Unit Plan Phase 4: 2 Lessons from the Unit

ELED 533 LESSON PLAN FORMAT – Two Lessons from Unit Planning Project
JMU Elementary Education Program

Lesson #1
A. Spaghetti and Meatball for All! (Week 1, Day 1)
B. Standards
Standard 3:10 – Strand: Measurement
The student will
a) measure the distance around a polygon in order to determine perimeter; and
b) count the number of square units needed to cover a given surface in order to determine area.
English
Oral Language
Standard 3.1
The student will use effective communication skills in group activities
b) Ask and respond to questions from teachers and other group members
c) Explain what has been learned.
d) Use language appropriate context.
e) Increase listening and speaking vocabularies.
Reading
Standard 3.4
The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
e) Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by listening and reading text
f) Use vocabulary from other content areas.
Standard 3.5
The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional text
b) Make connections between previous experiences and reading selections
f) Ask and answer questions about what is read.
h) Identify the problem and the solution.

Process/Practice Standards: (Common Core Standards)
Grade 3 - Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.MD.C.5
Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.
Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.MD.D.8
Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given
the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different
areas or with the same area and different perimeters
C. LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand – what are the broad
generalizations/concepts the students
should begin to develop? (These are
typically difficult to assess in one
lesson.)
U2: Students will understand that
perimeter and area can be used as
measuring tools to help us work
efficiently in our daily lives.
U3: Students will understand that
polygons with the same area can
sometimes have different perimeters.

Know – what are the tools,
vocabulary, symbols, etc. the
students will gain through this lesson?
(These “knows” must be assessed in
your lesson.)
K2: Perimeter- measures the distance
around a polygon. Measured in units.
K3: Area- The number of iterations of
a two-dimensional units needed to
cover a surface.

Do – what are the specific thinking
behaviors/procedures students will be
able to do through this lesson? (These
will also be assessed in your lesson.)
D1: Students will measure each side of
a variety of polygons and add the
measures of the sides to determine
the perimeter of each polygon.
D2: Students will estimate and then
count the number of square units
needed to cover the surface to
determine the area of a given surface.
D3: Students will solve real life
problems that involve area and
perimeter.
D4: Students will relate area to
operations of multiplication and
addition.

D. ASSESSING LEARNING
 Remember – every objective must be assessed for every student during the lessons!
Objective

Assessment Tool
What documentation will you have for each
student?

Data Collected
What will your students do and say,
specifically, that indicate each student has
achieved your objectives?

U2: Students will understand that
perimeter and area can be used as
measuring tools to help us work
efficiently in our daily lives.

Student Monitoring Chart: I will make
note of any verbal student responses
the students give when they are asked
how perimeter and area can be used
in the real world during a think-pairshare. Students’ homework activity
also relates to this question. Students
will come back to school with
responses in their math journals. I will
collect math journals to see student
responses.

I will ask students how perimeter and
area can help us in our everyday lives
during a think-pair-share. I will walk
around the classroom as students
discuss content. I will check off or
right notes by students’ names if I
hear appropriate responses such as:
Perimeter: fencing, frames, distance
around room, dog pen, soccer field,
etc.; Area: carpet, paint, wallpaper,
wrapping a present, tile, inside of a
garden, etc.) Some students may say
that finding the perimeter and area of
things can save you money! Ex.
Buying the right amount of fencing or
carpeting will save you money and
time. You should find the perimeter or
area of something before buying a
certain amount of material for it. I will
look for the above type of responses
when I look at student’s homework
too. I will also look at jobs carpenter,
architect, etc.

U3: Students will understand that

Math Journals: Students will respond to

Students will say that polygons with

polygons with the same area can
sometimes have different perimeters.

the question, “If polygons have the
same area, do they always have the
same perimeter?” in their math
journals. After class, I will collect math
journals to see student responses.
Student Monitoring Chart: I will also
walk around the room while students
respond to this question in their
journals. I will make note of which
students get it and which do not. I will
look to see who is explaining with
words and who is explaining by using
pictures.

K2: Perimeter- measures the distance
around a polygon. Measured in units.

Student Monitoring Chart: I will listen
in on student discussions. I will make
note of who does and who doesn’t
know what perimeter is.

K3: Area- The number of iterations of
two-dimensional units needed to
cover a surface.

Student Monitoring Chart: I will listen
in on student discussions. I will make
note of who does and who doesn’t
know what area is.

D1: Students will measure each side
of a variety of polygons and add the
measures of the sides to determine
the perimeter of each polygon.

