You are on page 1of 22

Isaiah Campos, Ngoc Tran, Zijun Zhou 

Professor Ogden 
English 1A 
19 June 2015 
 
English 1A ­ Annotated Bibliography 
 
Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M. “ A Guide to 
th​
Writing Evaluations”, ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​
. 10​
 ed. 

Boston: St. Martin’s, 2013.  295­311. Print. 
When developing an evaluation, writers ideally want to choose a subject that can be analyzed in 
great detail to write about. There are multiple steps that should be followed when constructing 
the evaluation, first basing judgement on widely recognized criteria. Once a subject has been 
chosen, it is key to develop the thesis based on the example. When creating the evaluation it is 
beneficial to have credible sources that help back your judgement, so utilizing databases for 
scholarly articles should be considered. When writing it is important to maintain a well 
organized and clear logic to maintain flow on the paper, so the reader can have a better 
understanding. Once completed review 310­311, for better understanding of evaluation. 
 
Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M. “A Guide to 
th
writing Autobiography.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​
. 10​
 

ed. Boston: St. Martin’s, 2013.  55­67. Print. 
When developing an Autobiography writers ideally write about significant events or a person in 
your life. There are multiple steps that should be taken into consideration, first writing out the 
draft by choosing the subject, reflecting on the subject chosen. After the development stage it is 
important to develop a comprising draft with a compelling story. After the draft is complete 
revise using tactics discussed on 64­65. 
 

Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M. ​
“​
A Guide to 
Writing Reflective Essays.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​

th​
10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin’s, 2013.  167­177. Print. 

When developing an reflective essay writers ideally write about an occasion or event; that the 
writers feel comfortable about writing. There are multiple steps that should be taken into 
consideration, first writing out the draft by choosing a subject or occasion allowing the reader to 
visualize the subject and occasion. there are  three techniques illustrated on page 169 that go into 
great detail on how to format paragraphs. After developing the essay it is important to return to 
173­177 to reflect on key questions.  
 
Amore, Jen. “What Is Freewriting.” ​
About.​
 About. Web.  20 May, 2015. 
She gives information of freewriting that writers do need to care about grammar, structure, or 
whether what’s coming out. Also, she points out some strategies on how to write by setting a 
timer for 10 minutes to fill out the blank paper and trying to write without stopping.  
 
Axelrod, Rise, Cooper, Charles, and Warriner, Alison. “Catalogue of Reading Strategies.” 
Reading Critically Writing Well​
. 10th ed. New York: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2014. 
507­27. Print. 
Authors of this text introduce students fifteen strategies for reading critically such as annotating, 
outlining, summarizing through judging the writer’s credibility. After giving the meaning of each 
strategy, the book includes an annotated sample from “Letter from Birmingham Jail” that 
provides information about the letter of Martin Luther King Jr. who was minister of a Baptist 
church when he was arrested for his role in organizing the protest to explain ideas for any 
strategy definition for reading critically. During giving sample for strategies from the annotating, 
taking inventory, outlining, summarizing, paraphrasing, synthesizing, contextualizing, explore 
the significance of figurative language, looking for patterns of opposition, reflecting on 
challenges to your beliefs and values to comparing and contrasting related readings, the book 
states very clear for these techniques. 
 
Etzioni, Amitai.  “Working at McDonalds.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and 
Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 
th​
10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. ​
246­259. Print. 

Across America, Preferably Mcdonald's the workforce is comprised of mainly teenage high 
school students. Amitai, Etzioni author of “working at McDonalds” argues fast food restaurants 
are exploding and corrupting American teenagers. The corruption begins with the teenagers 
following what scientist call “highly routinized” according to Etzioni the “There are breeding 
grounds for robots working for yesterday's assembly lines, not tomorrow's high tech post”. 
Lacking creativity and innovation, these jobs are highly unwanted and are left for the lower class 
middle class youngsters to fend for. Teen jobs should be evaluated, school should put first.  
 
Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M. “Proposal to 
th​
Solve a Problem”, ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​
. 10​
 ed. 

Boston: St. Martin’s, 2013.  445­447. Print. 
When writing a proposal to solve a problem writers ideally want to choose a problem to write 
about; that can help change the problem, in the sense this writing is a call to action. There are 
multiple steps that should be followed when constructing the proposal, but it is best to remember 
proposal appear in wide varieties of context. When writing out the proposal these question 
should be asked, for who is the audience?, What is the purpose of this paper?, What is the goal to 
differ opinions or proposals?. Writing a argumentative essay, is for change.  
 
Bornstein , David. “Fighting Bullying with Babies” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A 
Reader and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison 
th​
Warriner M  10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. 447­452. Print. 

A cure to bullying, or meanness David, Bornstein discusses the impact of bullying in today's 
society. The proposal Bornstein upholds is towards this modern day issue labeled as bullying, so 
Bornstein states a simple solution is a baby, thus data was collected with the interaction of 
kindergarteners and toddlers. Discussing how parents who faced lack of empathy at a young age, 
usually were abusive and neglectful (Mary Gordon) (449). Performing the study of toddlers in 
classrooms, spread across Canada and parts of the north­west corner of the United States, and 
researchers found unanimous results. The focus of this study was to install empathy in the 
students at a young age, so when older the students would have had experienced it at a young 
age. 
 
Brownell, Kelly D., and Frieden,Thomas D.. “Ounces of Prevention­ The public Policy case 
for Taxes on Sugared Beverages.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and 

Guide.​
 Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 
th​
 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. ​
466­471. Print. 

