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INTRODUCTION

Problem solving is a key skill which can help you


succeed. Problems or obstacles occur all the time,
and it is important that you can provide quick and
imaginative solutions to them. Being able to solve
problem displays both logical and creative thinking.
Applying this to problem solving in mathematics,
there are multiple strategies students can apply,
many of which can be specifically taught, practiced,
and applied.
Problem solving is the most difficult one to be
taught in the sense that this would need first, reading
skill of the pupils and secondly, comprehension level
of the pupils. So, this is a very big challenge for all the

teachers. We teachers should find a way to make


lessons in math be easily understood by the pupils so
that they will learn to love and excited always in
coming to math classes.
Problem solving maps are very useful to us
teachers. It is a privilege learning this technique or
strategy for this would help us makes lessons in math
be taught easily and pupils be able to comprehend
well the concept for the steps are clearly illustrated to
the learners.

Schedule for Problem Solving Maps workshop

Starts

Ends

Activity

Wikispaces page

Supporting
Information
Module 1. Introduction

Jan 27th

Jan 29th

Introduce yourself

Introduce yourself

Read the course objectives

Home

Learning about wikis

Wikis in plain English

Basic Technology

Learn how to use Equation Editor

Equation Editor

Basic Technology

Learn how to insert pages and files in


Wikispaces

Creating a new
page/uploading file

Basic Technology

Home

If you have any general question, post


them in the Discussion Board
Module 2: What is the problem with math education?

Jan 30st
Jan 31st

Lecture: Finding the best practices:


advantages and disadvantages
Discussion: What is your experience with
teaching math?

Workbook

Module 3. The direction of the solution

Math Learning Problems


Math Learning Problems

Feb 3rd

Lecture: A model based on thinking skills


Feb 5st

Workbook

Basic thinking skills


Basic thinking skills

Discussion: What generic thinking abilities


are needed to be successful in math?
Module 4: The Example-Conclusion Graph

Feb 6th

Feb 12th

Lecture: Problem Solving Map: Example- Workbook


conclusion graph

Example-Conclusion Graph Discussion

Discussion: Example-Conclusion graph

Example-Conclusion Graph Discussion

Upload your Example-Conclusion graph

Projects: Example-Conclusion Graph

Provide feedback to your team members

Projects: Example-Conclusion Graph

Module 5: The Multi-rule Branch


Feb 13th

Lecture: Problem Solving Map: Multi-rule


Branch

Feb 19th

Workbook

Multi-Rule Branch Discussion

Discussion: Multi-rule branch questions

Multi-Rule Branch Discussion

Upload your Multi-rule Branch

Projects: Multi-Rule Branch

Provide feedback to your team members

Projects: Multi-Rule Branch

Module 6: The Math Breaker


Feb 20th

Lecture: Problem Solving Map: Math


Breaker

Workbook

Math Breaker Discussion

Feb 26th

Discussion: Math Breaker questions

Math Breaker Discussion

Upload your Math Breaker

Project: Math Breaker

Provide feedback to your team members

Project: Math Breaker

Module 7: Implementing PSM in the classroom


Feb 27th

Feb 28th

Discussion: Implementing the Problem


Solving Maps in the classroom

Implementing PSM in the classroom

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
National Capital Region
DIVISION OF CITY SCHOOLS-VALENZUELA
Pio Valenzuela St., Marulas
Valenzuela City

ONLINE MATH TRAINING-WORKSHOP FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY TEACHERS

ELEMENTARY
Name

School

USERNAME

1.Marlyn G. Carduce
2. Leilani V. Santos
3. Jenny Lyn F. Racpan
4. Leticia T. Sison
5. Marilyn C. Resurreccion

Constantino ES
Silvestre Lazaro ES
Paltok ES
Doa Ata ES
Tugatog ES

marlyncarduce15
leisan74

GROUP 2
6. Leslie J. Acua
7. Jasmin DS. Austria
8. Marichu E. Eyo
9. Shirley C. Ilagan
10. Maribeth L. Fulo
11. Mary Anne M. Escarcha
GROUP 3
12. Liezel G. Salac
13. Veronica M. Rollon
14. Romel B. Gatila