Math Journals: Students will show work
in their math journals.
Seating Chart: Students will write
perimeter for each table on seating
chart.
Student Monitoring Chart: I will

the same area sometimes have
different perimeters. In their math
journals students should provide a
written explanation of how some
polygons have the same area, but
different perimeters. Students can
provide a numerical example in their
explanation (2 by 5 rectangle and a 1
by 10 rectangle have the same area,
but different perimeter) or students
can provide a visual representation by
drawing a 2 by 5 rectangle and a 10
by 1 rectangle, and describing how
they have the same area but different
perimeters. Students may provide
both a visual and written explanation.
During think-pair-share I will walk
around the room and I will hear for
students saying something along the
lines of: “Perimeter is the distance
around a shape.”
During think-pair-share I will walk
around the room and I will hear for
students saying something along the
lines of: “Area is number of iterations
of two-dimensional units needed to
cover a surface.”
I will look to see if students have the
correct perimeters in the seating
chart. I will observe to see if students
are adding to find the perimeter.

D2: Students will estimate and then
count the number of square units
needed to cover the surface to
determine the area of a given surface.

D3: Students will solve real life
problems that involve area and
perimeter.

D4: Students will relate area to
operations of multiplication and
addition.

E. MATERIALS NEEDED

observe students finding the
perimeter of the tables.
Math Journals: Any work students did
would be in their math journals or their
seating chart worksheet – which I will
both collect.
Seating Chart: Student will find the
area for each table
Student Monitoring Chart: I will
observe when students are working
and finding the area of the tables.
Math Journals: Students will solve a
real life problem in their math journals.
Student Monitoring Chart: While
students arrange the square tile
manipulatives, or draw in their
notebooks, I will make note of how
students are solving the problem.
Math Journals: Any work students did
would be in their math journals or their
seating chart worksheet – which I will
both collect. If I see students using
addition or multiplication, then I know
they related the operations to area
and perimeter.
Student Monitoring Chart: I will
observe when students are working
and see who is relating perimeter and
area to multiplication and addition.

I will look to see if students have the
correct areas in the seating chart. I
will observe to see if students are
adding or multiplying to find the area.

Students will rearrange tables and fit
guests around the tables to solve the
problems= of seating guests. I will
look to see if students are using
manipulatives or drawing. I will look to
see students filling out the perimeter
and area of the tables on their
worksheet.
Students will use multiplication or
addition when finding out the area.
Students will use addition when
finding out the perimeter. Students
may use multiplication when
answering the essential question.
Students may try to find factors and a
multiple to justify the answer.






Book: Spaghetti and Meatballs For All By: Marilyn Burns
Math Journals
Small square tiles for each student
Doc cam with square tile manipulatives
Student copies of seating chart worksheet
Pencils
G1

ANTICIPATION OF STUDENTS’ MATHEMATICAL RESPONSES TO THE TASK(S) POSED IN THE PROCEDURE
PORTION OF THE LESSON

Essential Question: If polygons have the same area, do they always have the same perimeter?
1. Students may have said yes. These students may try out drawings or math problems to figure this out, but
they may not find numbers or pictures that help them answer this question; therefore, they may think that the
answer to this question is yes.
2. Students may just guess, and say yes. Their explanation may fail to explain their thinking.
3. Students may have said no.
a. Some students may provide a picture to illustrate with square units how there can be two shapes that
have the same area, but different perimeter
b. Some students may explain their answer by describing their explanation by using words only.
c. Some students may support their answer by providing a picture/drawing and written out explanation of
what they think.
d. Some students might use multiplication/factors/multiples to find out the answer. Ex. 2 X 10 rectangle,
and a 4 X 5 rectangle have the same area (20), but different perimeter. The students could think of a
multiple (20) and they could think about factors that would make 20, to find two shapes that have the
area of 20, but different perimeters.
e. Some students could use trial and error to see if they can draw 2 polygons with the same area but
different perimeter.
f. Some students may have drawn their own boxes, and some students may have used graph paper.
4. Some students might say yes or no, and provide no explanation.
During the Reading: Arranging of the tables: Students will arrange tables throughout the story as they listen.
1. Some students may have a hard time following along with the story and moving the tables. I will make sure to
read slow and give students time.

2.
3.
4.
5.

Some students may choose to move the square tiles by hand during the story
Some students may choose to draw the tables during the story
Students can add or count to find perimeter of table
Students can count of multiply to find the area of the table

I will pick 2-3 students to come up to the doc cam to share their responses to the essential question (based on levels
of representation (concret, semi-concrete, or abstract). I will have a sequence of presenters (concrete -> semiconcrete -> abstract)
1. Students may have a hard time explaining how they solved/ answered the question. Students may not have a
hard time writing or drawing their thoughts down on paper, but they may have a hard time explaining their
work aloud. If students have a hard time explaining their work, I will ask them specific questions such as:
a. “I notice you changed your answer. Why? What were you thinking?
b. “How do the pictures show your thinking?”
c. “What did you try first?”
d. “What challenged you?”
Extension: Use the tiles to investigate similar problems by changing the number of people that are seated or the
amount of tables used. Ask students, “How would you seat 12, 16, 24 people?” (Students will have a choice of what
number they want to work with).
1. Students can us square tile manipulatives
2. Students can draw the tables
3. Students can use addition when adding the number of guests. Students can use addition when finding
perimeter
4. Students can count to find area
5. Students can multiply to find area
6. Students can arrange tables however they want, as long as it will seat the right amount of people.