Across America one third of Americans are obese according to the CDC, so what is one factor 
leading this sugared beverages. Kelly D. Brownell and Thomas R. Frieden authors of “Ounces of 
Prevention­ The public Policy case for Taxes on Sugared Beverages” propose stricter taxes and 
regulation on the beverage industry, yet comparing tobacco and alcohol taxes to base the 
argument off of. The approach taken in the article is health benefits that would conspire from 
lack of purchasing of sugared beverages, using statistical data and probability the outcome of the 
essay is to have a reduction of ten percent in consumption. The taxes on the beverages would be 
used to implement health and nutritional benefit of cutting consumption, yet solely depending on 
the amount generated and the size of the tax.  
 
Desmond­Harris, Jenee “Tupac and My Non­Thug Life.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: 
A Reader and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and 
th​
Alison Warriner M 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martian’s, 2013. 42­47. Print. 

Throughout the world there is music, although not all of it is good. Desmond­Harris author of 
“Tupac and My Non­Thug Life” explain how music was influential in her life. Being interracial 
Desmond­Harris grew up in a predominately white neighborhood where it was a struggle to find 
a culture to sight with. As an escape Harris was able to build a connection with Tupac’s music, 
which in turn helped her explore her culture and identity. The article is tragic due to the loss of 
Tupac it illustrates how listens develop personal relationship towards celebrates.   
 
Garcia, Jennifer. "Using Quotations in Your Essay." ​
YouTube​
. Youtube, 6 Sept. 2011. 
Web. 19 June 2015. 
This video explains that using quotations can support your point and make it clear that you 
understand your source. The quotations should be positioned carefully in the body paragraph 
which is composed of topic/claim, body/illustration, and explanation; quotations should be 
placed in the body part. The four steps of using quotes are using single phrase, the quote, in­text 
citation, and explanation sentence. It goes on introducing four ways to insert a quotation and also 
some special situations of using quotations in writing an essay. 
 
 

Pipher, Mary Bray. “Diving in: Getting Started.” ​
Writing to Change the World.​
 New York: 
Riverhead, 2006. 31­40. Print. 
Mary Pipher author of “Diving in: getting started” states it isn’t the always the task that is hard, 
but getting started which is the most difficult. Pipher argues writing is the same way, thus it is 
equally as difficult to accept the label of being a writer. There are multiple levels of difficulties 
and obstacles that come along with writing, which are stated in the chapter. Although we write 
formally, this style isn’t always healthy for writing. Pipher discovered that well writing a book, 
and she re­invented herself. According to Pipher writing is stressful, nor should it be called 
writer's block due to personal endeavors that’s why Pipher joined a group of authors.   
 
Elbow, Peter. “Freewriting.” ​
Wikispace. ​
Wikispace.​
 ​
Web. 20 May, 2015.  
Peter Elbow states the most effective writing is free­writing and it must be practiced regularly. 
Spending 10 minutes and more later on to write and it should be done at least 3 times per week is 
the way people can improve writing skill. The most important on free writing is never stop even 
writer do not know what to write and stuck in some ideas. The solution is to keep writing 
naturally without stopping for thinking. If you stuck, you can write anything in your mind as 
“what I can write, I am stuck stuck stuck”. This practice will help people to write more effective 
and can expand ideas in short time. Also, when doing free­writing, writer do not care about 
structure, grammar, and organizing. He also compares writing and speaking. In speaking, 
listeners need to respond to speaker promptly as writing skill. 
 
Goldberg, Natalie. “First Thought.” ​
Pasadena.edu​
, Pasadena City College. Web. 21 May, 
2015. 
Natalie Goldberg points out the important strategy for writing that is on the timed exercise. You 
should set your time to practice to be able to show your ideas in your mind. She provides some 
basic methods as keep your hand moving, don’t cross out, don’t worry about spelling, 
punctuation, grammar, lose your control, don’t think, don’t get logical and go for the jugular. 
The human mind is too crazy and too quick for us to have a chance to organize. To show your 
first though, the first thing is to show your first words inside your mind by writing from them. 
Also, she mentions why the first thoughts so energizing in the article and also provides an 
answer for that.   
 
"Online Writing Lab." ​
Common Writing Assignments: The Evaluation Essay​
. Aims 
Community College, n.d. Web. 12 June 2015. 
This article briefly explains the purpose of an evaluation essay and the occasions where 
evaluation essays can be used. It also explores the keys of a good investigative essay, those are, 

having clear and fair criteria, judgements, and evidence. Then the article introduces the definition 
of criteria, judgement, and evidence in the context of evaluation essay  The criteria means the 
ideal or standards that the evaluated item should be; the judgement refers to the result of whether 
the criteria are reached; the evidence looks for the details that support the judgement. It then also 
gives examples of how to fulfilling these key elements of writing a good evaluation essay.  
 