GROUP 1

Grade Level

E-mail

Contact Number

marilyn resurreccion

I
II
II
III
III

marlyn_carduce@yahoo.com
leisan74@yahoo.com
jhennyfranco@yahoo.com
sison_lettycharm@yahoo.com
mc_resurreccion7@yahoo.com

09156994148
09199635214
09322993149
09267344293
09192131361

Apolonia F. Rafael ES
Rincon ES
Sitio Sto.Rosario ES
Gen.T. De Leon ES
P.R. Sandiego ES
s. a. De guzmsn es

marichueyo
shirleyilagan
beth
escarcha_maryanne

III
III
IV
IV
IV
IV

diodina.acua@yahoo.com
09255250413
jasminaustria41@yahoo.com
0932963992
chizzykeso01@yahoo.com
09107510689
ilagan_s@ymail.com09327459984/09154910328
maribethfulo36@yahoo.com
09257021175
terencetimothy09@gmail.com 09093670351

Canumay West ES
Roberta De Jesus ES
Parada ES

miche17
veronica_rollon0203
Rbg2680

IV
IV
V

liezelsalac@ymail.com

09167979292

veronicarollon@yahoo.com 09055112519/09328925606

rbg2680@yahoo.com

09063499843

15. Sheena Mae I. Aquino


16. Paolo R. Alarde

Malinta ES
Serrano ES

GROUP 4
17. Rose-Marie I. Valcoba
18. Madeline DC. Pajarillaga
19. Efren M. Soriano
20. Michael John H. Aquino
21. Randolph P. Rodriguez

sheinaquino
paoloalarde23

V
V

sheinaquino@gmail.com
paoloalarde23@yahoo.com

09228851298
09183979835

Canumay East ES
rosevalcoba
Dalandanan ES
madiepajarillaga
Punturin I ES
efrensoriano
San Miguel Heights ES khel0909
Pasolo ES
randolphrodriguez

V
V
V
V
V

rvalcoba@rocketmail.com
mdcpajarillaga@yahoo.com
efrensoriano70@yahoo.com
khel0909@yahoo.com
randolph_1307@yahoo.com

09421674148
09168460177
09434676484
09273776793
09293871068

GROUP 5
22. Christopher M. Saremo
23. Ryan G. Feliciano
24. Lucila L. Legaspi
25. Edison B. Antonio
26. Teofilo R. Tantay Jr.

Paso De Blas ES
Andres Fernando ES
Isla ES
MES-Pinalagad Annex
Punturin ES

V
VI
VI
VI
VI

echingsaremo@yahoo.com
felicianoryang@yah00.com
lmlegaspi_1970@yahoo.com
Edlen37@yahoo.com
teofilotantay

09999968837
09325240987
09175236234
09062341173
09161390400

GROUP 6
27. Mary Jane L. Dela Cruz
28. Gladys F. Bartolome
29. Elsa T. Bobes
30. Raymond T. Morales
31. Jenny R. Alfaro
32. Maria Cecilia Z. Data

Maysan ES
Arcadio F. Deato ES
Pio Valenzuela ES
Marulas ES
Wawang Pulo ES
Andres Mariano ES

VI
VI
VI
VI
VI
VI

janedelacruz777@yahoo.com
gladysbartolome33@yahoo.com
elsbobes@yahoo.com
rhey_mhore@yahoo.com
jennyalfaro18@yahoo.com
cecille.data@yahoo.com

09179850658
09323279918
09178137771
09053350900
09328850418
09999370702

GROUP 7
33. Juliana P. Ocsona
34. Arlene M. Bautista
35. Jocelyn P. Yumul
36. Renalyn T. Ramirez
37. Joy C. Dela Rosa
38. Nicanor M. Cuerpo

Bitik ES
Caruhatan East ES
Lingunan ES
Lawang Bato ES
Tagalag ES
Coloong ES

julieocsona
arl.lhen
jocelynyumul
RenalynRamirez
dyjoy

VI
VI
VI
VI
VI
VI

ocsonajulie@yahoo.com
arl.lhen@yahoo.com
joyumul611@yahoo.com
dyjoy21@yahoo.com
apollo13_dazh@yahoo.com

09262637090
09999986413
09099983991
09085611056
09196655227
09333172290

SECONDARY
GROUP 8
39. Hilda A. Galicia
40. Eleuterio R. Flores JR.

