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EMERGENCY

PROCEDURES  GUIDE
Revised 2012

Independent School District #196
Rosemount/Apple Valley/Eagan Public Schools
Educating Our Students to Reach Their Full Potential
The information contained in this handbook is intended to provide general guidance in the event of
an emergency. Deviations from the guidelines contained in this handbook may be required based on
individual circumstances. A failure to adhere to the guidelines in a p
­ articular circumstance shall not be
construed to create liability for the school district.

Board of Education
Jackie Magnuson, Chairperson
Rob Duchscher, Vice Chairperson
Joel Albright, Clerk
Art Coulson, Treasurer
Gary Huusko, Director
Mike Roseen, Director
Bob Schutte, Director

Superintendent
Jane K. Berenz

Acknowledgements
Rosemount/Apple Valley/Eagan Police and Fire Departments
Mark Parr
Kerri Hudgens
Cris Town
Mike Radant
Joan Bertelsen
Tim Conboy
Sarah Dahl
Randy Dukek
Chad Rosa

Table of Contents
Introduction
Prevention and Mitigation/Preparedness/Response/Recovery/Evaluation
Minimum Annual Drills
Initial Response
Page
Annual Emergency Preparedness Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-II
Building-Level Emergency Management Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III
First Steps in Any Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV-V
Emergency Telephone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI
Contacts for After-Hours Building Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VII
High School and Middle School Administrative Cell Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII
Crisis Procedure Checklist for the Principal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IX-X
Crisis Information Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XI
Response Procedures
Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Bomb/Bomb Threat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Bus/Car Accident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Disturbance/Demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Drug/Alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Fallen Aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Fire/Explosion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Hazardous Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Hostage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Intruder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14
Kidnapping/Missing Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lockdown Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Medical Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-21
Multiple Casualty Incident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
National Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
District Response to Homeland Security Advising System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-27
Off-Site Evacuation/Relocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-34
Pandemic Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35-39
Parent/Student Reunification Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Prank Phone Call/Email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-42
Severe Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43-44
Sexual Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Shelter-In-Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Shooting/Stabbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48-49
Suspicious Substance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Suspicious Letter/Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Threats of Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52-53
Utility Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Weapons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55-58
Weapons on District Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59-60
Communications
Media Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Media Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
First Public Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Crisis Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Parent Notification Concerning Threats or Rumors at School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Recovery
Page
Understanding Emotional Trauma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Goals for Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-68
Post-Crisis Intervention Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
General Strategies for Follow-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Roles and Responsibilities in Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Information for Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Suicide Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-73
Examples of Classroom Strategies/Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-76
Helping Students and Staff Recover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77-78
Information to Share with Parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Appendix
District Background Check Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Emergency Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-85 
A Summary of the Key Findings and Implications for the Prevention of
School Attacks in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86-89
Telephone Threat Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Prank Phone Call Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Crisis Procedure Checklist for Principal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92-93
Crisis Information Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Evaluation of an Emergency (Procedure 709P) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95-96
Emergency Drill Schedule and Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Threat Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98-101
Threat Assessment Sources of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-104
Threat Assessment Inquiry Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105-109
Threat Assessment Analysis Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110-114
District Policies, Regulations, Procedures*
Adminstrative Regulation 401.5AR Pre-Employment Background Check . . . . . . . . . . . . 115-116
Policy 506 - Student Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117-120
Adminstrative Regulation 506.1AR - Security in District Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121-122
Adminstrative Regulation 506.2.1AR - Medical Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Procedure 506.2.1.4P - Medical Incident Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124-125
Adminstrative Regulation 506.5AR - Death of a Student or Employee . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126-128
Procedure 707.2.3P - School Bus Accident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129-130
Policy 709 - Emergency Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Procedure 709P - Follow-up Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132-133
Adminstrative Regulation 709.1AR - Emergency School Closings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134-135
Sample Emergency Notification Letters, Emails/Announcements/Parenting Tips
Attempted Child Abduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Bomb Threat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138-142
Exposure Incident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Student Death by Accident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Student Death by Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Suspicious Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146-148
Weapon Letter to Parent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Table Top Excercises
Table Top Excercises Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Table Top Excercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152-171
*Check District Policy Manual or website for most recent versions of policies, regulations and procedures.

INTRODUCTION

This manual is to be used by administrators and Building Emergency Management Teams as a guide
to dealing with crisis situations and to help guide buildings in developing their individual school crisis plans.
The manual should be reviewed annually by building management teams. Although each crisis is unique, the
best preparation for an emergency is careful planning, execution and evaluation and there will be occasions
when common sense and good, on the spot, decision making must prevail.

This manual is designed to walk the building administration and Building Emergency Management
Team through the Five Phases of Emergency Management: Prevention and Mitigation, Preparedness,
Response, Recovery and Evaluation. The manual follows this basic format in its layout. The Response
section is in alphabetical order. There is also a Forms section and a Table Top Exercise section at the end of
the manual. The forms should be used during and after a crisis. The sample letters that are included may be
changed or adapted as necessary.

PREVENTION AND MITIGATION
Prevention and Mitigation is the first phase of emergency management. Prevention is the attempt
to deflect a crisis before it can occur, by mitigating or reducing risks. Mitigation refers to actions
taken to reduce the adverse effect of an emergency. Mitigation measures can be implemented
before an emergency, during an emergency, or in recovery from an emergency.

Crisis Prevention and Intervention Recommendations
Prevention and early intervention should and must be an integral part of any plan to protect students, staff
and parents in the school community. The Federal Emergency Agency (FEMA) has determined the goal of
mitigration is to decrease the need for response as opposed to simply increasing response capability. Listed
below are recommendations that will help to create a safer environment for the staff and students who
work, learn and play in our schools. Some recommendations are easy to implement and may be done so
without large expenditures of money, time or material. There are other recommendations that will require
expenditures of money, time and materials. All recommendations are important and should be given equal
consideration.
PREVENTION: Activities designed to prevent a crisis from occurring.
1. A system of visitor passes should be set up, advertised and used in all schools.
2. Staff identification and substitute badges should be worn by all staff in all schools.
3. All exterior doors must be able to close and lock, according to fire safety regulations.
4. Access to the interior of the school should be limited to a few well-monitored areas.
5. An anonymous reporting system should be set up in each school .
6. It should be made clear to parents and students that desks and lockers are the property of
District 196 schools and are subject to search at any time.
7. A school, standardized, simple behavior code, which is written in positive terms, should be posted
in all classrooms.
8. The District 196 Student Rights and Responsibilities handbook will be available to parents/
guardians at the start of every school year, including strict consequences for weapon and drug
possession.
9. A police department School Resource Officer will be scheduled in each secondary school.
10. Surveillance cameras will be set up in problem areas to reduce theft, vandalism andassaults.
11. A building-specific laminated Important Safety Reminders Card should be made available to all
faculty and staff.

12. Crisis drill training should be conducted regularly with staff and students.
13. Teacher training programs should be set up in the following areas:






Social Skills Training Curriculum for problem solving;
Anger management and conflict management;
How to recognize individual predictors of violence;
How to recognize imminent warning signs of violence;
How to recognize the warning signs of suicide;
First aid and CPR training, and
Crisis drill training.

PREPAREDNESS
Preparedness is the process of a.) developing a school emergency plan, b.) deciding
what actions will be taken in an emergency, and c.) determining who will respond in an
emergency before the emergency actually occurs. Preparedness involves the coordination
between the school district, individual schools and the community at large.

1. A comprehensive, fully functional communications system should be in all schools. Included in this
recommendation are the following: two-way radios available for classes that are being conducted outside
the building, cellular phones for all principals and assistant principals, and intercom systems that allow
for communication to and from the main office, including corridors.
2. A Building Emergency Management Team should be in place at each school.
3. A close working relationship, with both formal and informal lines of communication should exist
between various community agencies, including the police, fire, mental health services, the school
district and parents.
4. All interior classroom doors should be in proper working condition and capable of being locked.
5. The Emergency Evacuation Routes should be displayed in each room at all schools.
6. Full-scale exercises should be conducted yearly in all buildings.

Schools are required by minnesota statutes 121a.037 & 123B.90
to conduct the following drills each year:
5 .........Fire Drills
1 .........Severe Weather Drill (coordinate with Minnesota Severe Weather Alert)

5 .........Emergency Lockdown Drills (one staff-only drill during workshop week, three during
the school year with students and one in summer)
1..........School Bus Safety Training Seminar for Students
1..........School Bus Evacuation Drill
DISTRICT-INITIATED PREVENTION ACTIONS
1 .........Canine Search (high school parking lot)
1..........Additional internal building canine search may be conducted at the discretion of the
principal when students are not present
Refer to the Emergency Drill Schedule and Log found on page 97.

RESPONSE
When an emergency occurs, it is time to implement the plan, not to create the plan. Response is the
process of implementing appropriate actions while the emergency situation is unfolding. In this phase
schools and districts mobilize resources and implement emergency procedures necessary to handle the
situation.

RECOVERY
The goal of recovery is to restore the learning environment and infrastructure of the school as quickly
as possible. The plan for recovery needs to be developed during the preparedness phase, not after
an emergency or crisis situation. Recovery consists of four main components: emotional, academic,
physical/structured and fiscal recovery.

EVALUATION
The evaluation process is critical to the emergency plan. Identifying those items of the plan which
operated well and those requiring additional improvement will provide for a safe school environment.

Initial Response

Initial
Response

Annual Emergency PREPAREDNESS EXPECTATIONS

���������

During pre-school workshop week, in-service Building-Level Emergency Management
Team members on Emergency P
­ rocedures Guide.

���������

During pre-school workshop week, in-service secretarial staff on proper procedures for
suspicious or threatening phone calls. (Note pages 41, 42, 90 and 91 in the Emergency
Procedures Guide. Check when finished. These pages should be copied and kept by the
secretary's desk.)

���������

Distribute and in-service all staff in your building on the School and Classroom Emergency
Procedures Guide.

���������

Review/update/complete utility emergency lists with names and numbers (page 54 in
Emergency Procedures Guide).

���������

Review the items to be kept in the emergency kit (page 82 in the Emergency Procedures
Guide).

���������


Complete the following documents (pages 83-85 in the Emergency Procedures Guide):
• Emergency Telephone Directory (page 83);
• Trained First Aid/CPR Providers/Defibrillator Operators (page 84), and
• Hazardous Materials List for Emergency Kit (page 85)

���������

The Health and Safety Consultant will consult with all building chiefs to obtain the
hazardous materials list and location of hazardous materials (page 85 in Emergency
Procedures Guide).

���������

Identify at least two on-site evacuation shelter-in-place locations (page V in Emergency
Procedures Guide) and two on-site command posts (page IV Emergency Procedures
Handbook).

���������

Develop/review an alternative communication plan in the event you cannot use the PA
system or radio communication.

���������

Develop/review a “lights-out” plan for when emergencies occur and the lights are out.

���������

Review minimum annual drill expectations and develop/review site specific emergency
lockdown procedures. Set a date for annual lockdown drill (September/October).

���������

Develop Parent Reunification Plan in case of a lockdown, shelter-in-place or off-site
evacuation.

I

Annual Emergency PREPAREDNESS EXPECTATIONS continued

���������

Make sure your building has an active EBS (Emergency Broadcast System) alarm/
weather alert radio.

���������

Post Tornado Shelter (shelter-in-place) and Building Evacuation maps in each room.

���������

Develop a telephone tree for all building staff members.

���������

Review web-based building layout and controls provided by Facilities. Place in front
pocket of the Emergency Procedures Guide.

���������

Review emergency shutoff locations and procedures (gas, water, etc.). These are
school specific.

���������

Replace and update security, safety, and building numbering signs on doors and
windows.

���������

Review “A Summary of the Key Findings and Implications for the Prevention of
School Attacks in the United States” found in Appendix (pages 86-89 in Emergency
Procedures Guide). Members of the Student Assistance Team will review these
documents.

���������

Send the names and voice mail numbers of your Building-Level Emergency
Management Team members to the appropriate director.

���������

Notify the appropriate director of any changes to off-site evacuation locations.

���������

School nurse reviews items to be kept in the Health Emergency Kit.

���������

School nurse ­develops evacuation plans for medically fragile students.

���������

School nurse completes the Multiple Incident Plan (page 22 in the Emergency
Procedures Guide).

���������

Review Emergency Phone Numbers List (pages VI and VIII in the Emergency
Procedures Guide).

*Reminder: After any emergency, complete the Follow-up Evaluation of an
Emergency form and send to the appropriate director at the District Office
(Procedure 709P - pages 95-96 in Emergency Procedures Guide).

II

Building-Level Emergency Management Team

NAME
POSITION

Principal

Administrator

Administrator

Administrator

Building Chief

Principal’s Secretary

School Psychologist

Counselor

Counselor

Police Liaison Officer

School Nurse

OFFICE VOICE
EXTENSION # MAIL #

HOME PHONE #

In the event of any emergency, the principal will:
a. Activate the Building-Level Emergency Management Team.
b. If necessary, provide first aid treatment and call the appropriate authorities.
Ambulance, fire, police (9)-911.
c. Notify the superintendent’s office #37749 (651-423-7749).

All building staff members will receive a telephone tree.
____________________________ is responsible for calling me.
I am responsible for calling ________________________, _____________________, ____________________

III

First Steps In Any Emergency
1.






Activate Building-Level Emergency Management Team.
• Principal #_______________
• Building administrator(s) or designee(s) #_______________
• Building Chief #_______________
• Principal’s secretary #______________
• School Psychologist or Counselor(s) # _______________
• Police Liaison Officer # _______________
• School Nurse # _______________

2. If necessary, provide first aid treatment and call the appropriate authorities.

• Ambulance, Fire, Police (9)-911
3. Principal’s secretary should notify the Superintendent’s Office (#37749 or 651-423-7749). They
will activate the District-Level Emergency Management Team.

• Superintendent #37749 or 651-423-7749

• Communications Specialist #37775 or 651-423-7775

• Director of Secondary Education #37712 or 651-423-7712

• Director of Elementary Education #37782 or 651-423-7782

• Director of Community Education #37720 or 651-423-7720

• Director of Special Education #37628 or 651-423-7628

• School District Attorney #37883 or 651-423-7883

• Director of Finance #37713 or 651-423-7713

• Director of Human Resources #37859 or 651-423-7859

• Coordinator of Facilities and Grounds #37702 or 651-423-7702

• Coordinator of Transportation #37685 or 651-423-7685

(Inform transportation of any evacuation, even if no buses are needed.)

• Coordinator of Food and Nutrition Services #36956 or 651-423-6956
4. If needed, establish a command post. (Each school should have two possible locations decided in
advance.) The principal’s secretary takes the emergency kit. The school nurse is responsible for the
nursing emergency kit. The nurse will develop and maintain an evacuation plan for medically fragile
student(s). 1) ___________________________________ 2) ______________________________________

• Do not release any information to the press. Refer all questions to the Communications Specialist #37775 or
651-423-7775.
5. If appropriate:
a. Announce the emergency throughout your building to alert all staff to the type of
situation and any immediate action required.
b. Turn off bell system and fire alarms.

• Emergency Lockdown:
An emergency incident has taken place and may prevent the safe evacuation of a school building
and require steps to isolate students and faculty from danger by instituting a school lockdown (e.g.
assault, weapon, intruder); students and teachers should remain in locked rooms (if possible) until
further notice. Building-Level Emergency Management Team will check hallways, restrooms, playground, phy. ed. areas, media center and other common areas, and take students in these areas to
a safe place. Teachers take class lists, purses and keys, and keep their students in groups.
If this occurs during non-instructional hours, all available staff will help take students to a safe
area.
Example: This is _____________. Teachers, a situation has occurred which requires everyone
to remain in a classroom until further notice. No staff or students are to leave the current classroom until told to do so and ignore any fire alarms. (Repeat twice.)

IV

First Steps In Any Emergency (continued)

• Evacuation:
An immediate evacuation of the building is required (e.g. hazardous materials). Teachers take class lists,
purses and keys, and keep their students in groups. An evacuation is when you leave the area of actual
or potential hazard (i.e. chemical or biological). Students and staff should be at least 500 feet away from
the building. Emergency managers carefully develop plans and procedures for evacuation to avoid confusion and get people out of an area safely and quickly.


Example: This is _____________. Teachers, a situation has occurred which requires you to gather
your students, take your class lists, purses and keys, and evacuate the building immediately. We will evacuate to _____________ (one of the e­ vacuation sites). (Repeat twice.)

• Shelter-in-Place:
Shelter-in-place means to stay inside the school building. Shelter-in-place can be used when there is little
time to react to an incident and it would be more dangerous to try to evacuate than it would be to stay
where you are. Identify two on-site shelter-in-place locations; It may also include additional precautions
such as turning off air conditioners and ventilation systems and closing all windows and doors.

1) ____________________________________ 2) __________________________________________

• Potential National Emergency:
Only release students to their parents/guardians at the front door. Students who travel from school to
school, must remain in their current building.

• Potential Local Emergency:
Police liaisons may not be available to assist at the schools. Activate building-level emergency
­management team.

ALL COMMUNICATION WITH PARENTS, COMMUNITY AND MEDIA
MUST BE COORDINATED WITH THE DISTRICT COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST.
* The Follow-up Evaluation of an Emergency (procedure 709P - pages 95 & 96) must be sent to the District Office.
6. When re-entry is permitted, staff should visually inspect their classrooms.
7. Grief counseling and aftercare will occur. Contact members of your faith community or (Apple Valley,
Burnsville, Eagan, Lakeville, Rosemount) police department to access the Chaplin Service program.

Community Education/After HOurs
If situations arise during Community Education/after-hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on
duty:
Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

V

VI

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential

Contacts for After-Hours Building Emergencies
1.

If there is a building emergency after-hours, the building chief for the building where the emergency exists is the first person
who should be contacted. The building chief is then required to contact the principal.
BUILDING
Apple Valley High
Area Learning Center (ATP)
Transition Plus/Pathway (ATP)
Black Hawk Middle
Cedar Park Elementary/STEM
Cedar Valley Learning Center
Cooperative Area Learning Program
Dakota Hills Middle
Dakota Ridge
Deerwood Elementary
Diamond Path Elementary/SIS
District Service Center/Facilities & Grounds
District Office
District Office East
Eagan High
Early Childhood Learning Center
Eastview High
Echo Park Elementary
Falcon Ridge Middle
Glacier Hills Elementary/SAS
Greenleaf Elementary
Highland Elementary
Northview Elementary
Oak Ridge Elementary
Parkview Elementary
Pinewood Elementary
Rahncliff Learning Center
Red Pine Elementary
Rosemount Elementary
Rosemount High
Rosemount Middle
School of Environmental Studies
Scott Highlands Middle
Shannon Park Elementary
Southview Elementary
Thomas Lake Elementary
Valley Middle
Westview Elementary
Woodland Elementary

2.

BUILDING CHIEF/MANAGER
Dave Herrmann – 651-463-3491
Jeff Schaefer – 952-994-0496
Jeff Schaefer – 952-994-0496
Dan Heller – 612-308-8874
Adam Herrmann – 651-334-6575
Susan LeTourneau – 612-360-3969
Steve Brown – 651-423-5720
Carol Hanson – 651-463-8482
Steve Brown – 651-423-5720
Dan Heller – 612-308-8874
Mark Rosenquist – 651-315-1536
Steve Brown – 651-423-5720
Mike Schwanke – 651-423-6553
Ken Kraft – 651-455-6466
Mark Kesti – 651-455-0368
Rita Marshall – 651-463-4873
Brian Fischer – 952-808-9690
Dick Rischmiller – 1-507-332-0382
Roger Wencel – 612-801-3460
Paul Van Zuilen – 651-463-8745
Rich Pruter – 651-423-6279
Jeff Dold – 651-438-9261
Steve Ball – 651-492-9411
Mark Warweg – 651-437-7552
Maureen Feyder – 612-490-0652
Dave Mattson – 952-412-1056
Tim Gulbranson – 651-442-8175
Mark Holter – 612-716-0930
Rolf Torkelson – 952-380-9817
Chuck Hyatt – 952-681-9355
Mike Halbmaier – 952-463-8525
Ron McCarthy – 952-894-2800
Jeff Dold – 651-438-9261
Ron Matson – 651-438-2493
Brad Stone – 1-507-645-5093
Mike Linnenkamp – 651-681-1838
Brad Stone – 1-507-645-5093
Don Hereau – 952-432-4270
Mark Quarford – 651-423-6228

PRINCIPAL/COORDINATOR
Steve Degenaar – 651-686-0804
Dave Schmitz – 651-423-6176
Paula Krippner – 612-636-4897
Rich Wendorff – 651-248-1281
John Garcia – 952-454-7654
Cathy Koering – 651-340-8469
Jane Schroer – 952-435-6317
Trevor Johnson – 651-456-0369
Nandi Rieck – 651-955-1452
Miles Haugen – 952-431-4494
Lynn Hernandez – 651-686-0029
Mike Schwanke – 651-423-6553
Mike Schwanke – 651-423-6553
Randy Dukek – 952-985-0740
Polly Reikowski – 952-452-5022
Debbie Kelly – 612-221-1599
Karen Kellar – 612-850-6792
Randy Peterson – 952-452-0232
Sally Soliday – 952-891-3457
Noel Mehus – 651-775-7772
Jeff Holten – 952-953-4968
Michelle deKam Palmieri – 612-825-6713
Chad Ryburn – 952-758-2777
Kathy Carl – 952-237-6276
Kris Scallon – 651-994-8738
Pam Haldeman – 651-688-2707
Cris Town – 651-895-2190
Cathy Koering – 651-340-8469
Gary Anger – 651-248-7562
Tom Idstrom – 651-485-1068
John Wollersheim – 651-248-8537
Mary Thompson – 651-322-4642
Dan Bodette – 651-212-1164
Dan Wilharber – 952-688-3763
Michael Guthrie – 952-435-1059
Rhonda Smith – 612-920-7539
Mary Jelinek – 651-683-0290
Dave McKeag – 952-953-3635
Tami Staloch-Schultz – 612-209-5234
Lisa Carlson – 1-507-645-0483

If the building chief or manager cannot be contacted, the following district personnel should be notified
in the order they are listed:
PHONE NUMBER
DISTRICT PERSONNEL
1. Mike Schwanke, Coordinator of Facilities
651-423-6553 (612-919-1040, cell)
2. Heather Nosan, Project Manager
651-423-6920 (952-220-6399, cell)
3. Kerry Hudgens, Health & Safety Supervisor
612-875-9078
4. Principal or Coordinator
See list above

3. After emergency action has been initiated, the following person should be contacted immediately:
1. Jeff Solomon .......................... 1-507-451-4632 (1-507-213-9493, cell)
4. If there is a Community Education building emergency, please contact:
1.

Revised 7/31/2012

Barb St.Aubin ...................... 651-245-4606

VII

HIGH SCHOOL AND MIDDLE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE CELL PHONE NUMBERS

July, 2012

NAME
Allen, Laura Kay
Bodette, Dan
Buchwald, Stacey
Budde, Kim
Buesgens, Pete
Conboy, Tim
Dahl, Sarah
Davis, Erik
Degenaar, Steve
Devich, Carol
Franchino, Rob
Hansen, Eric
Hanson, Jodi
Hedlund, Tara
Jameson, Stacy
Johnson, Trevor
Jokela, Linda
Manning, Mike
Martinson, Kim
McKeag, Dave
Mehus, Noel
Miller, Bruce
Parr, Mark
Percival, Matt
Peterson, Randy
Pulice, Joe
Reikowski, Polly
Roback, Pete
Roberts, Jim
Schafer, Brad
Schmitz, Dave
Setter, Sandra
Storley, Drew
Thomas, Stephanie
Thompson, Mary
Thompson, Steven
Tinder, Paul
Wendorff, Rich
Wilharber, Dan
Williams, Jay
Wollersheim, John
Zak, Peter

SCHOOL
AVHS
SES
VMS
RHS
AVHS
RHS
SHMS
DHMS
AVHS
FRMS
EVHS
RMS
EVHS
EHS
EHS
DHMS
AVHS
RHS
EVHS
VMS
FRMS
EVHS
DO
EVHS
EVHS
BHMS
EHS
RHS
DHMS
RMS
ALC
EHS
RHS
VMS
RMS
EHS
AVHS
BHMS
SHMS
BHMS
RHS
EHS

CELL NUMBER
612-363-8565
651-212-1164
651-341-9277
651-248-8897
651-307-6321
651-248-8011
952-292-2310
612-207-8314
651-492-9300
651-785-3477
651-755-1274
651-775-7776
612-202-6227
651-248-5392
651-402-0357
651-248-2091
612-801-6665
651-248-7250
952-797-2739
612-221-7355
651-775-7772
651-755-1278
952-484-3546
952-210-7112
952-452-0232
612-670-6433
651-248-5390
651-248-7464
651-248-2093
612-250-8940
651-353-6176
651-248-5495
651-248-4825
612-239-9666
651-248-6680
651-248-5189
651-230-0958
651-248-1281
952-688-3763
651-248-7165
651-248-8537
651-248-5389
VIII

CRISIS PROCEDURE CHECKLIST FOR THE PRINCIPAL
(Sample only, use sheet in appendix)

This checklist is provided as a guide for principals for emergencies. It is intended to be used as a tool to help
principals, secretaries and other Emergency Management Team members during a crisis.
______1. CONDUCT AN IMMEDIATE ASSESSMENT

a. Confirm and ascertain the type of incident.

b. Obtain essential information (what happened, who was involved, what did witnesses see).
______2. SUMMON HELP

a. Call police or (9)-911.

b. Implement site crisis management plan.

c. Gather school staff assigned to emergency duties.
______3. SOUND WARNING TO SCHOOL STAFF

a. Use PA and/or bell code systems or make announcement to all, such as lockdown.

b. Employ immediate sheltering actions for those exposed to danger.

c. Ensure that all others are sheltered in place or moved to a safer location if possible.
______4. LOCK DOWN BUILDING, SECURE AREAS, MONITOR SITUATIONS

a. Order all exterior doors locked.

b. Lock interior doors where possible.

c. Communicate to staff to monitor conditions.

d. Recognize need and be ready for contingencies.
______5. WAIT FOR POLICE
a. K 
eep responding units updated on situation via (9)-911, communicate command post location to
(9)-911 or police.

b. Assemble witnesses and victim, providing they are able to assemble.

c. Go to command post and wait for police and or emergency medical services.

d. Gather key information for law enforcement.
______6. STABILIZE ELEMENTS OF SITUATION AS SOON AS SAFE TO DO SO

a. Care for injured (ensuring safety for those assisting).

b. Account for all students and staff on-site or at hospital or other off-site locations.

c. Notify parents/guardians.

d. Protect crime scene, evidence.
______7. WORK WITH POLICE TO RESOLVE SITUATION

a. Stay at command post, supporting law enforcement.

b. Provide information, including incident-specific knowledge, site background and resources, and
special staff resources, abilities, training, etc.

c. Coordinate school response on-site and off-site (staging areas, hospitals, etc.).
______8. SIGNAL "ALL CLEAR" AFTER POLICE OR FIRE GIVE THE “OK”

a. Notify parents/guardians.

b. Support law enforcement follow-up activities.

c. Debrief staff.
______9. INITIATE RECOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES

a. Brief staff and provide (access to) support.

b. Plan for resumption of school ("next day" plan).

c. Arrange for physical plant clean-up and repair.

d. Begin long-term recovery planning.

IX

CRISIS PROCEDURE CHECKLIST FOR THE PRINCIPAL (con’t)
NURSE RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Administer first aid.
_____Request additional medical assistance from fire department using (9)-911.
_____Arrange for someone to go with unaccompanied students to hospital.
_____Secure student health information and accident card(s).
_____Send or bring information with student to hospital.

FACULTY RESPONSIBILITIES:
Check off what you want the faculty to do during a crisis:
_____Announce event in classroom and discuss with students. (if appropriate).
_____Identify students in need of counseling and notify an administrator, guidance counselor or psychologist.
_____Escort very distraught students to the guidance counselor.
_____Postpone testing.
_____Assist with care of injured and/or ill if needed.
_____Involve class in constructive activities relating to the event.
_____Eliminate, shorten, and structure assignments for a few days with an eye towards normal activities as
soon as possible.

GUIDANCE/SOCIAL WORKER/PSYCHOLOGIST
RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Coordinate counseling activities including obtaining more help.
_____Provide temporary counseling for students who are in need.
_____Communicate with faculty and be prepared to counsel staff.
_____Inform feeder schools and area schools so they can provide support for students affected.
_____Maintain a list of students counseled.
_____Call parents of students counseled to recommend continued out-of-school support for students who are
very distressed.
_____Provide appropriate mental health information to parents.

SECRETARIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Notify superintendent.
_____Direct all calls for information to the media spokesperson.
_____Keep in contact with the principal through two-way radio or intercom.
_____Contact Safety Team members to assemble, including location of meeting.
_____Direct emergency personnel to scene of crisis, if an evacuation has not been ordered.

X

CRISIS INFORMATION WORKSHEET (Sample only, use worksheet in appendix)
(THIS SHEET CONTAINS FACTUAL, CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION AND IS NOT FOR
GENERAL USE, PUBLICATION OR RELEASE. THE MEDIA SPOKESPERSON MAY USE THIS
INFORMATION TO DEVELOP PRESS RELEASES.)
Nature of Crisis:____________________________________________________________________
Location(s) of Crisis:________________________________________________________________
Police Commander:_________________________ Fire Commander:_________________________
Command Post Location: ______________________________________________
Action Taken at Time of Report:
Numbers of students involved:_______ Numbers of adults involved:_______
Parent meeting point location:_________________________________________
Police/fire involvement:____________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
Hospitals involved:________________________________________________________________
Parent notification method: __________________________________________________________
Stabilization and control of scene: ____________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Other pertinent information:_________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
Students Involved: HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL, NOT FOR RELEASE (A separate list may be attached)
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
Adults Involved: HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL, NOT FOR RELEASE (A separate list may be attached)
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
Other facts:________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
XI

Response Procedures

Response
Procedures

An Assault is defined as an act with intent to inflict
bodily harm upon another person. Understand
that violence is time-lined. Early intervention may
reduce or eliminate the escalation of an incident.

As

Steps in Case of Serious Physical Assault:

sa
ul
t

1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. E 
nsure the safety of students and staff by exercising the necessary physical constraints to stop the
incident. Request the assistance of other adult staff to break up fights. Separate participants and do
not allow further visual or verbal contact. Remove any bystanders as quickly as possible.
3. A 
ssess students involved for medical needs. Do not leave involved students alone. Notify medical personnel
(school nurse and/or (9)-911) as needed.
• Give type and number of injuries
• Advise if assailant is still in the building.
• Give name and description of assailant.
• Give direction and mode of travel (vehicle type and description).
4. R 
eport all serious physical assaults or aggravated assaults to the police liaison officer or local police. Protect
the crime scene. Make a note of circumstances and individuals present. Take
statements from witnesses and participants.
5. Take appropriate administrative and disciplinary actions, including detailed reports.
6. Contact parents and guardians of students involved in the incident.
Steps in Case of Sexual Violence
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. W 
hen a school is notified that a rape or other sexual abuse may have occurred, the school must protect the
identity and right to privacy of the alleged victim and the alleged perpetrator. News of the incident should be
contained as much as possible. Appropriate response by school staff will be directed at assisting the victim,
addressing and minimizing the fear of fellow students, and quelling the spread of rumors. Services provided to
the victim and his/her family must be kept confidential and should be coordinated with outside providers, such
as a rape crisis center, children's advocacy center as well as the confidentiality of names and nature of medical
emergencies.
3. Contact the community resource officer or local police department to begin a criminal investigation.
4. Contact parents/guardians of student(s) involved in the incident.
5. Secure the building and grounds.
6. Consult with the district communications specialist.
7. Take any appropriate administrative and disciplinary actions, including detailed reports.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Utilize the assistance of custodians or other adults to break up fights.
2. Call (9)-911.
3. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703.

1

Critical Information:
1. Schools are responsible for assessing bomb threats
to determine credibility.
2. All bomb threats must be taken seriously until they
are assessed.
3. The decision whether or not to evacuate rests with
the school, not the responding agencies, unless a
device is located.
Caution: Overreacting may encourage additional threats.