Pipher, Mary. “What You Alone Can Say.” ​
Writing to Change the World. ​
New York: 
Riverhead Books, 2007. 45­51. Print. 
This chapter starts with one of the best phrase “Every death is like the burning of a library” – 
Alex Haley. The idea that Mary Pipher wants to present to everyone is about sharing, doing 
something our own way to recognize who we are. Each of us is so different in activity ways or 
voices such as no one is in same voice or in the same circumstance, each person can do 
differently in her/his own way.  Thus, listen to yourself to recognize what you are and what you 
do.   
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "A1 Writing and Reading Critically." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th 
ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 71­78. Print. 
The section of “Writing and Reading Critically” states the fact that reading should be a 
multiple­step active process that contains previewing a text, annotating it, and conversing with it 
along reading in order to pay attention to details. Writing skills such as using outline can be used 
in active reading too for the sake of clarifying the thesis and key points while summarizing can 
be employed for the purpose of understanding the author’s ideas and demonstrate readers’ 
comprehension with their own words. Further, analyzing a text can balance the summary of a 
text with readers’ judgments of the arguments from the text. 
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "A2 Constructing reasonable arguments." ​
A Writer's 
Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 80­83. Print. 
In this session, authors state that our arguments might be a problem in public as religious, public 
school, or driving. When we give a reasonable argument, we do not state our agreement or 
disagreement. We just tell what the truth about our subject. Other information is mentioned as 
“examine your issue’s social and intellectual contexts.”  Readers could be a professional for 
subject we provide, so we should research to master our evidences for our argument. Also, we 

should view our audience as a panel of jurors. We bring all sides of argument to readers and do 
not assume that they agree with us.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "A2­g  Building common ground." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th 
ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 88. Print. 
When composing an opposing arguments, we need to seek out one or two assumptions that 
shows readers who do not agree with our views. To make them agree, we can show their 
assumptions. Intelligence and decency supporting people’s side of an argument are believed. 
Thus, we need to show qualities in our argument to be persuaded.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "A2­h Sample argument paper." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 88­93. Print. 
This is a sample from Sam Jacobs who argues the shift from print to online news benefits 
readers. He provides opportunities to become more engaged with the news to hold journalists 
accountable, and to participate as producers. During his writing, he present opposing views. He 
quotes and information from print and online sources within MLA citation.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "A3 Reading Arguments." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 89­97. Print. 
This part focuses on how to make arguments more persuasive and credible when writers need to 
write about a debatable issue. It is important to distinguish the reasonable arguments and 
fallacies. Fallacious, some of them are hard to notice, are misguided and dishonest that should be 
avoided in argumentative essays. Pathos, ethos, and logos are explained in detail serve as the 
argumentative strategies to appeal readers’ beliefs and values, authority and credibility, and 
sense of logic. Taking views of others into account and responding oppositions can make the 
arguments more complete and convincing. 
 

Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "C2 Focus on Drafting." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: 
Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 15­20. Print. 
This section introduces the strategies of drafting the essay including introduction, body, and 
conclusion. The introduction should always engage the reader’s attentions and insert the purpose 
and main point of the writing. The body of the essay needs to support the thesis and employing 
questions and visuals as a writer drafts. A conclusion should be drafted in order to restate the 
main idea in a new way with revisiting the main idea and some memorable detail from the 
introduction.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "C3 Revising." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 21­29. Print. 
Revising is a way to improve sentence structure, word choice, grammar, punctuation, and 
mechanics come later. This part gives many strategies to revise. Make global revisions is to stand 
in audience position to view our work, so we will see what we need to revise. Throughout 
revising, we edit for sentences, grammar, and so on. Revising comment is another tip. We will 
see comments from revisers. Authors share some tips to do within comment such as 
understanding the comment, summarising and analyzing more, and looking for your words. 
Another strategy is proofread the final manuscript to prepare for final manuscript.   
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "C4­d Improving Coherence." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 41­44. Print. 
In this session, author provides several techniques to make paragraphs coherent. First technique 
is how to link ideas clearly. A sentence should have a topic sentence directly or indirectly. 
Another technique is to repeat key words that is important to make cohence. But we need to use 
variation of the key word to avoid repeating. Also, using parallel structures is another technique. 
Parallel structure is usually used within sentences to underscore the similarity of ideas. 
Additionally, maintaining consistency is also a technique to shift from one point to another. One 
more technique is providing transitions. Transitions are bridge between what has been read and 
what is about to be read.  
 

Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "C5 Writing Paragraphs." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 43­56. Print. 
In the section of “writing paragraphs”, the authors explain how to develop paragraphs and 
provide useful strategies for improving coherence and developing the point. It covers the points 
of 1) using a topic sentence (usually comes first in the paragraph) to state the main point, 2) 
developing and stay at the main point, 3) choosing an appropriate pattern of organization 
according to writer’s subject and purpose, 4) making paragraphs coherent by linking ideas, using 
parallel structures, and adding adequate transitions, 5) modifying paragraph length or combining 
ideas to make readers stay attentive. 
 
Hacker, Diana and Sommers, Nancy. “Composing and Revising, Academic Writing, and 
MLA.” ​
A Writer’s Reference. ​
7th ed. Pasadena: Bedford /St. Martins. Print. 
The C­tab, Composing and Revising, presents about the composing and revising strategy for 
writer. It states technique about planning such as exploring ideas and sketching a plan. Also, 
drafting like introduction and thesis, body, conclusion is mentioned this part.  In addition, how to 
revise, writing paragraphs, designing documents, and writing with technology is also shown in 
the tab. The other article is about academic writing in the A tab. It tells about writing about texts 
within some techniques as sketching an outline, analyzing, and also giving evaluating arguments. 
Lastly, the MLA tab gives us information about how to do works cited in many sources. For 
example, how to cite in the printed book, an online documents, or even newspaper or magazines. 
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "G1­  Subject­verb agreement." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 197­205. Print. 
This grammar section introduces the occasions that verb agree with their subjects including the 
standard combination considering tenses, words between subject and verb, subject with and, 
subject with or, nor, indefinite pronouns, collective nouns, subject after verb, subject 
complement, who, which, that, plural form, singular meaning, and titles, company names, words 
as words, gerund phrases etc. It lists examples and explanations of these occasions and can be 
referred by novice writers when they need to. 
 

Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "MLA­1 Supporting a Thesis." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 396­399. Print. 
This section demonstrates how writers should use research skills to support the thesis idea with 
well­organized evidence. It is suggested that the paper should first start with a working thesis in 
order to provide a flexible main point that can be edited any time while working on the research, 
then consist a rough outline which portraits the organization, and utilize credible, authoritative 
sources to support writer’s argument with facts, statistics, examples, expert opinions, opposing 
opinions, and other types of evidence. 
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "MLA­1C Use sources to inform and support your argument." 
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 426­28. Print. 
In introduction, we can provide background information or context as using facts or statistic to 
support or to emphasize for our important topic. We should explain terms or concepts to readers 
if they are not familiar with ideas or words in our topic. Also, we must support for our claims by 
backing up your assertions with facts, examples and evidences. To make our argument becomes 
expert, We lend authority to our argument. 
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "MLA­3 Integrating Sources." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 412­470. Print. 
This section introduces a very critical skill for writing research paper or argumentative essay – 
how to integrate sources and let the sources speak for you. The sources should be used concisely 
and never lead to the loss of writer’s own voice. There should be signal words/phrases before 
quotations or paraphrases and introduce the credibility of the source too. In addition, writers need 
to explain how this specific source fits here and helps strengthen your arguments or explain your 
points. Writers can summarize, quote, or paraphrase the sources according to different purposes. 
It is suggested that one should limit the use of quotations because too many quotations can make 
your writing not authentic and lack of own voice. Synthesizing sources from different channels is 
a way to establish a conversation in the realm of the research topic which demonstrates that you 
know this topic from inside out. Each source should be glued together with writer's’ own 
thoughts and purposes as well. 
 

Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "P1­  The Comma." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: 
Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 287­295. Print. 
This section introduces how to use comma in different situations including clauses with “and”, 
“but”, introductory elements, items in a series, coordinate adjectives, nonrestrictive elements, 
transitions, parenthetical expressions, direct address, he said, dates, addresses, titles, numbers, 
etc. In each subsection, the writer’s reference introduces the examples and possible mistakes that 
usually made by beginner writers. 
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "R2­C Reading Critically." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 405­07. Print. 
Reading critically, authors claim that we must “read with an open mind and critical eye.” without 
bring our personal to prevent us from ideas and viewpoints of articles. Also, we must 
“distinguishing between primary and secondary sources” by determining whether primary source 
or secondary source. Moreover, “being alert for signs of bias” is asking us to consult Magazines 
for libraries to verify which sources are more objective.Additionally, in academic writing, we 
should assess the author’s argument. Looking for any disagreement is to find and test with our 
own critical intelligence.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "R2­d Assessing Web Sources." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. 
Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 407­09. Print. 
Information from web sources is valuable, but we must verify their credibility. When we use a 
site for research, we need to evaluate it like checking reliability by looking for author of articles 
if he/she is a credible expert or not, dates of publication, and sites supported from organizations 
or others. 
 

Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "R3 Evaluating Sources." ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: 
Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 375­388 Print. 
This tab introduces the strategies can be used to evaluate sources when a writer is researching 
and needs to find appropriate sources for his/her research question. Evaluation sources should be 
seen as a process and be ongoing while a writer plans, searches, reads, and writes. Scanning and 
previewing the type, summary, and appropriateness of sources should be applied to the searching 
stage in order to save time. Selecting sources should begin with an open and critical mind; telling 
the primary sources from the secondary ones should also be taken into consideration. The priors 
always include the original research, documents, studies, and research reports while secondary 
sources are another writer's’ opinions about the interpretation of a primary one.  
 
Hacker, Diana, Nancy I. Sommers, Thomas Robert. Jehn, Jane Rosenzweig, and Marcy 
Carbajal Van Horn. "R1­d Search Effectively" ​
A Writer's Reference​
. 8th ed. Boston: 
Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 362­366. Print. 
The authors show how to effectively use a combination of research databases from library and 
the Web to explore good sources. The college library has a lot of useful information and access 
to various databases and it is the best place for writers to seek help from librarians and instructor. 
The Web search engine and other online tools can be really helpful too because one can put in 
specific terms or phrases to refine the search results. It is very helpful to refer to the 
bibliographies and citations from scholarly books and articles since it is related and authoritative. 
 
Hacker, Diana and Sommers, Nancy. “S1­ Parallelism.” ​
A Writer’s Reference. ​
7th ed. 
Pasadena: Bedford /St. Martins. 115­17. Print. 
When using two or more ideas in parallel, we need to express them in parallel grammatical form 
which balances singles words with single words, phrase with phrases, and clause with clauses. 
Three balance of parallel ideas show in this session. First balance is for ideas in a serious to 
reach reader’s expectation such as using same words form. The next balance parallel ideas is 
present ideas as pairs. Parallel ideas linked with coordinating conjunction (but, and, or, etc) and 
linked with correlative conjunctions (either … or, neither … nor). Also, comparisons linked with 
than or as. Lastly, clarifying parallels use repeat function words such as preposition (by, to) and 
subordinating conjunctions (that, because).  
 

Hacker, Diana and Sommers, Nancy. “Word Choice.” ​
A Writer’s Reference. ​
7th ed. 
Pasadena: Bedford /St. Martins. 165­68. Print. 
According to the word choice session, authors show students some strategies in word selection. 
Writers usually repeat something that are not necessary, so authors give them strategies to 
eliminate redundancies to avoid unnecessary repetition of words. In addition, cut empty or 
inflated phrases, simplify the structure, and reduce clauses to phrase, phrase to single words 
strategies are given in this session of the text. 
 