G2

PROCEDURE

Include a DETAILED description of each step, including how you will get the students’ attention, your introduction
of the activity, the directions you will give students, the questions you will ask, and appropriate closure. Write
exactly what you will SAY and DO. Think of this as a script.
BEFORE: Engagement
Introduction: Today, we are going to help someone prepare for a Spaghetti and Meatball dinner!
 Put essential question on the board: If polygons have the same area, do they always have the same
perimeter?
A. Tell students to make their prediction to this question in their math journals. Tell students they can
draw a picture to help them illustrate their answer. Students have a choice or answering his question
in writing, or drawing a picture or both) Tell students that we are going find an answer to this question
today, to see if their prediction was right or wrong!
B. Provide graph paper, so students can use it to help them at anytime in the lesson.
 Activate Prior Knowledge:
A. Graffiti Activity to activate prior knowledge about area and perimeter
B. Let’s do a think-pair share about perimeter and area! Discuss what each term means with a partner.
Allow students to share their answers. Clarify any misconceptions.
 Be sure the task is understood:
A. Tell students that we are going to read a book that will help us find an answer to our essential
question. Introduce the book to the class and explain how Mrs. Comfort (the character in the book)
needs some help from them. Tell the students that you are going to read the book to them once. Tell
them to really listen to Mrs. Comfort’s situation, so they can begin to think about how to help her. Tell
students that when you read the book to them, they are to just listen.
 Establish Clear Expectations for reading:
A. When I’m reading, listen carefully. Keep your hands to your self. Be silent so everyone can listen. Raise
your hand if you have a question. Raise your hand if you want to answer a question I ask.
 Read the story once to set the context. But, STOP at the next to last page.
 Discuss the problems Mr. and Mrs. Comfort face during their family reunion. Review the facts presented in
the book:
A. 32 people are coming to the reunion
B. Mrs. Comfort has ordered 8 square tables for the guests.
C. As the guests arrive, tables are rearranged to accommodate seating.

D. With each new arrangement, Mrs. Comfort says, “But that won’t work!” until she finally gives up!
Ask students, “Why does Mrs. Comfort keep saying, “But that doesn’t work?” How does she know that their
arrangements are wrong? Allow students to discuss their observations from the book and explain their
reasoning’s for Mrs. Comfort’s skepticism.
 Have the students re-read their math journal entries, and respond to the same question again (If polygons
have the same area, do they always have the same perimeter?). Encourage them to draw examples from the
book to help explain and adjust their answers. b) Ask them to predict how the story will end. Review the
present arrangement of tables (4 arrangements of 2 tables each) and ask them to write a solution or ending
to the story in their journals.
 Establish Clear Expectations:
A. You will be given the problem. You will be given a choice of using either the square manipulatives or
drawing pictures.
B. If you get 8 square tiles (the amount of tables they have in the book) you can rearrange the tiles
according to the table arrangements. Or, you can choose to draw instead. With each arrangement,
record the guests seated, the table arrangement, the perimeter, and the areas of the tables on the
Seating Chart worksheet (hand out seating chart worksheet to each student).
C. Rearrange your square tiles or draw the new arrangements each time more company comes and
record the data on your worksheet, while I model and record the process on the doc cam.

DURING: Implementation
Let go!
A. Ask students the anchor problem from the book: There are 32 people and 8 square tables – how many
arrangements will work?
B. Give students time to explore the question. Students will either choose to draw the table
arrangements or use the tile manipulatives to help them solve the problem.
Notice children’s mathematical thinking
C. Observe students as they rearrange the tiles or draw pictures of the tables. Observe manipulation of
tiles and record notes on student monitoring sheet.
Provide appropriate support
D. Provide support of student choice/interest by having students use tiles or draw tables.
E. Provide support to students by allowing them to look back at parts in the book if they need more
support.
F. Questions for students to answer:

a.
b.