Bo B
m o
b

m

th b/
re
at
s

Steps in Case of a Bomb or Suspicious Device
1. Secure area. Do not touch anything suspicious.
2. U 
se alternative communication plan to inform staff and students of immediate evacuation. Areas in close proximity to the found device should be evacuated first, including floors immediately above and below the found
device.
3. Notify the local police and tell them you have evacuated the building. Report the location and an accurate
description of the object.
4. Notify the District Office of the evacuation and activate the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
Steps in Case of Bomb Threat
A decision to use the PA system will be based on the information received.
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
a. Consult with the District Office to decide whether you need to evacuate the building.
b. A decision to contact the local bomb authorities will be made at the district level.
Bloomington Bomb Squad - 952-563-4900
Minneapolis Bomb Squad - 612-348-2345
St. Paul Bomb Squad - 651-291-1111
c. The Building-Level Emergency Management Team should consider the safety of the outside perimeter.
Common exit areas should be carefully checked for suspicious items.
2. Notify the building chief immediately.
3. If you decide to evacuate:
a. DO NOT SOUND THE FIRE ALARM. If the PA system is not used, implement the alternative plan
to inform staff and students of the evacuation. (A sample announcement is provided on pages IV & V).
Also, remind staff and students:
DO NOT USE CELL PHONES, RADIOS OR FIRE ALARM SYSTEM BECAUSE OF THE RISK
OF ACTIVATING THE DEVICE. Do not touch anything suspicious!
b. While notification is being made, other staff should survey the grounds to clear exits and areas where
students and staff will be exiting. Exit routes should be altered accordingly if the location of the device is
known.
c. Notify the local police and tell them you are evacuating the building.
d. Everyone should be at least 500 feet away from the building. Teachers should take their class lists, keys
and purses, and keep their students in groups. Follow special arrangements for evacuating s­ tudents with
disabilities.
e. If elementary students are sent home, every effort should be made to accommodate the wishes of their
parent(s) and guardian(s).
4. Search Considerations:
a. A search will be organized by the fire and/or police departments. They may ask for assistance from the
custodial staff and other employees who are familiar with the building. The fire and/or police departments will brief the search teams on techniques to be used in a search. If necessary, the instructional

staff will be alerted and asked to report any unusual or suspicious items in their areas.
2

Bomb/Bomb Threats (continued)
b. Any suspicious devices, packages, etc. should be pointed out
to emergency responders. DO NOT TOUCH SUSPICIOUS
OBJECTS.
c. O 
nce a device is located and identified emergency responders take
responsibilty for it.

Bo B
m o
b

m

b/
t
hr
5. A decision to re-enter the building will be made upon consultation with the superintendent or designee.
ea 
NOTE: Persons receiving threats to bomb a school building must be prepared to
ts
ask certain questions and take note of certain characteristics of the call itself and
person making the call.

NOTE: T 
he following steps should be taken by the person who receives a telephoned
bomb threat.
a. K 
eep the caller on the line as long as possible. Have someone call the police to trace the call.
If possible, record the call.
b. Use the questions on the Telephone Threat Checklist to obtain information (page 4).
c. Inform the caller that the building is occupied and detonation of a bomb could result in death or
serious injury to many children and adults.
d. P 
ay particular attention to any strange or peculiar background noises which might give even a
remote clue as to where the call originated.
e. Listen closely to the caller’s voice. Note any unusual characteristics such as an accent or speech impediment. Try to determine the age and sex of the person.
f. Immediately after the caller hangs up, the person receiving the call should complete the following checklist
(page 4) and give it to the administrator in charge.

NOTE: The following steps should be taken by the person who receives a written bomb threat.
a. Save all materials, including the envelope or container the written threat came in.
b. Avoid unnecessary handling of the written threat.
c. Preserve the note for the police by sealing it in a zip-lock bag or another envelope.
d. T 
ake a photograph or videotape of a written bomb threat on walls to keep for future r­eference.

NOTE: The following steps should be taken by the person who becomes aware of a bomb threat
via social media, email, Facebook, or any other electronic communication.
a. Follow bomb threat procedures.
b. Save the message on the system, DO NOT delete the email message.
c. Print a copy of the message to be turned over to the police and the Information Technology Department.
d. In addition to described notifications, also notify the Coordinator of Technology.

Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911 and stay on the line to report building address and location of possible bomb.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.
a. A decision to evacuate the building will be made with assistance of district administration and the police/
fire officials.
b. If a decision is made to evacuate the building, do not sound the alarm. Inform all people of the incident
and evacuate to at least 500 feet from the building. DO NOT TOUCH ANYTHING.
c. Direct instructors to take class lists.
3. Notify the Director of Community Education who will notify the superintendent.

3

Telephone Threat Checklist:

A copy of this form should be kept
at the desk of any person who
regularly answers the phone.

If you receive a telephoned threat (bomb/chemical/other):
• Remain calm.
• Do not hang up, keep the caller on the line as long as possible and listen carefully.
Ask the caller the following questions:
• Where is the bomb/chemical or other hazard located?
• When will it explode/be activated?
• What does it look like?
• What kind of bomb/hazard is it?
• What will cause it to explode/activate?
• What is your name?
• Where did you place the bomb/hazard? WHY?
• Where are you?

Exact wording of the threat:__________________________________________________________________
If voice is familiar, who did it sound like?________________________________________________________
Caller ID information
Male

Female

Adult

Juvenile

Age

Was the phone number identified?___________________________
Call origin:
Local

Long Distance

Internal

Cell Phone

Length of call_________ Exact time (hour, minute, second)_____________________ Date__________________
Record the next two calls to come in (phone number and exact time)
Phone:______________________ Time: _____________________
Phone:______________________ Time: _____________________
Caller’s voice: Note pattern of speech, type of voice, tone. Check all that apply.
Calm
Raspy
Slow
Drunken

Excited
Distinct
Rapid
Familiar

Loud
Slurred
Disguised
Incoherent

Soft
Normal
Accent
Deep breathing

Deep
Crying
Lisp

Nasal
Laughter
Stutter

Background sounds: Check all that apply.
Voices
Clear
Horns
Motor

Airplanes
Static
House noises
Phone booth

Street noises
Animals
PA system
Other:

Trains
Party
Music

Quiet
Vehicles
Factory machines

Bells

Threat language: Check all that apply.
Well-spoken (educated)

Foul

Taped

Incoherent

Irrational

Message read from script

Did caller indicate knowledge of the building? Give specifics:__________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Person receiving call:____________________ Phone number where call was received:_____________________
4

The principal and the coordinator of transportation or their designees will go to the
scene. Principal or designee will bring the
bus roster in order to account for all students. The bus roster may be used for checkout procedures and verification.
Steps in Case of Bus Accident with Injury - During School Hours

BU
AC S
CI /CA
DE R
NT

1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. School nurse may take one of the following actions:
a. Take the emergency cards and go to the accident scene if requested to do so by the principal.
b. C 
heck in all students arriving at school from the accident scene. Communicate with parent(s)/guardian(s)
accident information as soon as possible.
3. If a student is transported to the hospital, the principal or her/his designee will accompany. The emergency
card will be taken to the hospital along with the student. Communicate accident information with parents or
guardians as soon as possible.
4. R 
efer questions to the District Communications Specialist. Do not release any information until you have consulted the Communications Specialist.
Steps in Case of Bus Accident with Injury - After School Hours
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. The Coordinator of Transportation or her/his designee will go to the scene.
3. The principal or her/his designee will report to the school to assist in parent communication.
Community Education/After HOurs
In situations during Community Education/after hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty:
Cell phone 651-295-1703.
Car Accidents
1. A 
ccidents involving students which require EMS action will be dealt with by the appropriate agencies. High
school administrators, who become aware of accidents involving students which require EMS action, should
contact Mark Parr at 651-623-7714.
2. If school officials become aware of student(s) being involved in a car accident which does not require EMS
action, all involved students must be examined by the school nurse and parents must be contacted.

5

Disturbance or Demonstration
A disturbance or demonstration could threaten the
welfare and safety of staff and students. This can
include both small and large groups and can occur
inside the building, outside the building on the school
campus, and/or in the area of the school campus.
Demonstrating on school property should be deemed
trespassing. Minnesota State Statute 609.605 gives a
building school administrator authority to have persons
removed from school property as trespassers.

DE DIST

U
ON RB
ST AN
RA CE
TI /
ON

M

1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Normal classroom operations are to be maintained as much as possible and all students encouraged to stay in
the building.
3. Try to have the disturbance end peacefully. Clearly communicate to all students that students should either
attend classes or move to a designated area.
4. Ensure the safety of students and staff, particularly safe entry into and exit from the building.
5. Contain the disturbance in the smallest area possible.
6. Building Administrator asks demonstrators to leave school property. Warn them that they are violating the
state trespass statute. Notify law enforcement if necessary.
• If demonstrators leave, continue to monitor the situation.
• If the demonstrators do not leave, notify law enforcement. Building administrators may initiate a building
"lockdown" (refer to lockdown procedures) as necessary.
7. Keep the staff fully informed of the situation.
STUDENT WALKOUT
• Meet with student leaders upon notification of walkout to discuss concerns and try to stop the action.
• Teachers should attempt to maintain control in their rooms, telling the students the consequences of a walkout. However, they are not to physically restrain any student who chooses to leave.
• Principal to notify all students who walk out that they will be subject to disciplinary action if
they don't return to class and that they are to return to class immediately.
• Attendance should be taken after walkout, names of students who did not return to class sent to principal.
• Principal may decide to call police depending on the nature and tone of the walkout.
• Principal, or designee, should generate a list of all who walked out, for disciplinary measures.
• Contact parents and notify them of their child's participation in the walkout and the disciplinary action to be
taken.
• Meet with student leaders to discuss concerns that caused walkout.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911 (if applicable) and stay on the line to report the location and nature of the disturbance.
2. Notify the custodial staff in building if available.
3. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703. Notify
other staff members as appropriate.
4. Be prepared to evacuate people from the area, if necessary, using exits away from the disturbance area.
5. Use the building office as a central coordination point.

6

Drugs, Alcohol, Contraband (stolen goods, drug
paraphernalia, etc.)
Possession is against the law and school policy.
The principal, or designee, will determine the need
to question and/or transport the student(s) to the
hospital upon consultation with the school nurse
or other medical personnel. Police involvement is
recommended when dealing with drugs or alcohol
issues.

Dru
g/
Contraband
A

lco
ho

l

1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
2. A 
n administrator should be contacted to come and escort the student to the main office where the student
can be safely isolated in the building.
3. F 
aculty or staff members should not attempt to secure the drugs or alcohol from the student unless they fear
the student is about to get rid of or destroy the suspected drugs or alcohol.
4. If the drugs or alcohol are given up voluntarily, they are to be secured until the administrator arrives.
5. T 
he administrator will speak with the staff member and determine if reasonable suspicion exists to search the
student.
6. O 
nce the administrator escorts the student to an office, he or she will ensure that an administrator of the
same sex as the student is present prior to any search. Once the necessary administrator(s) is present, the
student will be asked to empty their pockets, remove their socks and shoes, and empty any bag or package
in their possession.
7. If suspected drugs or alcohol or other contraband (to include smoking devices) are recovered from the student, the administrator will involve the Community Resource Office or contact the police to report the incident. Police questioning will take place upon notification of a parent or guardian and with a school administrator present.
8. If no drugs or alcohol or contraband are found and police involvement is not otherwise necessary, the administrator will proceed according to existing school policy.
9. Parents are notified of the incident including the suspension or expulsion of the student(s).
10. In no instance should school administrators or other personnel keep drugs, alcohol, contraband, or drug
paraphernalia in their possession beyond the day in which it is found.
Community Education/After HOurs
In situations during Community Education/after hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty:
Cell phone 651-295-1703.

7

Fallen Aircraft 
Several District 196 buildings are in flight paths leading to the Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport.
In the event of a fallen aircraft the following procedures are to be implemented.

Fa
Aircraft
ll
en

Fallen Aircraft Near Campus, Not Impacting the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
2. The principal (or his/her designee) will order a lockdown of the building unless there is some
type of danger to the school building resulting from the fallen aircraft (i.e. fuel spill, dangerous
fumes, etc.).
3. If there is an inherent danger in remaining in the school building, an evacuation will be ordered. This
may require evacuation of the building in several phases to avoid overcrowding at the exits being used
(and related safety risks). Those areas closest to the fallen aircraft will be evacuated first.
If an evacuation is ordered, accountability and reunification procedures will take place.
a. The principal will meet with responding police and fire officials.
b. If the building is evacuated, the principal will go the command post.
c. If the building is locked down, the principal will stand-by in the main office.
d. Contact Superintendent's Office
Fallen Aircraft in School Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
2. The principal (or his/her designee) will order an evacuation, if possible or appropriate.
3. If an evacuation is ordered, accountability and reunification procedures will take place.
4. Teachers will take attendance and determine injuries and missing students.
5. Principal reports to command post to aid fire officials and police.
6. Contact the Superintendent's Office.
7. Notification of injured and missing students must be made to principal and emergency medical personnel.
8. Evacuate students to alternate site.
Community Education/After HOurs
In situations during Community Education/after hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty:
Cell phone 651-295-1703.

8

Fire/Explosion
The following procedures are to be implemented in the
event of a fire, smoke from a fire or detection of gas
odor. Remember smoke is just as dangerous as fire.
Most fire deaths are due to smoke inhalation.

EX FI
PL RE
OS /
IO
N

Steps in Case of Fire
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Follow the fire drill procedures for evacuating the building. Students and staff should be at
least 500 feet away from the building. Teachers should take their class lists, keep their students in
groups and take attendance following the evacuation. Missing student information should be reported to the principal.
3. Follow primary fire drill evacuation routes whenever possible. Follow alternate route if primary route is
blocked or dangerous.
4. Follow special arrangements for evacuating disabled students. DO NOT USE ELEVATORS.
5. Check assigned areas where students may not hear the alarm.
6. Call (9)-911.
7. Contact the Superintendent's Office.
8. Have someone meet fire and/or police officials outside the main entrance.
9. Fire department officials are legally in charge of the building when they arrive, and their instructions must be
followed.
10. If elementary students are sent home, every effort should be made to accommodate the w
­ ishes of their
parent(s) and guardian(s).
Steps in Case of an Explosion
1. Students take cover under desks or tables, when appropriate.
2. After explosion teachers take attendance and determine injuries and missing students.
3. Seriously injured people should not to be moved, staff member should stay with students and make arrangement for remaining students to evacuate when ordered to.
4. Principal will evacuate building after explosion(s) have stopped.
5. Call (9)-911. 
6. Contact the Superintendent's Office.
7. Principal reports to fire and police with information about the explosion, injuries and missing students.
8. The head custodian or maintenance person should assist with locating and providing information on utility
shutoffs and other related information.
9. Teachers will take attendance and report missing and injured students to the Principal.
10. Fire and/or police will determine when it is safe to enter building.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will have access to a building fire emergency plan that includes
a designated off-premises evacuation site and/or procedures to shelter people in cold or severe
weather.
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911. Stay on the line to give building address and location of the fire.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703.
3. Close all fire doors and check to make sure building has been completely evacuated.
4. Go to the evacuation area designated by the building fire emergency plan.
Instructors will:
1. Have people leave the building immediately without taking coats, books or other belongings.
2. Take class list and keep people in a central area.
3. Follow special arrangement for evacuating people with disabilities. (do not use elevators.)

9

Hazardous Materials
Each school has an inventory of chemicals and
hazardous materials that are on the school campus.
The inventory identifies the chemical's name, storage
location, associated hazards, and recommended
personal protective equipment. This information is
included in the "Emergency Kit." In the event of a
natural or propane gas leak or other - EVACUATE
IMMEDIATELY.

HA
M ZAR
AT
E

DO
RI US
AL
S

Steps in Case of Hazardous Materials In the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. M 
ove students away from the area of leak or spill. Close doors to the area(s). Shut down ventilation system in
the hazardous area(s) to prevent circulation of the material to other parts of the building.
3. E 
valuate the information known about the material and make a decision to either evacuate or lockdown the
building or an area. Consider the following decision making criteria.
a. The location of the hazardous material in the building.
b. The type of material released (i.e. gas, liquid, solid).
c. The known danger for the type and amount of material released.
d. Can the students and staff be safely evacuated?
e. Will the students and staff be safe remaining in the building?
4. If appropriate call (9)-911.
5. If it is necessary to evacuate the area, move cross wind (never directly with or against the wind, which may be
carrying toxic fumes) and remain at least 500 feet away from the building.
6. Shut down ventilation system in the hazardous area(s) to prevent circulation of the hazard to other parts of
the building, and close doors to that area(s).
7. Notify the Health and Safety Supervisor (# 37735 or 651-423-7735).
8. District Communications Specialist to notify media outlets.
9. Notify the Minnesota Duty Officer at #1-800-422-0798 (see attached sheets).
10. If elementary students are sent home, every effort should be made to accommodate the wishes of their
parent(s) and guardian(s).
Steps in Case of Hazardous Materials In the Vicinity of the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Warning of a hazardous materials accident will usually be received from the fire or police department.
3. W 
hen such accidents occur near enough to the school to be a threat to the safety of students and staff,
follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
4. If the hazard exists outside and the occupants are to remain in the building, it is important to shut down
the ventilation systems that bring outside air into the building.
5. Students who are outside should immediately be brought into the building.
6. S 
tudents who are housed in annex buildings may be brought into the main building depending on the
situation. They are able to follow the same protocols above if they must remain in the annex building.

10

Steps in Case of Hazardous Materials In the Vicinity of the
Building-Continued
7. C 
onsider moving students out of windowed areas to shelter in the auditorium
and/or gymnasium.

HA
M ZAR
AT
E

8. B 
e aware and alert for any changes in health conditions for students and staff, especially
respiration problems. Seek medical attention if necessary.

DO
RI US
AL
S

9. Fire or police personnel will determine when it is safe to resume normal school activities.
10. District Media Specialist to notify media outlets.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703.

11

If taken hostage:
• Cooperate with hostage-taker to the fullest extent
possible.
• Try not to panic. Calm students if they are present.
• Treat the hostage-taker as normally as possible.
• Be respectful to the hostage-taker.
• Ask permission to speak; do not argue or make suggestions.
• If the hostage-taker is unaware of your presence, do
not attract attention!

HO

ST
AG
E

Steps in Case of a Hostage Inside the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Call the police (9)-911.
3. Seal off area near the hostage scene. Remove all students and staff from the room or location of the incident
and take them to a secure area. Teachers need to make every attempt to stay with their classes. Get everyone
down low and stay away from windows.
4. Lock the doors and turn off lights in classrooms.
5. Police will take control of the hostage scene upon arrival.
6. Stay in a secure area and wait for further instructions from the police.
Steps in Case of a Hostage Outside the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Call the police.
3. If possible, get all students inside the building.
4. Lock the doors and turn off lights in classrooms.
5. Move students to the opposite side of the building away from the situation, and keep away from windows and
doors. Teachers need to make every attempt to stay with their classes.
6. Stay in the interior secure area and wait for further instructions from the police.
When police arrive, the principal or his/her designee should be prepared to provide the following
information to them:
a. The number of hostage takers.
b. Description of hostage takers.
c. Type of weapons being used.
d. The number and names of the hostages.
e. Any demands or instructions the hostage taker has given.
f. Description of the area. (Maps and diagrams, even if hand-drawn, are valuable to police.)
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.
3. Follow police department instructions.
4. If incident is occurring outside the building, keep all people in the building until police give authorization to
leave.

12

An intruder is an individual in the building who has not
followed established visitor procedures and will not
identify their purpose, who has no reason to be there
or who will not leave the building after being asked.

IN

Minnesota State Statute 609.605 subd. 4 gives a school
building administrator authority to have persons
removed from school property as trespassers if they are
not authorized to be there.

TR
UD

ER

If the intruder is armed, call (9)-911 immediately.
Steps in Case of Intruder(s)
1. P 
olitely greet intruder and identify yourself. Consider asking another staff person to accompany you before
approaching the intruder.
2. Inform intruder that all visitors must register at the main office. Ask intruder the purpose of his/her visit. If
possible, attempt to identify the individual and or vehicle.
3. If the visitor refuses to register, follow the “intruder” and continue asking him or her to proceed (or
accompany you) to the main office.
a. A 
sk the first employee you see to notify an administrator, who will then follow the First Steps in Any
Emergency (pages IV & V).
b. The administrator will assign someone to assist the employee with the intruder.
c. Guide the intruder away from students.
d. Visually inspect the person, looking for suspicious bulges or any other indication of a weapon.
4. If you feel threatened by the intruder, use your own judgment about following or confronting them.
If intruder refuses to leave:
1. Notify law enforcement if intruder refuses to leave. Give law enforcement full description of intruder.
2. B 
ack away from intruder if he/she indicates a potential for violence. Allow an avenue of escape. To the extent
possible, maintain visual contact.
a. B 
e aware of intruder's actions at this time (where he/she is located in school building, whether he/she is
carrying a weapon or package, etc.).
b. M 
aintaining visual contact and knowing the location of the intruder is less disruptive than doing a
building-wide search later.
Should the situation escalate quickly, the building administrator may decide at any
time to initiate lockdown procedures.
NOTE: To assist staff members who interact with a stranger at school, use the "I CAN" rule.
Intercept
Contact
Ask
Notify

13

Follow-up: Send a trespassing letter to the intruder
and copy the local law enforcement agency.

Confronting an Armed Person
In the event that you are confronted by a person armed with a gun or other weapon,
the following procedures should be used:

IN

TR
UD

ER

1. Remain calm. Do not raise your voice; to avoid upsetting the person. Your tone and demeanor
hopefully will influence the outcome of the crisis.
2. Never try to disarm a person with a weapon.
3. Avoid sudden moves or gestures.
4. Be observant to what the person looks like and is wearing, what he/she is saying, etc. This could be valuable
in identifying the person should they leave before police arrive.
5. Don't try to be the hero. If possible remove yourself and students from the scene, then call (9)-911.
Community Education/After HOurs
In situations during Community Education/after hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty:
Cell phone 651-295-1703.

14

Kidnapping/missing child:
"...a child goes missing every 40 seconds in the U.S.,
over 2100 per day."
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention

M KIDN
IS

SI

NG

Steps in Case of a Missing Child
1. Call the classroom to see if the teacher has any information.
2. Check the student sign-out list to see if someone has picked up child.
3. Check bathrooms and other areas where the child might be.
4. Page the child to the office.
5. Notify parents/guardians, superintendent and, if determined to be necessary, call the police.

AP

PI

CH NG/
IL

D

6. Have the following information available for the police.
a. Child's name and age;
b. Address;
c. Clothing and physical description including distinguishing marks such as scars or birthmarks;
d. Medical status, if appropriate;
e. Time and location child was last seen;
f. Person with whom the child was last seen, and
g. Have child's information including picture, if possible, available for the police upon their arrival.
Steps in Case of Kidnapping
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Contact the parent/guardian and have them come to school. Request the parent/guardian bring a recent
photo of the student.
Be Prepared to Assist Police Personnel as They Arrive
1. Have the student's file and any school photos available.
2. Have the student's counselor and/or other "significant building adults" present.
3. Provide a conference room or other location to be used as a "command post".
4. Provide additional rooms or offices for interviews as needed.
Community Education/After HOurs
Steps in Case of a Missing Child
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Consult with instructor or adult responsible for activity.
2. Check bathrooms and other areas where the child might be.
3. Page the child to the office/building entrance.
4. If determined to be necessary, call the police (9)-911.
5. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703.
Steps in Case of Kidnapping
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell phone 651-295-1703.

15

LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES
One means of securing the school is to implement
lockdown procedures. Lockdown procedures may be
issued in situations involving dangerous intruders or
other incidents that may result in harm to persons
inside the school building. These procedures may be
called for in the following instances:

Lockdo

Procedures
w

n

1) Lockdown with warning – The threat is outside of the
school building. The school may have been notified of a
potential threat outside of the building.
2) L 
ockdown with intruder – The threat/intruder is inside
the building.
Lockdown With Warning Procedures
When appropriate follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (IV & V)
1. Building administrator will order and announce “lockdown with warning” procedures. Repeat announcement
several times. Be direct. Code words lead to confusion.
2. Bring people inside.
3. Lock exterior doors.
4. Clear hallways, restrooms and other rooms that cannot be secured.
5. Pull shades. Keep students away from windows.
6. Control all movement, but continue classes. Disable bells. Move on announcement only.
7. Building administrator will announce “all clear.”
Lockdown With Intruder Procedures
When appropriate follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (IV & V)
1. Building administrator will order and announce “lockdown with intruder.” Repeat announcement several times.
Be direct. Code words lead to confusion.
2. Immediately direct all students, staff and visitors into nearest classroom or secured space. Classes that are
outside of the building SHOULD NOT enter the building. Move outside classes to primary evacuation site.
3. Lock classroom doors.
4. DO NOT lock exterior doors.
5. Move people away from windows and doors. Turn off lights.
6. DO NOT respond to anyone at the door until “all clear” is announced.
7. Keep out of sight.
8. Building administrator will announce “all clear.”
Some other threats may override lockdown, i.e., confirmed fire, intruder in classroom, etc.
Consider making an action plan for people in large common areas, i.e. cafeteria, gymnasium.
Lockdown may be initiated in non-threatening circumstances to keep people away from areas
where there may be a medical emergency or disturbance.
Community Education/After HOurs
In situations during Community Education/after hour times, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty:
Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

16

A medical emergency exists anytime a student, staff
member or visitor requires first-aid medical attention
for any reason. The role of school staff in a medical
emergency is to provide care to the victim until first
responders arrive. Staff should not provide any first aid
beyond their training. They should comfort the victim
and reassure him or her medical assistance is on the
way. In all cases the privacy rights of individuals must be
considered as well as the confidentiality of these involved
and nature of the medical emergency.

EmerMedica
gencies
l

The Steps in Case of Serious Injury or Illness
1. Administer appropriate first aid by doing the following:
a. Wear gloves when possible.
b. Check airway, breathing, and circulation – ABCs. Begin CPR if needed.
c. Check for bleeding, start first aid.
d. L 
ook for a medical alert bracelet or necklace.
e. After giving care, do not touch your mouth, nose or eyes, or eat or drink until you have t­horoughly
washed your hands.
2. Notify the school office.
3. The nurse (or administrator, if the nurse is not available) will determine the seriousness of the injury or
illness and follow procedures a. or b. listed below:
Do not move the victim unless an immediate emergency situation dictates evacuation.
a. • Call (9)-911 to dispatch an ambulance for serious injury or illness; state the school location.
• Contact the parent, guardian or individual designated on the emergency card.
• Have someone meet the ambulance and direct medical personnel to the injured or ill person.
• Designate a staff person to accompany the injured or ill person to the hospital.
•Do not move the victim unless an immediate emergency situation dictates evacuation.
b. • Contact the parent, guardian or individual designated on the emergency card.
• Have the student’s parent/guardian transport him or her to medical aid or arrange for alternate
transportation with parent or guardian approval.
4. In case of serious illness or injury, Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V) notify as appropriate.

a. • 
Director of Elementary Education (#37782 or 651-423-7782) or
• Director of Secondary
Education (#37712 or 651-423-7712) or
­
• Director of Community Education (#37720 or 651-423-7720) or
• Director of Special Education (#37628 or 651-423-7628)
b. Superintendent (#37749 or 651-423-7749), and
c. Communications Specialist (#37775 or 651-423-7775).
5. Notify local health officials if food poisoning or a serious communicable disease is involved.
6. Knowledgeable first aid/CPR trained personnel listed on page 84.

See following pages for Specific First Aid Incidents.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Determine the seriousness of the injury or illness and follow procedures a. or b. listed below:
a. • F 
or serious injury or illness call (9)-911 to dispatch an ambulance state building location.
• Have someone meet the ambulance and direct medical personnel to the patient.
b. • If the individual requests, contact the person he/she designates.
• Have the individual’s contact transport him/her to medical aid or arrange for alternate transportation
with individual’s approval.
2. If Community Education, in the case of serious illness or injury, notify the facilities manager/coordinator
on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.
3. Facilities manager/coordinator will notify local health officials if food poisoning or serious communicable
disease is involved.

17

Procedures for Specific First Aid Incidents
A. Allergic Reaction
1. Assist in getting "Epi Pen" (Epinephrine) for individuals who carry them (usually in backpack) or prescription
medications if known to be kept in nurse's office.
2. Contact nurse, principal or parents as quickly as possible to determine if person has serious allergies.
3. Follow instructions of nurse, principal or parent.
4. If person is at imminent risk and assistance is not available, CALL (9)-911 for help. 
NOTE: Urgency in addressing the situation may be critical for certain persons. If immediate action is required
while in a vehicle; call for help and follow instructions as to where and when to meet an emergency
vehicle for assistance.
5. If an insect sting, remove stinger immediately if present.
6. Record time, site and circumstances of allergic reaction; name of medicine, dosage and time administered.
B. Bleeding
1. Gently blot the wound to inspect for debris. If bleeding is severe, apply pressure on the wound. Apply a dry
cold pack to the area around the wound.
2. Continue pressure until bleeding stops. Elevate wound above level of heart to help reduce bleeding. If
bleeding is not easily controlled with direct pressure, call (9)-911.
3. Treat for shock (see section M).
C. Cessation of Breathing/Choking 
If victim can cough, speak and breathe, do not interfere. If the victim cannot speak or cough, uses the distress
signal, or appears cyanotic (blue) from poor air exchange, proceed with the following:
1. Stand behind victim with one foot beside the victim to support him or her.
2. Wrap your arms around victim’s waist.
3. Make a fist, place the thumb side of your fist against the victim’s abdomen, slightly above the navel and below
the breastbone.
4. Grasp your fist with the other hand. Press your fist into the victim’s abdomen, with a quick inward and
upward thrust.
5. Repeat this action until the obstruction is cleared or victim becomes unconscious. If victim becomes
unconscious, begin CPR immediately. Call (9)-911 for all breathing emergencies.
6. Once the airway is open, if the unconscious victim is not breathing, CPR may need to be given.
D. Convulsions/Epileptic Seizures
1. Protect victim from injury, but do not restrain.
2. Support and protect victim’s head, being careful not to be kicked.
3. Following the seizure or if the victim vomits, turn their entire body onto their side.
4. Do not force a blunt object between the victim’s teeth. Do not give fluids.
5. If breathing stops, give CPR if trained in these techniques.
6. Try to time how long the seizure lasts. If it lasts five minutes without stopping, call (9)-911. If no known Sz
Hx; call (9)-911.

18

Procedures for Specific First Aid Incidents (continued)
E. Drowning
1. Call (9)-911. Inform 911 operator that a drowning has occurred at the School Pool. Instruct them to send
emergency personnel to the (indicate which) entrance.
2. Send a staff member or responsible student to the nurse’s office for assistance. Administer appropriate first
aid and/or CPR. (First aid kits are in the nurse’s office.)
3. Send a staff member or responsible student to meet the emergency personnel at the designated entrance to
the building.
4. Notify principal of the incident. The principal will notify the s­ uperintendent.
F. Drug/Alcohol Overdose
1. Send for school nurse and/or principal.
2. Arrange for the supervision of other students, move students away from the victim.
3. If unconscious, check for life signs and perform CPR. Call (9)-911.
4. Attempt to determine:
a. What the victim overdosed on (ask friends that were with the victim).
b. If any other students used the drug/alcohol.
c. Where and how the student got the drug/alcohol.
d. When and how much of the drug/alcohol was taken.
5. Isolate witnesses from the student population and each other for questioning.
6. Isolate the area as much as possible.
7. Notify parents.
8. Involve community resource officer.
G. Disease Outbreak/Foodborne Illness
1. Send for school nurse and/or principal.
2. Isolate persons affected in a separate room and restrict access to essential personnel only.
3. Notify superintendent.
4. Notify parent/guardian of affected student(s).
5. If necessary contact the Minnesota Health Department.
H. Eye Injuries
Chemical Burn:
1. Flush the eye with a gentle stream of lukewarm water while holding the eye open.
2. If only one eye is affected, turn the head so the injured eye is down. If both eyes are affected, tilt the head
back and pour water onto the bridge of the nose.
3. Flushing should continue at least 20 minutes.
4. For acid/alkali burns, it may be necessary to remove jewelry and clothing which may be contaminated by the
runoff.
5. Ears may also become contaminated. Consider (9)-911 or parent/guardian call and MD evaluation.
Eye injuries - continued next page

19

Procedures for Specific First Aid Incidents (continued)
Eye injuries - continued
Penetrating Injury:
1. Do not remove the object or wash the eye.
2. Stabilize the object.
3. Cover both eyes loosely.
4. Keep the victim quiet on his/her back.
I. Insulin Reaction
(NOTE: A student will not have a reaction if not in insulin therapy.)
1. A reaction can be in the form of disorientation, mood change, clammy skin, etc. – give the person sugar, milk,
sandwich or any food available with sugar.
2. A reaction may culminate in convulsions and coma. Call (9)-911 immediately if convulsions or coma
occur. This must be done FAST. Put sugar cube or gel between cheek and teeth. Lay the person on their
side so saliva does not choke their air passage. Use “glucose” if available (glucose may be p
­ urchased at any
drug store).
3. Treat person with convulsions as if they are diabetic and not epileptic unless the medical alert bracelet or
necklace informs you otherwise.
4. Coma is caused by the lack of sugar supplied to the brain and such lack will cause brain damage more quickly
than a ­shortage of oxygen.
J. General Medical Procedures
1. Contact the school nurse and/or principal.
2. Provide basic first-aid if possible. This includes (but is not limited to) the following:
a. Checking for airway blockage, breathing, and circulation
b. Performing CPR if necessary
c. Controlling any bleeding:
d. Avoiding body fluids whenever possible
e. Keep the person warm and comfortable until help arrives.
3. Have health records available to identify pre-existing conditions or allergies.
4. Move crowds away from the injured or ill person.
5. The nurse or administrator will determine if further medical assistance is needed.
a. If it is determined that an ambulance is needed to provide additional medical assistance and/or transport
the injured person, call (9)-911.
b. If the nurse and/or staff members are able to deal with the incident, they will do so either at the scene of
the injury or at the nurse's office.
6. Any time a student is injured and kept in school, the nurse will notify the parents. In the absence of the nurse,
the administrator or his/her designee will notify the parents.
7. If a student or staff member is transported from the school by ambulance, the following should be done:
a. Locate and copy emergency card to accompany student to hospital.
b. The principal or his designee may accompany the injured person to the hospital.
c. If it is a student that is transported by ambulance, a parent or guardian will be contacted.
d. If a staff member is transported by ambulance a member of the family will be contacted.
8. Depending on the nature of the medical emergency, counselors may be made available to counsel students or
staff.