Haines, Katherine. “Whose Body is This.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and 
Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 
th​
10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. 161­66. Print. 

Katherine Haines author of “Whose Body is This” is writing on behalf of women and their body 
structure. Introducing the health issues that women have been faced with throughout the year 
with weight, transitioning into a personal issue that happen to her sister. Haines illustrates a clear 
depiction of the extend junior high school girl’s would undergo to obtain this body that was 
visualized as perfect. Haines states “This mixed message will never give women the power they 
deserve over their bodies and will never enable them to make their own decisions about what 
type of body they want”.(163)”. 
 
Hooks, Bell. “Critical Thinking.” Google Docs. n.d. Web. 21 May, 2015.  
The author gives us a recipe for the development of Critical Thinking following the reasoning of 
a child. Bell Hooks in the article explains: 
“critical thinking involves first discovering the who, what, when, where, and how of things— 
finding the answers to those eternal questions of the inquisitive child— and then utilizing that 
knowledge in a manner that enables you to determine what matters most.”. In order to develop 
critical thinking changes should be change the teaching way in the educational system by 
creating an environment for student to ask questions and take initiative. Critical thinking is an 
action and interactive process.  
 
Horn, Heather. “Stop Close Reading.” ​
Theatlantic.com. ​
The Atlantic Monthly Group. 2015. 
Web. 22 May, 2015. 
Heather Horn criticizes at close reading. This author shares information why we need to stop 
close reading. She tells that close reading is a common way that applied to educational system in 
middle school, high school or even in college by teaching students learn by reading paragraphs, 
chapters, and even single sentence. It is a vehicle for teaching students that need to be stopped. 

The other information that she presents that close reading is slow. By reading this way, how 
many books or articles that readers can finish to look for other materials that they like.  
 
How To Write a Literacy Narrative. Hubpages. 19 Jun. 2013. Web. 29 May, 2015. 
This article tells readers some techniques to know how to write a literacy narrative. It presents 
some ideas in reflection like asking questions and experiences to focus on our writing. Also, this 
article mentions that writing a narrative is as telling a story. Another strategy that the article tells 
is about freewriting. Freewriting is a good way to expand idea and to avoid our stuck in mind by 
keeping our writing without stopping during a limit time. This practice will help writers in 
capturing their thoughts to use in their writing. In addition, brainstorming tips are provided such 
as asking questions yourself, think about detail, and sensory detail. These tips are useful to make 
our writing clear to readers. Finally, consider the audience is another good tips to write a literacy 
narrative. We need to know who will be our audiences and what they expect from our writing. 
 
“How To Write a Reflection Paper.” ​
wikiHow​
. Mediawiki, n.d. Web. 04 Jun., 2015 
This article tells about purpose of a reflection paper to show personal and subjective and give us 
three parts of how to write a reflection paper. The first part is brainstorming. It firstly identifies a 
main theme and then jot down materials that stands out in your mind. Another step is to create a 
chart that is helpful for you to keep track of your ideas. Lastly, You need to ask yourself 
questions to guide your response. The second part is organizing your reflection paper. A 
reflection paper should be short and sweet. Also, it must introduce your expectations and develop 
your thesis statement. Then, you should explain your conclusion in your body and conclusion 
with summary. The last part is how to evaluate what you write by revealing your information 
wisely, maintaining a professional or academic tone, checking sentence level and using 
transitions.  
 
Jennings, Dana.  “Our Scars Tell the Stories of our Lives.” ​
Reading Critically 
Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond 
th​
Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. 143­48. Print. 

Dana Jennings author of “Our Scars Tell the Stories of our Lives” is writing on his personal 
behalf illustrating the depiction of how scars should be worn as trophies, similar to how tattoos 
are seen. Introducing the most visible scar that was given to Jenning in his early childhood, to 
how he received the most painful one in his adulthood, yet composing the story on his personal 
account Jenning has made it relatable to the readers by introducing acne. Throughout the reading 
scars are viewed as reminders and motivation, but at the ending of the essay Jenning explains 
how scars arent always intended are necessarily wanted. Although Jenning dislikes his scars it 
stated “More than anything, i relish the stories they tell.”(145)”. 
 
Kappel, Andrew. "How to Write a Thesis for Beginners." ​
YouTube​
. YouTube, 21 Apr. 2013. 
Web. 20 June 2015. 

 
This video uses colorful fonts and pictures  introduces the steps of writing a thesis statements for 
beginners. One should always start with a question of “What is your topic”? And then think 
about the topic and form a question; the last step is to put the information from the previous 2 
steps and combine it. The thesis serves as the road map for the entire essay and needs to be 
carefully written following the previous steps and suggestions. 
 
 
KornBluh, Karen. “Win­Win Flexibility.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A 
Reader and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison 
th​
Warriner M 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. 474­479. Print. 

Working to survive in this world is a present day issue viewed across the world, yet putting a job 
before all shouldn't be allowed in America. Karen, KornBluh author of “Win­Win Flexibility” 
argues America needs to take new approach to worker flexibility, thus allowing more benefits for 
part time employees. This call to action is based on a number of European countries allowing 
their workers to have proper benefits and access to a union. Over the years the work force 
exploded across america from the years 1970­2000, so with more expendable workers part time 
positioning exploded. According to KornBluh “ Workers often buy flexibility by sacrificing job 
security, benefits, and pay.(476)”. Ultimately the closing argument of the paper is not only are 
family losing money and time spent with loved ones, but the children are left to suffer without 
their parents.  
 
