
create their
own area
models/arrays
.
Some
students may
multiply as a
strategy for
finding area.
They may
come up with
a formula
(A=L X W) or
A= b X H).

paper.


Week 4
Math
(1
hour)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday
Toilet Paper Math
Challenge and
Performance
Based
Assessment
U1, U2, U3, K1,
K2, K3, K4, K5,
K6, K7, K8, K9,
D1, D2, D3, D4,
D5, D6, D7
 Students will
complete

Lesson Topic/
Essential
Question

Additive Area

Perimeter and
Area Math
Centers

Bringing it Home:
The Culminating
Project

Bringing it Home:
The Culminating
Project

Unit Learning
Objectives
Addressed

U1, U2, K2, K3,
K5, K7, K8, K9,
D1, D2, D3, D4,
D5, D6, D7

D5, D6

Math Task(s)

U1, U2, U3, K1,
K2, K3, K4, K5, K6,
K7, K8, K9, D1,
D2, D3, D4, D5,
D6, D7
 Have students
create an area

U1, U2, U3, K1,
K2, K3, K4, K5,
K6, K7, K8, K9,
D1, D2, D3, D4,
D5, D6, D7
 Have students
complete the

Students will
continue and

1. Area Dice
Game: Each

finish working
on their
Dream House
from
yesterday.

player
chooses a
colored
pencil. Players
take turns
rolling the
dice; using
the numbers
they roll to
draw the
perimeter of a
rectangle or
square and
writing the
area in the
middle of the
shape. Game
ends when
players run
out of room to
draw. Winner
is player who
has used the
largest
area/most
squares.
2. Estimation
Station:
Students will
estimate the
perimeter and
area of
polygons

and perimeter
neighborhood.
Print and copy
square-inch
grids onto
construction
paper of
different
colors. After a
bit of
modeling,
students select
four different
colors to create
the house,
roof, door, and
windows.
Drawing their
polygons and
cutting and
fitting them
together into a
house shape.
Students will
calculate area
and perimeter
of each.
Completed
houses will be
displayed on a
bulletin board
along with a
sheet that lists

“Bringing it
Home,”
Neighborhood
project from
yesterday.

performancebased
assessment.
Toilet Paper
Math
Challenge:
Students will
be divided
into groups
and complete
task: What is
the largest
area and
longest
perimeter
your group
can make
using only
one roll of
toilet paper?
(Each toilet
paper strip
must touch
another toilet
paper strip)

(rectangles,
triangles,
trapezoids,
parallelogram
s, pentagons,
hexagons,
and octagons)
using graph
paper.
3. Area and
Perimeter
Names: Use
centimeter
graph paper
to write your
name. Next,
find the area
and perimeter
of your entire
name.
4. Perimeter
and Area
computer
games!
Students will
be provided
laptops and
they will play
perimeter and
area games
from a list of
provided
online links.

their name, the
area and
perimeter, and
their favorite
part of the
project.
Extension:
Have students
design trees
for the display.

Measurement Learning Progressions
Length
Make Comparisons
 Describe measureable attributes
 Direct comparison and seriation
Use physical models of standard units
 In direct comparison and unit iteration with manipulative standard units and standard rulers
Use measuring instruments
 Personal benchmarks for estimating
 Units of units within and across systems
Area
Make Comparisons
 Describe measureable attributes
 Direct comparison
Use physical models of standard units
 Spatial structuring as unit iteration with manipulative standard units
Use measuring instruments
 Mental visual image for spatial structuring
 Relate perimeter and area
 Abstract and use formulas

Justification using Learning Progressions
Justify both what you chose to include (the scope) and the order you chose to teach it in (the sequence) using
content and or process learning progressions.
Measurement Learning Progressions Justification: I chose to have students compete Graffiti activities and sort
polygons and other shapes to have them describe measureable attributes. I had students compare perimeters to
allow them to practice direct comparison and seriation. I then had them use physical models of standard units (tiles

that are 1 inch) to measure the perimeter of polygons and use indirect comparison and unit iteration. Students then
will use rulers, yard sticks, etc. to measure perimeter in order to use physical models. I described to students how
units are smaller measures if you use more of them in order for them to see the inverse relationship between size of
the unit and number of units. They can see this by comparing a centimeter ruler to an inch ruler. I had students
create personal benchmarks for estimating by allowing them to complete a graphic organizer of benchmarks they
can use for personal estimations that are relatable to them. For area, I had students complete a graffiti activity to
describe measureable attributes. I then had them compare the sizes of multiple rectangles and other polygons so
they could experience direct comparison. I then had students use physical models of standard units to experiment
with unit iteration. Students used square tiles to measure the area of polygons. Students experienced mental visual
image for spatial structuring when engaging in the activities in the Math book by Van de Walle. I then had students
complete two activities on fixed perimeter and area so they would be able to relate perimeter and area. Lastly, I had
students come up with strategies to find the area of a polygon. This allows students to think abstractly and come up
with formulas, if they choose to do so. I introduced and then had students experience using additive area to allow
them to see how shapes can be decomposed and composed. This is also important because it allows students to see
that smaller parts of area can be used to find the whole area of a polygon and smaller parts of perimeter can be
used to find the entire perimeter of a polygon. Seeing how perimeter and area can be related or used in the real
world is a step farther I wanted to take; therefore, I wanted to dedicate a day to relating area and perimeter to realworld applications. This also allowed students to connect perimeter and area to literature as we red the book,
Spaghetti and Meatballs For All. Solving real life problems involving perimeter and area will be beneficial to students,
as they grow older. At the end of the unit, I wanted to engage students in a fun creation that involved creativity. I
decided to have students create a house (pentagon) to go in a class neighborhood that I would put up on our class
bulletin board. This project brought all of the material the children have been learning, together. For the last day of
the unit, I wanted to have students complete the performance-based assessment, that they completed as a preassessment, so I can see how much they have learned from the beginning to the end of the unit. It would be great to
see progress from every student! For a fun and critical thinking challenge, I wanted to engage students in a toilet
paper challenge to conclude the unit in a fun and challenging way.
Unit Learning Progressions Justification: As I planned my unit, I followed the unit learning progressions. I started my
unit (2 weeks before my unit actually stated) by giving my students my performance-based assessment that was a
high cognitive demand task. It had a high mathematical ceiling and a low mathematical floor. My lesson on the first
day of my unit (The Spaghetti and Meatballs for All lesson) was a lesson for developing the students’ conceptual
understanding. It is a great lesson to have at the beginning of the unit because it has student’s relate perimeter and
area to the real world. The lesson was a high cognitive task and it was perfect for developing conceptual

understanding. Throughout my unit, I provided a variety of strategic competence lessons, so students could develop
strategies for finding perimeter and area. Toward the end of the perimeter and area concepts, I provided students
with procedural fluency practice by implementing lessons that involved math centers. The math centers had
perimeter and area games and activities where students could practice their fluency with perimeter and area.