20

Procedures for Specific First Aid Incidents (continued)
K. (Suspected) Neck or Spinal Cord Injury
1. Maintain open airway by lifting jaw, do not move head or use "head-tilt."
2. Do not move victim.
3. Do not transport victim.
4. Call (9)-911.
L. Poisoning
Non-Food Poisoning:
1. Call the Poison Control Center Hotline 1-800-222-1222 or (9)-911.
2. Consider diluting poison by giving one or two glasses of water if advised by Poison Control.
Food Poisoning:
1. Administer first aid, using trained personnel in building.
2. Notify School Nurse.
3. Call (9)-911 or make appropriate medical referral.
4. Call parent or guardian.
5. Notify Food and Nutrition Services Department if it appears school-prepared food is involved.
6. Building administrator and staff will follow directives of medical authorities.
M. Shock
Watch for cold, clammy skin; pale, bluish face; profuse sweating; weak, rapid pulse.
1. Have person lie down.
2. Maintain body temperature.
3. Cover victim only enough to keep victim from losing body heat.
4. Reassure and calm the victim.

Staff or student experiencing any of these medical emergencies should be
evaluated further for medical care. The emergency medical service, (9)-911, should be called.
Notify parent/guardian of the student, or the emergency contact for a staff member.
(Procedure 406P, Emergency Information - Employees).

21

A multi-casualty incident is any situation in which
there are three or more potentially critical patients
or when the number of patients requires resources
above and beyond those normally available.
Steps in Case of a Multiple (three or more) Casualty Incident
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Establish medical management area.

Ca

su Mu
al lt
t y ip
In le
ci
de

A. Assess area for safety.
a. Identify victims, including walking wounded, to determine number.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

22

nt

Warning of an impending national emergency will be
received via:
a. C 
ommunity outdoor warning sirens attack
warning signal (five minute wavering tone).
(A steady tone is an alert signal used for local
emergencies.)
b. R 
adio and television (Emergency Broadcast
System).

N
EM AT
ER ION
GE AL
NC
Y

Steps in Case of a National Emergency
1. T 
une to local radio or television station Emergency Broadcast System (EBS) for instructions and emergency information.
2. If necessary, move students to pre-designated shelter areas in the school.
3. All clear will be broadcast by radio and television ONLY.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:

1. Call (9)-911.

2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

23

District 196 Response to Homeland Security Advisory System
The following threat response actions correlate to the federal government’s Homeland Security
Advisory System. With each code condition are listed the protective measures that have been
or may be put in place by Independent School District 196 in cooperation with local, state,
and federal authorities. Plan designs are flexible to accommodate the differing circumstances
of various types of critical events.

There are five threat conditions, each identified by a description and corresponding color. The following threat
conditions each represent an increasing risk of terrorist attacks. Risk includes both the probability of an attack
occurring and its potential gravity.

Threat Condition

Actions for Emergency Management
NOTE: District administrators will be notified any time
there is a change to the National Threat Condition Status

Low Risk
(Green)
and
General Risk
(Blue)

Significant Risk
(Yellow)

• Review and update district and school crisis plans.
• Coordinate emergency plans with Dakota County, state, and federal plans.
• Conduct crisis management and communications training for employees, including
readiness of support personnel to address student and staff emotional responses, as
needed.
• Continue visitor control procedures.
• Maintain current emergency communication lists.
• Inventory emergency supplies and equipment.
• Disseminate emergency communications methods and resources (i.e. where to get
information) to employees.
In addition to the measures listed above, the following measures will be
­instituted:
• Review crisis response plans with program managers, principals, and building and
office staff.
• Ensure facility security measures are operational, including access control and surveillance cameras.
• Review employee emergency call lists and building phone trees.
• Ensure alternative communication capabilities are operational.

High Risk
(Orange)

In addition to the measures listed above, the following measures will be
­instituted:
• Increase surveillance of critical locations specific to each building.
• Evaluate heating/ventilating/air conditioning systems to verify operation.

24

District 196 Response to Homeland Security Advisory System (continued)

Threat Condition
Severe Risk
(Red)

Actions for Emergency Management
In addition to the measures listed above, the following measures will be
­instituted:
• District-Level Emergency Management Team will meet upon request of the superintendent or designee. The team will:
s Assess threat level to determine local impact on the school district.
s If schools are open, the team may:

ß Cancel outside activities, field trips, or after-school events.

ß Restrict visitor access.

ß Enhance security measures.
• The District-Level Emergency Management Team and schools will address critical
emergency needs under the direction of public safety officials and in accordance with
district emergency procedures.
s Coordinate parent-child reunification process, if necessary.
s Increase building security throughout the school system.
s Continue staff, parent, and community communication.

25

Red Alert Tasks for Principal or Designee

Three people should be knowledgeable and able to perform all tasks listed below.

1.
2.
3.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.


12.
13.

Phone tree is accurate and distributed to all staff members.
Emergency and Utility Emergency numbers are accurate and available.
Television Plan
a. Elementary schools do not view television coverage of event.
b. Secondary schools view limited television coverage of the event.
(Announcement from office, televisions turned on and monitored, closing announcement from
the office, televisions turned off, return to normal daily routine.)
Psychologists, Social Workers, and Counselors are available for students before, during, and after
the event.
Emergency cards are available.
Check contents of Emergency Kit (pg. 82) as well as the nurse’s emergency kit. Make sure all
items in each kit are functioning (such as batteries).
Heating/ventilation/air conditioning system procedures in place.
Water/gas turn-off procedures in place.
Check with food service personnel for food availability.
Check that the Emergency Broadcast System is operational.
Alternative communication system in place. Plan for:
a. L 
oss of electricity
b. L 
oss of computer network
Review your off-site evacuation holding site and shelter-in-place plans.
Review reunification plans for students and parents.

Notes
• Develop parent-child reunification plan (site, process, and materials).
• Develop parent pick-up routine for each school/elementary vs. secondary schools.
• Quelling rumors – communication expectations.
• Is food available off-site (for how long and how much)?

26

Menu of Red Alert Options
The District-Level Emergency Management Team will consider the following
options if the federal Office of Homeland Security’s color-coded threat advisory
system changes to Red Alert Status. The District-Level Emergency Management
Team will communicate to each of the schools directing which actions are necessary
at each building. It is the responsibility of the principal, or designee, to confirm that
all actions have been implemented.
1. Arrange a meeting time with the members of the Building-Level Emergency Management Team to
discuss the current red alert status and situation.
2. Ensure alternative communication capabilities are operational.

• Continuous monitoring of email for additional communication from the District-Level Emergency
Management Team
3. Shut down heating/ventilation/air conditioning systems
4. Restrict visitor access, including:

• Lock all doors to the building.

• Main entrance monitored by rotating staff members.

• Continuous monitoring of surveillance cameras.
5. Turn on and monitor emergency cell phones.
6. Develop, coordinate, and communicate the districtwide parent-child reunification plan.
7. Cancel after-school activities, community education classes, and field trips.
8. Cancel school.
9. No outside activities including physical education classes and recess.
10. No intradistrict transportation between school buildings.
11. Adults monitor phone calls made by students.
12. Prepare for off-site evacuation.
13. Prepare communication for community, including:

• Change outgoing message on school answering machines.

• Develop the Backpack Online email list service message and the district web-site message.
14. Implement operational procedure for parents and guardians picking up children at each school.
15. Restrict and control traffic patterns and parking areas.

27

Evacuation procedures are used when conditions are
safer outside the building than inside the building. If
it becomes necessary to evacuate students and staff
to an off-site location, specific holding sites have been
designated for each school. Alternative sites also
have been identified in case there is a need to relocate
to a safe facility away from the school’s immediate
geographical area.

EV
AC
UA OF
F
TI
ON -SIT
E
/R
el
ocation

Any time students are evacuated to an off-site location,
they must be under the direct supervision of a staff
member whether they are walking or on buses.

Evacuation:
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Building administrator initiates evacuation procedures.
3. Evacuation routes may be specified according to the type of emergency. They may need to be changed for
safety reasons.
a. Bombs: Building administrator notifies staff of evacuation route dictated by known or suspected location
of a device.
b. Fire: Follow primary routes unless blocked by smoke or fire. Know the alternate route.
c. Chemical spill: Total avoidance of hazardous materials is necessary as fumes can overcome people in
seconds. Plan route accordingly.
4. Teachers take class rosters.
5. Do not lock classroom doors when leaving.
6. When outside the building, account for all students. Immediately inform building administrator of any missing
student(s).
Relocation:
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Building administrator determines whether students and staff should be evacuated to a relocation center.
3. Building administrator or school emergency response team designee notifies relocation center.
4. If necessary, a school emergency response team designee coordinates transportation to relocation center.
5. Teachers stay with class en route to the relocation center and take attendance upon arriving at the center.
6. Use student release forms for students who are picked up from a relocation center.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

28

28

It is necessary to contact the Transportation Department (#37685 or 651-423-7685) to request a
wheelchair accessible bus.

School of Environmental
Studies

Rosemount High School

Eastview High School

Eagan High School

Apple Valley High School

Area Learning Center/
Transition Plus/Pathways

BUILDING

Wrestling and weight room

Scott Highlands Middle
School, Highland Elementary
School

Auditorium
Main classrooms

(Eastview High School)

29

Lower foreign language
hallways

Lower phy. ed. hallways

Zoo Tropics Building

(Eastview High School)

Rosemount Community
Center

(Apple Valley High School)

Warehouse

(Rosemount High School)

Choir and band room

Lower level mechanical
hallway

Designated severe weather
rooms

Locker rooms

Computer labs hallway

ON-SITE
SHELTERING PLAN

Eagan Civic Center and
Wescott Public Library

(Eastview High School)

Apple Valley Community
Center Complex

(Eastview High School)

Apple Valley High School

OFF-SITE EVACUATION
HOLDING SITE
(ALTERNATIVE SITE)

Students will be bused to
Eastview High School.

Students will walk to the
Tropics Building.

Students will be bused to
Eastview High School.

Students will walk to
Rosemount Community
Center.

Students will be bused to
Apple Valley High School.

Students will walk to Scott
Highlands Middle School and
Highland Elementary School.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
Eastview High School.

Students will walk to
Community Center.

Students will be bused to
sites.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION PLAN

400 students and 35 adults

2000 students and
150 adults

2050 students and
200 adults

2250 students and
300 adults

1900 students and
200 adults

100 students and 10 adults

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

Dakota Ridge School

Valley Middle School

Scott Highlands Middle
School

Rosemount Middle School

Falcon Ridge Middle
School

Dakota Hills Middle
School

Black Hawk Middle School

BUILDING

Multi-Purpose room
Cafeteria/gym
Lower level hallway

(Falcon Ridge Middle School)
Black Hawk Middle School
(Falcon Ridge Middle School)

Students stay locked in their
rooms

Rosemount High School

Sixth grade science area
Gym
Gym

Apple Valley High School
(Falcon Ridge Middle School)
Rosemount Community
Center

30

Academic wing hallway

Locker rooms, music area

(Eastview High School)

(Rosemount High School)

Lecture rooms A and B

Falcon Ridge Middle School

(Falcon Ridge Middle School)

Locker rooms

(Eastview High School)

Scott Highlands Middle School Lower entrance hallway

Gym

ON-SITE
SHELTERING PLAN

Dakota Hills Middle School

OFF-SITE EVACUATION
HOLDING SITE
(ALTERNATIVE SITE)

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
Falcon Ridge Middle School.

Students will walk to
Rosemount High School.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION PLAN

100 students and
50 adults

1150 students and
100 adults

800 students and
75 adults

1200 students and
100 adults

1100 students and
100 adults

1200 students and
100 adults

900 students and
100 adults

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

Greenleaf Elementary
School

Glacier Hills Elementary
School

Echo Park Elementary
School

Diamond Path Elementary
School

Deerwood Elementary
School

Cedar Park Elementary
School

BUILDING

Main office hallways, gym/
cafeteria

(Scott Highlands Middle
School)

31

Main offices

Gym

Severe weather designated
areas

Office, main office, hallway

Gym

Gym

Main office hallway

Fan room

Gym

Mail office hallway

Gyms, cafeteria

ON-SITE
SHELTERING PLAN

Falcon Ridge Middle School

(Deerwood Elementary
School/Black Hawk Middle
School)

Woodland Elementary School

(Southview Elementary
School/Valley Middle School)

Westview Elementary School

(Highland Elementary School/
Scott Highlands Middle
School)

Dakota Ridge School

(Thomas Lake Elementary
School)

Glacier Hills Elementary
School

(Westview Elementary School)

Southview Elementary
School/Valley Middle School

OFF-SITE EVACUATION
HOLDING SITE
(ALTERNATIVE SITE)

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
Highland Elementary School/
Scott Highlands Middle
School.

Students will walk to Dakota
Ridge School.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION PLAN

850 students and
100 adults

500 students and
75 adults

800 students and
90 adults

750 students and
93 adults

500 students and
60 adults

500 students and
60 adults

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

Red Pine Elementary
School

Pinewood Elementary
School

Parkview Elementary
School

Oak Ridge Elementary
School

Northview Elementary
School

Highland Elementary
School

BUILDING

Fifth grade area, main office
hallway
Interior hallways

(Diamond Path Elementary
School)
Dakota Hills Middle School

Main office area/severe
weather designated areas

Gym with doors shut

Office, office hallways

Gym

Severe weather designated
areas

Gym

32

Rosemount Elementary School Severe weather designated
areas
(Shannon Park Elementary
School)
Gym

(Black Hawk Middle School)

Dakota Hills Middle School

(Highland Elementary School/
Scott Highlands Middle
School)

Cedar Park Elementary School

(Deerwood Elementary
School/Black Hawk Middle
School)

Thomas Lake Elementary
School

(Woodland Elementary School) Gym

Gym, cafeteria

ON-SITE
SHELTERING PLAN

Eastview High School

OFF-SITE EVACUATION
HOLDING SITE
(ALTERNATIVE SITE)

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
Woodland Elementary School.

Students will walk to Dakota
Hills Middle School.

Students will be bused to
sites. Special needs students
will require handicapped
building.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION PLAN

970 students and
100 adults

700 students and
70 adults

750 students and
70 adults

600 students and
75 adults

500 students and
50 adults

(65 of the students are
special needs.)

600 students and
100 adults

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

Woodland Elementary
School

Westview Elementary
School

Thomas Lake Elementary
School

Southview Elementary
School

Shannon Park Elementary
School

Rosemount Elementary
School

BUILDING

(Deerwood Elementary
School/Black Hawk Middle
School)

Glacier Hills Elementary
School

(Southview Elementary
School/Valley Middle School)

Apple Valley Community
Center Complex

(Deerwood Elementary
School/Black Hawk Middle
School)

Oak Ridge Elementary School

(Apple Valley High School)

Apple Valley Community
Center Complex

(Falcon Ridge Middle School)

Highland Elementary School/
Scott Highlands Middle
School

(Shannon Park Elementary
School)

Rosemount Middle School

OFF-SITE EVACUATION
HOLDING SITE
(ALTERNATIVE SITE)

33

Cafeteria/office hallways

Cafeteria/gym

Severe weather designated
areas

Gym

Gym

Severe weather designated
areas

Severe weather designated
areas

Gym/cafeteria

Severe weather designated
areas

Gym

Designated rooms

Selected hallways

ON-SITE
SHELTERING PLAN

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
Southview Elementary
School/Valley Middle School.

Students will walk to Apple
Valley Community Center
Complex.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will be bused to
sites.

Students will walk to
Rosemount Middle School.
Students will be bused to
Shannon Park Elementary
School.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

EVACUATION PLAN

450 students and
50 adults

550 students and
60 adults

450 students and
50 adults

700 students and
65 adults

800 students and
75 adults

650 students and
80 adults

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

HOLDING SITE

Cedar Park Elementary School Valley Middle School

Cedar Valley Learning
Center
Oak Ridge Elementary School

Highland Elementary School/ Diamond Path Elementary
Scott Highlands Middle School School

Early Childhood Learning
Center

Rahncliff Learning Center

District Office

District Office East

34

Thomas Lake Elementary
School

Eastview High School

Eastview High School

Dakota Ridge School

District Office Annex

Rosemount High School

District Office East

Academic wing hallway

Gym

ALTERNATIVE
SITE

District Office

Rosemount Community
Cooperative Area Learning Center
Program
(Rosemount High School)

BUILDING

40 adults
25 adults

Employees will transport
themselves.
Employees will transport
themselves.

Adult students will be sent
home.
150 children and adults
Children will be bused to sites.

Adult students will be sent
home.
100 children and adults
Children will be bused to sites.

250 children and adults

90 adults

Employees will transport
themselves.

Students will be bused to
sites.

6 students and 1 adult

ESTIMATED NUMBER
OF EVACUEES

Students will be bused to
sites.

EVACUATION
INSTRUCTIONS

OFF-SITE EVACUATION PLAN

Pandemic: An epidemic of infectious disease that
spreads through human populations across a large
region.

See pages 36-39.

35

PA
N
DI DE
SE M
AS IC
E

Before
Develop a communications plan
including templates that can be used
when word of a pandemic surfaces and
throughout the duration of the
pandemic. Templates need to be
translated into Spanish, Vietnamese,
Chinese, Russian, Hmong and Somali.
Communications, Use our website and intranet to
Technology
communicate pertinent information.
Communications Mass notification system
Communications, Webstreaming/broadcasting of board
Technology,
meetings, possibly messages from the
AVHS Cable
superintendent.
Community Ed.- Be prepared to cancel facilities rentals;
Facilities
refund money if necessary? Keep in
mind our buildings may be used by
government agencies.
Community Ed.- Be prepared to cancel after-school and
Classes
all other enrichment classes; refund
money or give credits as necessary?
Education
Encourage teachers to plan ahead for
activities students can complete at
home to keep them prepared for
learning when they return to school.
Elementary Ed.,
Teachers disinfect door knobs, faucets,
Secondary Ed.,
desks, etc. on a daily basis.
Special Ed.,
ABE, ECFE
Elementary Ed.,
Teachers reinforce hand-washing
Secondary Ed.,
procedures and cough etiquette with
Special Ed., ABE,
students on a daily basis.
ECFE

1

Department
Communications,
Graphics,
Print room,
Mailroom

36

Teachers will use a calling system,
perhaps the teacher of the family’s
youngest student will be the contact,
calling weekly to check on the family.

Broadcast “reading hours” on cable TV or
webstream?

Use our website and intranet to
communicate pertinent information.
Mass notification system
Webstreaming/broadcasting of board
meetings, possibly messages from the
supt.
Facilities rentals can begin again once
schools have reopened.

Use our website and intranet to
communicate pertinent information.
Mass notification system
Webstreaming/broadcasting of board
meetings, possibly messages from the
supt.
Buildings may be used by government
agencies. Communicate with Facilities
Department, if necessary.

Teachers reinforce hand-washing
procedures and cough etiquette with
students on a daily basis.

Develop a flexible plan for re-opening
schools, perhaps all elementary schools
being designated k-12 for a week or two
until most students return.
Teachers will call those families to make
them aware of the process of reopening
schools, where to go, etc.

Community Ed. classes can resume once
schools have reopened.

After
Mail letters, as needed, after students have
returned to school.

During
Mail letters, if necessary, to families. One
letter during the pandemic, one before
school opens to share re-opening plan
with families.

November 2008

Pandemic Plan for District 196

Keep principals, coordinators and
managers informed on a frequent basis
with any information the district has
regarding upcoming pandemic.

2

Human
Resources

Food and
Nutrition
Services

Finance
Food and
Nutrition
Services (FNS)

Finance

Facilities –
Health & Safety
Facilities Health & Safety,
Nursing Services

Communicate Health & Safety
information with directors.
Stockpile enough N95 masks to
provide school nurses with masks for a
week of school (4-5 masks per nurse
per day).
Develop a process to continue paying
bills and receiving revenue during a
pandemic when we will be shortstaffed.
Encourage staff to use direct deposit.
Follow FNS Department’s HCAAP
plan for food storage and discard.
Begin planning what will be needed
when schools reopen.
Establish FNS bio-security
management team, FNS emergency
contact list, and phone list of pertinent
local authorities.
Prepare employees for remote access
to servers, TIES HR/PAY system,

Districtwide
Explore the feasibility of using radios
Emergency Team in lieu of cell phones during a
pandemic.
Facilities
Custodial staff continues routine
disinfecting procedures.

Elementary Ed.,
Secondary Ed.,
Special Ed.,
ABE, ECFE

37

Mail checks, if necessary.
Discard food, if necessary. Re-order food
for reopening of schools. Will our sites be
distribution sites for USDA?

Continue to pay bills, receive revenue.

Prepare buildings to be re-opened.

Building chiefs use their normal
weekend/holiday building rotation to
make sure systems are maintained.
Communicate Health & Safety
information with directors.
Replenish N95 masks, if possible.

Mail checks, if necessary.
What will the plan be if food is not
available for the re-opening of school?
Communicate that students bring cold
lunch?

Continue to pay bills, receive revenue.

Communicate Health & Safety
information with directors.
Issue masks for nurses to use, if they
choose.

Communicate with principals,
coordinators and managers what will be
required to reopen buildings and what
they need to share with teachers who will,
in turn, share information with parents.

Keep in touch with principals,
coordinators and managers who will be
responsible for maintaining some type of
communications “tree” for their sites.

November 2008

Pandemic Plan for District 196

Educate nurses, principals, etc. about
grief counseling.
Prepare to maintain our technology
during a pandemic; educate on remote
usage. Determine minimum level of
support required for essential services:
phones, Internet, email, voice mail.
Develop and implement disinfecting
procedures for buses.

Keep in mind that parents of severely
disabled students will need extra help
during a pandemic. Coordinators will
need to communicate closely with

Nursing Services

Special
Education

3

Transportation

Technology

Nursing Services

Establish a list of employees essential
to continued operations.
Develop flexible sick leave, personal
leave policies for pandemic.
Take daily census, report to
DCPH/MDH.
Assist, as necessary, with student
needs prior to school closure.

Human
Resources
Human
Resources
Nursing Services

Human
Resources

Human
Resources

Docuware, etc.
Remind/notify employees of insurance
coverage/Employee Assistance Plans
for coping w/loss and treating stress.
Keep employee directory current.
Prepare to share directory with
supervisors.

38

Once we know schools will close,
coordinate delivery of equipment to the
homes of severely disabled students.
Work with Dakota County.

Coordination of transportation services
may be necessary with state/county.

Maintain technology systems.

Maintain communication with special ed
coordinators and severely disabled
students to get them necessary help.

Report as needed to DCPH/MDH.

Encourage supervisors to make contact
regularly with employees, have a back-up
plan so we know who is sick; who isn’t
returning, family circumstances, etc.

November 2008

Pandemic Plan for District 196

Make sure buses have been disinfected
prior to the start of school; continue
disinfection procedures until all danger of
a recurrence has passed.
Coordinate the return of equipment from
the homes of severely disabled students.
Make sure extra precautions are taken so
these students are not exposed to illness.

Continue communications with special ed
and families until all students are back in
school.
Assess students’ needs for grief
counseling.
Continue to maintain systems.

Report as needed to DCPH/MDH.

Try to determine who will be returning to
work.

4

Superintendent

Student
Information
Student
Information

Be prepared to provide contact
information to directors, principals,
teachers in a timely fashion.
Incident Commander-communicates
with MDE and Dakota County and
disseminates information to the
appropriate district personnel.

these families. Work with Dakota
County?
Labels.

39

Incident Commander-communicates with
MDE and Dakota County and
disseminates information to the
appropriate district personnel.

Continue to provide contact information.

Labels.

November 2008

Pandemic Plan for District 196

Be prepared to help extensively as schools
reopen to do census checks of families,
who has died, who will return, etc.
Incident Commander-communicates with
MDE and Dakota County and
disseminates information to the
appropriate district personnel.

Labels.

Reunification Planning: The release of students is a
critical part of emergency planning. Parent/student
reunification may be needed in the event of an
off-site evacuation or school lockdown. Advanced
planning may not prepare for every situation
however, each building must establish a safe
parent/student reunification plan.

Parent
Reunification

Consideration in Developing a Reunification Plan

/S
tudent
Pl

an

1. B 
e aware of the off-site evacuation holding area and alternative site for your school, refer to
pages 29-34, Off-Site Evacuation Plan.
2. Do not release to the public off-site evacuation holding locations prior to an emergency.
3. If the building is to be evacuated to an off-site location parents will be notified via the District 196 website,
local media and as of January 2009 the districtwide mass notification system.
4. T 
raffic control should be coordinated by building security personnel, school personnel and/or Community
Resource Officer until law enforcement officials are available.
5. W 
hen in doubt, a picture ID will normally be required to insure the person requesting the child/children is on
the emergency card.
DO NOT release students to people not listed on the student emergency card. A well intended
friend or neighbor may offer to take a child home; however, school personnel must be certain that
students are only released to the appropriate people so families know where their child is located.
6. P 
arents may be emotional when arriving at the pick-up site. Have administration, counselors, social worker,
etc. available to deal with issues.
7. S 
ome parents, due to confusion, may refuse to cooperate with the parent/student reunification process. This
situation can be diminished to some degree if parents are informed about student release procedures before
an emergency occurs. Parents should be reminded that the safety of their child is the utmost priority. It is recommended to include reunification information in the school handbook and/or website.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

40

A prank phone call/email is any communication that
is threatening in nature and may cause disruption to
the usual routine. All prank communications are to be
taken seriously and reported within the building.

If the call/email is a bomb threat, see pages 2-4.

PH

ON
E

PR
CA ANK
LL
/E
M

AI

Steps in Case of Prank Phone Call
The individual receiving the call should:
1. Notify the principal.
2. Record the next two phone calls that come in (to help trace the call).
3. Complete the Prank Phone Call Checklist (page 42).
4. Notify the police and ask them to have the call traced.
Steps in Case of Prank Email
The individual receiving the email should:
1. Notify the principal.
2. Save the message on the system, DO NOT delete the email message.
3. Print a copy of the message to be turned over to the police and the Information Technology Department.
4. Notify the police and ask them to help trace the email.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

41

L

Prank Phone Call Checklist
Record the exact time of call (hour, minute, second): ________________
Length of call: ______________ Date:_____________

A copy of this form should be kept
at the desk of any person who
regularly answers the phone.

Record the next two calls to come in (phone number and exact time): Phone_____________ Time___________
Phone_____________ Time___________
Sex of the caller:

M

F

Age:__________

Record exact wording of call:__________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Caller’s Voice:
Calm

Angry

Excited

Slow

Rapid

Soft

Loud

Laughing

Crying

Normal

Distinct

Slurred

Nasal

Stutter

Lisp

Raspy

Deep

Ragged

Accent

Disguised

Familiar

Cracking

Deep breathing

If voice is familiar, who did it sound like? _____________________________________________________________
Was the phone number identified? __________________________________________________________________

Background Sounds
Street noises

Factory machinery

Animal noises

Voices

PA system

Music

House noises

Motor

Office

Office machinery

Clear

Static

Local

Long distance

Booth

Other____________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Threat Language
Well spoken (educated)

Foul

Irrational

Incoherent

Taped

Message read by threat maker

42

Severe Weather
Do not evacuate the building in the event of severe
weather. Monitor NOAA weather radio Emergency/
National Weather Service.
The director of Secondary Education (#37712 or 651423-7712) is the district contact for questions in the
event of severe weather.

S
W EVE

EA R
TH E
ER

Severe Thunderstorm/Tornado/Flash Flood/Blizzard/Winter Storm Watch
(conditions are such that one could occur) 
Building and district administrators will stay alert for changing weather conditions and be prepared
to take appropriate action if the watch becomes a warning.
Severe Thunderstorm/Tornado/Flash Flood/Blizzard
(condition has been confirmed)
As indicated by community sirens - five minute steady tone. Listen to EBS (Emergency Broadcast System) alert
radio or tune to a local radio station for information.
1. Administration designee will direct everyone to pre-designated areas.
2. Teachers are to close doors, take class rosters and keep students together and take attendance once the designated safe area has been reached. Account for all students.
3. Members of Building-Level Emergency Management Team will make sure all students and staff are in the predesignated shelter areas. Keep staff and students aware of changes or emergencies.
4. Once students are assembled in a safe area, instruct them to respond to a specific command to assume a protective posture (crouched down on elbows and knees with hands over back of head) facing an interior wall (if
possible) when danger is imminent. Stay away from open areas.
5. Custodial staff will shut off fuel and electricity.
6. Nurse will go to an area designated in the building emergency plan.
Storms
1. Public warning is issued by the weather bureau through the radio and television Emergency Broadcast System
(EBS) when severe weather is anticipated.
2. Schools closed
a. Schools may be closed early by direction of the superintendent.
b. Buses will maintain radio contact with the transportation office at all times.
c. Radio station WCCO (830-AM), and local television stations will be notified of schedule changes.
d. District Information Line (#37777 or 651-423-7777) will have a recorded message.
e. Notice will be posted on district website. As of January 2009, parents/guardians will be notified via the
districtwide mass notification system.
3. Students will be advised to go directly home after school and will be reminded that low visibility may
make it difficult for drivers to see them.
Shelter Areas are:
• interior hallways
• enclosed conference rooms
• stairwells away from glass and glass walls
• lowest level of the building, except for flash floods

43

Severe Weather (continued)

W SEVE

Severe Thunderstorm/Tornado/Flash Flood/Blizzard/Winter
Storm Followup:
• Maintain order and direct students to remain in place.
• If there are injuries, provide first aid and notify (9)–911.
• Warn students and staff to avoid touching any electrical devices or exposed
wires.
• If the odor of natural gas is detected, evacuate the building. DO NOT use the fire
alarm or activate any electrical switches or devices that may cause a spark.
• If a section of the school is partially collapsed, evacuate students from that area.
• Notify (9)–911 if there is any structural damage.

EA R
TH E
ER

Community Education/After HOurs
During a warning, building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Use the building emergency plan that designates a tornado shelter area.
2. Notify all people in building.
3. Contact custodian regarding shutting off fuel and electricity.
During a warning, instructors should assist building supervisors by:
1. Taking class lists and leading students to shelter area.
2. O 
nce people are assembled in a safe area, instruct them to respond to a specific command to assume a protective posture (crouched down on elbows and knees with hands over back of head) facing an interior wall
(if possible) when danger is imminent. It is essential that this command be understood and obeyed instantly.

44

Sexual Assault is a crime of violence. For the victim,
it is often an experience of fear, loss of control,
humiliation and violence. Victims may experience a full
range of emotional reactions. It is extremely beneficial
for the victim to seek support regarding the assault.

In








As

Se

xu
sa al
ul
t

the event of a sexual assault or notification of a sexual assault:
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Contact the parent/guardian.
3. Confidentially must be maintained during the investigation.
• If a staff person reports or hears of a report, tell them not to repeat anything they heard or
provide any information within or outside the school unless specifically told to do so.
4. If the assault occurred on campus.
• Notify appropriate law enforcement.
• Notify local rape crisis center.
5. Designate a school counselor or staff member who has a positive relationship with the victim to review the
types of support she or he may need.
6. Determine the need for peer support from a rape crisis center.
7. Take action to control rumors.
8. Document all actions taken by staff.