Noine, T., Venezia, A., and Bracco, K. ​
Changing Course: A Guide to Increasing Student 
Completion in Community Colleges.​
 San Francisco: WestEd. 2011. PDF 
Authors share their design principles to help students and schools solving problems to be more 
effective in study. In college, there are many models to effective completion pathways. One 
model is to improve a connection with K­12 system to help teachers and students understand 
what knowledge and skills they study in college level. Also, college needs to have partnerships 
in outside such as business, industry to help students after they leave school. Another way is to 
support students in courses selection and inform information clearly. Additionally, throughout 
program in college, make sure to help students reach learning outcomes to improve their skills. 
Colleges also need to engage students throughout support programs such as counseling, career 
assistance, etc. Other model is to customize curriculum to improve student learning. College 
must provide instructional programs and student services to help students catch up their study.   
 
 

Pipher, Mary Bray. “Cooling Down­ Revising.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: 
Riverhead, 2006. 139­152. Print. 
Mary, Pipher author of “Writing to Change the World” chapter “Cooling Down­Revising” 
introduction explains the difficulty writers face when finishing a draft. Pipher discusses the 
challenges as if it was similar to gardening, for once you overcome the difficult parts it only gets 
easier. “Pause and Rest” Pipher suggest it is important to always go in with a clear mind, not 
always taking the approach “i just want to get this over with”. “Read Your work Aloud” argues 
the importance importance of reading aloud. Pipher used her daughter to see the reaction towards 
her book to see what needed to be changed.”Brevity” explains the purpose of keep it simple and 
short, or as Pipher writes “Speak only words that are kind, useful and true”(142). “Use Your 
Audience to Help You Focus” Pipher states when writers write its as if there's a single goal to 
encourage fresh thinkers and open minds. “Preaching to the Choir” explains what significance 
writing has towards the readers, for when a book is read the words and passage can be used to 
better educate and inform others who don't think the same. “Writing for the Unconvinced”, 
argues the significance in trying to convert people into certain beliefs, so its always best to use 
judgement when promoting our cause. “Readers” Pipher discusses the importance of criticism, so 
when finishing a writing it's important to be open minded. “The Perfect Title”, it comes down to 
a hit or miss, and for every paper or book the title can change time and time again as the 
arguments develop.  
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Introduction.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: Riverhead, 
2006. 1­15. Print. 
Writing is weapon, founded and based a­pond by language it can be used as a tool. Mary 
Pipher’s introduction into “Writing to Change the World” gives a detailed explanation into the 
world and purpose of writers. Stories are being born every day, though some good and some bad 
these stories are needed to be told. With modern technology beliefs and stories have been 
polluted, the idea of the past were enslaved and misinterpreted into the current cultural beliefs. 
The thoughts and actions have been manipulated and it is left to writers to reconnect the readers 
to a clear perspective. It is then left to reader to accept or decline these reading based on personal 
beliefs, because in the end writing as multiple purpose. 
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Know Thyself.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: Riverhead, 
2006. 31­40. Print. 
Mary Pipher author of “Know thyself” brings up relevant points developing questions and soul 
purpose to life, it is left to the reader to heed these messages and become the person were meant 
to become. Using guidance from readings Pipher was able to develop a proper vocabulary and 
insight towards the world, yet Pipher was not always reading but also exploring. In all of us their 

personal backstory that must be told, according to Mary Pipher it is our purpose to write these 
stories down no matter how insignificant it may seem. 
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Growing Our Souls.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: 
Riverhead, 2006. 49­59. Print. 
In modern day America there's a sense of disparancy between the citizens, yet if a person was to 
stand up for personal rights it would be viewed as subversive. Mary Pipher author of “Growing 
Our Souls” argues “ Growing our souls could be defined as the steady accretion of empathy, 
clarity, and passion for the good.”(58)”. Discussing life events and occasion that have changed 
Pipher life, the author takes the reader back into the 1960’s. Throughout Pipher's life she has 
advocated for the greater good of mankind, and its animal companion. Explaining life in 
berkeley during the vietnam protest, to discussing anorexia in the small town where she was a 
therapist page (57). Pipher sparked her interest for writing during free time after her children had 
grown up, so developing her writing style came from a local professor (56).  
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Point of View.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: Riverhead, 
2006. 125­138. Print. 
Mary, Pipher author of “Writing to Change the World” introduces the chapter how writers point 
of view influences their writing style, also the influence of the reader. Diving the chapter into 
five parts, “Insiders, Outsiders, Connected Critics”, “Pronouns”, “Framing”, and “A Personal 
Letter to Our Readers”, lastly “Compassion”. “Insiders, Outsiders, Connected Critics” takes a 
different approach to writing, discussion stance. Being three major types according to Pipher, 
“insider, outsiders, connected critics”.  “Pronouns” gives reason to writers, why certain struggle 
with making a connection/ relationship when writing. “Framing” is based on the point of view 
reference, if a reader has made up their mind and is introduced to new facts they possibly 
become confused, So the argument is immediately rejected. “A Personal Letter to Our Readers” 
discusses the importance of writing style, using an essay from Myer and Scanzoni on marriage. 
Pipher discusses the significance of writing in a person's frame of reference, using tone, quotes 
making the essay easy to identify with. “Compassion” closes the chapter with a new perspective 
on how writing and the world should be interpreted. “what it feels like to be in someone's else’s 
place.”(137), thus the cure to this is empathy shattering ideologies, and stereotypes.  
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Swimming Along: The Writing Process.” ​
Writing to Change the 
World​
. New York: Riverhead, 2006. 103­124. Print. 