“What is happening to the perimeter, each time the seats are changed?”
“How do you think Mrs. Comfort’s problem will be solved?” Just when she is ready to give up,
what do they think will happen next in the story?
c. With each arrangement, record the guests seated, the table arrangement, the perimeter, and
the areas of the tables on the Seating Chart worksheet (hand out seating chart worksheet to
each student).
G. Tell students to talk to each other about the size of each arrangement and the number of people the
new arrangement seats.
H. Allow students to adjust the solutions entered in their math journals earlier.
Provide worthwhile extensions:
I. Have students use the tiles to investigate similar problems by changing the number of people that are
seated or the amount of tables used
J. Ask students, “How would you seat 12, 16, or 24 people?” (Students will have a choice of what number
they want to work with)
K. Challenge students, “What if you only had tables that were pentagonal that only seat 5 people per a
table (show students a pentagon shape). Explain how you would seat 30 relatives.
L. Challenge students by allowing them to pick other shaped tables that each seat a certain amount of
people (ex. triangle -3, hexagon- 6) and have them come up with table arrangements for each shaped
table for a certain amount of guests that need to be seated. Students can find out ways to rearrange
tables to seat their guests/relatives.
AFTER: Engage the class in full discussion
Promote a community of learners:
1. Show the different arrangements on the overhead after students have had time to explore and the teacher
has had time to observe manipulation of tiles.
2. Read the last page of Spaghetti and Meatballs For All by Marilyn Burns. Discuss with students whether their
predictions were correct.
3. After completing the Seating Chart and reading the solution, have students return to their math journals and
re-answer the question from Session I: -If polygons have the same area, do they always have the same
perimeter? Explain your answer. Encourage students to draw examples from their observations today to
support and adjust their ideas.
4. I will tell students that I’m going to select a couple of students to come up to the front of the room to share
with the class their journal responses to - If polygons have the same area, do they always have the same

perimeter? Explain your answer. - I will tell students to respect others as they share their work.
5. I will pick 2-3 students who had different journal responses to come up to the doc cam to share their work.
This way, students can see how different students answered the question and how they came to the answer
of the question, differently.
a. I will first pick a student who answered the question wrong the first time, but then changed his/her
answer as he/she completed the class activity. This student will be able to explain the change in
his/her thinking and why it changed.
b. The second person I will pick will have had the correct answer the first time, and then he/she would
have expanded his/her knowledge by completing the class activity. This person may have expanded
and made his answer more detailed each time. This student will be able to explain why he/she got the
question right in the first place as he/she explained their thinking, and then how he/she expanded
their responses from what they learned in class.
c. Have students share in an appropriate sequence: Consider the levels of representation learning
progressions the students use (concrete, semi-concrete, and abstract). *Choose a person who
explained by just using simple pictures first with no explanation (concrete). Then pick a person who
explained using just words and pictures who explained fully (abstract). If you have time for a third
person, select a student who had a semi-concrete response, but have them share before the abstract
student. This progression will go from more concrete examples, to more abstract, so students can see
the different ways of thinking and solving questions/problems.
6. Encourage other students to ask questions.
7. Prompt students with questions if they do not know what to say:
a. “I notice you changed your answer. Why? What were you thinking?
b. “How do the pictures show your thinking?”
c. “What did you try first?”
d. “What challenged you?”
8. Generate discussion and explore mathematical meanings and relationships: Connect strategies of students:
a. “How could we know for sure?”
b. “Will this always work?”
c. “What would happen if you drew a picture to help explain your thinking?”
d. Who agrees/disagrees? Why?
e. Can someone else show me another way you answered this question?
f. Does anyone want to add to that?
g. *Compare, contrast, and connect student responses.

i. Ask students, How are these similar/ different?
h. Connect area and perimeter to operations of multiplication and addition.
Listen actively without evaluation:
9. As students share their responses/creations and explain how they solved/answered the question, listen
actively.
10.Look for opportunities to highlight significant ideas in students’ work to make these mathematical ideas more
explicit to all students (make connections).
11.Notice children’s mathematical thinking and make it visible to other students (avoid judging the correctness
of an answer so students are more willing to share their ideas.)
Summarize main ideas and identify future problems:
12.Highlight main ideas of lesson: polygons with the same area can sometimes have different perimeters.
Perimeter and area can be used to help us in our daily lives.
13.Think-pair-share:
a. Ask students if they have ever experienced perimeter and area situations like the one in Spaghetti and
Meatball for All, in real life?
14.Think-pair-share:
a. Ask students to come up with examples of how perimeter and area can be used as measuring tools to
help us work efficiently in our daily lives (Ex: Perimeter: fencing, frames, distance around room, dog
pen, soccer field, etc.; Area: carpet, paint, wallpaper, wrapping a present, tile, inside of a garden, etc.)
Homework:
15.Tell students to go home and ask their parent’s/guardian if/how they use perimeter and area, or other forms
of measurement in their job or when doing tasks around the house. If their parents/guardian says they do use
perimeter and area during their job or when doing tasks around the house, tell students to think of other
specific jobs/tasks that would use perimeter and area. Tell students to record the responses in their math
journal and bring it to class tomorrow.
16.Ask students if they have any questions.