45

SHELTER–IN–PLACE
Sheltering in place provides refuge for students,
staff and the public inside the school building during
an emergency. Shelters are located in areas of the
building that maximize the safety of inhabitants.
Sheltering in place is used when evacuation would
put people at risk (i.e., tornado, environmental hazard, blocked evacuation route).

SHe
In l
Pl ter
ace

Shelter areas may change depending on the emergency.
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Identify safe areas in each school building.
3. Building administrator announces that students and staff must go to shelter areas.
4. Bring all persons inside building(s).
5. Teachers take class rosters if moving from classroom.
6. Close all exterior doors and windows, if appropriate.
7. Turn off ventilation leading outdoors, if appropriate.
8. If advised, cover mouth and nose with handkerchief, cloth, paper towels or tissues.
9. Teachers account for all students after arriving in shelter area.
10. All persons remain in shelter areas until a building administrator or emergency responder declares that it is safe
to leave.
If all evacuation routes are blocked:
1. Stay in room and close door.
2. Keep air as clean as possible.
a. Seal door.
b. Open or close windows as appropriate.
c. Limit movement and talking in room.
3. Communicate your situation to administration or emergency officials by whatever means possible.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

46

Shooting/Stabbing: School policies should address
who has authority to initiate a lockdown procedure
in all schools and buildings. Do not become a victim
by unnecessarily exposing yourself to danger.
Steps in Case of a Shooting/Stabbing
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).

SH

ST OO
AB TIN
BI G
NG /

2. Institute lockdown with intruder procedures (refer to page 16). Provide the following
information if known:
• Location of shooter(s).
• Description identity and number of shooters.
• Description of weapon(s).
• Number of shots fired.
• Is shooting continuing?
• Number of injuries.
3. Call the police, (9)-911.

When police arrive, the principal or his/her designee should be prepared to provide the
following information to them:
a. Description and/or identification of suspect.
b. Description and location of the scene.
c. Type of weapon being used and location of weapon.
d. Number and names of victims.

e. Refer media to the district spokesperson.

4. If the suspect is still on school property, attempt to identify his or her location. If the suspect has left the
school building, secure all exterior doors to prevent re-entry.
5. Isolate students from danger or send students to a secure area. Initiate building lockdown procedures if
appropriate.
6. T 
eachers need to make every attempt to stay with their classes. Students and staff should keep away from
windows and doors.
7. C 
are for the injured if it is safe to do so until emergency responders arrive. Do not add to the victim list by
exposing yourself to danger.
8. Teachers take attendance and notify the principal of missing students or staff as soon it is safe to do so.
9. Implementing recovery procedures.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.
3. Follow police department instructions.
4. If incident is occurring outside the building, keep all people in the building until police give authorization to leave.
5 Refer media to the district spokesperson.

47

SUICIDE ATTEMPT/THREAT
Over the course of any given school year, a number
of students are hospitalized for suicidal actions.
Writing, talking, even hinting about suicide must be
taken seriously. Immediate intervention is essential.
Most situations are handled by the school counselor,
psychologist and/or school social worker, the family/
guardians and outside treatment providers (i.e.: hospital
staff, psychologist, psychiatrist, etc.). A school response
is likely to be necessary only when the attempt is
made at school or when a significant number of other
students/staff are aware and in need of services. In
this case, it may be that only additional mental health
services are needed.

At

te

m

Su

pt

ic

/T

id

hr

e

ea
t

In all cases, it is important to maintain the student’s
privacy, quell rumors, assist the victim and their
family and address the needs of other students.
Suicide Attempt/Threat at School:
PROCEDURE
1. Verify information.
2. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
3. Call (9)-911, if the person requires medical attention, has a weapon, or needs to be restrained.
4. Notify school psychologist or school social worker, principal, school nurse and guidance counselor.
5. Notify parent/guardian.
6. Principal calls district office and parent/guardian if suicidal person is student. If a staff member, call next of kin.
Principal may schedule a meeting with parents and school psychologist/social worker to determine course of
action.
7. Try to isolate suicidal person from other students.
8. Never leave a suicidal person alone.
9. Do not allow the student to leave school without parent, guardian or other appropriate adult supervision.
10. Implement recovery procedures (see Recovery Section). Determine level of intervention and to discuss staff
notification.
Suicidal Attempt/ Serious Injury Outside of School:
PROCEDURE
1. Verify information.
2. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
3. Activate Building Emergency Management Team to assess recovery, post-crisis intervention needs, and
notifications.
4. Principal notifies district office.
5. Implement recovery procedures (see Recovery Section page 67)

48

Suicide Attempt/Threat-Continued

At

te

Post-Crisis Intervention:

1. To determine level of intervention for staff and students, meet with school
counseling staff, faith community and/or other mental health workers.
2. Designate rooms as private counseling areas. Escort siblings and close friends and
other “highly stressed” students to counselors. Do not allow the students to leave
school without parents, guardian or other appropriate supervision.
3. Assess stress levels of staff. Recommend counseling to overly stressed staff.
4. Refer media to media spokesperson. Do not let media question students or staff.
5. Follow-up with students and staff who receive counseling.
6. Resume normal routines as soon as possible.

m

Su

pt

ic

/T

id

hr

e

ea
t

Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

49

Su

A suspicious substance is anything biological or
chemical in nature. Follow the First Steps in Any
Emergency (pages IV & V).

Su

sp
bs icio
ta u
nc s
e

Steps in Case of Suspicious Substance Inside the Building
1. Isolate students and staff who have come in contact with the substance. Also, isolate
the area (room). Document all who were in the area.
2. Call (9)-911. Notify the Superintendent’s Office (#37749 or 651-423-7749).
3. Notify the MN Duty Officer at #1-800-422-0798.
4. Turn off the ventilation system, secure air-intake systems, and the science/kitchen/technology
exhaust hoods for the entire building.
5. Staff and students in the immediate area should wash with warm water and soap.
6. The building administrator may order an evacuation of the school building(s) or other action, per school district policies.
7. Contact parents/guardians of students involved. If necessary, instruct parents to have their daughter/son
shower as soon as possible.
Steps in Case of Suspicious Substance Outside the Building
1. Bring staff and students inside the building. If they have been exposed, keep them separate from rest of
school population and have them wash with warm water and soap.
2. Call (9)–911. Notify the Superintendent’s Office (#37749 or 651-423-7749).
3. Notify the MN Duty Officer at #1-800-422-0798.
4. Turn off the ventilation system, secure air-intake systems, and the science/kitchen/technology exhaust hoods
for the entire building.
5. Close all doors and windows.
6. Minimize the introduction of outside air by placing towels in front of exterior doors and tape the seals of all
exterior doors, windows and ventilations supply vents.
Steps in Case of Suspicious Substance in Water
1. Call (9)–911.
2. Contact City Water Department. See page VI, “Emergency Telephone Numbers.”
3. Make announcement that the water should not be consumed and that faucets should not be operated.
4. Shut off the main water valve to building.
5. Cover (bag) all water fountains and faucets.
6. Document all staff and students that consumed water for that day for exposure evaluation by health o
­ fficials.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

50

SUSPICIOUS LETTER/PACKAGE
Items received by mail or delivery service, a suspicious
letter or package that might be a chemical or
biological threat.

Le S u
tt

er

sp

/P

Suspicious Substance
If a telephone threat references a chemical or biological device or package, complete the
Telephone Threat Checklist (refer to page 4) and refer to safety procedures in Bomb Threat and
Hazardous Materials sections.

ic

io

ac us
ka
ge

When sorting mail or receiving delivered packages:
1. Look for characteristics that make you suspicious of the content.
a. excessive postage, excessive weight
b. misspellings of common words and or badly written or typed words
c. oily stains, discolorations, odor
d. n o return address or showing a city or state in the postmark that does not match the return address
e. package not anticipated by someone in the school or not sent by a known school vendor
f. possibly mailed from a foreign country
2. Do not open package or letter.
If a letter/package is opened and contains a written threat but no suspicious substance:
1. Notify building principal and law enforcement.
2. L 
imit access to the area in which the letter/package was opened to minimize the number of people who might
directly handle it. It is considered criminal evidence.
3. Ask the person who discovered/opened the letter or package to place it into another container, such as a plastic bag.
4. Turn the letter/package over to law enforcement. Document all activities.
If a letter or package is opened and contains a suspicious substance:
1. Notify building principal and law enforcement.
2. Isolate the people who have been exposed to the substance. The goal here is to prevent/minimize spreading
contamination.
3. Limit access to the area in which the letter/package was opened.
4. A 
sk the person who discovered/opened the letter/package to place it into another container, such as a clear
plastic zip–lock bag. Handle with gloves if possible.
5. E 
mergency officials will determine the need for decontamination of the area and the people exposed to the
substance.
Building principal:
1. Building principal and emergency officials determine whether evacuation is necessary.
2. B 
uilding principal notifies superintendent. Notification is made to parents/guardians, according to district
policies.
3. Implement post-crisis procedures as necessary.
Consider having gloves and zip–lock bags available at mail sorting areas.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

51

THREATS OF VIOLENCE
A threat of violence is any expression, verbal or behavioral, of the intent to inflict harm, injury, or damage to
persons or property. The threat of violence carries with
it the implied notions of a risk of violence and a high
probability of harm or injury.
All threats of violence within or involving a school may
have serious consequences and can be expected to have
some type of negative impact. Threats to students or
staff could be a prelude to a more serious incident, such
as an armed assault or a hostage taking. Even when
more serious incidents or crises do not follow, threats
typically result in significant adverse consequences
(physical and/or psychological) to the victim(s).

Of Thr
Vi eat
ol

en

s

ce

DEFINITIONS RELATED TO THREATS OF VIOLENCE
Assault and Battery
Any intentional act of hitting, pushing, scratching,
biting, kicking, or any other form of physical contact
engaged in by, or directed toward, another person,
which results in or is intended to result in death,
physical injury, and/or mental/emotional damage.
Harassment
Unwelcome activity (verbal or physical) or creation
of a hostile work environment through unwelcome
words, actions, or physical contact not necessarily
directly resulting in physical harm.
Intimidation
The act of frightening or coercing by threat or implied
threat.

Theft
Taking without permission property belonging to
another.
Simple Assault
The act of threatening to strike or harm another
person with a weapon or a specific physical
movement intended to induce fear.
Vandalism
Damaging or defacing school property or the property
of school personnel and/or students.
Violence
Aggression resulting in physical contact / assault with
or without the use of a weapon.

LAWS RELATED TO THREATS OF VIOLENCE
Assault / Assault & Battery
It is against the law to commit assault, or assault and battery against another person
Threats and Harassment
1. It is not, in and of itself, against the law to verbally threaten another person without an accompanying physical
threat (see exception below).
2. It is, however, against the law to threaten a school employee with death or bodily injury while at school, on the
school bus, or at a school-sponsored function or activity.
3. It is against the law to threaten someone by telephone or to otherwise harass someone over the phone (i.e.
hang-up calls, breathing on the phone, etc.).
4. It is against the law to threaten someone using an internet / e-mail communication.
5. It is against the law to threaten someone or to threaten any member of their family in writing.

52

Threats and Harassment (con’t)
6. Harassment, in and of itself, is not a violation of the law unless the
action constituting the harassment is otherwise a violation of the law.
7. It is against the law to commit stalking; stalking is defined as when a person,
on more than one occasion, engages in conduct directed at another person with
the intent to place, or with knowledge that the conduct places, that other person in
reasonable fear of death, criminal sexual assault, or bodily injury to that person or that
other person's family or household member.

Of Thr
Vi eat
ol

en

s

ce

Steps in Case of Threats of Violence
1. Follow First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V)
2. Convene the appropriate staff to evaluate the threat (e.g. threat assessment worksheet).
3. Develop an action plan.
4. If necessary, isolate the possible offender(s) with the assistance of the police. Follow the District 196 disciplinary
policy. Consider lockdown procedures.
5. Make every effort to reduce the offender's level of agitation before they leave the building. If the offender's
behavior continues to escalate, notify the police liaison officer.
6. Contact parents or legal guardians. Inform them of the situation, any concerns and course of action.
7. Provide the front door greeter / security personnel with a photograph of the offender and information
pertaining to the unauthorized return to school.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

53

Utility Emergency:
Natural gas leak, power or water failure, downed
power lines.
Steps in Case of Utility Emergency
Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).

EM UT
ER ILIT
GE Y
NC
Y

Gas Line Break – Top Priority
1. Call the gas company using a phone located away from the gas line break (page VI).
• Our gas company is ____________________________.
• Phone number is____________________.
2. Do not use ANY electrical switches.
3. Custodial personnel should shut off gas inside the building if possible.
4. Evacuate the building. Students and staff should be at least 500 feet away from the building. Teachers
should take their class lists and keep their students in groups.
5. If necessary, call the Coordinator of Transportation (x37685 or 651-423-7685) to evacuate students to
an off-site location.
6. Notify Health and Safety Supervisor (x37735 or 651-423-7735).
Electric Power or Water Failure
1. Call the utility company (page VI).
• Our electric utility is ____________________________.
• Phone number is____________________.
2.. Call the City Water Department (page VI).
• Our water department phone number is____________________________.
3. Custodial personnel will check for possible dangerous electrical or water situations and report to principal.
4. The principal (or designee) will evaluate the situation considering: the time of day, weather conditions,
the cause of the power or water failure (if known).
5. Notify Facilities and Grounds Department (x37706 or 651-423-7706).
6. Whenever possible the school's normal schedule and activities should be adhered to.
Downed Power Lines
1. Keep students away from the area.
2. Call the electric utility company (page VI).
• Our electric utility is ____________________________.
• Phone number is____________________.
3. Notify Facilities and Grounds Department (x37706 or 651-423-7706).

In the case of any utility emergency, check utilities and
electrical devices for damage due to any outage.
Community Education/After HOurs
In the case of any utility emergency, the building supervisor/administrator will:
1.  Consult with the custodian on duty or notify the building chief.
2. If Community Education, notify the facilities manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-270-8794.
Gas Line Break
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Clear the immediate area and evacuate the building, if necessary.
2. Call (9)-911.
3. Call the gas company using a phone located away from the gas line break (page VI).
4. Not use any electrical switches.
5. Notify Facilities and Grounds Department (x37706 or 651-423-7706).

54

A weapon of any type poses a serious threat to the
safety of students/staff and visitors who occupy our
school buildings. A weapon is defined as any object or
item that is designed or otherwise used to threaten or
inflict bodily harm or injury against another person or
group of people. Weapons include, but are not limited
to: firearms (loaded or unloaded), knives (regardless
of design or normal use), clubs, wire-mesh gloves,
chemicals, chemical sprays, laser pointers, and lookalike weapons. Items such as pens and pencils and
other "everyday" items can also be considered weapons
when used improperly. Early intervention may reduce or
eliminate the escalation of the incident.

W

EA

PO

NS

Steps in Case of Weapon(s) Outside the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Do not investigate the matter. Report the incident to an administrator.
3. Members of the Building-Level Emergency Management Team should direct any students and staff who are
outside the building to a safe entrance into the building.
4. Lock classroom doors and exterior doors as necessary.
5. Keep students in rooms and away from doors and windows until further notified.
Steps in Case of Weapon(s) Inside the Building
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2. Remove students to a secure area.
a. If a person with a weapon is in the area, direct students to drop low to the ground and crawl to a safe
area.
b. If in an open classroom, use tables, file cabinets, desks, etc. for protection.
3. Do as the person with the weapon demands.
a. Do not make sudden moves which could frighten the person. (Ask permission to move.)
b. Never argue.
c. Take your time.
d. Keep your students as calm as possible.
e. Do not use physical force unless someone’s life is in imminent danger.
4. Talk to the person with the weapon.
a. Learn as much as you can about the person.
b. Keep the person’s attention on you, not on your students.
5. Be observant.
a. Mentally record a detailed description of the individual and the weapon.
b. Identify a distinctive feature and continue to concentrate on that one item.
c. Remember what objects the person touches and safeguard them for evidence for law enforcement officials.

55

Weapons (continued)
Steps in Case of Weapon(s) Suspected
1 If a witness is reporting weapon(s), isolate him or her in the office.
2. Interview the witness to gather as much information as possible.

W

EA

a. Name of suspect with weapon.
b. What type of weapon is suspected?

PO

NS

c. Location of witness when weapon was seen.
d. What did the suspect do with the weapon after it was displayed?
e. Has the suspect threatened anyone?
f. Is the current location of the suspect with the weapon known?
3. W 
ithout confronting the suspect, the principal or designee should go to the area where the suspect is reported
to be and observe him or her.
4. The suspect should be accompanied by the principal or designee to a private area and questioned.
5. A 
second administrator or officer should take all of the suspect’s belongings (book bag, clothing, etc.) from the
classroom. Do not allow the suspect to pick-up or carry his or her own belongings.
6. T 
he suspect should be thoroughly searched by the police officer or an administrator with another adult witness
present. An administrator should search belongings, including – but not limited to – book bags, purses,
lockers, and autos if applicable. If a gun or other weapon is found, the police officer takes control of the
search.
7. The police should take possession of and secure any weapon located during such a search.
8. Take photo of weapon to be included in the expulsion proceedings.
9. Follow procedures for student disciplinary actions.
10. Notify parent or guardian.
11. Secure a detailed written statement from witnesses, including staff.

56

STEPS IN CASE STUDENT THREATENING WITH A
WEAPON
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
2.Call (9)-911. Give the operator all the information that you have regarding
the location of the student(s), a physical and clothing description, and the
weapon(s) involved. Advise the operator if you are locking down the building.
3. If possible, isolate the student and move students from the area without causing
injury to yourself or others.
4. The principal may order the lockdown depending upon the nature of the incident.
5. The principal, or designee, will meet with police officials at a command post outside the
school, in the event a student/staff has a firearm. The principal should have as much of the
following information available as possible:
a. Location of the student/staff
b. Description of the student (sex, race, age, height, weight, hair, clothing, etc.)
c. Any known weapons (seen by staff or mentioned by the student)
d. Names of any staff members that have had contact with the student during the incident
e. Any statements made by the student
f. Maps of the school building(s) - these should be part of the "Crisis Kit"
6. If the police are able to confine the student to one area of the building, they may determine that evacuation is
necessary.
a. T 
he police will help ensure that no students or staff exit the building so as to be exposed to the student
with the weapon.
b. T 
his may require evacuation of the building in several phases to avoid overcrowding at the exits being used
(and related safety risks). Those areas closest to the student with the weapon will be evacuated first.
c. Those areas directly adjacent to the student with the weapon may have to remain locked down to avoid
exposing students and staff to danger.
7. All questions from outside sources must be directed to the media spokesperson at the command post.
8. Be prepared to keep media, parents, and other community members out of the building and off of the campus
if necessary; the police secure the campus.
9. Contact the offender’s parent/guardian.

W

EA

PO

NS

STEPS IN CASE STUDENT IN POSSESSION OF A WEAPON (NO IMMEDIATE THREAT)
1. The principal, or designee, will evaluate the situation and determine whether to approach the student or call the
police.
2. The principal will consider the following in deciding whether or not to lockdown the building:
a. T 
he type of weapon(s) involved and location of student, if known.
b. T 
he location of the weapon(s) - is it actually in the student's possession or is it accessible to the student?
(If the weapon is in a locker or elsewhere, an administrator or staff member should be assigned to monitor
that area until police arrive).
c. The time of day - is it the beginning or end of the day or during lunch when locating and containing the
student will be difficult?
d. A 
ny knowledge of the student's background, emotional state, etc.
e. Any other information as to the student's intent with the weapon (i.e. a specific time or location for the
weapon to be used).
f. If a lockdown will possibly alert the student and create an unsafe situation.
3. At no time should a staff member attempt to forcibly retrieve a weapon from a student. If a student offers to turn
over a weapon they should be instructed to put the weapon down and step back from it so that it can be safely
retrieved by the staff member.

57

STEPS IN CASE STUDENT IN POSSESSION OF A WEAPON
(NO IMMEDIATE THREAT) CONTINUED
4. If the police are contacted, the principal and the police officers will
search the student/staff in possession of a weapon.
5. If a weapon (as defined by the law) is located, the police officers will assume
control of the weapon. The principal will ensure that a school investigation is
also completed.
6. If a weapon is located that violates school policy, but not the law, the principal will
conduct a school investigation into the matter. The police will assist with the investigation
as needed.
7. Contact the offender's parent/guardian.

W

EA

PO

NS

STEPS IN CASE A WEAPON IS RECOVERED IN SCHOOL
1. Contact the police resource officer.
2. The officer will take possession of the weapon. Be prepared to provide any information you have on the
weapon, such as:
a. When, where and who found the weapon?
b. Who has handled it since it was found?
c. Was in found in a public or private area?
d. Are there any suspects for possession of the weapons?
3. If enough information exists, the officer will conduct a criminal investigation into the manner in which the
weapon came onto the school campus. The principal will assist with this investigation if requested to do so by
the police.
4. C 
ontact the student’s parent/guardian, if a weapon is in the possession of the student.
5. D 
etermine school consequences.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

58

Steps in Case of Weapons on a District Vehicle

Di We

st ap
ri on
ct s
Ve On
hi
If the driver determines the situation to be hostile, threatening or aggressive, he or she will:
cl
1. Follow the First Steps in Any Emergency (pages IV & V).
e
2. Call for assistance. If safe to do so stop the vehicle. If possible and safe to do so remove the
If the driver becomes aware of a concealed
weapon, he or she will notify the Coordinator of
Transportation (651-423-7685) who will contact the
school and the local police department.

students to a safe area.
3. Do as the person with the weapon demands.
a. Do not make sudden moves which could frighten the person. (Ask permission to move.)
b. Never argue.
c. Take your time.
d. Keep your students as calm as possible.
e. Do not use physical force unless someone’s life is in imminent danger.
4. Talk to the person with the weapon.
a. Learn as much as you can about the person.
b. Keep the person’s attention on you, not on your students.
5. Be observant.
a. Mentally record a detailed description of the individual and the weapon.
b. Identify a distinctive feature and continue to concentrate on that one item.
c. Remember what objects the person touches and safeguard them for evidence for law enforcement officials.
Community Education/After HOurs
Building supervisor/administrator will:
1. Call (9)-911.
2. If Community Education, notify the manager/coordinator on duty: Cell Phone 651-295-1703.

59

Communications

Communications

Communications: Media Procedures
How you handle the media has a profound effect on how families and the community view
your school. Therefore, it is critical that you work closely with the District Communications
Specialist (#37775 or 651-423-7775) on any emergency.
The Communications Specialist will help you:
• Select a spokesperson.
• Identify key messages and major points of focus.
• Develop communications (letters, emails, etc.) to be sent home to parents.
• Write news releases.
Points to Remember
1. W 
ork with the media, not against them. The Communications Specialist will help you keep the media
informed, decreasing the need for them to seek information from other sources.
2. Stick to the facts. Do not speculate or offer your own opinion.
3. R 
emember, internal communications are as important as external. Staff and students are potential
spokespeople.
4. R 
efer any questions involving the details of a police or fire investigation to the appropriate public safety
agency.
What You Need to Know:
1. A 
ccess: Schools are not required to allow media access to the campus during an emergency or at any other
time. Remind staff to refer all visitors to the office for assistance. Ask staff to alert the principal if a reporter
is in the building without permission. Building administrators have the authority to allow or deny access to the
campus.
2. P 
hotos: Refer reporters to the Communications Specialist for student photograph requests. Photographs
published in a school yearbook are public information. Schools may give or loan a yearbook to someone from
the media, or schools may allow a reporter to take a photo of a yearbook photo. If a school does not publish
student photos in any form, student photos are private and may not be distributed to the media.
3. P 
ublic Information: The following information relating to an early childhood or K-12 student is “directory
information*” and may be released to the public: name; date and place of birth, sex, major field of study,
participation in officially recognized school activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic
teams, dates of school attendance, grade level completed, degrees, honors and awards received in school,
honor roll, school of attendance, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended;
photographs, videotapes and other visual representations for school-approved publications, newspapers, public
presentations, and publication on school-approved Internet and World Wide Web pages. Directory information
does not include identifying data which references religion, race, color, disability, social position or nationality.
* If the parent or guardian has completed a Denial of Release of Directory Information Form to deny release of
all or certain pieces of directory information, that information is NOT to be released.

61

Media checklist:
_____ B 
uilding administrator relays all factual information to superintendent and district communications
Specialist.
_____ Establish a media information center away from the affected area. Consider:
a. M 
edia need timely and accurate information. However, protect the privacy of staff and students when
necessary and justified.
b. M 
edia will want to be close enough to shoot video footage and photographs, but they should not be
allowed to hinder responders.
_____ B 
efore holding a news conference, brief the participants and coordinate information.
a. D 
etermine the message you want to convey. Create key messages for target audiences: parents, students
and the community.
b. Emphasize the safety of students and staff.
c. E 
ngage media to help distribute important public information. Explain how the emergency is being
handled.
d. R 
espect privacy of victims and families of victims. Do not release names to media.
_____ Update media regularly. DO NOT say “No comment.” Ask other agencies to assist with media.
_____ Maintain log of all telephone inquiries for future use.

62

First Public Statement
This is what I can confirm at this time:
At approximately _________ this __________ (morning/afternoon/evening), we experienced:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
At this point we cannot provide you with the full details because members of our team are continuing to assess the
situation.
Our primary goal is to ensure the safety of everyone, the security of the facility and the restoration of services and
to provide the most accurate information we can as quickly as possible.
(Optional) We can confirm that: ___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
We have requested assistance from: ________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
We can confirm that ____________ person(s) has/have been injured.
At this time their is/are __________ known fatality(ies)
We ask members of the media to stay in touch with us to confirm all facts so the public is assured of the most accurate information we can provide.
We will conduct another briefing __________ (state time or offer as possible) to provide you with additional information. In the meantime, please bear with us.
If you have specific questions, _________________________ (name) will take your questions and we will try to
get answers for the next briefing.

63

Crisis Clock
What we are doing:
1.

What others are doing:
1. Teachers/Students

Media talking points:
1.

2.

2. Parents

2.

3.

3. School Board

3.

4.

4. Public

4.

5.

5. Media

5.

64

Communication: Parent Notification Concerning Threats or Rumors at School
In the event of a threat or rumor that may disrupt the normal daily routine, the school may decide that it is necessary to communicate accurate information to parents. The method and level of communication should reflect
the scope and nature of the threat. The principal will decide the details that will be communicated with input
from the Building Emergency Management Team and consultation with the appropriate director, and with the
communications specialist and superintendent as necessary. The method of communication may include, but
is not limited to, any of the following: phone call, email, U.S. mail, or hand-delivered letter. The draft will be
reviewed by the communications specialist, appropriate director and superintendent.
Possible Indicators:
• The building administration believes that a large number of students are aware of the threat or rumor.
• Additional law enforcement presence or involvement at the school concerning threat or rumor of a threat.
• An announcement concerning the threat or rumor has been made to the students during the school day.
• A law enforcement investigation concerning a threat to the school.
•A 
local, regional, or national event that causes great fear or anxiety among students which could disrupt the
normal daily routine.
• An investigation concerning a student with a history of violent behavior or law enforcement involvement.
• A concern gathered from a threat assessment inquiry (page 105-114 Emergency Procedures Guide).
These indicators are not exhaustive. Other indicators may be present to warrant parent notification.

65

Recovery

Recovery

RECOVERY
The goal of recovery is to return to learning and restore
the infrastructure of the school as quickly as possible.
School staff can be trained to deal with the emotional
impact of the crisis, as well as to initially assess the
emotional needs of students and staff. During this
process, it is extremely important to provide a caring,
consistent, and supportive school environment.
Adopted from U.S. Department of Education, Office of
Safe and Drug-Free Schools, Washington, D.C., 2003

Re

co
ve

ry

UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONAL TRAUMA
Trauma knows no bounds. Schools are confronted with putting the pieces back together following sudden, tragic
events such as death or serious injury to students or staff, bus accidents, fires, violence and natural or man-made
violence both close to home and far-away. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, research indicates
that both adults and children demonstrate a wide-range of reactions following a catastrophic event. The range of
human responses can include physical, cognitive and emotional symptoms including nausea, sleep disturbance,
slowed thinking, bad memories, regressed behavior, anxiety, guilt, depression, anger and a host of other
responses.
The first step in the recovery phase actually begins in preparation. Roles and responsibilities of staff and others
need to be determined prior to the crisis. Experience shows that after a crisis, many unsolicited offers of assistance
from outside the school community are made. It is imperative that school resources are the primary source of
assistance until it is determined what, if any, outside resources are necessary. With prior planning, those service
providers in the community with appropriate skills may assist in the recovery phase.
OVERVIEW OF GOALS FOR RECOVERY
Adopted from U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, Washington, D.C., 2003
Return to the “business of learning” as quickly as possible. Experts agree that the first order of business
following a crisis is to return to students learning as quickly as possible. Routines are important during these times.
Schools need to keep students, families, and the media informed. Be clear about what steps have
been taken to attend to student and staff safety and emotional well-being. Let families, students and staff know
what support services the school is providing and/or what community resources are available. Messages should
communicate appropriate information. (Information regarding resources and sample letters are available at the end
of the sample letters section of the Emergency Procedures Guide).
Focus on the building, as well as people, during recovery. Following a crisis, buildings and their grounds
may need repairing. Conduct safety audits (if necessary) and determine the parts of the building that can be used
and plan for repairs.

67

OVERVIEW OF GOALS FOR RECOVERY (con’t)
Provide assessment of emotional needs of staff, students and families. Teachers are an important
resource in assessing the emotional needs of all students including baseline behavior. Referrals for individual/
group support can be made to the school guidance counselor, social worker or school psychologist. Staff should be
given opportunities to self-refer if they feel as though they need support. In addition, available services need to be
identified for families who may want to seek treatment for their children.
Provide stress management during class time. Trauma experts emphasize the need to create a caring, warm
and trusting environment for students following a crisis. The classroom is an important place to provide support
for students. Students who require more individualized support can be referred to the appropriate personnel.
Conduct daily debriefings for staff and others assisting in the recovery phase. Experts stress the
importance of ensuring that those who are providing “psychological first aid” are supported with daily critical
incident stress debriefings. Debriefings are meetings that help staff cope with their own feelings of vulnerability.
Take as much time as needed for recovery. An individual recovers from a crisis at his/her own pace.
Recovery is not linear. After a crisis, healing is a process filled with ups and downs. Depending on the traumatic
event and the individual, recovery may take months or even years.
Evaluate. Evaluations should be conducted on a regular basis (hourly, daily, weekly, etc.), as well
as at the end of the recovery phase. Evaluating recovery efforts will help prepare for the next crisis. Use
interviews and surveys to evaluate recovery efforts. Conduct brief interviews with families, staff and students.
ACTION CHECKLIST
• Strive to return to learning as quickly as possible.
• Assist in assessing students for the emotional impact of the crisis.
• Identify what follow-up interventions are available for students and staff.
• Conduct debriefings with staff.
• Assess curricular activities that address the crisis.
• Allocate appropriate time for recovery.
• Assess “lessons learned” and incorporate them into revisions and trainings.
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, Washington, D.C., 2003

68

POST-CRISIS INTERVENTION PROCEDURES
1. Assess the situation to determine the need for post–crisis interventions for staff, students and families.
2. Provide post–crisis briefings for staff, students and families as appropriate.
3. Re–establish school and classroom routine as quickly as possible.
4. Consider interventions:
a. D 
efusing – Provide defusing sessions for students and staff as quickly as possible after the emergency.
Defusings are brief conversations with individuals or small groups held soon after an incident to help
people better understand and cope with the effects of the incident. Defusing should be conducted by
trained individuals.
b. D 
ebriefing – Conduct critical-incident stress debriefing (CISD) three to four days after the emergency.
CISD is a formal group discussion designed to help people understand their reactions to the stress of an
event and to give referral information. It must be modified for student’s developmental level. CISD should
only be conducted by trained professionals.
c. Counseling – Provide grief counseling.
5. Provide ongoing support as necessary for staff, students and families.
a. Monitor and support staff.
b. P 
rovide ongoing opportunities for children to talk about their fears and concerns. They may have more
questions as time passes.
c. Identify and monitor at–risk students.
d. Provide individual crisis or grief counseling, if necessary.
e. Conduct outreach to homes.
f. Provide follow–up referral for assessment and treatment if necessary.
In the event of a tragic, highly publicized event, mental health professionals from federal,
state and non-government agencies may respond to offer post-crisis aid. Effective coordination
is critical. Consult with the Minnesota Department of Education for support, advice and
assistance in coordinating the activities of outside entities.