Mary Pipher mother had died and it was quite compelling how little she was able to do for her, 
so utilizing this emotion it helped better Pipher's writing. Through out history the most powerful 
writing technique has been self deprivation or events that have occurred, so highlighting 
important authors and writers Pipher discusses the importance of emotion. Writing with emotion 
is to empower the thoughts and feelings of the readers, expressing emotion allows the readers to 
contextualize and sight with the author's emotions and ideologies. With writing comes new 
discoveries, and in doing should invoke the readers into the reading. Caring arguments through 
the reading is quite difficult according to Pipher, so when addressing an issue it important to set a 
foundation on where the idea sprung from.  To be a successful writer according to Pipher, writers 
must say something better, original, different, or first. 
 
 
Pipher, Mary Bray. “Writing to Connect.” ​
Writing to Change the World​
. New York: 
Riverhead, 2006. 19­30. Print. 
In all of us there is an inner voice that needs to be written down, discouragement is no longer an 
option. Throughout the world change is occurring, Mary Pipher explains the different types of 
writing styles and writers that are out there. With the writing comes multiple levels ranging from 
straightforward to emotional. Though the mentality towards reading has shifted for the worst, it 
is writer’s jobs to document all that has occurred as Anne Frank did. Throughout the world 
writing and democracy is shunned, it is best to remember when writing to connect your message 
can be conveyed across multiple continents across the world. 
 
Prose, Francine. “Close Reading.” ​
Theatlantic.com. ​
The Atlantic Monthly Group. 2015. 
Web. 22 May, 2015.   
 
Author starts her article by giving information about herself when she attended in school in some 
fiction courses to answer an question at the beginning of the article that “can creative writing be 
taught”. She states that it could not be found in school. The best way to be a good writer is 
reading by looking best authors who you like most to read to see how writers write, how they 
organize and structure their writing. The reading strategy for her is read close word by word, 
sentence by sentence to learn from them. “I’ve always found that the better the book I’m reading, 
the smarter I feel, or, at least, the more able to imagine that I might, someday, ​
become​
 smarter.” 
she wrote. Also, she tells herself when she left her PHD program to be a writer and how she 
wrote her first novel in India.   
 
Raymond, Jack, and Allen Brizee. "Writing a Research Paper." ​
Purdue OWL: Research 
Papers​
. The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University, 21 Feb. 
2013. Web. 19 June 2015.  
 

This article aims to introduce the detailed information about how to write research papers 
including discussing research papers as a genre, choosing topics, and finding sources. It starts 
with the introducing the research paper is a final product of research, critical thinking, source 
evaluation, organization, and composition, rather a summary of primary and secondary sources. 
Two genres of research paper are argumentative and analytical, the previous one aims to make an 
argument on a thesis statement through persuasion while the latter focuses on writers asking a 
question that he/she does not take stance. The section of choosing a topic explains how to narrow 
down and decide a topic through methods such as brainstorming and prewriting.  
 
Rosen, Christine.  “The Myth of Multitasking” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader 
and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison 
th​
Warriner M  10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. ​
270­275 
Multitasking a daily challenge that is done unconscious, yet sometimes tried consciously. Rosen, 
Christine author of “ The Myth of Multitasking” argues the advantages and disadvantages of 
multitasking, incorporating studies and statistics the discussion of multitasking is brought to 
light. The reading is divided into three sections introduction, changing our brain and paying 
attention. In the introduction the disadvantages of multitasking are introduced, thus including 
health, and impact on the U.S. economy. Changing our brain, introduces the long term effect of 
multitasking, across america psychologist using fMRI’s have come to numerous conclusion that 
multitasking is affecting the way we learn, and recollect. Paying attention is a section in which 
the author draws upon information that discusses the side effects, and possibilities for future 
generations. 
 
Shirey, Gail. “Learning How To Annotate.” ​
YouTube​
. YouTube, 21 Jan. 2011. Web. 21 
May, 2015. 
In the video, she tells how to learn about annotation by doing a sample from The Oldest Creature 
paper. The first thing we need to pay attention on what we are reading. The strategy is turning 
heading or title to questions and bases on the text, we scan the content of the article to answer the 
questions to understand what the article is. All important information should be noted in sides to 
have a general idea about article.  
 
Shah, Saira “Longing to Belong.” ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader and Guide. 
th
Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 10​
 
ed. Boston: St. Martian’s, 2013. 37­41. Print. 
     
When being multicultural old family tradition are viewed as taboo. Saira Shah Author of 
“Longing to Belong" illustrates a clear example of one’s past family tradition being completely 
absurd. Originating from Afghanistan a tradition known as arranged marriage still occurs, Shah’s 
being an English transplant she is viewed as an outsider. Trying to conform to her family’s 
tradition she is displaced between the two cultures, Shah is then faced with an arranged marriage 

with a distant cousin, spontaneously an incident occurs and her aunt comes to the rescue and 
ends the wedding. 
 