H. DIFFERENTIATION

Describe how you plan to meet the needs of all students in your classroom with varied interests and readiness
levels by completing ONE of the six boxes below for each day. You may choose the same box for each day. Use
the learning progressions to support your decisions. Include a specific differentiation plan for each day.
This connects to your During Phase Actions: providing support and extensions.

Content

Interest

Students will also get to
choose which number to
work with for the extension
activity.

Process
Students will be able to
choose whether to use the
square tile manipulatives or
whether to draw pictures of
the different arrangement of
tables while we read
Spaghetti and Meatballs for
All.
Students also had a choice of
answering the essential
question the first time, by
using just words, just a
picture, or both.

Product

Readiness

I chose to differentiate my lesson by interest because it is one of the first lessons of the unit. This is a conceptual
understanding lesson, and I wanted to give students some choice during the lesson by allowing them to choose to
use manipulatives or draw. I wanted every single student to be fully involved by arranging the tiles, or drawing the
tiles as I read. Since I wanted each students to be individually involved during the lesson, It was more appropriate
for students to work individually, as I read, because it would have become loud if students worked in pairs – they
would have had to communicate, which could have caused argument to arise on table arrangements etc. Therefore,

I thought it was appropriate to provide students with a concrete choice of manipulating square tiles, or a semiconcrete choice of drawing table arrangements. Since this was the third lesson in the unit, it is appropriate to have
students working concretely and semi-concretely, while also having them connect the material to the real world.
Having the students relate perimeter and area to the real world throughout this lesson will allow students to develop
conceptual understanding. By completing this lesson, students will begin to truly understand how perimeter and
area can be used as measuring tools to help us work efficiently in our daily lives and how polygons with the same
area can sometimes have different perimeters, which are 2 of my unit objectives. I differentiated by process since I
gave students choice in what materials/ resources they used during the reading. I also gave students a choice when
they answered the essential question the first time, since they could answer it by using words, a picture, or both.
Lastly, I wanted to allow students to have some choice for the extension. I allowed them work with a different
number other then 8, and I gave them the choice of picking a new number (12, 16, or 24) Differentiation of interest
will allow students to have a feeling or emotion that causes them to focus on something because it matters to them
or it may just spark a certain interest in some way. Differentiation by interest will allow students to make the lessons
more meaningful and interesting to them, which ill promote learning, especially at the beginning of the unit.

Seating Chart
Guests Seated
Table Arrangement
Perimeter

Area
Mrs. Comfort’s daughter and her husband with 2 children;

Mr. & Mrs. Comfort

6 units

2 units squared

ELED 533 LESSON PLAN FORMAT – Two Lessons from Unit Planning Project

Lesson #2

JMU Elementary Education Program

17.Comparing and exploring perimeter by using physical models of standard units: (Week 1, Lesson 4)

18.Standards
Standard 3:10 – Strand: Measurement
The student will
measure the distance around a polygon in order to determine perimeter;
Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.MD.D.8
Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the
perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the
same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
19.LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand – what are the broad
generalizations/concepts the students
should begin to develop? (These are
typically difficult to assess in one
lesson.)
U1: Students will understand that
smaller parts of area can be used to
find the whole area of a polygon and
smaller parts of perimeter can be used
to find the entire perimeter of a
polygon.

Know – what are the tools, vocabulary,
symbols, etc. the students will gain
through this lesson? (These “knows”
must be assessed in your lesson.)

Do – what are the specific thinking
behaviors/procedures students will be
able to do through this lesson? (These
will also be assessed in your lesson.)

K2: Perimeter- measures the distance
around a polygon. Measured in units.
K8: Tools: graph paper, tiles

D1: Students will measure each side of
a variety of polygons and add the
measures of the sides to determine
the perimeter of each polygon.

20.ASSESSING LEARNING
 Remember – every objective must be assessed for every student during the lessons!
Objective

Assessment Tool
What documentation will you have for each
student?

Data Collected
What will your students do and say,
specifically, that indicate each student has
achieved your objectives?

K2: Perimeter- measures the distance
around a polygon. Measured in units.

K8: Tools: graph paper, tiles

D1: Students will measure each side

Centers Recording Sheet: I will collect
the recording sheets that each student
completes at each of the centers.
Student Monitoring Sheet/Observation:
As students work in the math centers,
I will walk around observe/listen in on
student discussions. I will take note of
when I see a student really
understanding the math concepts and
I will take note of which students seem
to be confused about a math concept.
While observing, I will ask students,
“What is perimeter?” and I will see
what students say.
Centers Recording Sheet: I will collect
the recording sheets that each student
completes at each of the centers.
Student Monitoring Sheet/Observation:
As students work in the math centers,
I will walk around observe/listen in on
student discussions. I will take note of
when I see a student really
understanding the math concepts and
I will take note of which students seem
to be confused about a math concept.
While observing, I can ask students
how graph paper and tiles can help us
find the perimeter of a polygon.