69

GENERAL STRATEGIES FOR FOLLOW-UP TO EMERGENCIES/CRITICAL INCIDENTS
The Day After: The first day back after an incident.
1. Convene the Building Emergency Management Team to update them on any additional information/
procedures:
a. P 
repare a statement/letter to faculty and staff, which provides them with the details of the incident, the
proposed daily schedule, and plan of action. The information should be distributed in a faculty meeting
format.
b. D 
istribute materials to faculty (i.e. letters to parents, handouts pertaining to students/staff reactions to
crisis).
c. W 
ork in conjunction with the Rapid Response Team (principal, school psychologists, social workers,
nurse, and guidance counselors from the district) to determine what district-wide resources are needed.
2. Identify students and staff in need of follow-up support and assign staff members to monitor at-risk students:
a. Coordinate counseling opportunities for students (both in and out of class).
b. Announce ongoing support for students and staff with place, time and staff facilitator identified.
c. Provide parents with a list of community resources available to students and their families.
d. Determine what, if any, outside resources may be necessary to provide support in the school.

Using outside personnel/agencies should only take place after an evaluation is made of the
incident's impact on the members of the school community.
3. R 
econvene staff at close of school to provide staff the opportunity to discuss feelings and reactions of the day as
well as to review and plan for the next day.
Long Term Follow-up and Evaluation:
1. Inform faculty, students and parents that ongoing support will be provided as long as needed.
2. Conduct an assessment of Emergency Management protocols if needed.
3. Write thank-you notes to people who have provided support during the emergency.
4. B 
e alert to anniversaries and holidays. Often students and staff will experience an anniversary trigger reaction
the following month(s) or year(s) on the date of the emergency or when similar crises occur. The Building
Management Team should be responsible for keeping track of anniversaries following a crisis.
How to help when the crisis occurs in another school:
When a crisis occurs in another school, the first reaction is to rush and help. Prior events have taught us that
this action leads to confusion, can be counterproductive and can delay the recovery effort. When a crisis occurs
in another school, the proper response is to convene the appropriate members of your Building Emergency
Team and determine the physical and emotional safety of your school. The following are just a few samples of
appropriate and effective ways for your staff to reach out:
• Make available counselor(s), psychologist and/or other services as requested,
• Send flowers, cards;
• Attend wakes/visitations;
• Offer to provide lunch, breakfast or coffee; and/or
• Make a donation to an appropriate charity;
Remembering that the goal of recovery is to return the school community to a safe and secure learning
environment, it is important to remember that if other schools respond in a hasty manner they may unnecessarily
spread/heighten the impact of a crisis.
Although the first reaction is often to reach out quickly and ease the pain of others, it is important to remember
that recovery is an ongoing process. Those that have experienced a crisis often feel “forgotten” as time goes on
and report that receiving support weeks or months after a tragedy helps them feel “remembered.”

70

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN RECOVERY
The role of the principal:
• Assemble and direct the Building Management Team.
• Be visible, available, and supportive.
• Dispel rumors by giving everyone the facts.
• Communicate with the District Office.
• Provide updated information to all concerned (parents, students and staff).
The role of psychologist’s / counselor’s / social workers:
• Act as a crucial member of the Emergency Management Team.
• Locate counseling space.
• Assist in identifying at-risk students.
• Support the faculty.
• Be visible, available and supportive.
• Evaluate student and staff needs.
• Provide short-term counseling.
• Provide referrals to outside counseling as needed.
The role of the Emergency Management Team:
• Assess needs of school.
• Coordinate recovery effort.
• Conduct meetings to discuss progress of recovery.
• Evaluate response to intervention and discuss future changes.
• Provide Community Resource Guides and Teacher/Parent Handouts.
The role of the teacher:
Emergencies hit children hard. It can be difficult for children to understand and accept that there are events in their
lives that can’t be controlled or predicted. This resource was designed to help teachers assist children and is useful
for general disasters as well as emergencies that occur in the lives of individual children.
Ways teachers can assist students:
• Children take cues from adults, be visible and supportive.
• Identify and manage your own natural feelings of helplessness, fear, anger; until you do this; you won’t be able
to effectively help your students. If overwhelmed,
• Ask for help and remember the importance of self-care.
• Provide a warm, friendly, and supportive environment for your students.
• Learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of unusual distress and post-traumatic stress reactions.
• Put the emergency or critical incident in context; provide a perspective.
• Communicate a positive attitude.
• Start the healing process; help children feel safe.
• Identify the children who may need crisis intervention counseling and refer to school mental health professionals.

71

INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS
As a result of traumatic events, some students will show a variety of symptoms of distress. As teachers, you know
your students’ baseline or “usual” behavior and are the best resource in helping to determine which student(s) are
exhibiting “unusual” or problem behavior and may need to be referred for more intervention. Below is a list of
possible problem behaviors exhibited by children after an incident.
• Any unusual complaints of illness
• Keeping isolated from the rest of the class
• Student seems so pressured, anxious that he/she dominates and/or distracts others
• Changed behavior/appearance
• Resistant to “opening up” (not related to being shy or having a language/cultural barrier)
• Poor eye-contact
• Difficulty concentrating, can’t focus
• Hyperactive, silly, giddy
• Lack of emotional expression
• Extreme emotional display; crying, regressed behavior
• Lethargic, apathetic
• Easily startled, “on edge”
Again it is important to remember that these behaviors may be considered “usual” for a particular student.
Typically, a child’s response to a disaster will not last long. However, it is important to recognize that some
problems may be present or recur for months afterward. Also, anniversaries of the event may trigger reactions.
Suicide Response
A school’s general response to a suicide does not differ markedly from a response to any death emergency.
However, some issues exclusive to suicide require specific attention.
School administrators must allow students and staff to grieve the loss without glorifying the method of death. Over
emphasis on a suicide may be interpreted by vulnerable individuals as a glamorization of the suicidal act, which can
assign legendary or idolized status to taking one’s own life.
The following “DOs” and “DON’Ts” will help school staff limit glamorization of suicide:
• Do acknowledge the suicide as a tragic loss of life
• Do allow students and staff to attend funeral services
• Do provide support for students and staff profoundly affected by the death
• Don’t organize school assemblies to honor the deceased
•D 
on’t dedicate the yearbook or yearbook pages, newspaper articles, proms, athletic events, or advertisements
to the deceased individual
•D 
on’t pay tribute to a suicidal act by planting trees, hanging engraved plagues or holding other memorial
activities
A suicide in the school community can heighten the likelihood, in the subsequent weeks, of “copycat” suicide
attempts and threats among those especially vulnerable to the effects of a suicide. To prevent further tragedies,
students considered to be especially susceptible to depression/suicide must be carefully monitored and appropriate
action taken if they are identified as high risk. These efforts require a limited, rather than school-wide, response.

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Memorials
When a member of the school dies, often people will want to find ways to memorialize the student or staff
member. A word of caution, carefully think through the type of tribute you pay to a person who has died.
Consider these points and examples:
• In general, memorials should focus on the life lived, rather than on the method of death.
• Yearbook memorials should be a regular-sized picture with a simple statement such as “We’ll miss you”.
• If a school were to create a permanent or lasting memorial for one person, it would be difficult to refuse a similar
memorial for another person.
• A school that planted a tree for a student who died, realized this was needed also for a second death and then a
third. The resulting group of trees came to be referred to as “the graveyard” by students.
• Another school had a “memorial tree” die during one dry summer and had to address the hard feelings of the
family who thought the tree had not been properly cared for.
• There are many wonderful ways to support students' and loved ones' need to remember, examples include:
cards, food, kind words, work parties for relatives, scholarship funds, contributions to a favorite charity, flowers,
or being remembered after the urgent time of the tragedy.
• Parents and loved ones especially want to know people miss the person and there was great sadness at the loss;
they also want to know people assisted the grieving friends.
Permanent or lasting memorials should not be employed as a way for schools to remember someone
who died as a result of suicide.

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EXAMPLES OF CLASSROOM STRATEGIES/ACTIVITIES
Drawing Method
The drawing method is a playful experience to express feelings.
First introduce drawing as:
• Another way of “talking,” but with pictures instead of words
•A 
means of expression used by many (point out that some people express themselves by talking, some by
singing, some by dancing, some by drawing)
•R 
emember when introducing drawing of any sort to clearly say that the goal is not to draw a “pretty picture” but
rather, a picture of expression
• Drawing should be presented to the child as an option for expression, not as a required activity
•R 
EMEMBER to use previous questions to help lead these activities; a question can become a theme for a
drawing
Drawing Method Activities:
• Draw/write a book together or make journals with pictures
•D 
o a collective drawing such as a mural (murals tell a “collective story,” develop/support teamwork, and feel
“safer” for some children as opposed to individual art)
• Give the mural a “place of honor” in the classroom
• Make the mural accessible for everyday viewing
• Celebrate the mural: use it to demonstrate getting through something tough, or to facilitate discussions
• Take photos/slides of the mural when completed
• Draw aspects of the event (people, places, activities, etc.)
•S 
uggest lots of options, not specifics (e.g., rather than saying “draw a fireman helping someone,” say, “draw a
person you saw doing something helpful...”
•C 
reate a collage (a variety of materials) using a leading question such as, “Where were you when the disaster
happened?”
•T 
he teacher/facilitator may draw/paste on the central image, then the children add photos, magazine pictures,
articles, fabric pieces, etc.
•C 
ollages are the “safest” form of “drawing” because the child is using others’ symbols. The child may feel he/
she is “losing less of himself/herself”
• Collages provide “boundaries” for the child; this can act as a safety net (emotionally) for some children
• You may also want to look at other pictures (drawings, paintings) and talk about what they communicate
•A 
llow a full range of expression: some kids draw recognizable “things," others draw “abstracts;" respect all
varieties
• Emphasize to the children that their work will not be judged, graded or necessarily shown to others
• Only exhibit the artwork if a child desires to share with others.
• Reassure them that there is no “right way” to draw
• Allow the use of various mediums (pastels, crayons, pencils, markers, etc.)
• It’s preferable to do the drawing method with more than one adult present
• Exercise as little control as possible over the artwork

74

Concluding Drawing Activities:
• A key element of the drawing method is the follow-up discussion. This discussion can help to bring closure to
the experience, an important step in the process of expressing feelings
• Allow those who want to, to talk about their drawings
• Others will “close” by listening to others
• Use open-ended questions in this process
• Sometimes a child’s artwork may be especially expressive of his/her feelings; a drawing can give “clues” to
some deeper problems or feelings within the child
• Try to “read” the picture in the same way you might read words; what might it be telling you
• Look at it as a piece of communication, not just fantasy
Keep in mind:
• Colors, forms, etc. have a different meaning to children of various cultural backgrounds and to different children
within each culture
• Regard the artwork as just a part of what’s going on with a child; look at the child with a holistic view
• The best source for what’s going on behind the drawing is the child ask him/her
Discussion Method
Classmate Tragedy:
The following section is designed to assist teachers and staff in preparing the class to help a student who has
experienced a tragedy prior to their return to class.
Example: Death of a friend or family member
• Explain what is known of the loss
• Ask if other students have experienced the death or a friend or family member?
• Are there things that people said or did that made you feel better?
• How do you think (name) might be feeling?
• What might you say or do that might make (name) feel better?
• It is important to guide students’ responses to helpful comments as you guide them away from less helpful ones
• What would you want someone to say to you if you experienced the death of someone?
• We can take our cues from the person; that will guide our actions

75

Discussion Method (con’t):
When a grieving classmate returns:
First Words
• At least say, “hello,” “welcome back,” or “I’m glad to see you”
• Others might say, “I missed you” or “I’m sorry to hear about your _______’s death”
• Other ideas: write a brief note or card, etc.
• Inform students that if their classmate cries, that’s OK; you did not cause the grief
Some Don’ts
• Don’t shun the student
• Don’t expect the student to “snap back”
• Don’t be surprised if (name) seems unaffected by the loss, everybody deals with loss differently
• J ust because (name) may appear “fine,” don’t assume the grieving has stopped, nor the need for comfort and
support
If You Have Concerns:
When working with your students, you might notice a child exhibiting more serious problems. If you have
concerns, refer those children to your school counselor/social worker/psychologist or designated support
personnel.
NOTE: One sign of successful defusing of your students is that they feel better. Another sign of success might be
that the defusing process surfaced other problems that will come to your attention. These problems might take a
variety of forms.
•T 
he teacher must know the child’s baseline behavior and cultural/ethnic responses before identifying “serious
problems” in that child
• The teacher is not meant to be in the role of “diagnostician”; refer those children you are concerned about
• Student is not able to “let go” of a memory
•T 
he degree of emotionality and the degree of silence are both clues (be sure to talk with the child and simply ask
them quietly, how they are feeling and coping)
• Make note of other physical manifestations of stress
• Be aware of different forms of adjustment in each child
•S 
ome children may be predisposed to adverse reactions following a critical incident (generally, these are children
who have experienced other loss, relocation, death, abuse, crime, etc.)
•A 
n anniversary date of a disaster or death is a predictable time when memories and associated problems may
resurface
Refer the student if you are unsure:
• Contact your school counselor/social worker/psychologist or designated support personnel
• Refer the student to the School Safety Team (if applicable)
In closing: Through using the methods and techniques in this guide and adding your own unique
perspective, expertise and energy, you will help students, and perhaps yourself, recover from
trauma.

76

HELPING STUDENTS AND STAFF RECOVER
Children and adults may experience a number of powerful feelings following a crisis. This outline describes the
Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD, Everly & Mitchell, 1999), an interactive process to facilitate a person’s
expression of these feelings. The Building Emergency Response Team can assist individuals to process their
feelings and reactions following a crisis. The process is most effective when you focus on the events in this
sequence:
1. Introductory Phase
2. Fact Phase
3. Feeling Phase
4. Reaction/Teaching
5. Closure Phase
1. Introductory Phase
• Introduce team members to discuss why we are here and what we hope to accomplish
• Stress the need for confidentiality and ask for a verbal agreement to keep what is said confidential
2. Fact Phase
• Give all known relevant facts about the death/incident
• Question others’ understanding of the event
• Ask if there is other information known
• Ask if there are any other questions
• Other possible questions to ask:
a) How did you find out?
b) Where were you when you first heard?
c) What were your first thoughts?
d) Is there anyone not here that perhaps needs to be?
e) Who are you worried/concerned about?
3. Feeling Phase (make an effort to include everyone in the discussion)
• How did you feel when you first heard? Explore feelings (shock, denial, anger, fear, etc.)
• How are you feeling now?
• We did not know (name), could anyone tell us about him/her?
• What was he/she like?
• When do you think that the reality of this event will hit you?
• What are some of your memories of (name)?
4. Reaction/Teaching Phase
• Explore the physical, emotional and cognitive stress reactions of group members
• What are some things that you usually do when you are really upset or down?
• Has anyone lost anyone close recently? What were some of your reactions to his/her death?
• Does anyone remember feeling this way before?
• Take this opportunity to talk about the grief process
• Talk about effective coping techniques
• Determine if there are others’ that the group members can talk to and feel supported by

77

HELPING STUDENTS AND STAFF RECOVER (con’t)
5. Closure Phase
• Give information about wake/funeral if available
•S 
tudents/staff will often make comments about wanting to take-up a collection, plant a tree, dedicate a page in
the yearbook; let them talk, then refer the ideas to the School Safety Team
• Encourage group members to support one another
• Remind them that it may take a long time before they will feel settled and that’s normal
• Encourage them to talk with someone in their family about their feelings
• Remind them about the resources that are available in an out of school
• NOTE: This process needs to conclude with quiet, reflective time
Caring for the Care Provider
General Reactions to Emergencies or Critical Incidents in Adults:
First Reactions May Include:
• Numbness, shock, difficulty believing what has occurred or is in the process of occurring
• Physical and mental reactions may be very slow or confused
•D 
ifficulty in decision making; uncertainty about things; it may be difficult to choose a course of action or to
make even small judgment calls
Ongoing Reactions May Include:
• Loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping, loss of interest or pleasure in everyday activities
• Desire to get away from everyone - even family/friends
• Emotional lability; becoming irritable or upset more quickly than usual
• Feelings of fatigue, hopelessness, helplessness
• Digestive problems, headaches or backaches
• Difficulty accepting that the emergency has had an impact or difficulty accepting
support from friends and the community
Some Things That Can Be Helpful:
•T 
ake time to relax and do things you find pleasant; getting away for a few hours with close friends can be
helpful
• Stick with your regular routine for a while; avoid making changes, even if it appears to be a positive change
• Get regular exercise or participate in a regular sport; activity soothes anxiety and helps you relax
• Keep your days as simple as possible; avoid taking on any additional responsibilities or new projects
• Tap sources of assistance with your workload
• If symptoms of stress persist beyond a few weeks or are severe, seek professional help

78

INFORMATION TO SHARE WITH PARENTS:
Parents often contact their child’s teacher for advice after a crisis. The school psychologist, social worker or
guidance counselor should be used to consult with these parents. The following information may be shared with a
parent through a psychologist, social worker or guidance counselor.
Helping Children after a crisis:
Children may be especially upset and express intense feelings in response to a critical incident. These reactions are
normal and usually will not last long. Listed below are some problems you may see in children:
• Excessive fear of darkness, separation or being alone
• Clinging to parents, fear of strangers
• Worry
• Increase in immature behaviors
• School refusal
• Changes in eating/sleeping behaviors
• Increase in either aggressive behavior or shyness
• Bedwetting or thumb sucking
• Persistent nightmares
• Headaches or other physical complaints
The following strategies may be helpful to share with parents:
• Talk with your child about his/her feelings about the incident; share your feelings, too
• Limit TV exposure to the incident
• Talk about what happened; give your child information in language he/she can understand
• Reassure your child that you are safe and together; you may need to repeat this reassurance often
• Hold and comfort your child often
• Spend extra time with your child at bedtime
• If you feel your child is having problems at school or at home, please contact school so we can work together.
CAUTIONARY STATEMENT: When composing a letter about the death of a student or staff member do not
mention the cause of death. This could be confidential information and is not for public consumption.

79

Appendix

Appendix

District Background Check Requirements
Pre-employment
1. All candidates who have received initial conditional job offers as new employees to District 196 are required
to consent to a background check before beginning employment with the district. District 196 401.5R Preemployment Background Check.
Volunteers
District 196 requires background checks for the following volunteers (including parents):
• the volunteer will have unsupervised contact with the students;
• the volunteer has a regular ongoing assignment at the school;
• the volunteer will be off campus with students in an unsupervised (not under the direct visual supervision of
a District 196 employee) situations including: overnight field trips and/or driving students to/from school
sponsored events;
• the volunteer is a mentor to a student or students;
• the volunteer is a coach, club sponsor, or director/assistant of a student activity;
• the volunteer is unknown to the school or faculty/staff.

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Emergency Kit
Each building will have an Emergency Kit which will be the responsibility of the principal’s secretary. The kit will
be taken whenever the building is evacuated. The District Office will supply the original kit, and update and replace
specific items as needed.
The following chart lists the contents of the kit and specifies who is responsible for replacing or updating the item.

Item

Supplied by

Replacement/Updating

Building Maps

Principal’s Secretary

As needed when there are building changes

Bullhorn

Principal’s Secretary

Fresh batteries as needed

Bus Passenger
Roster
(elementary only)

Transportation Department

Monthly

Cell Phone/
Radio

District Office –
Technology Department

Should be charged weekly by building staff

Emergency
Telephone
Directory

Principal’s
Secretary

Each September

First Aid Kit

District Office –
Nursing Department

School nurse

Flashlight

Principal’s Secretary

Fresh batteries as needed

Hazardous
Materials List

Building Staff

Each September

List of Students
with Disabilities

Principal’s Secretary

Each trimester (or semester or quarter)

Pencils/Pens/
Nametags

Principal’s Secretary

As needed

Staff Directory

Principal’s Secretary

Each September

Student and Staff
Emergency Cards

School Nurse

As necessary

Student Directory

Principal’s Secretary

Each trimester (or semester or quarter)

Gloves/
Masks

District Office –
Nursing Department

As needed

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Emergency Telephone Directory (for Emergency Kit)
SERVICE AGENCY

TELEPHONE NUMBERS
(include area code)

CONTACT PERSON

DAYTIME NIGHTTIME

AMBULANCE SERVICE

(9) – 911

(9) – 911

FIRE DEPARTMENT

(9) – 911

(9) – 911

DIRECTOR OF ELEMENTARY ED

651-423-7782

952-431-7968

COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST

651-423-7775

DIRECTOR OF SECONDARY ED

651-423-7712

DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL ED

651-423-7628

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY ED

651-423-7720

POLICE DEPARTMENT

COORDINATOR OF TRANSPORTATION 651-423-7685

952-484-3546

612-940-5621

ELECTRIC SERVICE
GAS SERVICE
TELEPHONE COMPANY
CITY WATER DEPARTMENT
EVACUATION HOLDING SITE:
Specify:
ALTERNATIVE EVACUATION SITE:
Specify:

NOTE: Include your evacuation sites as listed in the off-site evacuation plan, local community agencies,
houses of worship, hospitals, etc.

83

NAME

LOCATION/
DEPARTMENT

84

FIRST AID TRAINED
(YES  OR  NO)

CPR TRAINED
(YES  OR  NO)

DEFIBRILLATOR
OPERATOR

TRAINED FIRST AID/CPR PROVIDERS

Hazardous Materials List for Emergency Kit
MATERIAL NAME

QUANTITY

LOCATION

85

EMERGENCY ACTION

A Summary of the Key Findings and Implications for the
Prevention of School Attacks in the United States
United States Secret Service and United States Department of Education (May 2002)

The Key Study Findings and Implications
Key Finding 1

Incidents of targeted violence at school rarely are sudden,
impulsive acts.

Implications
Students who engaged in school-based attacks typically did not “just snap” and then engage in
impulsive or random acts of targeted school violence. Instead, the attacks examined under the Safe School
Initiative appeared to be the end result of a comprehensible process of thinking and behavior: behavior that
typically began with an idea, progressed to the development of a plan, moved on to securing the means to
carry out the plan and culminated in an attack. This is a process that potentially may be knowable or
discernible from the attacker’s behaviors and communications.
To the extent that information about an attacker’s intent and planning is knowable and may be
uncovered before an incident, some attacks may be preventable. However, findings from the Safe
School Initiative suggest that the time span between the attacker’s decision to mount an attack
and the actual incident may be short. Consequently, when indications that a student may pose a threat
to the school community arise in the form of revelations about a planned attack, school administrators and law
enforcement officials will need to move quickly to inquire about and intervene in that plan.
Prior to most incidents, other people knew about the attacker’s
idea and/or plan to attack. In most cases, those who knew were
other kids–friends, schoolmates, siblings, and others. However,
this information rarely made its way to an adult.
Key Finding 2

Implications
First and foremost, this finding suggests that students can be an important part of prevention efforts.
A friend or schoolmate may be the first person to hear that a student is thinking about or planning to harm
someone. Nevertheless, for a variety of reasons, those who have information about a potential incident of
targeted school violence may not alert an adult on their own. Schools can encourage students to report this
information in part by identifying and breaking down barriers in the school environment that inadvertently
may discourage students from coming forward with this information.
Schools also may benefit from ensuring that they have a fair, thoughtful and effective system to
respond to whatever information students do bring forward. If students have concerns about how adults will
react to information that they bring forward, they may be even less inclined to volunteer such information.
In addition, this finding highlights the importance in an inquiry of attempts to gather all relevant
information from anyone who may have contact with the student. Efforts to gather all potentially relevant
pieces of information, however innocuous they may appear on their own, from all individuals with whom the
student has contact may help to develop a more comprehensive picture of the student’s ideas, activities and
plans. In the end, investigators may find that different people in the student’s life have different pieces of the
puzzle.

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Key Finding 3

Most attackers did not threaten their targets directly prior to
advancing the attack.

Implications
This finding underscores the importance of not waiting for a threat before beginning an inquiry. The
Safe School Initiative found that most attackers in fact did not threaten their target directly and some made no
threat at all. Instead, other behaviors and communications that may prompt concern, such as hearing that a
child is talking about bringing a gun to school, are indicators that the child may pose a threat and therefore
should prompt the initiation of efforts to gather information.
School administrators should respond to all students who make threats. The lack of response could be
taken by the threatener as permission to proceed with carrying out the threat. In the end, however, it is
important to distinguish between someone who makes a threat–tells people they intend to harm someone–and
someone who poses a threat–engages in behaviors that indicate an intent, planning or preparation for an
attack. Those conducting inquiries should focus particular attention on any information that indicates that a
student poses a threat, regardless of whether the student has told a potential target he or she intends to do
them harm.
Key Finding 4

There is no accurate or useful profile of students who engaged in
targeted school violence.

Implications
The demographic, personality, school history, and social characteristics of the attackers varied
substantially. Knowing that a particular student shares characteristics, behaviors, features or traits with prior
school shooters does not help in determining whether that student is thinking about or planning for a violent
act.
The use of profiles in this way likewise is not an effective approach to identifying students who may
pose a risk for targeted school violence at school or for assessing the risk that a particular student may pose for
a school-based attack, once a particular student has been identified. Reliance on profiles to predict future
school attacks carries two substantial risks: (1) the great majority of students who fit any given profile of a
“school shooter” will not actually pose a risk of targeted violence; and, (2) using profiles will fail to identify
some students who in fact pose a risk of violence but share few if any characteristics with prior attackers.
Rather than trying to determine the “type” of student who may engage in targeted school violence, an
inquiry should focus instead on a student’s behaviors and communications to determine if that student appears
to be planning or preparing for an attack. Rather than asking whether a particular student “looks like” those
who have launched school-based attacks before, it is more productive to ask whether the student is engaging
in behaviors that suggest preparations for an attack, if so how fast the student is moving toward attack, and
where intervention may be possible.
Key Finding 5

Most attackers engaged in some behavior, prior to the incident,
that caused others concern or indicated a need for help.

Implications
Several key findings point to the fact that kids send signals–both directly and indirectly–to others
regarding their problems. The boys who engaged in the targeted school violence examined by the Safe
School Initiative were not “invisible” students. In fact nearly all of these students engaged in behaviors--prior
to their attacks--that caused concern to at least one person, usually an adult, and most concerned at least three
people.
This finding highlights the range of behaviors in a student’s life that may be noticeable and that could
prompt some additional probing by a caring adult. A student’s family, teachers, friends and others may have
information regarding aspects of a student’s behavior that has raised concern. As was true in some of the
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87

incidents covered in this study, individuals in contact with the attacker may have observed something of
concern about that student’s behavior, but not of sufficient concern for them to notify anyone in a position to
respond.
Educators and other adults can learn how to pick up on these signals and make appropriate referrals.
By inquiring about any information that may have prompted some concern, an investigator may be able to
develop a more comprehensive picture of the student’s past and current behavior, and identify any indications
that the student is intent on or planning to attack. However, discretion should be exercised in determining
whom to talk to about the student, so as not to alienate or stigmatize the student of concern. A significant
challenge facing schools is to determine how best to respond to students who are already known to be in
trouble or needing assistance.
Key Finding 6

Most attackers had difficulty coping with significant losses or
personal failures. Many had considered or attempted suicide.

Implications
Many students, not just those who engaged in school-based attacks, experience or perceive major
losses in their lives. Most students who face a significant loss, or who have difficulty coping with such a loss,
are not going to be at risk for a school-based attack. However, information that indicates a student is facing
or having trouble dealing with a significantly difficult situation may indicate a need to refer the student to
appropriate services and resources.
In cases where there is concern about the possibility that a student may engage in targeted violence,
attention should be given to any indication that a student is having difficulty coping with major losses or
perceived failures, particularly where these losses or failures appear to have prompted feelings of desperation
and hopelessness. An inquiry also should anticipate changes in the life of a troubled student, and consider
whether these changes might increase–or decrease–the threat the student poses.
Key Finding 7

Many attackers felt bullied, persecuted, or injured by others prior
to the attack.

Implications
Bullying was not a factor in every case, and clearly not every child who is bullied in school will pose a
risk for targeted violence in school. Nevertheless, in a number of the incidents of targeted school violence
studied, attackers described being bullied in terms that suggested that these experiences approached torment.
These attackers told of behaviors that, if they occurred in the workplace, likely would meet legal definitions of
harassment and/or assault.
The prevalence of bullying found in this and other recent studies should strongly support ongoing
efforts to reduce bullying in American schools. Educators can play an important role in ensuring that students
are not bullied in schools and that schools not only do not permit bullying but also empower other students to
let adults in the school know if students are being bullied.

Key Finding 8

Most attackers had access to and had used weapons prior to the
attack.

Implications
Access to weapons among some students may be common. However, when the idea of an attack
exists, any effort to acquire, prepare or use a weapon or ammunition may be a significant move in the
attacker’s progression from idea to action. Any inquiry should include investigation of and attention to
weapon access and use and communications about weapons. Attention should also be given to indications of
any efforts by a student to build a bomb or acquire bomb-making components.
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The large proportion of attackers who acquired their guns from home points to the need for schools
and law enforcement officials to collaborate on policies and procedures for responding when a student is
thought to have a firearm in school. In particular, schools should be aware of the provisions of the Federal
Gun-Free Schools Act, which requires that all schools expel students who bring a firearm to school and should
report all violations to local law enforcement officials.

Key Finding 9

In many cases, other students were involved in the attack in some
capacity.

Implications
This finding highlights the importance of considering what prompting or encouragement a student
may receive from others in his life that influences his intent, planning or preparations for a potential attack.
Any investigation of potential targeted school violence should include attention to the role that a student’s
friends or peers may be playing in that student’s thinking about and preparations for an attack. It is possible
that feedback from friends or others may help to move a student from an unformed thought about attacking to
developing and advancing a plan to carry out the attack.

Key Finding 10

Despite prompt law enforcement responses, most attacks were
stopped by means other than law enforcement intervention and
most were brief in duration.

Implications
The short duration of most incidents of targeted school violence argues for the importance of
developing preventive measures in addition to any emergency planning for a school or school district. The
preventive measures should include protocols and procedures for responding to and managing threats and
other behaviors of concern.

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Telephone Threat Checklist:

A copy of this form should be kept
at the desk of any person who
regularly answers the phone.

If you receive a telephoned threat (bomb/chemical/other):
• Remain calm.
• Do not hang up, keep the caller on the line as long as possible and listen carefully.
Ask the caller the following questions:
• Where is the bomb/chemical or other hazard located?
• When will it explode/be activated?
• What does it look like?
• What kind of bomb/hazard is it?
• What will cause it to explode/activate?
• What is your name?
• Where did you place the bomb/hazard? WHY?
• Where are you?

Exact wording of the threat:__________________________________________________________________
If voice is familiar, who did it sound like?________________________________________________________
Caller ID information
Male

Female

Adult

Juvenile

Age

Was the phone number identified?___________________________
Call origin:
Local

Long Distance

Internal

Cell Phone

Length of call_________ Exact time (hour, minute, second)_____________________ Date__________________
Record the next two calls to come in (phone number and exact time)
Phone:______________________ Time: _____________________
Phone:______________________ Time: _____________________
Caller’s voice: Note pattern of speech, type of voice, tone. Check all that apply.
Calm
Raspy
Slow
Drunken

Excited
Distinct
Rapid
Familiar

Loud
Slurred
Disguised
Incoherent

Soft
Normal
Accent
Deep breathing

Deep
Crying
Lisp

Nasal
Laughter
Stutter

Background sounds: Check all that apply.
Voices
Clear
Horns
Motor

Airplanes
Static
House noises
Phone booth

Street noises
Animals
PA system
Other:

Trains
Party
Music

Quiet
Vehicles
Factory machines

Bells

Threat language: Check all that apply.
Well-spoken (educated)

Foul

Taped

Incoherent

Irrational

Message read from script

Did caller indicate knowledge of the building? Give specifics:__________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Person receiving call:____________________ Phone number where call was received:_____________________
90

Prank Phone Call Checklist
Record the exact time of call (hour, minute, second): ________________
Length of call: ______________ Date:_____________

A copy of this form should be kept
at the desk of any person who
regularly answers the phone.