Silvestri, Karen. “Descriptive Writing.” ​
YouTube. ​
YouTube, 14 Mar. 2013. Web. May 29, 
2015. 
The author of this article presents about descriptive writing definition and structure of a 
paragraph or essay. She compares the structure of paragraph and essay within a topic sentence, 
supporting details, and conclusion. She also shares something for writing a description like show 
our readers, but do not tell something or someone to readers by giving a specific examples. Also, 
she provides some strategies for students as how to write supporting ideas using sensory details, 
impression based on an example. Finally, she ends up by finishing up a conclusion. 
 
Staples, Brent. “Black Men and Public Space”​
 ​
Reading Critically Writing Well: A Reader 
and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond Cooper, and Alison 
th​
Warriner M 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. 132­35. Print. 
 
Brent Staples author of “Black Men and Public Spaces” is writing on his personal behalf and 
how he has been sodomized and fallen victim to modern day stereotypes due to his skin tone. 
Through out America there has been an epidemic of racial driven hate towards one another, 
Staples explains the drastic measure adopted into his lifestyle to stop the stereotypes. Originating 
from a troubled neighborhood Staples broke away from all the violence and perused higher 
education. Although being college educated Staples continued to fall victim of these hate crimes 
and even compared stories with others.  
 
“Shatford Tutorial.” ​
Pasadena City College​
. Pasadena City College. n.d. Web. 04 Jun., 2015 
Tutorial guides students to using library database. It represents four sessions to help students. 
First session is to introduce the Shatford library such as where for borrowing, computer lab, and 
so on. Next is session 2 for research by looking up database through library website. Session 3 
shows types of database as periodical or books. Then, how to use searching technique is showed 
in session 4. Session 5 is to evaluate sources and the last session is to avoid plagiarism.  
 
Tardiff, Elyssa, and Allen Brizee. "Tips and Examples for Writing Thesis Statements." 
Purdue OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement​
. The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue 
and Purdue University, 10 Feb. 2014. Web. 19 June 2015. 
This section provides some tips for writing thesis statement by 1) Determining what kind of 
paper you are writing; 2) Being specific with thesis statement; 3) Making sure thesis statement 
usually appears at the end of the first paragraph of a paper; 4) Having a tentative thesis first 

because your topic may change as you write. The section also offers thesis statement examples 
for analytical paper, expository paper, and argumentative paper for different needs. 
 
 ​
"Ten Steps for Writing a Research Paper.avi." ​
YouTube​
. CCFTL1'S Channel, 24 Feb. 2012. 
Web. 19 June 2015. 
 
This video breaks the process of writing a research paper down into 10 steps.The steps are 1) 
Choose and Narrow a Subject to a more focused topic; 2) Think about purpose, audience, and 
voice; 3) Use a variety of sources; 4) Take notes and use bibliography cards; 5) Organize your 
information; 6) Make an outline; 7) Write a main idea statement; 8) Write your report; 9) Write 
your reference list; 10) Revise and proofread your report. It provides the viewers a quick way to 
know what the process is and also helps the novice writers understand how to break the task 
down and tackle it step by step. 
 
“Test Preparing Strategy Timed Writing.” ​
California State University Northridge. 
California State University Northridge.​
 ​
n.d.​
 ​
Web. 21 May, 2015. 
This article helps students in timed writing by giving some strategies. First, Analyze an essay 
question to determine what it requires. Next strategy is writing a clear thesis statement for a 
position. Lastly, plan and write under pressure of a limit time. 
 
 
Wells, Jaclyn M., Morgan Sousa, Mia Martini, and Allen Brizee. “Steps for Revising Your 
Paper.” ​
The OWL at Purdue​
. 1 Mar. 2013. Web. 12 June 2015. 
This section serves as a manual to provide step­by­step instruction for novice writers to revise a 
paper. It is suggested that one should follow the questions to revise and evaluate one’s paper: 1) 
Final your main point; 2) Identify your readers and your purpose; 3) Evaluate your evidence; 4) 
Sve only the good pieces; 5) Tighten and clean up your language; 6) Switch from writer­centered 
to reader­centered. 
 
William Akana.  “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World: A Hell of a Ride” ​
Reading Critically 
Writing Well: A Reader and Guide​
. Ed. Axelrod, Rise B., and Charles Raymond 
th​
Cooper, and Alison Warriner M 10​
 ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2013. ​
279­283. ​
Print. 
 
It was a saturday night William Akana had just finished watching the Scott Pilgrim vs the World, 
and was most likely compelled to write a review about the movie. Through out the review Akana 
depicts key parts of the movie that were most intriguing to him, utilizing lines from the movie 
the review takes a more personal approach. Discussing the target audience of the movie being 
geared towards the  “gaming generation” Akana finds the movie relatable. In Akana’s review 

key factors are discussed and analysed, yet utilizing other reviews of the film Akana illustrates 
into great detail of how the movie was “A Hell of a Ride”.  
 
“Writing a Reflection.” ​
YouTube​
. Love Your Pencil. 22 Sep. 2012. Web. 04 Jun. 2015. 
 
Author represents about how to write a reflection. The reflection paper is to show how you 
thoughts about something rather than writing a summary or description. It is not a description 
paper; you need to give readers a good understanding on how you feel and what you think about 
the subject. In this video, authors also brief examples to make it clear to write reflection 
sentence. 
 
“Writing a Thesis Statement.” ​
YouTube​
. YouTube, 21 Apr., 2013. Web. 19 Jun. 2015 
 

In the video,​
 ​
Author shows the three steps to write a thesis statement. First step is to ask what is 
your topic by forming a question about ourselves. Then, we will find some reasons that answer 
for your question. Lastly, we combine information from first and second step to get a thesis 
statement.