Centers Recording Sheet: I will collect

If students correctly find the perimeter
on the recording sheets, then it will
tell me that they know what perimeter
is. When observing, I will look to see
how students are finding perimeter. I
will listen in on student conversations
if they talk about perimeter. I will
listen to see if they know what
perimeter when they use the term in
conversation. If students say that
perimeter measure the distance
around a polygon, then they will
achieve this objective.
Students will use graph paper and
tiles throughout the math centers. I
will collect any graph paper the
students use. I will observe to see how
students are using the tiles to find the
perimeter. I will make note of who is
using the tools correctly and who is
not using the tools correctly.
If students say that tiles can help us
find the perimeter by laying tiles
around a book and counting them up
by using the tile sides, then they will
show that they know how tiles can be
used to find perimeter. If students say
that graph paper can be used to find
perimeter by counting the square
units, sides just like the tiles, then
students will achieve this objective.
I will look on the recording sheets to

of a variety of polygons and add the
measures of the sides to determine
the perimeter of each polygon.

U1: Students will understand that
smaller parts of area can be used to
find the whole area of a polygon and
smaller parts of perimeter can be
used to find the entire perimeter of a
polygon.

21.MATERIALS NEEDED
Graph Paper
Square unit tiles/ color tiles
Different sized books (4-5)

the recording sheets that each student
completes at each of the centers.
Student Monitoring Sheet/Observation:
As students work in the math centers,
I will walk around observe/listen in on
student discussions. I will take note of
when I see a student really
understanding the math concepts and
I will take note of which students seem
to be confused about a math concept.
Centers Recording Sheet: On their
recording sheets, will show how
adding up the sides of a polygon will
allow them to find the entire perimeter
of a polygon.
Student monitoring
Sheet/Observation: I will observe
students while they engage in the
math centers. I will ask students at
each center, “How did you find the
perimeter?”

see if/how students found the
perimeter. While observing I will make
note of who is finding the perimeter of
shapes in the centers by adding the
measures of the sides.

On students recording sheets, if I see
how they added the sides of the
polygons, to get the entire perimeter
of the polygon, I will sees that they
understand that smaller parts of
perimeter can be used to find the
entire perimeter of a polygon. As I
walk around the room to observe
students at the math centers, I will
ask students how they found the
perimeter of the polygons. If students
say that they added the sides of the
polygon/shape to find the entire
perimeter of the shape then it will tell
me that they understand that smaller
parts of perimeter can be used to find
the entire perimeter of a polygon.

Pentominoes
Center 1 Recording
Center 2 Recording
Center 3 Recording
Center 4 Recording

Sheet:
Sheet:
Sheet:
Sheet:

Book Perimeters
Tile Task
Pentomino Task
Measurement data sheet

Book Perimeters
 Some students may but the tiles on each side of the book
 Some students may put the tiles around the book
 Students my miscount
 Students may count the tiles as they put them around the book to find the perimeter.
 Students may place the tiles around the book first, and then go back and count the tiles to get the perimeter
 Students may place the tiles around the book first, and then add up the four sides of the book to get the
perimeter.
 When finding the difference between the two books, students may subtract wrong. Student may write out the
subtraction problem, or some may subtract mentally.
 Students my compare the books incorrectly.
Tile Task
 Students may make all of the shapes first, and then go back to see how many different perimeters there are of
those shapes.
 Students may make each shape and find the perimeter of each shape first, before going to the next shape.
 Students may end up counting the same shape twice for the perimeter.
 Students may forget to record a shape on the graph paper.
 Students may have a hard time transferring/drawing the shape on the graph paper.
 Students could be counting the perimeter of the shapes incorrectly, which could affect how many shapes they
find with different perimeters.
 Students may accidentally use more than 8 or less than 8 colored tiles when completing this task.
Pentomino Task
 Students could find the perimeter of the pentominoes incorrectly.