Record the next two calls to come in (phone number and exact time): Phone_____________ Time___________
Phone_____________ Time___________
Sex of the caller:

M

F

Age:__________

Record exact wording of call:__________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Caller’s Voice:
Calm

Angry

Excited

Slow

Rapid

Soft

Loud

Laughing

Crying

Normal

Distinct

Slurred

Nasal

Stutter

Lisp

Raspy

Deep

Ragged

Accent

Disguised

Familiar

Cracking

Deep breathing

If voice is familiar, who did it sound like? _____________________________________________________________
Was the phone number identified? __________________________________________________________________

Background Sounds
Street noises

Factory machinery

Animal noises

Voices

PA system

Music

House noises

Motor

Office

Office machinery

Clear

Static

Local

Long distance

Booth

Other____________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Threat Language
Well spoken (educated)

Foul

Irrational

Incoherent

Taped

Message read by threat maker

91

CRISIS PROCEDURE CHECKLIST FOR THE PRINCIPAL
This checklist is provided as a guide for principals for emergencies. It is intended to be used as a tool to help
principals, secretaries and other Emergency Management Team members during a crisis.
______1. C 
ONDUCT AN IMMEDIATE ASSESSMENT

a. Confirm and ascertain the type of incident.

b. Obtain essential information (what happened, who was involved, what did witnesses see).
______2. SUMMON HELP

a. Call police or (9)-911.

b. Implement site crisis management plan.

c. Gather school staff assigned to emergency duties.
______3. SOUND WARNING TO SCHOOL STAFF

a. Use PA and/or bell code systems or make announcement to all, such as lockdown.

b. Employ immediate sheltering actions for those exposed to danger.

c. Ensure that all others are sheltered in place or moved to a safer location if possible.
______4. LOCK DOWN BUILDING, SECURE AREAS, MONITOR SITUATIONS

a. Order all exterior doors locked.

b. Lock interior doors where possible.

c. Communicate to staff to monitor conditions.

d. Recognize need and be ready for contingencies.
______5. WAIT FOR POLICE
a. Keep responding units updated on situation via (9)-911, communicate command post location to
(9)-911 or police.

b. Assemble witnesses and victim, providing they are able to assemble.

c. Go to command post and wait for police and or emergency medical services.

d. Gather key information for law enforcement.
______6. STABILIZE ELEMENTS OF SITUATION AS SOON AS SAFE TO DO SO

a. Care for injured (ensuring safety for those assisting).

b. Account for all students and staff on site or at hospital or other off-site locations.

c. Notify parents/guardians.

d. Protect crime scene, evidence.
______7. WORK WITH POLICE TO RESOLVE SITUATION

a. Stay at command post, supporting law enforcement.

b. Provide information, including incident-specific knowledge, site background and resources, and special
staff resources, abilities, training, etc.

c. Coordinate school response on site, off site (staging areas, hospitals, etc.)
______8. SIGNAL "ALL CLEAR" AFTER POLICE OR FIRE GIVE THE “OK”

a. Notify parents/guardians.

b. Support law enforcement follow-up activities.

c. Debrief staff.
______9. INITIATE RECOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES

a. Brief staff and provide (access to) support.

b. Plan for resumption of school ("next day" plan).

c. Arrange for physical plant clean-up and repair.

d. Begin long-term recovery planning.

92

CRISIS PROCEDURE CHECKLIST FOR THE PRINCIPAL (con’t)
NURSE RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Administer first aid.
_____Request additional medical assistance from fire department using (9)-911.
_____Arrange for someone to go with unaccompanied students to hospital.
_____Secure student health information and accident card(s).
_____Send or bring information with student to hospital.

FACULTY RESPONSIBILITIES:
Check off what you want the faculty to do during a crisis:
_____Announce event in classroom and discuss with students (if appropriate).
_____Identify students in need of counseling and notify an administrator, counselor, or psychologist.
_____Escort very distraught students to the guidance counselor.
_____Postpone testing.
_____Assist with care of injured and/or ill if needed.
_____Involve class in constructive activities relating to the event.
_____Eliminate, shorten, and structure assignments for a few days with an eye towards normal activities as soon
as possible.

GUIDANCE/SOCIAL WORKER/PSYCHOLOGIST
RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Coordinate counseling activities including obtaining more help.
_____Provide temporary counseling for students who are in need.
_____Communicate with faculty and be prepared to counsel staff.
_____Inform feeder schools and area schools so they can provide support for students affected.
_____Maintain a list of students counseled.
_____Call parents of students counseled to recommend continued out-of-school support for students who are very
distressed.
_____Provide appropriate mental health information to parents.

SECRETARIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
_____Notify superintendent.
_____Direct all calls for information to the media spokesperson.
_____Keep in contact with the principal through two-way radio or intercom.
_____Contact Safety Team members to assemble, including location of meeting.
_____Direct emergency personnel to scene of crisis, if an evacuation has not been ordered.

93

CRISIS INFORMATION WORKSHEET
(THIS SHEET CONTAINS FACTUAL, CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION AND IS NOT FOR GENERAL
USE, PUBLICATION OR RELEASE. THE MEDIA SPOKESPERSON MAY USE THIS INFORMATION
TO DEVELOP PRESS RELEASES.)
Nature of Crisis:____________________________________________________________________
Location(s) of Crisis:________________________________________________________________
Police Commander:_________________________ Fire Commander:_________________________
Command Post Location: ______________________________________________
Action Taken at Time of Report:
Numbers of students involved:_______ Numbers of adults involved:_______
Parent meeting point location:_________________________________________
Police/ fire involvement:____________________________________________________________ __________
______________________________________________________________________
Hospitals involved:________________________________________________________________
Parent notification method: __________________________________________________________
Stabilization and control of scene: ____________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Other pertinent information:_________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
Students Involved: HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL, NOT FOR RELEASE (A separate list may be attached)
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
Adults Involved: HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL, NOT FOR RELEASE (A separate list may be attached)
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
___________________ ____________________ ___________________ ____________________
Other facts:________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________

94

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential

Series Number 709P

Adopted

November 1998

Revised

August 2001

Title

Follow-up Evaluation of an Emergency

To:

Director of Secondary Education/Director of Elementary Education/Director of
Special Education/Director of Community Education/Director of
Finance/Director of Human Resources (circle one)

From:

Principal or Department Head
(specify school or department)

Date:
Re:

Evaluation of Recent Emergency Situation

Recently your school/department went through an emergency situation that
resulted in you and your staff (and students) following the guidelines in the District
196 Emergency Procedures Guide. To help us assess the guide, I would appreciate
your comments about the emergency, the response to the emergency and the value of
the guide in helping you and your staff respond to the emergency. Please respond to
the following questions and return this form within one week. Use additional paper to
answer the questions if needed. Thank you.
Describe the emergency situation (include date, place, people involved, etc.)

Describe the response to the emergency situation by you and the people in your
building, by district-level employees and by non-district emergency people.

95

Procedure 709P
Page 2
Comment on the value of the Emergency Procedures Guide in the emergency
situation. Especially note things that were particularly helpful or not helpful and any
changes you would suggest to help people who face a similar emergency in the future.

Any other comments:

Please return this completed form within one week to the director
circled above at the District Office.
THANK YOU!

Procedures/700 series/709P
Graphic Arts/8-27-01

96

EMERGENCY DRILL SCHEDULE AND LOG
Minnesota State laws require schools to conduct five fire drills, five lockdown drills, one tornado
drill and one bus evacuation drill each year. The following worksheet will assist in the planning
and documentation of schools drills when they occur.
School:

Principal:

FIRE DRILLS: Schools must conduct at least five fire drills annually.
Date
Scheduled

Date
Conducted

Weather
Conditions

Number of
Occupants

Evacuation
Time

Comments:

LOCKDOWN DRILLS: Schools must conduct at least five lockdown drills annually.
Date
Scheduled

Date
Conducted

Number of
Occupants

Student
Participation

Response
Time

Comments:

TORNADO DRILL: Schools must conduct at least one tornado drill annually.
Date
Scheduled

Date
Conducted

Weather
Conditions

Number of
Occupants

Evacuation
Time

Comments:

BUS EVACUATION DRILL: Schools must conduct at least one bus evacuation drill annually.
Date
Scheduled

Date
Conducted

Weather
Conditions

Number of
Occupants

Evacuation
Time

Comments:

OTHER DRILLS OR PRACTICE: Drills such as reverse evacuation, shelter in place.
Date
Scheduled

Date
Conducted

Weather
Conditions

Number of
Occupants

97

Evacuation
Time

Comments:

School Safety Toolkits

THREAT ASSESSMENT
The primary purpose of a threat assessment is to prevent targeted violence. Targeted
violence is defined as any incident of violence where a known or knowable attacker
selects a particular target prior to their attack. Through the implementation of a
threat assessment process, schools have an opportunity to build capacity for
violence-reduction strategies that create healthy cultures of safety, respect, and
emotional support for students and staff.
When gathering information about a student of concern during a threat assessment
inquiry, it is essential that school district policies and procedures are in place to allow
for the collection of valuable information while protecting the rights of all students
involved. If policies do not exist, the development of policies is crucial.

Â

The threat assessment toolkit is supplemental material and NOT to be used
as a substitute for threat assessment training.

In May 2002, the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education published the
results of the School Safety Initiative. This study of 37 incidents of targeted school violence
between December 1974 and May 2000 examined the thinking, planning and pre-attack
behaviors of attackers. The ten key findings were:
• Incidents of targeted school violence are rarely sudden, impulsive acts
• Prior to most incidents, other people knew of the attacker’s intent, idea or plan to attack
• Most attackers did not directly threaten their targets prior to the attack
• There is NO accurate or useful profile of students who engage in targeted school
violence
• Most attackers engaged in some behavior prior to the incident that caused concern or
indicated a need for help
• Most attackers were known to have difficulty coping with significant losses or personal
failures
• Many had considered or attempted suicide
• Many attackers felt bullied, persecuted or injured by others prior to the attack
• Most attackers had access to and had used weapons prior to the attack
• In many cases, other students were involved in some capacity
• Despite prompt law enforcement responses, most acts of targeted violence were stopped
by means other than law enforcement intervention
One of the main conclusions of the School Safety Initiative study was those who committed
targeted attacks of school violence did not threaten their targets directly. Instead, they
engaged in behaviors before the attack that, if identified, would have indicated the inclination
toward, or the potential for, targeted violence. By using a fact-based approach, or a threat
assessment, it is possible to identify individuals or situations of concern.
THREAT ASSESSMENT PROCESS
A threat assessment process is a fact-based approach that primarily relies on the assessment of
behaviors, rather than on stated threats or traits, as the basis for determining the level of
concern. The process, designed by the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of
Education, provides a method for school administrators and law enforcement officials to
incorporate a threat assessment process in investigating, evaluating and managing targeted
violence into strategies that prevent school violence.

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School Safety Toolkits

The principles of a threat assessment process are:
• Targeted violence is the end result of a process of thinking and behavior
• Targeted violence stems from interaction among the individual, situation, setting and the
target
• An investigative, skeptical, inquisitive mindset is critical
• Facts-based rather than based on characteristics or traits
• An “integrated systems approach” should guide the process
• The central question to be answered is: does the student of concern pose a threat, not
whether the student has made a threat
Threat assessment processes are most effective as part of larger violence prevention strategies
and when the policies and programs are authorized, developed and implemented by local
officials using a multi-disciplinary approach. The components of an effective school threat
assessment process include:
• Authority to conduct an assessment
• Capacity to conduct an assessment
• Systems relationships (e.g. law enforcement, mental health)
It is important to understand that not all threat assessments require extensive and elaborate
gathering and analysis of data. Whether an assessment is limited in scope or not is determined
by the facts of the situation and information developed about a student of concern. Many
assessments are resolved after initial information gathering and evaluation.
Including law enforcement or other community agencies may aide in the process of effective
and appropriate interventions. The involvement of law enforcement should be determined on a
case-by-case basis and by school district policies. A school threat assessment team should
initiate the threat assessment process and determine the appropriate time for law enforcement
involvement.
IDENTIFY STUDENTS OF CONCERN
The first step in the threat assessment process is to identify students of concern. Remember, a
student of concern is an individual who poses a threat rather than one who simply makes
threatening statements. The evaluation of an individual who poses a threat includes the individual’s
capacity and capability to actually commit an act of violence. Not every person who makes a threat
will act upon it, nor will every person who commits an act of violence necessarily provide warnings
in the form of threatening remarks. All staff, students and parents need to be aware of the
process to report a student of concern. These policies and procedures must be clear and
accessible to all stakeholders.
A student may rise to the level of concern by engaging in communications such as submitting
an essay about bringing a bomb to school, emailing statements about killing people, directly
threatening another student or adult, or posting a web page with information regarding
weapons or explosives. Someone may also hear a student talking about bringing a weapon to
school; a student may report that s/he has been threatened; someone learns that a student is
experimenting with bomb-making materials; or someone may hear a student talking about
revenge or “getting even.” Additionally, district personnel may receive an anonymous tip
reporting a threat or concerns about a student’s behavior.
The list above provides some examples of how to identify students of concern but the list is not
exhaustive. If there is a cause for concern, it is important for the concern to be addressed.
CONDUCTING A THREAT ASSESSMENT
Once a student of concern has been brought to the attention of the threat assessment team,
the information gathering and analysis components of the threat assessment process begin. All
information gathered should be examined for evidence of behavior or conditions that suggest a
student is planning or preparing for an attack.

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The analysis should answer the following questions:
• Is the behavior of the student consistent with the movement toward an attack?
• Do the student’s current situations and setting incline him/her toward or away from
targeted violence?
During the assessment research, interviews should be guided by the following key questions
established through the Safe Schools Initiative:
• What are the student’s motives and goals?
• Have there been any communications suggesting ideas or intent to attack?
• Has the subject shown inappropriate interest in school attacks or attackers; weapons
(including recent acquisition of relevant weapons); or incidents involving mass violence
(terrorism, workplace violence, mass murderers)?
• Has the student engaged in attack-related behaviors?
• Does the student have the capacity to carry out an act of targeted violence?
• Is the student experiencing hopelessness, desperation and/or despair?
• Does the student have a trusting relationship with at least one responsible adult?
• Does the student see violence as an acceptable – or desirable – or the only – way to
solve problems?
• Is the student’s conversation and “story” consistent with his or her actions?
• Are other people concerned about the student’s potential for violence?
• What are the circumstances that might affect the likelihood of an attack?
This information can be gathered through:
• School and student data
• Collateral school interviews
• Parent or guardian interviews
• Interview with the student of concern
• Potential target interviews
Documenting all details and actions is critical to the threat assessment process. Welldocumented records indicate the student’s thinking and action a specific point in time. The
information gathered at this time may help future investigations determine how the student’s
behaviors and thinking have changed during the interim and will be useful if the student comes
to the attention of the threat assessment team in the future. Also, should the situation rise to
the level of prosecution, a well-documented threat assessment file is important in
demonstrating the threat assessment was conducted in compliance with applicable laws,
policies and procedures.

Â

Included in this toolkit are worksheets and guidelines that may assist in the
information gathering and analysis components of the threat assessment
along with the documentation.

CONCLUDING THE THREAT ASSESSMENT
The threat assessment team should have enough information to determine the credibility of the
threat once all the information gathering and analysis have been completed. The student may
still be in need of additional assistance and support even if the threat assessment team
concludes the threat is not credible. The priority of the threat assessment team should be to
make the appropriate referrals to prevent any future actions of violence.
When the findings do suggest a student has the interest, motive and ability to mount a school
attack, and has started down the path toward an attack, the role of the threat assessment team
is to prevent the attack and protect the potential targets by developing a management or
monitoring plan for the student. The elements of, and responsibility for, this plan will vary,
depending on the student and circumstances.

Â

Accurate documentation is essential for historical reference in future
investigatory or prosecutorial situations that may arise.

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School Safety Toolkits

TOOLS FOR THE THREAT ASSESSMENT PROCESS
The U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education developed several resources to
assist schools in implementing and conducting a threat assessment. They can be used in
training school threat assessment teams.
The Final Report and Findings of the Safe Schools Initiative: Implications for
Prevention of School Attacks in the United States
The U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education reviewed and examined 37 acts of
targeted school violence between December 1974 and May 2000. The study attempted to answer the
questions of, “Could we have known these attacks were being planned?” and “What could we have
done to prevent the attacks from occurring?” The study provides ten key findings and their
implications for schools and communities.

Threat Assessment in Schools: A Guide to Managing Threatening Situation and
Creating Safe School Climates
The U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education reviewed several acts of targeted
school violence as part of the Safe Schools Initiative. Through this study, both agencies developed and
recommended the use of a threat assessment protocol to prevent future acts of targeted violence. This
guide provides an in-depth description of the threat assessment process.

A Safe School and Threat Assessment Experience: Scenarios Exploring the Finding
of the Safe School Initiative
This CD is a complimentary piece of the threat assessment guide. It provides interactive scenarios to
practice conducting a threat assessment.

Prior Knowledge of Potential School-Based Violence: Information Students Learn
May Prevent a Targeted Attack
In the first Safe Schools Initiative study one key finding was that other students knew of the potential
for targeted school violence prior to the event. This pilot study interviewed by-standers and
highlighted the critical nature of positive school climate in preventing school violence.

Worksheets
Several worksheets are included in the Threat Assessment Toolkit to aide in the threat
assessment process.
Threat Assessment: Sources of Information Guidelines
This guideline assists with gathering additional information from a variety of sources including
conducting interviews with staff, other students, and/or parents or legal guardians.

Threat Assessment: Inquiry Worksheet
This worksheet aids in the collection and documentation of information regarding the student or
situation of concern.

Threat Assessment: Information Analysis Worksheet
This worksheet assists in the analysis of the threat assessment inquiry and the documentation of
decisions made and actions taken.

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School Safety Toolkits

THREAT ASSESSMENT: SOURCES OF INFORMATION
A school threat assessment inquiry should start with what is known about the student
from school records, staff interviews and other information accessible from school
officials. Follow school policies and relevant laws regarding information sharing.
Questions that can be answered through school data include:

Is the student of concern well known to any adult at school?

Has the student of concern come to attention for any behavior of concern? If so, what?

Has the student of concern experienced serious difficulties, stress or been in distress?

Is there anyone with whom the student of concern confides (e.g. shares worries,
frustrations, and/or sorrows)?

Has the student of concern expressed suicidal thoughts?

Has the student of concern been the victim and/or initiator of hostile, bullying or
harassing behavior directed toward other students, teachers or other staff?

Does the student of concern have an interest in weapons? If so, has the student made
efforts to acquire or use weapons? Does the student live at a home where there are
weapons?

SCHOOL RECORDS
A variety of information about a student of concern can be identified through school
administrative records. These records contain information about the student’s background,
academic performance, disciplinary issues and any other areas of concern. This data will
provide a foundation for the threat assessment interview.
STAFF AND STUDENT INTERVIEWS
Students, staff and other adults who know the student of concern should be interviewed as part
of the threat assessment inquiry. They should be asked about communications or other
behaviors that may indicate the student of concern’s intent or ideas. Interviews should also be
conducted with bystanders, witnesses and other people who were present when the student
engaged in the behaviors of concern or made threatening statements.
Questions that should be answered through the staff and student interviews include:
• What was said or written? To whom?
• What was done?
• When and where did this occur?
• Who else observed this behavior? Did the student of concern say why he or she acted in
that manner?
• Have there been any changes recently in the student’s attitudes and behaviors? Do any
of these changes cause concern?
The focus of any staff or student interviews is factual. Individuals interviewed should not be
asked to characterize the student or interpret the meanings of communications that the student
of concern may have made. These statements may not accurately reflect the student’s intent
and are unlikely to be useful to the threat assessment inquiry.
PARENT OR GUARDIAN INTERVIEWS
The parent or guardian of the student of concern should be included in the interview process.
The threat assessment team needs to be aware of the potential reactions when approaching the
parent or guardian. Parents or guardians may be protective of their child or embarrassed about
the inquiry. The threat assessment team should communicate the objective of the threat

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School Safety Toolkits

assessment inquiry to the student’s parent or guardian. The purpose is not only to prevent a
targeted act of violence and to minimize the chances that the student or others would be
harmed, but also to provide assistance to their child.
The threat assessment team should seek assistance from the student’s parent or guardian to
understand the student’s actions and interests. The interview should focus on the student’s
behaviors and communications, especially those related to attack-behaviors. Questions should
explore the student’s interest in weapons and access to weapons in the home. It may be useful
to conduct a home visit to observe the student of concern’s behavior at home.
POTENTIAL TARGET INTERVIEWS
Another source of information is the potential targets of the student of concern. Interviews with
potential targets should be conducted with great sensitivity. Care must be taken during the
interview not to unduly alarm the potential target while still gathering valuable information. If
the threat assessment team believes that a target is at risk of violence, assistance and support
should be offered to the target.
When conducting interviews with potential targets, let them know the primary purpose of the
interview is to gather information about a possible situation of concern. The target should be
questioned about their relationship to the student of concern and recent interactions with that
student. The interview should include questions about potential grievances or grudges that the
student of concern may have against a target or others.
STUDENT OF CONCERN INTERVIEWS
A variety of legal concerns need to be considered when conducting either interviews or
searches. Policies and procedures need to be in place as part of the threat assessment process
to reflect legal issues that may arise during this process.
Key questions
• Should
• Should
• Should
• Should

that should be addressed in any policy include:
parents or guardians be notified of the interview?
parents or guardians be present during the interview?
information gathered during the interview be used for criminal proceedings?
the student be allowed, offered or provided legal representation?

It also may be essential to the threat assessment process to search the student of concern,
his/her property or the property of another student. Since there are a variety of legal
considerations to student searches, policies and procedures related to such searches must be
enforced by school personnel.
The threat assessment team must have completed gathering relevant school data prior to
conducting an interview with the student of concern. The team must review this data to prepare
for the student interview. The purpose of this interview is to identify the student’s thinking,
motives and behavior. The tone of the interview must be professional, neutral and nonconfrontational – not accusatory or judgmental. In general, the student should be asked
directly about his or her intentions as adolescents typically respond frankly to a direct question.
The interview should provide the student of concern with opportunities to be heard and to tell
his/her personal stories. The team should draw attention to the fact that school personnel have
noticed his/her concerning behavior. During the interview, it should be clear that the team is
concerned about his/her welfare. Gathering key information will result in a better understanding
of the risk of violence and may lead to further inquiry.
While the student interview can provide beneficial information, the data gathered may be
incomplete, misleading or inaccurate. Therefore, data must be corroborated through other
sources to determine if a threat is credible.

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School Safety Toolkits

SUMMARY
It is essential that school district policies and procedures are in place that allow for the
collection of valuable information, while protecting the rights of all students involved. If policies
do not exist, developing policies is essential.
Valuable information can be gathered from student records and through interviews.
Interviewing staff, students, parents or guardians of the student of concern, potential targets
and the student of concern provides insight into the situation, motives, intentions and risk for
potential violence that the student of concern may have. All interviews must focus on the facts
and behaviors, not the interpretations of the student of concern’s behavior or comments.
Throughout the process data gathered should be corroborated through multiple sources.
Interview questions need to be tailored to the interview subject. This will help gather the best
information without unduly alarming or offending anyone. Appropriate accommodations may
also need to be considered based on the interviewee’s needs. The offer of assistance should be
provided to anyone interviewed.

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School Safety Toolkits

THREAT ASSESSMENT INQUIRY WORKSHEET
A Threat Assessment Inquiry is to be conducted by the school threat assessment
team. For assistance in collecting the variety of information needed to complete the
Threat Assessment Inquiry, consult the Threat Assessment Sources of Information
Guidelines.

Provide the facts that identified a student, the situation or potential target(s)
Provide fact-based information: alleged accounts of behavior may be inaccurate and may
be subjective interpretations of events. All information should be corroborated by multiple
sources if possible.

1. What behaviors and/or communications were reported, and by whom?

2. What was the situation?

3. Who, if anyone, witnessed the reported behavior of concern?

4. What was the context for the reported behavior?
Remember that individuals who report information about possible threatening situations may have
multiple motives and accounts may be inaccurate and subject to interpretation of events.

Provide identifying information about the student of concern

Name

Date of birth

Address______________________________________
Home phone
Student ID

_________________

Cell phone
Social security number_____

Parent guardian
Parent or guardian phone numbers
Emergency contact info

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School Safety Toolkits

Provide background information about the student of concern

1. Describe the current, known family or home situation.

2. Describe the student’s academic performance.

3. Describe the student’s social networks (friends).

4. Describe any history of relationships and conflicts.

5. Describe any history of harassing others or being harassed.

6. Describe any history of violence toward self or others.

7. Describe any history of having been a victim of violence or bullying.

8. Describe any known attitudes toward violence.

9. Describe any criminal behavior.

10. Describe any mental health or substance abuse history.

11. Describe any access to and use of weapons.

12. Describe any history of grievances or grudges.

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School Safety Toolkits

Provide current life information about the student of concern

Â

Note, as appropriate, whether the student has any trusting relationship with
adults who are emotionally available to the student of concern or whether he or
she is known to be consistently respectful to any adult.

1.

Describe the present stability of living and home situations.

2.

Describe the nature and quality of current relationships and personal support.

3. Describe any recent losses or losses of status (shame, humiliation, recent breakup or loss of
significant relationship).

4. Describe any current grievances or grudges.

5. Describe any perceptions of being treated unfairly.

6. Describe any known difficulty coping with a stressful event.

7. Describe any “downward” progression in social, academic, behavioral or psychological
functioning.

8. Describe any recent hopelessness, desperation or despair including suicidal thoughts,
gestures, actions or attempts.

9. Describe any pending crises or change in circumstances.

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School Safety Toolkits

Provide information about attack-related behaviors

1. Describe any ideas or plans about injuring him/herself or attacking a school or persons at
school.

2. Describe any communications or writings that suggest that the student has an unusual or
worrisome interest in school attacks.

3. Describe any comments that express or imply the student is considering mounting an attack
at school.

4. Describe any recent weapon-seeking behavior, especially if weapon-seeking is linked to
ideas about attack or expressions about interest in attack.

5. Describe any communications or writings suggesting the student condones or is considering
violence to redress a grievance or solve a problem.

6. Describe any rehearsals of attacks or ambushes.

108
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

31

School Safety Toolkits

Provide information about motives for an attack

Â

All statements should be taken in context. Students make threats and engage in
other risky behaviors for a variety of reasons. Many threatening statements do
not reflect the student’s actual movement on a path to attack.

1. Has the student of concern displayed behaviors that show he or she is:
[Check all that apply]

Seeking revenge for a perceived injury or grievance

Yearning for attention, recognition or notoriety

Has a wish to solve a problem otherwise seen as unbearable

Has a desire to die or be killed

Other (specify)

2. Provide a description of those behaviors:

Provide information about target selection

Â

Information about a selected target(s) may provide insight regarding motives,
planning and attack-related behaviors. Remember that a potential target may
shift to another target over time.

109
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

32

School Safety Toolkits

THREAT ASSESSMENT: ANALYSIS WORKSHEET
The analysis of the information gathered during the Threat Assessment Inquiry
should answer the following two questions:

Â

Is the behavior of the student consistent with the movement on a path towards an
attack?

Â

Does the student’s current situation or setting incline him or her toward or away
from targeted violence?

What are the student’s motives and goals?
• What motivated the student to make the statements or take the actions that caused
him/her to come to attention?

Does the situation or circumstance that led to these statements or actions still exist?

Does the student have a major grievance or grudge? Against whom?

What efforts have been made to resolve the problem and what has been the result?

Does the student feel that any part of the problem is resolved or see any alternatives?

Have there been any communications suggesting ideas or intent to attack?
• What, if anything, has the student communicated to someone else (targets, friends,
other students, teachers, family, others) or written in a diary, journal or Web site
concerning his or her ideas or intentions?

Have friends been alerted or “warned away”?

110
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

33

School Safety Toolkits

Has the student shown inappropriate interest in school attacks, attackers, weapons
or incidents of mass violence?

Has the student engaged in attack-related behaviors such as developing a plan,
attempting to acquire weapons, researching potential sites for attack or rehearsing
attacks?

Does the student have the capacity to carry out an act of targeted violence?
• How organized is the student’s thinking and behavior?

Does the student have the means to access a weapon and/or carry out an attack?

111
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

34

School Safety Toolkits

Is the student experiencing hopelessness or desperation?
• Is there information to suggest that the student is experiencing desperation and/or
despair?

Has the student experienced a recent failure, loss or loss of status?

Is the student known to have difficulty coping with a stressful event?

Is the student now, or has the student ever been, suicidal or accident prone?

Has the student engaged in behavior that suggests that he or she has considered
suicide?

Does the student have a trusting relationship with at least one responsible adult?
• Does the student have at least one relationship with an adult where the student feels
that he or she can confide in the adult and believes that the adult will listen without
judging or jumping to conclusions? With whom?

Is the student emotionally connected to other students?

Has the student previously come to someone’s attention or raised concern in a way that
suggested he or she needs intervention or supportive services?

112
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

35

School Safety Toolkits

Does the student see violence as an acceptable, desirable or only way to solve
problems?

Does the setting around the student (friends, fellow students, parents, teachers, adults)
explicitly or implicitly support or endorse violence as a way of resolving problems or
disputes?

Has the student been dared by others to engage in an act of violence?

Is the student’s conversation and story consistent with his or her actions? For
example, does information from collateral interviews and from the student’s own
behavior confirm or dispute what the student says is occurring?

Are other people concerned about the student’s potential for violence?
• Are those who know the student concerned that he or she might take action based on
violent ideas or plans?

Are those who know the student concerned about a specific target?

Have those who know the student witnessed recent changes or escalations in mood and
behavior?

113
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

36

School Safety Toolkits

What circumstances might affect the likelihood of an attack?
• What factors in the student’s life and/or environment might increase or decrease the
likelihood that the student will attempt to mount an attack at school?

What is the response of other persons who know about the student’s ideas or plan to
mount an attack?

Do those who know about the student’s ideas actively discourage the student from
acting violently, encourage the student to attack, deny the possibility of violence,
passively collude with an attack, etc.?

CONCLUDING A THREAT ASSESSMENT INQUIRY
The threat assessment team should determine the response to a situation based on the analysis
of the information gathered and the answers to the questions above.

Â

If the threat assessment team concludes there is enough reliable information and the
weight of the information leads to the conclusion that the student of concern does not
pose a threat, the threat assessment team may close the inquiry. An inquiry can be reopened at a later date if new information arises.

Â

If the threat assessment team concludes that there is insufficient information to be
reasonably certain that the student of concern does not pose a threat or the student of
concern appears to be on a path to attack, the team should recommend the matter be
referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency for a threat assessment
investigation.

114
Adapted from the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of Education School Safety Initiative

37

District Policies,
Regulations, Procedures

District Policies, Regulations,
Procedures

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Public Schools
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number 401.5AR
Title

Adopted

June 1995

Revised

April 2011

Pre-Employment Background Check

1. Consent
1.1 All job candidates who have received initial conditional job offers as new hires
to District 196 will be required to consent to a background check before
beginning employment with the district. A background check is also required
of all job candidates, except enrolled student volunteers, who are offered the
opportunity to provide athletic or extracurricular academic coaching services,
regardless of whether any compensation is paid. A job candidate's conditional
offer of employment and an offer for coaching services may be revoked and
employment with the district terminated based on the result of the
background check.
1.2 Candidates must sign an Informed Consent Form (District Procedure 401.5P,
Informed Consent - Pre-Employment Background Check), which gives the
district permission to retrieve information from appropriate personnel,
institutions or agencies (including but not limited to the Minnesota Bureau of
Criminal Apprehension, similar agencies in other states, counties, motor
vehicles departments, the FBI and consumer reporting agencies) concerning
the candidate’s background relative to any criminal history or motor vehicle
violations. If a candidate fails to provide the district with a signed Informed
Consent Form at the time the candidate receives a job offer, the candidate will
be considered to have voluntarily withdrawn his or her application for
employment.
1.3 When required, candidates must provide fingerprints to the district so that a
background check may be conducted. If the fingerprints provided by the
candidate are unusable, the candidate will be required to submit another set
of prints.
1.4 Candidates for positions involving the treatment, assessment or counseling of
a mental or emotional illness, symptom or condition will also be subject to a
pre-employment inquiry pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 604.20-604.205.
Positions will include counselors, psychologists, social workers, nurses and
any other position described in Minnesota Statute 604.20, subd. 5.
2. Process – Candidates who receive a conditional job offer will be referred to the
Human Resources Department where a staff member will explain the background
check policy and provide the candidate with a copy of the background check policy
and regulation.
2.1 Human Resources Department staff will obtain from the candidate a
completed and signed copy of District Procedure 401.5P, Informed Consent Pre-Employment Background Check, acknowledging that he or she has read
and received a copy of the background check policy and regulation, and
providing the requested information. This form will become part of the
candidate's personnel record. The Human Resources Department will also
obtain any necessary fingerprints.
2.2 Candidates may be required to pay the school district an amount of money
equal to the actual cost of the criminal history background check.

115

Regulation 401.5AR
Page 2
2.3 The candidate will be informed of the results of the background check(s) to the
extent required by law.
2.4 If the background check confirms a criminal record, the district will notify the
candidate with District Procedure 401.5.1P, Background Check: Pre-Adverse
Action Letter including a copy of the background check results.
2.5 If the background check confirms a criminal record, the candidate will have
the following recourse:
2.5.1 To withdraw the application;
2.5.2 To obtain from District 196 a copy of the background check report;
2.5.3 To obtain from the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension any record that
forms the basis for the background check report;
2.5.4 To challenge the accuracy and completeness of any information
contained in the background check report or record pursuant to
Minnesota Statutes 13.04 (4), and
2.5.5 To be informed by District 196 if he or she is denied employment or
continued employment by the district because of a background check
report. This communication will be complete when District Procedure
401.5.2P, Background Check: Adverse Action Letter, is sent as per Fair
Credit Reporting Action Sec. 604, 606.615.
2.6 Candidates subject to the inquiry described in Section 1.4 will be asked to
sign an authorization and release form and provide the names and addresses
of employers for the previous five years for which the candidate provided
services involving the treatment, assessment or counseling of a mental or
emotional illness, symptoms or condition. District 196 will inquire of the
identified employers concerning the occurrence of sexual contacts with
patients or former patients. Any job offer to the candidate is conditional upon
the satisfactory response to the background inquiry.
3. Independent Contractors, Student Employees and Volunteers – The district
may, at its discretion, require a criminal background check on an individual
working as an independent contractor, as a student employee or a volunteer
pursuant to the procedures contained in this regulation except as otherwise
required by section 1.1 for individuals providing coaching services.
4. Communications
4.1 The Human Resources Department shall post a notice at the District Office
located at 3455 153rd Street West, Rosemount, that states that the district has
a background check policy and that copies of this policy are available in the
Human Resources Department.
4.2 A statement about the need to submit to a background check will be included
on all employment applications.
References:

-Minnesota Statute 123B.03, Background Check
-Minnesota Statute 171.3215, Canceling Bus Endorsements for Certain
Offenses
-Minnesota Statute 299C.60 et. seq., Minnesota Child Protection
Background Check Act
-Minnesota Statute 604.202, Liability of Employer
-Fair Credit Reporting Act Sec. 604, 606.615

Regulations/401.5AR/4-1-11

116

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number
Title

506

Adopted January 1979

Revised

May 2004

Student Welfare

1. Safety - The board recognizes its responsibility to provide a safe environment for
students. The superintendent shall develop regulations and procedures detailing
the district safety program.
2. Student Health
2.1 Medication -- School nurses may dispense medication to students only with
appropriate authorization from the student's physician, parent or guardian.
2.2 Serious Illness or Injury/Medical Emergencies
2.2.1 School officials will make every effort to contact parents in the event of
serious illness or injury. However, when school authorities determine
that illness or injury requires emergency care, emergency services will
be contacted and used.
2.2.2 An emergency information card (District Procedure 506.2.1.1P
[elementary], 506.2.1.2P [secondary] or 506.2.1.3P [early childhood])
for each student will be kept on file with the school nurse.
2.2.2.1 In a medical emergency, school personnel will do everything
possible to help the student(s) involved.
2.2.2.2 School personnel will not accept, file, transmit or implement a
"Do Not Resuscitate" request for a student. If the parent or
guardian of a student asks to submit a "Do Not Resuscitate"
request to a school, the school will advise the parent or
guardian to discuss the issue with local medical emergency
teams and local medical facilities.
2.3 Allergies -- When the parent or guardian of a student, or an adult student
(age 18 or over) informs the principal or school nurse that the student has
allergies to specific animals, food or other substances, school staff will make
every effort to ensure that the student does not come into contact with those
specific animals, food or other substances in school.
2.4 Individualized Health Services
2.4.1 A documented health plan shall be developed and implemented for
students with special health needs by the school nurse, as requested
by the parent or appropriate school personnel, or deemed necessary by
the school nurse. The plan shall be developed in cooperation with the
parent, appropriate school personnel and, as necessary, appropriate
medical personnel.

117

Policy 506
Page 2
2.4.2 Any private duty nurse or other person hired as an independent
contractor by a student’s parent or guardian or an outside agency to
care for a student at school and/or on district vehicles will be expected
to abide by all district and school policies unless specifically stated
otherwise in the student’s health plan.
2.5 Chronic Infectious Diseases
2.5.1 The board recognizes the need to prevent and to manage occurrences
of chronic infectious diseases in the student population.
2.5.2 The board directs the administration to develop regulations that will
include:
2.5.2.1 Prevention methods, including hygiene and cleaning
techniques.
2.5.2.2 Student rights to attend school.
2.5.2.3 A method of assessment of risk factors for infected students,
as well as risks for others in the school.
2.5.2.4 A provision for creation of an advisory committee to review
individual cases of chronic infectious diseases as deemed
appropriate by the superintendent.
2.5.2.5 Safeguards for the data privacy of students.
2.6 Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) – District 196 strives to provide a safe
environment for students, staff and visitors. In this regard, automated external
defibrillator (AED) implementation is a component of our overall safety program.
2.6.1 The school district will provide an AED in school facilities where staff,
first responders or others may access the unit in an emergency
medical situation.
2.6.2 AED training for select employees will be provided by the school
district.
2.6.3 Maintenance of the AEDs is a function of the District 196 Health and
Safety Office.
2.6.4 Any medical incident requiring the use of an AED will be documented
on District Procedure 506.2.1.4P, Medical Incident Report for
Students, Community Education Participants and Visitors.
3. Suspected Maltreatment of Minors -- District employees shall report the
following to the proper authorities in accordance with state statutes:
3.1 Suspected maltreatment of minors (physical or sexual abuse, neglect, mental
injury or threatened injury), or
3.2 If they know or have reason to believe that a child has been neglected or
physically or sexually abused within the preceding three years.

118

Policy 506
Page 3
4. Death of a Student
4.1 If a student dies, in school or outside of school, the principal and other school
employees will inform other students and their families of the student's
death, in accordance with the family’s wishes, in a sensitive and timely
manner, and make sure that students are provided with the support
necessary to respond to the death of a classmate.
4.2 If a student dies as a result of suicide, the school principal and other school
employees will also take special care in informing and supporting classmates
and friends of the deceased student, in accordance with the family’s wishes,
and in compliance with the district’s student data and records policies.
4.3 The School Board will observe a moment of silence in memory of a student at
the next regularly-scheduled school board meeting after hearing about the
death of that student, unless requested by the family to keep this information
private.
5. Chemical Abuse
5.1 For the purposes of this policy and related regulations, chemicals (drugs) are
defined as any substance that has a rapid mood-altering or intoxicating effect
on the central nervous system and is:
5.1.1 Illegal as defined by state and federal laws;
5.1.2 Statutorily prohibited for those under age 21;
5.1.3 Legal by physician's prescription only, but obtained and/or used in
non-prescribed ways;
5.1.4 Available as an over-the-counter drug, but obtained or used in nonrecommended ways, or
5.1.5 One of certain volatile substances (glue, paint thinner, etc.) which can
be inhaled for their mood-altering effect.
5.2 Use of any substances mentioned above in this manner by students will be
dealt with appropriately by district staff as outlined in Administrative
Regulation 503.3AR, Student Behavior Expectations and Consequences for
Misbehavior.
5.3 The district recognizes that chemical abuse is one of the nation's leading
health problems. In accordance with its continuing interest in the personal
welfare, growth and performance of all students, the district recognizes its
responsibility to help maintain the health and productivity of students who
are or may become involved in chemical abuse.
5.4 Because the district recognizes that emotional, physical, economic and social
problems are often related to the use of chemicals, it is committed to
developing programs designed to educate and support students in the
following ways: heightening awareness about chemical use and abuse;

119

Policy 506
Page 4
increasing knowledge about the symptoms and development of chemical
dependency; creating a more receptive climate for early and effective
intervention; and providing a supportive environment for individuals faced
with chemical abuse problems.
5.5 The district recognizes that chemically dependent people can be helped to
achieve freedom from active dependency when appropriate assistance is
offered. While the district cannot provide treatment for chemical dependency,
it is committed to the concept of providing appropriate assistance.
5.6 The district recognizes that a student's chemical abuse may interfere with his
or her health and/or school performance. It is therefore necessary for staff
members to take action when chemical abuse is either observed or suspected
of interfering with a student's performance in any way, as described in
Administrative Regulation 506.7.3AR, Student Chemical Abuse.
6. Pregnant Students and Students Who Have Children - Maternal, paternal or
pregnancy status shall not affect the rights and privileges of students to receive a
public education or to take part in any cocurricular activity offered by the school.
7. Food Services
7.1 Free and Reduced Price Meals - As a participant in the National School Lunch
Program, the district shall provide free and reduced price meals to eligible
students in district schools.
7.2 Any food served to students in school, other than food prepared by the Food
and Nutrition Services Department or in a properly supervised class, must be
store-bought and brought to school still sealed in the original wrapper or
container.

References: - Minnesota Statute 121A.26, School preassessment teams
- Minnesota Statute 626.556, Reporting of Maltreatment of Minors

Policies/500 Series/506
Graphic Arts/5-18-04

120

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan, Public Schools
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number

506.1AR

Adopted January 1998

Revised April 2010

Security in District Schools

Title

To help increase the safety and security of district schools for students, staff and
visitors, the guidelines described below will be followed in all district schools.
1.

Visitors
1.1

All visitors must report to the office or visitor’s desk and sign in when they
first arrive at school during school hours.

1.2

All visitors should be given a name tag or badge to wear while they are in
the building during school hours.

1.3

Staff are expected to question people in the building whom they don’t
recognize and who are not wearing a name tag or badge.

2.

Students and Staff – Students and staff are instructed to immediately report to
a teacher or administrator any suspicious behavior or situation that makes them
uncomfortable.

3.

Building Security
3.1

Lock as many outside doors as possible, as determined by a premises
survey.

3.2

Close off portions of the building that will not be needed after the regular
school day, as determined by a premises survey.

3.3

Signage
3.3.1

Post signs on all unlocked doors of schools to welcome visitors to
the schools, and instruct them to report first to the office or
visitor’s desk and wear a name tag or badge while they are in the
building.

3.3.2

Post signs on all locked doors to explain the door is locked for
safety reasons and direct people to an unlocked door.

4.

After Regular School Hours – Building supervision is provided in schools when
community education and other after-school activities are taking place.

5.

High Schools – In district high schools, the following steps will also be taken:
5.1

Require students to carry identification cards with them at all times in
school or on school property, and

5.2

Station a person at the main entrance to greet visitors and direct them to
the school office or visitor’s desk.

121

Administrative Regulation 506.1AR
Page 2

6.

General
6.1

Video cameras are placed in schools as a deterrent for misbehavior and to
aid investigation of misbehavior. Students are subject to discipline and
referral to law enforcement for incidents of misconduct caught on
videotape.

6.2

Each school shall conduct the following emergency drills annually:
6.2.1

Five lockdown drills – three with students and two without
students;

6.2.2

Five fire drills with students, and

6.2.3

One tornado drill with students.

6.3

Schools shall be available to law enforcement officials, as requested, for
practice drills.

6.4

Schools and departments should not display their building layout on
websites.

6.5

In the event of a major disaster covered by the media during the school
day, in general, high school students should be permitted to see
televisions and media throughout the day to observe and discuss the
situation; middle school students should be permitted to see televisions
and media for a relatively short time, and elementary school students
should not be permitted to view television and other media.

7.

Communications – All schools shall include security/safety information in
student, parent and staff newsletters, handbooks and other publications.

8.

Background Checks – The school district must perform criminal history
background checks on everyone offered employment in the district, including all
volunteer athletic and cocurricular coaches. The district exercises discretion
when requiring background checks on selected other volunteer student and
independent contractors considering such factors as the amount and duration of
student contact.

____________________________________________________________________________________
Reference: -Minnesota Statute 121A.37, School Safety Drills
-Minnesota Statute 123B.03, Background check
regulations/506.1AR/4-5-10

122

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential
SERIES NUMBER

506.2.1AR

ADOPTED February 1990

REVISED

May 2000

TITLE Student, Community Education Participant or Visitor Medical Emergencies
1. Students
1.1 Each student's parent or guardian shall complete an emergency information card
(District Procedures 506.2.1.1P, Emergency Information – Elementary Students;
506.2.1.2P, Emergency Information – Secondary Students or 506.2.1.3P, Emergency
Information – Early Childhood) and give it to the school nurse at the beginning of
each school year. This card with emergency contact information will be maintained
for each student by the school nurse.
1.2 In case of the serious injury or illness of a student in school, the following steps will
be taken immediately:
1.2.1 The school nurse will be called;
1.2.2 Emergency telephone number 911 will be called, if deemed necessary, and
1.2.3 The student's parent, guardian or other person designated on the emergency
card will be called. If none of them can be reached, the school staff will make
whatever arrangements are necessary for the health of the student.
1.2.4 The district has a standing doctor's order for use of an automatic external
defibrillator. In case of an emergency involving a student, the school nurse or
other school staff trained in the use of the defibrillator and cardio-pulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) may use the defibrillator on the student, as appropriate.
2. Medical Incident Reports for Students, Community Education Participants and
Visitors
2.1 In case of the serious injury or illness of a student, a Medical Incident Report for
Students, Community Education Participants and Visitors (District Procedure
506.2.1.4P) will be completed and kept on file by the school nurse.
2.2 In case of the serious injury or illness of a community education participant, a
Medical Incident Report for Students, Community Education Participants and
Visitors (District Procedure 506.2.1.4P) will be completed and kept on file by the
appropriate Community Education office.
2.3 In case of the serious injury or illness of a visitor, a Medical Incident Report for
Students, Community Education Participants and Visitors (District Procedure
506.2.1.4P) will be completed and kept on file in the school or building where the
incident occurred.
Regulations/500 Series/506.2.1AR
Graphic Arts/5-11-2000

123

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number
Title

506.2.1.4P Adopted July 1980

Revised November 1996

Medical Incident Report for Students, Community Education
Participants and Visitors

This form is to be completed by the District 196 staff person reporting the serious injury or
illness of a district student, community education participant or visitor.
Name of injured/ill person _______________________________ Age ______ Sex: M or F (circle one)
Address ___________________________________________City__________________ Zip code _______
Phone (home) _________________________________ (work)
School student attends (if early childhood-grade 12 student) ______________________________________
Grade ____________

Bus #

Class/activity (if community education participant) ________________________________________________
Time

Date of incident

a.m./p.m.

Location (specify school or building, bus, inside or outside, etc.) _______________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Name of person reporting __________________________________ Position ______________________
How incident occurred (what person was doing, any unsafe acts or conditions, other people or equipment
involved, etc.)

_______________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Location of injury/illness on body ________________________________________________________
Description of injury/illness ______________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Witnesses to injury/illness (include name, address, and home and work phone numbers)
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Parent/Guardian name(s) (if early childhood-grade 12 student)
Phone (home) ___________________________________ (work)
Address ___________________________________________City__________________ Zip code _______
Name of person notified ______________________________________ By whom __________________
Relationship to injured/ill person ________________________

Time ______________________

Disposition: Class __________ School nurse ___________Home__________ Hospital __________
Physician ________________________ Other (specify) _______________________________________
By whom: ____________________________________

124

Procedure 506.2.1.4P
Page 2

To be completed by school nurse or other district employee in charge
Staff observations ________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Complaints or responses of injured/ill person _____________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Intervention/treatment ___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Name of doctor, clinic or hospital involved in treatment or follow-up _______________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Follow-up information ____________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
School nurse’s signature (if involved) ______________________________

Date ________________

Administrator’s signature _________________________________________ Date ________________
Signature of person completing form _____________________________

Date ________________

Position of person completing form ________________________________________________________
Comments _______________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Procedures/500 Series/506.2.1.4P
Graphic Arts/12-2-96

125

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number

506.5AR Adopted November 1992

Revised November 2002

Title School Response to the Death of a Student or Employee
1.

If a student or school employee dies, school officials will take the
following actions:
1.1

The principal will notify school employees, the principal’s supervisor,
the superintendent and other appropriate people (students’ parents, site
council, etc.) of the death; give teachers a brief written, factual
statement of what occurred to share with their students, and share
information about memorial and/or funeral services as soon as it is
available. (The superintendent will also issue a brief, factual statement
to other district schools and departments to inform them of the
situation.)

1.2

The school crisis team (homeroom teacher, school psychologist, school
nurse, school counselor [if any] and principal) will determine whether
there is a need to bring in professional help from other schools or
agencies (psychologists, counselors, etc.).

1.3

If it appears students have a need to talk about the situation, a plan
will be developed to respond to that need. If any students show a need
for individual attention, teachers may request help from the school
psychologist, school nurse and/or school counselor.

1.4

The school psychologist, school nurse and/or school counselor(s)
and/or employee assistance program will provide support for teachers
and other school personnel, as needed.

1.5

The principal may send a brief note to parents in the student’s or employee’s class, grade level or school (whichever the principal deems
appropriate) to explain the death. It is suggested that the letter include
information on memorial and/or funeral services, the name of a contact
person at school (school psychologist, school nurse and/or school
counselor) and available resources. If needed, the principal may also
schedule a special meeting at school with appropriate resource people
for parents and/or teachers who need support in responding to
children’s needs.

1.6

Questions from parents, reporters, lawyers, doctors, etc., will be
referred to the principal. (Refer to Administrative Regulation 505.2AR,
Protection and Privacy of Student Records, for specific information.)

126

Regulation 506.5AR
Page 2
1.7

A school will not usually be closed for a funeral. If the funeral takes
place during a school day, the principal, after consulting with
appropriate staff, will decide which staff members may attend.

1.8

If the cause of a student’s death is suicide, the school administration
will also take the following actions:
1.8.1 The school crisis team (homeroom teacher, school psychologist,
school nurse, school counselor [if any] and principal[s]) will meet
to develop a plan for the school day. If information about a
suicide is received from someone other than a family member, a
team member will verify the suicide. To help prevent a "copy-cat"
suicide, the school crisis team will review the attendance list to
check for names of close friends of the deceased student.
1.8.2 The principal will notify his or her supervisor, the
superintendent and other district principals about the suicide.
1.8.3 The school crisis team will meet at the end of the day to review
the day, discuss students who need further follow-up, determine
if there is a need for outside agency help and plan for the next
day.
1.8.4 The principal will make sure that appropriate follow-up steps are
taken, which may include:
1.8.4.1 The school psychologist offering groups for students who
request ongoing support;
1.8.4.2 The principal offering an inservice meeting for staff to
provide information about the warning signs of
depression or suicidal behavior and referral procedures,
and/or
1.8.4.3 The principal encouraging staff to maintain a normal
routine and normal student expectations during the
crisis period.

1.9

If a teacher dies, the principal will also make sure that a school
psychologist, school nurse, teacher, school counselor or administrator
attends all of the deceased teacher's classes to acknowledge the death,
tell students what happened and deal with students’ expressions of
feelings.

1.10

If a student or teacher dies during a vacation period, the principal or
designee shall take appropriate action, based on this regulation and the
specific circumstances.

127

Regulation 506.5AR
Page 3
2.

3.

If an immediate family member of a student or school employee dies,
school officials will take the following actions:
2.1

The principal will announce the death to other school employees and
let them know about memorial service and/or funeral arrangements.

2.2

The principal will decide when it is appropriate for school staff
members to attend memorial and/or funeral services.

2.3

The school psychologist, school nurse and/or school counselor will be
made available to the student, the student's friends and staff, as
needed.

Memorials - Appropriate ways of memorializing the deceased student or
employee through donations may be considered. This should be implemented
only after consulting with the principal’s supervisor, the principal and the
family. For individuals interested in donating money on behalf of the
deceased, the family will be requested to identify those charities and/or
organizations to which donations may be sent.

regulations/500 series/506.5AR
Graphic Arts/11-19-02

128

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Public Schools
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number
Title

707.2.3P

Adopted January 1990 Revised August 2010

School Bus Accidents

1. Transportation Department Responsibilities
1.1 Dispatcher – When notified that an accident has occurred, the dispatcher will call
the police and maintain radio contact with the vehicle involved.
1.2 Other Transportation Staff
1.2.1

Transportation staff will notify the Transportation Training Specialist,
Coordinator of Transportation, Director of Finance and Operations, and the
office of the principal or administrator of the school the students attend.

1.2.2

Routers will print a roster of students and give it to the dispatcher.

1.2.3

Transportation staff will work cooperatively with the school to notify
parents/guardians of students as described in 2.1.3 below.

1.3 The Transportation Training Specialist or designee will take the following actions:
1.3.1

Proceed to the accident site immediately;

1.3.2

Take charge of the accident site, in cooperation with the investigating
police officer;

1.3.3

See that all injured persons (if any) receive proper care;

1.3.4

Determine facts pertaining to the accident;

1.3.5

Release the bus and students, after consulting with the investigating police
officer;

1.3.6

When appropriate or required, transport the school bus driver to the
district-designated medical facility for drug or alcohol testing;

1.3.7

At the earliest possible opportunity, meet with the principal or
administrator or designee about the accident;

1.3.8

Transmit facts about the accident to the Coordinator of Transportation,
Director of Finance and Operations and principal or administrator;

1.3.9

Submit all required reports to the insurance company and the Minnesota
Department of Public Safety;

1.3.10 Submit accident facts to the district Accident Review Committee, and
1.3.11 Conduct follow-up programs, as needed, with drivers.
2. School Staff Responsibilities
2.1 The principal or administrator or designee will take the following actions:
2.1.1

Go to the accident scene, if necessary, and work with the Transportation
Training Specialist or designee and/or investigating police officer;

129

Procedure 707.2.3P
Page 2
2.1.2

Determine whether it is necessary for the school nurse to go to the accident
scene to check students or to check students as they arrive at school, and

2.1.3

Communicate with Transportation staff to determine the most appropriate
and timely notification of the accident to parents and guardians. In
general, school staff will notify parents and guardians of accidents that
occur on the way to school or on field trips and Transportation staff will
notify parents and guardians of accidents that occur on the way home from
school.

3. Bus Driver Responsibilities – If a bus driver is involved in a traffic accident, at the
scene of the accident he or she will:
3.1 Stop immediately (shut off engine and set brakes);
3.2 Notify the Transportation Department of the accident by radio. (If unable to use the
radio, the driver will write down the location and assistance needed, and ask a
student or bystander to make the telephone call);
3.3 Assist any injured person (NOTE: never move an injured person unless they are in
imminent danger);
3.4 Protect the area by properly placing emergency warning triangles;
3.5 Record seat placement of students on passenger roster (located in yellow folder in
the bus);
3.6 Provide his or her name, driver’s license number and insurance information to
those involved;
3.7 Not discuss the accident with anyone except the Transportation Training Specialist,
other school district designee and the police;
3.8 Record the date, time, location and description of the accident, and any of the
following information, as appropriate, on the accident report (located in blue folder
in the bus):
3.8.1

Other driver(s) – name, address, telephone number, driver’s license number
and state, and insurance information;

3.8.2

If driver is not the vehicle owner, vehicle owner – name, address, telephone
number and insurance information;

3.8.3

Passenger – name, address and telephone number;

3.8.4

Damage to property of others;

3.8.5

Other vehicle(s) – license number and state, vehicle type, make and year,
and insurance information;

3.8.6

Injured person(s) – name, address and telephone number, and description
of injury;

3.8.7

Witness(es) – names, addresses and telephone numbers, and

3.8.8

Investigating police officer – name and badge number.

3.9 Return to the bus garage, complete the appropriate accident report forms, meet
with the Transportation Training Specialist and sign the state accident report form.
procedures/707.2.3P/8-6-10

130

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number

709

Adopted

November 1989

Revised

November 1998

Title Emergency Plans
1. Emergency Preparedness -- District 196 recognizes the possibility that emergency
situations resulting from natural or human causes could happen on district
property or at a district event.
1.1 In order to ensure that the district is prepared to respond to emergency
situations, the superintendent or designee will prepare district emergency
procedures, in cooperation with city, county and state emergency officials.
1.1.1 The superintendent or designee(s) will coordinate district plans for
emergency preparedness with each principal and department head.
1.1.2 Each principal and department head will annually review the
procedures with his or her students and staff and implement the
procedures, as needed.
1.1.3 The superintendent or designee will ensure that district emergency
procedures are reviewed annually and after each emergency incident
(refer to District Procedure 709P, Follow-up Evaluation of an
Emergency), and updated as needed.
1.2 Updated emergency procedures will be distributed throughout the district and
should be easily accessible to administrators and other district employees.
2. Emergency School Closings - The superintendent is authorized to temporarily
close or delay the opening of schools, as needed, to ensure the safety of students
and employees in the face of emergency or hazardous situations. Emergency or
hazardous situations are those, such as severe weather or utility failures, which
make it unfeasible or unsafe to carry on normal activities.
2.1 Decisions to close schools, shorten the school day, or cancel or postpone any
school or district activities shall always be made on the basis of the safety of
the participants. If there is any doubt, the decision-maker should err on the
side of safety.
2.2 Students, employees and parents shall be informed annually about emergency
school closing procedures. The superintendent shall develop procedures to
inform all affected persons when there is an emergency school closing.
Policies/700 Series/709
Graphic Arts/11/24/98

131

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount, Minnesota
Educating our students to reach their full potential

Series Number 709P

Adopted

November 1998

Revised

August 2001

Title

Follow-up Evaluation of an Emergency

To:

Director of Secondary Education/Director of Elementary Education/Director of
Special Education/Director of Community Education/Director of
Finance/Director of Human Resources (circle one)

From:

Principal or Department Head
(specify school or department)

Date:
Re:

Evaluation of Recent Emergency Situation

Recently your school/department went through an emergency situation that
resulted in you and your staff (and students) following the guidelines in the District
196 Emergency Procedures Guide. To help us assess the guide, I would appreciate
your comments about the emergency, the response to the emergency and the value of
the guide in helping you and your staff respond to the emergency. Please respond to
the following questions and return this form within one week. Use additional paper to
answer the questions if needed. Thank you.
Describe the emergency situation (include date, place, people involved, etc.)

Describe the response to the emergency situation by you and the people in your
building, by district-level employees and by non-district emergency people.

132

Procedure 709P
Page 2
Comment on the value of the Emergency Procedures Guide in the emergency
situation. Especially note things that were particularly helpful or not helpful and any
changes you would suggest to help people who face a similar emergency in the future.

Any other comments:

Please return this completed form within one week to the director
circled above at the District Office.
THANK YOU!

Procedures/700 series/709P
Graphic Arts/8-27-01

133

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196
Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Public Schools
Educating our students to reach their full potential
Series Number
Title
1.

709.1AR

Adopted November 1976

Revised April 2012

Emergency School Closings
Schedule Change Decisions Made by Superintendent – Decisions to cancel or
shorten the regular school day and after-school activities shall be made by the
superintendent in consultation with other staff as appropriate. Although severe
weather conditions are the most common reason for a change of school schedule,
other events could necessitate the delay, cancellation or early dismissal of school.
1.1 Beginning of School Day – If poor weather conditions or other emergency
situations arise prior to the beginning of the school day, the superintendent
will discuss the situation with appropriate staff and authorize one of the
following options:
1.1.1 School will begin as scheduled.
1.1.2 School will begin two hours late – School (including Kindergarten
Plus) will open on a two-hour delayed schedule. Morning half-day
kindergarten programs, morning Adult Basic Education (ABE)
classes, morning early childhood classes (ECSE and ECFE), morning
School-Age Care (SAC) and all morning community education
activities will be canceled. All buses (except for classes and activities
noted above) will operate on a normal, but two-hour delayed
schedule. After-school and evening activities, including ABE, ECFE
and SAC, will take place as scheduled.
1.1.3 School will be canceled – All regularly scheduled classes, all daytime
and after-school community education activities, ABE, ECSE, ECFE,
SAC, and all elementary and middle school after-school and evening
activities will be canceled for the entire day. A decision about high
school and community education evening activities will be made by
the director of secondary education and the director of community
education, respectively, by 3 p.m.
1.2 During School Day, After School and Evening – If there is a need to
change the schedule during the school day, the superintendent will discuss
the situation with the appropriate staff and authorize one of the following
options:
1.2.1 Continue with Regularly Scheduled School Day – The school day,
including after-school and evening activities, will continue on a
regular schedule for the remainder of the day.
1.2.2 Schedule Change During School Day – The schedule of school
activities will be changed in one or more of the following ways:
1.2.2.1

Afternoon kindergarten, after-school community education
activities, ABE, ECSE, ECFE and SAC will be canceled;

1.2.2.2

Schools will be dismissed early (decision to be made no later
than two hours before school dismissal time), or

1.2.2.3 All middle school and high school activity bus routes (not
necessarily activities) will be canceled (decision to be made
no later than 30 minutes before school dismissal time;
elementary principals to be informed).

134

Administrative Regulation 709.1AR
Page 2
1.2.3 Cancel After-School and Evening Activities – The superintendent may
decide to cancel all or some after-school activities (decision must be
made no later than 30 minutes before school dismissal time) and/or all
or some evening activities (decision to be made no later than 3 p.m.).
1.2.4 The principal of an individual school may decide to cancel k-12 afterschool and/or evening activities due to existing or predicted weather
conditions even if such activities are not canceled districtwide by the
superintendent. (The principal does not have the option to cancel
community education activities.) However, if the superintendent
cancels after-school and/or evening activities districtwide, a principal
may not continue with after-school and/or evening activities at his or
her school.
1.3 School Activities Held on Weekends and Vacations – If a school’s activity
schedule must change during a weekend or vacation period, the principal
will decide the advisability of canceling or postponing activities. This
decision shall be made in consultation with the coordinator of transportation
if district vehicles are involved. As a result, one of the following options will
be authorized by the principal:
1.3.1 School activities will continue on a regular schedule, or
1.3.2 The schedule of activities will be changed and the principal will notify
those affected; designated radio and television stations, if appropriate;
his or her director, and the coordinator of facilities.
2.

Community Education – If it appears there may be a need to change the
schedule of community education activities, the director of community education
will decide the advisability of canceling or postponing activities. This decision will
be made in consultation with the director of elementary education and, as
appropriate, the director of secondary education. As a result, one of the following
options will be authorized by the director of community education:
2.1 Community education activities will continue as scheduled, or
2.2 The schedule of activities will be changed and the director of community
education will notify those affected; designated radio and television stations,
if appropriate; the superintendent, and the coordinator of facilities.
2.2.1 Weekday schedule changes to community education activities will be
decided by 1 p.m. for after-school activities and by 3 p.m. for evening
activities (See Section 1.2.3).
2.2.2 Weekend or vacation schedule changes to community education activities
will be decided by the director of community education who will determine
the advisability of canceling or postponing activities. If the schedule of
activities is changed, the director of community education will notify those
affected; designated radio and television stations, if appropriate; the
superintendent, and the coordinator of facilities.

3.

Communications Process – When schools are opened on a delayed schedule,
canceled at the beginning of the school day or dismissed early during the school
day, the decision will be communicated with staff and parents via the district
website, mass notification telephone service, television and radio stations, and on
the District Office telephone recording line.

4.

Employee Obligations – All employees are to report to work in accordance with
established contract provisions and practices with Independent School District 196.

Regulations/709.1AR/4-3-12

135

Sample Emergency Notification
Letters, Emails and
Announcements

Sample Letters

Attempted Child Abduction:
Parent letter and information to share with faculty/staff.

S

[DATE]

[SCHOOL] Parents and Guardians:

A

M

On [DAY] at approximately [TIME], a man driving a [IDENTIFY COLOR] car attempted, unsuccessfully,
to entice a student into his car by offering her candy. The incident happened on [STREET], between
[STREET], as the girl was walking home from school. The [CITY] Police Department was called and
officers made a report of the incident.

P

The suspect, who fled the scene, is described as [PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION]. He was driving a [VEHICLE
DESCRIPTION]. If you have any information about this incident or the suspect, call the [CITY] Police
Department at [PHONE].

LE

[SCHOOL NAME] teachers encouraged students to walk with friends to and from school. Please take a
few minutes to remind your children about important safety rules regarding strangers.
Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL]
Principal

137

Bomb Threat:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

[SCHOOL] School Parents and Guardians:

A

M

On [DATE], a note containing a bomb threat was found at [SCHOOL] School and turned over to school
administration. The hand-written note indicated that there was a bomb in the building at approximately
[time] [usually do not provide these details per police].