 Students may not find the shape that has the smallest perimeter.
 Students may not find the shape that has the largest perimeter.
 Students may accidentally use 3 pentominoes instead of 2.
 Students may forget to record the shapes.
Estimate then Measure Task
 Students may not estimate.
 Students may just count/find the perimeter before estimating.
 Students may estimate incorrectly by just randomly throwing out a number, and not relating it to the actual
shape.
 Students will count or add up the tiles to find the perimeter of the shapes
 Students may estimate to the nearest half unit.
Provide worthwhile extensions:
 I will challenge early finishers by asking questions:
o I see you found one way to do this, are there any other ways to solve the problem?
 Students may think of other ways to answer the question. Students may draw more pictures,
come up with a formula for perimeter, or use the manipulatives to check their work
I will pick 2 students from each center to come up to the doc cam to share their work (based on levels of
representation (concrete, semi-concrete, or abstract). I will have a sequence of presenters (concrete -> semiconcrete -> abstract)
1. Students may have a hard time explaining how they solved/ answered the question. Students may not have a
hard time writing or drawing their thoughts down on paper, but they may have a hard time explaining their
work aloud. If students have a hard time explaining their work, I will ask them specific questions such as:
a. What did you try first?
b. What strategy did you use?
c. Why did you choose that strategy?
d. Will this always work? Who agrees or disagrees? How do we know for sure?
e. I noticed you changed your answer. Why? What were you thinking?
G2

PROCEDURE

Include a DETAILED description of each step, including how you will get the students’ attention, your introduction
of the activity, the directions you will give students, the questions you will ask, and appropriate closure. Write
exactly what you will SAY and DO. Think of this as a script.
BEFORE:
Activate Prior Knowledge:
 Think-pair-share: What is perimeter?
 Think-pair-share: We compared perimeters yesterday, but what are some ways we can measure perimeter?
 We can use square unit tiles and explain how each tile = 1 unit square. We can count the sides of unit
squares to find the perimeter of certain objects.
Be sure that the task is understood:
 Today, we are going to explore perimeter by using unit tiles in math centers!
 There will be 4 math centers and you all will be split up into assigned groups.
 We will go over each activity at the math centers so you know what to do when you get to that particular
center. Go over, and model each math center:
o Comparing Book Perimeters
 Tell students to use the provided colored tiles to compare the perimeter of 2 different books.
Find the perimeter of the book with the largest perimeter and record on the recording sheet for
that center. Then, record the other book’s perimeter. Lastly, find the difference of the two books.
Show your work and record each step.
o Tile Task:
 Use 8 color tiles to find how many shapes you can make with a different perimeter. Record the
shapes you make by drawing the different shapes on the graph paper recording sheet for this
center.
o Pentomino Task:
 Show students what a pentomino is. Pentominoes are shapes that have 5 square units. Find the
perimeter for each pentomino. Then arrange 2 pentominos together to create a shape with the
smallest perimeter possible. Draw a picture of that shape and record the perimeter. Then, use 2
pentominos to relate a shape with the largest perimeter possible (conceptual understanding of
perimeter).
o Estimate then Measure Task:
 Estimate the perimeter and then count the perimeter of the shape using tiles. Complete a tile

measurement data sheet for this center.
 Are there any questions about any of the centers?
Establish Clear Expectations:
 Tell students that they are going to be placed into assigned groups for the math centers.
 Establish expectations: Say, “I want you to work together and follow directions carefully before completing
the tasks.”
 “Keep the noise level down, and to use your “conversation voice” at the math centers.”
 ** Tell students that in their groups they need to be supportive of each other. If one person finishes their work
earlier, then they can help the others in their groups, if they are having difficulty completing a task on their
own.**  (this relates to the way I differentiated) Explain to students how our classroom is like our own little
community, and we can help teach each other to help our community thrive!
 Post groupings on doc camera: (I grouped students based on readiness levels I grouped high ability student
with lower ability students to encourage peer assisted learning)
 Remind students to not begin their centers until they carefully read the directions on the recording sheet
DURING:
Let go!
 Tell students to go to the math center where they are placed and to bring a pencil with them.
 Students will be working in groups at math centers. Students will be engaged in the activities and they will
be recording their work on the corresponding recording sheets.
Notice children’s Mathematical Thinking:
 I will walk around the math lib centers with my observation chart that has a box for each child. I will monitor
the students as they work. I will listen in on student conversation all of the groups. I will see if students are
filling out their recording sheets. I will remind students if they are not.
 I will take note of who seems to get the information and who does not. I will make note of which students I
want to have share their work at the end of class. (I will make notes at each center for who I want to share) I
will see if there are students work where the different levels of representation learning progressions are used
(concrete, semi-concrete, or abstract) I will look for correctness/accuracy of the problem solving as well.
 I will ask students questions: “How did you come up with that? Why did you choose that?”
 Note any strategies used
Provide appropriate support:

I will ensure that children understand what they are supposed to be doing in each math center. I will assist
students if they need help.
 I will answer student questions.
Provide worthwhile extensions:
 I will challenge early finishers by asking questions:
o I see you found one way to do this, are there any other ways to solve the problem?
 I will also encourage early finishers to ask their group members if they need help. Students will engage in
peer-assisted learning which is beneficial to everyone.
I will ring the bell to tell students it is time to go to the next center. I will post the rotation on the doc cam to assist
students:
Comparing Book Perimeters  Tile Task  Pentomino Task  Estimate then Measure Task
AFTER: Engage the class in a full discussion
*I will tell students that Center Time is up!
Promote a community of learners:
 I will tell students that I’m going to select a couple of students to come up to the document camera to share
their work from today’s centers. I will tell students to respect other students’ work.
 I will try to select 2 students from each center, depending on if I see different strategies or not. This is good
for students to see how the students solved the problems in different ways.
 Have students share in an appropriate sequence based on what strategies they used to solve the problem.
Consider the levels of representation learning progressions the students used (concrete, semi-concrete, and
abstract).
 Begin with one station and move to the others. First, for the book center, pick a student who individually
counted the square units all the way around the books to find the perimeter. Second, pick a student who
recorded the length of each side and added up the 4 sides. The first one just shows counting tiles, which is
pretty concrete. The second student who counts the sides but then adds them up, knows that strategy for
finding the perimeter of a shape- which could be more semi-concrete.
 For the tile task, have someone come up who has just found a few shapes that they could make out of the
tiles. Prompt this students’ thinking to get him/her to think a little more, to see if they can find more. Then,
have the person who has found the most shapes come up and share their work. Allow him/her to explain
their strategy of how they found so many shapes. This will follow the levels of representation progression.
 For the pentomino task, have a student come up to share their smallest perimeter possible. Ask students if
they had a smaller perimeter? If so, ask her/him to come to the doc cam and share. Then have another

student come share their largest perimeter of 2 pentominoes. Ask students if they had a larger perimeter? If
so, ask him/her to come to the doc cam and share. Prompt students to explain their mathematical thinking.
This will naturally follow the levels of representation learning progression.
 For the estimate and measure center, have 2 students come to the board who estimated using two different
strategies. One student could have freely guessed, for example, while another student may have had a
strategy he/she used for estimating that could help other learners.
 Encourage other students to ask questions. Agree, and disagree with students as they share their work (but
also tell students to remain respectful).
 Prompt presenting students with questions if they do not know what to say:
o What did you try first?
o What strategy did you use?
o Why did you choose that strategy?
o Will this always work? Who agrees or disagrees? How do we know for sure?
o I noticed you changed your answer. Why? What were you thinking?
 Generate discussion
o Can someone tell me another way to solve the problem?
o Who agrees/disagrees? Why?
o Does anyone want to add to that
Listen actively without evaluation:
 As students share their work and explain how they solved the problems, listen actively.
 Look for opportunities to highlight significant ideas in students’ work to make these mathematical ideas more
explicit to all students.
 Notice children’s mathematical thinking and make it visible to other students (avoid judging the correctness
of an answer so students are more willing to share their ideas.)
 Ask other students what they think about the student’s response.
 Connect, compare and contrast students’ strategies. (If the strategies are different).
Summarize main ideas and identify future problems:
 Highlight main ideas of lesson: Have students engage in a Think-Pair-Share as a teaching strategy to engage
all students. (Every child will get a chance to discuss these topics with a partner).
o Think-pair-share: What are some ways to use physical models to compare and find the perimeter of
shapes?

o
o

I.

Think-pair-share: What is something you learned today that is crystal clear? What is something you are
confused about? What is one question you still have about today’s lesson?
Ask students if they have any questions.

DIFFERENTIATION
Describe how you plan to meet the needs of all students in your classroom with varied interests and readiness
levels by completing ONE of the six boxes below for each day. You may choose the same box for each day. Use
the learning progressions to support your decisions. Include a specific differentiation plan for each day.
This connects to your During Phase Actions: providing support and extensions.

Content

Process

Interest

Readiness

Students will be placed into
groups according to who works
well with who, as well as
according to ability levels. I
want students to experience
helping their peers; therefore, I
created heterogeneous groups
with a mix of ability levels. This
grouping style will allow for

Product

peer assisted learning and a
strong, community of learners.

I chose to differentiate by readiness because I wanted my students to have practice helping one another out as well
as experience peer assisted learning. I feel that it is a good idea to group students by readiness rather than interest,
because you want your groups to work well together and promote learning. By grouping lower students with higher
students, it will allow for peer assisted learning. This is appropriate for this stage of my unit because I wanted to
have my students experience working with a variety of people and the differing ability levels will promote learning
by have the higher students strengthen learning concepts my teaching/ helping the others, while the lower ability
students will learn from their peers. Later in my unit, I will group students in homogenous groups according to
pattern groups and readiness, when I know more about the ability levels and individual needs of the students.