P

Students were evacuated from the school. Our students boarded school buses that were brought in to keep
the students warm. A bomb detecting canine from the [name of agency] was brought in as part of the
search, which was led by members of the [city] Police and Fire Departments and assisted by school staff
and district officials. After completing the room-by-room search, at approximately [time], the schools were
reopened and students returned to the classroom to resume their studies for the remainder of the day.

LE

School District 196 takes threats of this nature very seriously and actively pursues the identity of the
individual(s) involved. Students guilty of making bomb threats against a school face immediate expulsion
from school and possible criminal charges. If you have information about this incident, please contact the
[city] Police Department at [phone].
Situations like these are difficult for everyone involved and we appreciate your support and understanding.
If you have questions, please call me at [phone].

Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

138

Bomb Threat:
Community letter

S

[DATE]

"I expect that each of you will join me in recommitting
our efforts to emphasize and maintain the safe, positive
and orderly learning environment we have at [SCHOOL].

[SCHOOL] Community Members:

A

M

A safe, positive and orderly learning environment is a top priority at [SCHOOL]. In fact, most schools ARE
safe. Less than one percent of violence in our communities occurs on school grounds. At the same time,
no school is immune. The tragic loss of life at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado is one more
example of violence finding its way inside the schoolhouse door. Even though schools are among the safest
places, we must do more. This is an issue that can only be addressed when everyone works together.

P

The Incident

LE

For the past few weeks, there have been a rash of bomb threats in schools throughout the United States.
We had such a threat at [SCHOOL]. A handwritten note was found in the building on [DATE], indicating
that a bomb had been placed in the school.
The Response

Each of the recent threats throughout the United States has been a hoax. Yet, our staff and students are
too important for us to take any chances and simply assume another hoax. Therefore, we evacuated the
building and released students from campus in a timely, orderly and supervised fashion. I am extremely
proud of the leadership demonstrated by our faculty, staff and students in responding to this emergency.
We worked in coordination with local police and fire departments, and bomb squad team to thoroughly
search the building. We found no evidence of any threat.
The Consequences
We have zero tolerance for anyone who would attempt to jeopardize the safety and human rights of our
students and staff at [SCHOOL]. We will investigate and find the person or persons who did this and
prosecute to the fullest extent of the law. Anyone having any information regarding this matter is asked to
visit personally with me or share this information with a trusted adult at the school.

139

Bomb Threat:
Community letter Continued
The Future

S

A

I hope that each of you are as disappointed as I am regarding this act. Everyone needs to know that this is
a serious matter. This is our school and no one has the right to place us in jeapordy or make us feel unsafe.
I expect that each of you will join me in recommitting our efforts to emphasize and maintain the safe,
positive and orderly learning environment we have at [SCHOOL].

P

Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

M

Thank you for your continuing efforts to make [SCHOOL] a great and safe place for teaching and learning.

LE
140

Bomb Threat:
Student Announcement
Please excuse this interruption:

S

A

Good Morning: This is [NAME], principal. I would like to take a few moments to review with you last
Friday's building evacuation and to talk about our personal responsibilities and commitment for today and
the future.

M

Two weeks ago I shared with you that a safe, positive and orderly learning environment is a top priority at
[SCHOOL]. Last week once again our environment was tested when information was received regarding a
bomb threat.

P

I greatly appreciate your response to our emergency and the leadership of students, faculty and staff.
However, what occurred last [Day] was extremely disappointing.

LE

Two weeks ago I reminded you that we are all citizens of the [SCHOOL] community. We have a personal
and group responsibilty to be positive and productive members of our community. However, we know
through experience that a person or persons can act irresponsibly making us feel unsafe. I am asking that
you continue to be positive and productive citizens by taking personal responsibilty for your actions. No
one has the right to place us in jeopardy, make us feel unsafe or disrupt our school day. Once again we will
find the person or persons who did this and prosecute to the fullest extent of the law.
As indicated earlier, we have identified the students responsible for the [DATE] evacuation of the building.
Those students have been suspended and expulsion proceedings are in progress.
County Attorney [NAME] has indicated that these types of offenses can result in felony level charges of
terroristic threats punishable by a fine of $60,000 and 90 days in jail. I have a hard time understanding
why someone would want to go through these types of consequences in addition to the personal
humiliation and that of their family.
Note that school has has not been cancelled in our district when these threats occur. Rather, students are
being evacuated and held pending decisions on building safety.
Anyone having information regarding Friday's emergency evacuation is asked to visit with me personally or
share your information with a trusted [SCHOOL] adult. We need to put a stop to these interruptions and
hold the responsible parties accountable for their actions.

141

Bomb Threat:
Student Announcement Continued
I would also like to address rumors.

S

A

Since the April tragedy which occurred at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado rumors have
been active throughout our country. The internet has been one of the primary methods used to spread
these rumors. One rumor has been that today is Marilyn Manson's birthday and tragic events are to occur.
Actually his birthday is in January. Another rumor has circulated regarding a note found at [SCHOOL]
referencing [DATE] - again untrue. We have not received any threats. Psychics interviewed on talk shows
have been rumored to make predictions however, we have not received direct threats about today.

M

One of the things I would encourage us all to do is not to participate in rumors or fall into rumor traps.

P

Again, I know that each of you are as disappointed as I regarding the behavior of a few students. I expect
that each of you will join me in recommitting our efforts to emphasize and maintain the safe, positive and
orderly learning environment that we have at [SCHOOL].

LE

The kinds of situations we are dealing with at our school are not unique to [SCHOOL]- they are occuring
across the country. What is unique is that they are occurring at [SCHOOL] because I have always felt this is
a special place with special people. We must continue this tradition.
Thank you for your continuing efforts to make [SCHOOL] a great and safe place for teaching and learning.

Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

142

Exposure Incident:
Parent letter

S

Incident reminds us to be cautious in parking lot areas

A

In cooperation with the [CITY] Police Department, we are reminding students, staff and visitors to our
school to be cautious in the parking lot areas as a result of a recent incident involving a man who exposed
himself to two female students as they were walking to their vehicles after dark.

M

Since the incident, the [CITY] Police Department has been conducting on-going surveillance and increased
patrols in the parking lots and areas surrounding the school. The suspect was described as a white male in
his 30s with an average build. The incident remains under investigation.

P

Teachers and coaches remind students to be alert and to walk in groups when they leave the school building, especially after dark. Please help us reinforce these personal safety practices with your students at
home.

LE

If you have any information about this incident, call the [CITY] Police Department at [PHONE]. If you see
any suspicious activity similar to this incident, police urge residents to call 911 immediately.

Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

143

Student Death by Accident:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

A

Dear Parent/Guardian,
As many of you know, on [DATE], [SCHOOL] experienced the sudden and tragic loss of senior
[STUDENT] in an automobile accident. [NAME] brother [NAME] was also severely injured and is
hospitalized. As one would expect, students and the faculty.staff have experienced a great deal of shock
and sadness.

M

Throughout the week we have arranged for numerous support personnel including counselors,
psychologists and area youth pastors to be in the building to talk with students, parents and faculty/staff
in need of assistance. Resource rooms have been established for students who need a place to talk or feel
they cannot be in their regular classroom. This support will continue for as long as needed. If you wish to
have one of the available support personnel talk individually with your child, or wish to talk with someone
yourself, please contact the [SCHOOL] Counseling Office, [PHONE].

P

LE

Each of our students will be affected by this tragedy in their own way and each will deal with this tragedy
in their own way. To help with this process, I am suggesting that you review the enclosed resource
material which outlines typical behaviors and reactions of young people after a tragedy or crisis situation.
Please take time to read and discuss these materials with your family.
I want to express my appreciation to your student for his/her sensitivity and cooperation during this most
difficult time. {SCHOOL] continues to demonstrate a strong sense of community and caring for one
another. I thank you for your role in establishing this climate of support.
If I can personally be of assistance to you please contact my office,
[PHONE].
Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

144

Student Death by Suicide:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

A

Dear Parent/Guardian,
As many of you know, on [DATE], [SCHOOL] experienced the sudden and tragic loss of two students
[NAME] and [NAME]. As one would expect, students and the faculty.staff have experienced a great deal of
shock and sadness.

M

Throughout the week we have arranged for numerous support personnel including counselors,
psychologists and area youth pastors to be in the building to talk with students, parents and faculty/staff
in need of assistance. Resource rooms have been established for students who need a place to talk or feel
they cannot be in their regular classroom. This support will continue for as long as needed. If you wish to
have one of the available support personnel talk individually with your child, or wish to talk with someone
yourself, please contact the [SCHOOL] Counseling Office, [PHONE].

P

LE

Each of our students will be affected by this tragedy in their own way and each will deal with this tragedy
in their own way. To help with this process, I am suggesting that you review the enclosed teen suicide
resource material, list of local resources, and information which outlines typical behaviors and reactions of
young people after a tragedy or crisis situation. Please take time to read and discuss these materials with
your family.
I want to express my appreciation to your student for his/her sensitivity and cooperation during this most
difficult time. {SCHOOL] continues to demonstrate a strong sense of community and caring for one
another. I thank you for your role in establishing this climate of support.
If I can personally be of assistance to you please contact my office,
[PHONE].
Sincerely,
[principal],
Principal

145

Suspicious Behavior:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

A

[SCHOOL] Elementary Parents and Guardians:

M

Several parents have asked about an incident that occurred at [SCHOOL] on [DAY], and I would like to
clarify the facts about what happened.

P

The incident occurred at 8:15 a.m., approximately one hour before students arrived for school. A man in
his early 20s was found looking into an empty classroom. When confronted by a teacher, he indicated
that he was looking for a bathroom. The teacher then notified me and I determined that the man did not
have a legitimate reason to be visiting the school. Consistent with school district policy, he was asked to
leave and was escorted out of the building.

LE

The incident was reported to the [CITY] Police Department, as well as the make, model and license
number of the vehicle he was driving when he left the school.
If you have questions, please feel free to call me at [PHONE].

Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL]
Principal

146

Suspicious Behavior:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

A

[SCHOOL] Elementary Parents and Guardians:

M

I am writing to make you aware of a suspicious male who was seen driving slowly on the streets
surrounding our school this morning during student arrival time.

P

A parent reported the matter to the school and to the [CITY] Police Department, which is investigating.
We are working with police to help ensure the safety of our children. To our knowledge, no children were
approached by this suspicious male.

LE

The vehicle is described as a [make/model/color], license plate # [license number] [IF WE
HAD THE LICENSE PLATE NUMBER THE POLICE WOULD BE ABLE TO LOCATE AND QUESTION
THE INDIVIDUAL WITHOUT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLIC]. If you have
information about this individual, please call the [CITY] Police Department at [PHONE].
The [CITY] Police Department will provide additional patrol around the school and on nearby streets
during student arrival and dismissal times for the remainder of this week. Please take this opportunity to
talk with your children about safety and dealing with strangers.
If you have questions, please feel free to call me at [PHONE].

Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL]
Principal

147

Suspicious Behavior:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

A

Dear [SCHOOL] Parents,

M

I am writing to inform you that five students at [SCHOOL] were approached by a man in a vehicle, in
three separate incidents, as the students walked home from school yesterday. The students reported
that a man in a small red car approached them and made inappropriate comments before driving off.
The students immediately went home and told their parents, who notified the police. [CITY] Police
apprehended a suspect and the matter remains under investigation.

P

LE

If an incident like this occurs, it is critical that you contact police immediately. This incident is also a
reminder of the importance of talking with your children about safety concerns and what to do if they
are approached by a stranger. Keeping our children safe is a top priority for all of us.
Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL]
Principal

148

Weapon:
Parent letter

S

[DATE]

Parents and Guardians of [SCHOOL] Students,

A

I am writing to inform you that on [DAY] I was contacted by police and informed that a weapon had
possibly been brought to school by a student that day.

M

Shortly after receiving the call, a search of the entire school building and grounds was conducted
by police officers and weapon-detection canines. No weapons were found during the search. As a
precaution, we had extra security in the building this morning to greet students as they arrived.

P

Although there were no incidents or reports of anyone seeing a student with a weapon at school, rest
assured that we take these types of reports very seriously and will respond according to our building’s
emergency preparedness plan to ensure the safety of our students, visitors and staff at all times. Our
staff learned about the situation at a meeting early this morning and is working in cooperation with local
police to make sure our students feel safe at school.

LE

If you or your child has any information about this situation, please call the [CITY] Police Department
at [PHONE].

Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL]
Principal

149

Table Top Exercises

Table Top Exercises

TABLE TOP EXERCISE WORKSHEET
School: _______________________________ Principal: ___________________________________
I. INVESTIGATIVE PHASE:
What happened? _____________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Where? ____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
When? _____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Who’s affected? _____________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
II. RESPONSE PHASE:
Do what? (Evacuation, Reverse Evacuation, Lockdown, Sheltering, Recovery) ___________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
How will you announce?_______________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Call who?___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Go where? __________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Bring what? _________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Command post location(s)? ____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, who does what? ___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Reunification where & who?____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Recovery Plan? ______________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
151

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 1
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: 17-year-old Chad arrives at Kent County High School at 7:40 a.m. and tells his best friend
John that his girlfriend of two years recently broke up with him because she likes someone different who
attends the same high school. Chad admits that he is angry with his girlfriend and her new boyfriend (he
does not know who this is) and plans to "get even" with them. He proceeds to tell John that he has made
and planted a homemade bomb somewhere in one of the school lockers but does not identify where the
locker is.

After giving John this information, Chad takes off in his car leaving John with the above
information. John immediately goes to the principal who in turn calls the police. School officials are aware
that Chad is in the advanced chemistry class and has some knowledge of what elements in an explosive
device could cause real damage.
As the school is being evacuated an explosion is heard in the locker area across from the library.
Other facts:
• 764 of the schools 796 students and 79 of 84 staff are safe and accounted for outside the building.
• Twenty-seven students and 4 staff have been transported to either Kent or Rhode Island Hospital.
• The extent of the injuries is unknown.
• It is unknown whether there are any casualities.
• Parents and relatives of students and staff are beginning to arrive at the school.
• Five students and one staff are unaccounted for.
• News crews are arriving at the school.
• The police located and interviewed Chad and believe that no other explosives are in the school.
• The physical damage is confined to the library, two classrooms and the hallway opposite the library.

152

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 2
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: 8:10 a.m. The principal has been notified by the school nurse that several members of the
high school chorus have become ill during chorus practice. This is the final rehearsal of the chorus for the
Holiday Concert in the Tiger High School auditorium. Initially two members of the chorus began feeling
faint. The choral instructor had them escorted from the auditorium to the school nurse's office. Symptoms
were headaches, light headedness and dizziness, they were sweating and their skin was hot and damp. The
school nurse first thought it was the flu or a cold, possibly drug use. One student could not focus or answer
routine questions. The nurse has called for an ambulance. A third member of the chorus was just sent to
the nurse’s office. [The riser area on the stage is very warm. The spot lights are on and the students are
under a shell installed on the stage to improve acoustics for choral concerts. Students are crowded together.
The ventilation system is working but the air under the concert shell is stagnant. Many of the students are
wearing winter sweaters and clothing appropriate to the cold weather outside. There is considerable stress
as the chorus puts the finishing touches on the most important concert of the year.
8:15 a.m. The first two students who were sent to the nurse's office are transported to the hospital. The
choral instructor has been monitoring the other members of the chorus. He notices that other students are
not feeling well. Three more students are sent from the choral practice to the nurse's office. He decides to
take more breaks to get water and get off the hot stage.
8:20 a.m. The SRO tells the choral instructor to evacuate his students from the auditorium but to keep
them away from other students. The SRO notifies the county dispatcher of a possible mass
casualty situation at the high school. The school goes into a lockdown. The VACS is shut down. The
auditorium is sealed off. Inspections are made around the outside of the building and at intakes for the
ventilation system.
8:25 a.m. Nine more students are sent to see the nurse, bringing the total thus far to 15. They were
complaining of headaches. First responders and local authorities begin to arrive. A triage room is
established in the school for the members of the chorus who were feeling sick and requesting medical
assistance.
8:30 a.m. Eleven outside agencies have responded (County Sheriff’s Department, State Highway Patrol,
HAZMAT Team, County Emergency Management Director, two area Volunteer Fire Companies, two
area Ambulance Services, County Health Department, Electric and Gas Companies). The County Health
Department assumes incident command at this time and is in charge parents begin arriving at the same
time as the emergency responders. Some demand their children be released to them.
8:35 a.m. The first media briefing is held by the incident commander and the school superintendent.
Updates are scheduled for every 60 minutes.
8:40 a.m. A total of 16 more students from the chorus are complaining similar symptoms, bringing the
total number of ill students to 31. They are being transported to two local hospitals as ambulances become
available.
8:45 a.m. The County HAZMAT Team is taking air samples immediately with instantaneous results.
Nothing is being detected. Air testing continues.
153

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 3
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: Ten minutes before the first class is to begin, a phone call is received at Hopedale School. Ms.
Note, Hopedale secretary, answers the telephone. A person on the other end of the line makes a bomb
threat. The caller gives the following information to the secretary. There is a bomb set to go off in your
school at 9:00 A.M.
Secretary informs principal of the bomb threat phone call.
Principal informs the superintendent of the bomb threat and relates the details. The principal also informs
the superintendent of the fact the students are scheduled to take the math portion of the NECAP test in
the cafeteria in one hour. Principal calls together the appropriate members of the School Safety Team to
assess the threat and to quickly decide what action to take. This is the third bomb threat this semester.
H hour + 15 minutes: Law enforcement has established a perimeter around the school. Parents are calling
asking if there has been a bomb threat at the school. They are driving to the school to pick up their child.
Local media representatives are calling school representatives and law enforcement. The phone call has
been traced back to a pay phone at the convenience store located three blocks from the school.
Other facts: This is the third bomb this semester.

154

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 4
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: It is two days before the beginning of the school year, with teachers scheduled to begin
tomorrow and students the following day. A parent in your school neighborhood calls to inform you that
two of your students and their mother were murdered in their home last night. The students were very
popular and were involved in many activities both in school and the community.

This is a close knit community with neighbors often socializing at a variety of community functions.
The murders have put the neighborhood in a state of panic.
Other facts:
• The murderer has not yet been caught.
• There was a similar murder in the neighborhood a few years ago.
• At this time the police have no leads.
• This incident is receiving national attention from the news media and they are camped out around the
school.
• Parents will not let students walk to school so the cars in and out of the parking lot have become a
serious problem.
• Children are visibly upset throughout the day.
• The police are willing to do whatever we ask of them.

155

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 5
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: A half hour before lunch is to be served the sink backs up and sends sewage water all over
the food service area and into the cafeteria. The cafeteria workers refuse to serve the food because of their
fear of contamination and the smell in the cafeteria. They call their boss who tells them to leave the area
until it is cleaned up and the health inspector checks it out. The sewerage smell is beginning to drift down
the corridor into the classrooms. The custodian goes to the area and says that the water is still leaking
out and a plumber should be called. He estimates that it will take a few hours to clean up the sewage and
disinfect the area. He says that it would not be ready for the end of the day. Some of the cafeteria workers
are complaining of feeling sick to their stomachs. You are concerned about the smell that is beginning to
permeate the area.
Other facts:
• The custodian refuses to clean the area without proper safety equipment.
• This area is used as a waiting area for all bus students at the end of the day.
• Students will not be served lunch in the cafeteria and must eat elsewhere.
• The teachers' union representative reminds you of the lunch time stipulation in the contract.
• There are three classrooms opposite the cafeteria.

156

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 6
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: On Sunday you receive a call from the police saying that your school has been vandalized and
fires were set in two classrooms. Three classrooms were ransacked prior to the fires being set in the other
two. Much of the wing that housed the classrooms that were set on fire suffered smoke damage, making
the wing unusable until the smoke damage has been taken care of.
Other Facts:
• The rooms that were ransacked had NECAP tests locked-up in the file cabinets.
• The file cabinets were opened and the tests destroyed.
• You cannot get into the rooms that were set ablaze until it is declared structurally safe. There are tests in
those rooms.
• A total of eight rooms have been impacted by the smoke and/or fire in that wing.

157

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 7
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: A driver was making a delivery to the rear of your school and backed into a natural gas pipe
causing it to leak. There was no fire or explosion at this time, but the gas was leaking into the school
through some open classroom windows. The driver leaves the truck where it is and runs from the area due
to fear of explosion. The gas is leaking into the room where the students and teacher are beginning to feel
the affects from the fumes and evacuates the room. The teacher, in his state of panic, forgets to close the
door. A teacher in a nearby room begins to smell the gas and calls the office with a report. The exit door
next to the gas leak is used by several classrooms to leave the school during an evacuation of the building.
Other facts:
• Natural gas is highly explosive and you cannot make an announcement over the PA in fear that it might
cause a spark.
• Some of the students who were in the room that was first evacuated are saying they feel sick.
• The school nurse is at another building.

158

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 8
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: It is a very cold and snowy Monday when the electrical power to the school goes out. You
immediately call the electric company to be told that there was an accident and a main line
transformer has been put out of service causing a wide-spread electrical outage. The area of the
outage includes several schools and a hospital. You call the superintendent to discuss the
situation and she tells you that there are 4 elementary and 2 secondary schools that have been
affected by the outage.
Other facts:
• The superintendent is planning to dismiss all schools early due to the rapidly mounting snow.
• The building temperature is beginning to fall fairly fast because it is early on Monday and the heat is
usually turned down over the weekend.
• The busses will be running late due to the weather conditions.
• The lavatories have no emergency lights in them.
• Lunch cannot be served.
• There is no hot coffee in the teacher’s room.

159

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 9
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: It is early on Wednesday morning when you receive a call from the transportation company
telling you that one of your busses was in an accident at Main St. and Cross Rd. at the traffic light. He
tells you that the police and rescue squads have been dispatched to the scene and there is a report of very
serious injuries on the bus. What will you do now.
Other Facts:
• At the hospital you are told that one of the students has died.
• The student has a sister who also attends your school and was on the bus at the time of the accident.
She received minor injuries and will be released from the hospital tomorrow.
• The father of the deceased boy is an active member of the community and coaches his child’s soccer
team.
• There were a total of 37 students on the bus, 4 received serious, but not life threatening, injuries that
will require hospitalization of about 3 weeks. The remaining students will be released anywhere from
overnight to about 4 days.
• According to witnesses, the bus driver was at fault as she ran a stop sign and was hit by a large truck.

160

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 10
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: You just got home from chaperoning the Junior Prom when you receive a call from the police
telling you that there was a car crash involving students going home from the prom. The students have
been transported to hospital. You get to the hospital to find out that one of the students, the junior class
president has died. The driver, another student at your school, was injured, but will be okay. Unfortunately,
the driver will be charged with driving drunk, death resulting. The girl that died was very popular and
involved in lots of activities in and out of school.
Other facts:
• Her mother is a teacher at a local elementary school in your school district.
• Her father is a police officer in another city.
• She has a younger brother that attends the local junior high school.
• The driver is the son of the School Board president.
• The accident has been all over the news and there will be school on Monday.

161

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 11
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: You are the administrator in charge and your school day has just started when your secretary
says that you need to visit with Laura Crouse, a 7th grade student. Laura, who is crying, tells you that
her best friend, Beth Rey, committed suicide last night. Beth Rey is another 7th grade student at your
school. Laura lives next door to Beth, and you are told that Beth's mother found Beth in her bedroom this
morning. You send Laura to be with a counselor. Before you can do anything else, your secretary tells you
that the police department has called and an officer has been dispatched to the school to talk with you
concerning a student death.
YOU KNOW:
• Beth Rey was caught with alcohol at school yesterday and she was removed from the cheerleading
squad.
• Beth's mother has not been supportive of the school in the past.
This scenario was taken, with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

162

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 12
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: Becky Sylvester, an 11th grade student, enters the office crying hysterically. She tells you that
a man she thinks is her English teacher's husband is in the classroom waving a gun, saying he is going to
kill the teacher. Becky says that he acts drunk and keeps yelling that she (Mrs. Caster the English teacher) is
not going to divorce him. Becky says that she sits near the back of the classroom and slipped out when the
man's back was turned.
YOU KNOW:
• Mrs. Caster told you yesterday that she had filed for divorce.
• Mrs. Caster has told you that her husband can be violent and has been drinking a lot recently.
• Divorce papers were to have been served on him today.
This scenario was taken, with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

163

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 13
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: You are the classroom teacher and receive a call on the telephone/intercom from the
principal. He confirms with you that Tom Eubanks, a student, is present in your class. The principal tells
you there is a possibility that Tom may have a gun with him and may be suicidal. You are told the police
have been called. The principal tells you he will call you back shortly to let you know how the police wish
to get Tom out of your classroom. As soon as you hang up the receiver, you notice Tom staring at you.
Tom then begins to collect his belongings and announces he is not feeling well and is leaving.
YOU KNOW:
• You believe that Tom suspects the telephone conversation was about him.
• The rest of the class has taken note of the conversation but does not seem alarmed.
• Tom has a large book bag with him, which is a normal occurrence.
This scenario was taken, with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

164

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 14
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: It is about 9:30 a.m. on a warm, breezy, spring day, and you are the administrator in charge.
Your secretary calls you and says that several classroom teachers have called in via intercom indicating they
have a noxious odor in their classrooms. The teachers are reporting that multiple students are becoming
sick at their stomachs. As you end the conversation, a cafeteria worker enters the office and tells you that
there is a noxious odor in the cafeteria area. Your secretary calls again to say that several more teachers
have now called in complaining of an odor in their rooms.
YOU KNOW:
• Your school is adjacent to a highway and railroad tracks.
• You are beginning to notice an odor in your office.
This scenario was, taken with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

165

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 15
CATEGORY: Elementary
SCENARIO: You are the principal and have just arrived back at your school after a meeting across town.
As you exit your car you observe a woman you believe to be Nancy Cline leading student Sammy Cline to
a nearby car. Sammy appears to be willingly going with Ms. Cline, who is Sammy's biological mother. Ms.
Cline looks your direction and upon observing you, quickens her pace and attempts to get Sammy into a
small car.
YOU KNOW:
• Ms. Cline and her ex-husband Stanley were divorced late last year.
• Several times during the divorce the police were called to the school when she and her husband became
involved in serious disturbances.
• Mr. Cline was awarded full custody and a restraining order is currently in place forbidding contact by Ms.
Cline with Sammy.
This scenario was taken, with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

166

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 16
CATEGORY: Elementary
SCENARIO: You are the teacher in charge of 23 third-grade students on a field trip to the local Nature
Center. After spending several hours at the center you have loaded the bus for the return trip when you
discover that Maria Mendosa is not on the bus. A check of the immediate vicinity does not locate her. In
talking with the other children, student Clifford McGinnis tells you that he saw Maria go walking with a
man who was carrying a small puppy. Clifford is unable to be any more specific.
YOU KNOW:
• Maria is an ESL (English as a Second Language) student who has just recently enrolled in your school.
• No other students remember seeing Maria with a man carrying a puppy.
• Besides a parent volunteer and the bus driver, you are the only adult from the school on the field trip.
This scenario was taken, with permission, from Problem Solving Exercises written by Judy M.
Brunner and Dennis K. Lewis, available through EDU SAFE Co. Website: www.edu-safe.org

167

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 17
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: While talking to the secretary, you get a call from the cafeteria lunch server asking you to
come to the cafeteria. Upon your arrival at the cafeteria you see the lunch server standing next to a student
who has had several discipline problems during the year. The lunch server explains to you that John was
caught attempting to steal an entire lunch by walking out the in-door with a full tray of food. This was not
the first time this year that John has attempted to steal food out of the cafeteria. The other times, John
quickly pulled the money out of his pocket and paid for the lunches. You decided that this was the final
straw and suspend John for two days, with a letter home to the parent explaining the circumstances for the
suspension.
As the day draws to a close, you hear a rather loud and belligerent parent in the outer office
yelling at the secretary that he wants to see the f-----in principal. Hearing the commotion,
several teachers and a few students begin to gather near the office. At which point you come out
of the office and quietly ask him to come into your office where he can talk to you. He becomes
even more belligerent yelling that you’re not going to tell him what to do and that his son will
come to school tomorrow because the lunch lady is a crazy old bat who picks on his son. You
explain the situation to him and tell him that he will not be allowed to come to school because of
a two-day suspension. At that point he yells at you and says that we'll see who's going to be in
school tomorrow and punches you in the jaw and walks out of the building.
Other facts:
• John’s father is well known to the police.
• John always has money on him, although he doesn’t have a job that you are aware of.
• There has been a rash of thefts from students and faculty in the last few months.
• Several students and faculty members witnessed the attack.

168

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 18
CATEGORY: Secondary
SCENARIO: It was the night of a very important basketball game. Your school and the team they were
playing were tied for first place in the division and the season was almost over. You had seen this team play
before and they were rather rough on their opponents. This team came from a tougher part of the state
and because the game meant so much, had lots of supporters from their school with them. Early during
the play, you could feel the excitement and tension in the air.
It was a hard-fought game and both sides had pushing fouls called against them. At one point in the game,
when the referee called a foul against the opponents, a can of soda was thrown at the referee missing him
by a foot. The game ended with your team winning in overtime. As your team began to walk off the floor,
after the handshakes, more cans were thrown out onto the floor towards your team. Your coach did a great
job of quickly moving the team into the locker room. Several students from your school started to yell at
the other school. It quickly escalated when they started swearing and threatening each other. With that, the
two groups started to move towards each other when a shot rang out and one of your cheerleaders fell to
the floor wounded. Screaming, yelling, running and total chaos took over.
Other facts:
• The police officer on duty was in the hall watching the people leave when the shooting took place.
• A parent, who identified herself as a nurse, went to the aid of the cheerleader.
• Someone in the crowd must have called 911 as you could hear the sounds of sirens.
• Most people were panicking and running out the gym doors.
• Someone pulled the fire alarm and the sound of the alarm added to the confusion.
• At this point, you believe that there was only one person shot.

169

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 19
CATEGORY: Elementary
SCENARIO: It was a beautiful day for the students to be out at recess playing games and playing on the
jungle gym. The older students decided to have a game of softball with the students choosing fairly even
sides. The teams were made up of fourth & fifth grade students. Jim Pearson, a large fifth grade student
was batting. Jim, although big for his age, was not very athletic. Today luck was with him and he hit a
solid hit into the outfield. Jim was so excited he threw his aluminum bat and began to run towards first
base. Suddenly there was a scream and then a thump as Mary Sternum fell to the ground, blood coming
from her face. The lunch aide ran to Mary’s side pulling out a handkerchief to try and stop the bleeding.
She yelled to the students to get the school nurse.
You were in the cafeteria when several students came running in screaming and crying that Mary
Sternum was dead on the playground. She had been hit in the head with a baseball bat and was on the
ground bleeding, LOTS.
Other facts:
• The nurse was not in the building and a sixth grade student was manning the secretary’s desk, as she
is at lunch.
• You know that Mary Sternum is a petit fourth grader.
• Her little brother is in the cafeteria having lunch.
• Most of the lunch aides are senior citizens and one has a heart problem.

170

TABLE TOP EXERCISE 20
CATEGORY: Elementary or Secondary
SCENARIO: Mr. Jefferson had been teaching physical education in your school for the past 18 years
and was well known by the students. Mr. Jefferson was about 53 and somewhat overweight. That
fact, however, did not prevent him from taking an active part in his physical education classes often
demonstrating many of the skills he was teaching. Today he brought his class outside to practice some
soccer skills, demonstrating many of the skills he asked the students to learn. The class was almost over
when he collapsed on the ground and did not move. Many of the students started to panic and cry. A few
of the boys, who were scouts, ran over in an attempt to help him. One of the boys yelled for someone to
get help. A few of the students ran to the building to summon help from an adult inside.
You were walking down the corridor when your secretary called you on your walkie-talkie. She told you
what happened and that she had called 911. You hurried out to the field to render assistance. When
you got to the scene Mr. Jefferson was on the ground not responding at all. The EMT's arrived within a
matter of three minutes and took over.
Other facts:
• Mr. Jefferson had no life signs in the ambulance, even though the paramedics tried many things to
revive him.
• About a half hour after you arrived at the hospital, a doctor came out and informed you that Mr.
Jefferson was just pronounced dead. That was at 10:30 am.
• Mr. Jeffersons family had not yet arrived at the hospital.
• Mrs. Jefferson taught fifth grade in a neighboring school system.
• The Jefferson’s had a daughter who had just started her first year of college out of state.
• There were about 30 students in Mr. Jefferson’s class when he collapsed.
• Mr. Jefferson coached the high school football team.

171