Valenzuela NHS
Parada NHS

dhang_galicia
eleuterio36

ahha_dhang@yahoo.com
jingflores12@yahoo.com

09228793084
09477925441

christophersaremo
ryangfeliciano
Charm3
TeofiloTantayJr

gladys bartolome
elsbobes
raymondmorales
jennya.

Grade 7
Grade 7

renalyn_ramirez291@yahoo.com

41. Dioscorro G. Lumogdang III DNHS-Bagbaguin Annex


42. EDELYN MADRONIO
Lawang Bato NHS
edelynmadronio
43. Verginia B. Leonin
Maysan NHS
verginialeonin
Araceli Catiis
aracelicatiis

Grade 7 & 4th


Grade 8
grade 8

chad_nica@yahoo.com
blueagle_26@yahoo.com
cjseven5586@yahoo.com

09332989289
09234851815
09165259231

3rd
3rd
3rd
3rd
3rd
3rd

gerwaynepalomar@yahoo.com
conniepie_sison@yahoo.com
jciple_26@yahoo.com
annebanc2005@yahoo.com
delino18@yahoo.com
roxanne040685@gmail.com

09324274767
09234952262
09058687700
09228982709
09228204843
09258515816
09156611838
09094140696
09182028959
09175253574
09159702316
09325881547
09198444493

GROUP 9
44. Gerwayne M. Palomar
45. Maria Concepcion T. Sison
46. Jaycee R. Oco
47. Rachelle Anne Alejo Baez
48. Christopher J. Delino
49. Roxanne P. Delos Santos

Caruhatan NHS
Arkong Bato NHS
Gen. T. De Leon NHS
Dalandanan NHS
Canumay East NHS
Canumay NHS

gerwaynepalomar
connie_sison
ocojaycee
RachelleAnneBanez
ChristopherDelino
roxannepdelossantos

GROUP 10
50. Silverio M. Agustin
51. Norman A. Panelo
52. Midjet V. Barbosa
53. Randy V. Dela Vega
54. Roel M. Rocero
55. Roderick D. De Leon
56. Odelon B. Penaflorida

Val City Science HS


Bignay NHS
S. Francisco Mem. NHS
Polo NHS
V. P. Trinidad HS
Malinta National HS
Wawangpulo NHS

agustinsilverio05

3rd & 4th


4th
Midjet Velayo-Barbosa 4th
delavegarandy
4th
rmrocero
3rd & 4th
ricdeleon
4th year
odie1122
Grade 7 and 4th year

agustinsilverio05@gmail.com
pbunsamin@yahoo.com.ph
midjet_barbosa@yahoo.com
delavegarandy@yahoo.com
roelmrocero@yahoo.com
keridor8866@yahoo.com
odie_1122@yahoo.com

Math Supervisor
Elementary Principal

vickytafalla
norlita_nato_santos

vickytafalla@yahoo.com
norl2003@yahoo.com

57. Mrs. Victoria C. Tafalla


58. Mrs. Norlita Santos
59. Regina Gomas

Why do you think students performance in math is so


low?
The students performance may be so low for the
fact maybe they dont
have the positive outlook about the subject. They
have the negative impression on math lessons. One
more thing maybe the way teacher deliver the lesson.
The approach or strategy being used maybe not
suitable to the group of students. It may be too difficult
for the students to understand.
Therefore, students performance in math
because of the following factors:
- Teacher factor
- Student factor

Where are most efforts being focused?


Most efforts are designed to improve the teaching
of individual content.

o Best way to teach fractions?


o Best way to teach decimals?
o Best way to teach functions?
o Best way to teach equations?
o New curriculum, new books, new ways to
evaluate, new..

What is challenging about this approach?


The methods used by students to learn one topic
may not transfer to a different topic.
Continuous changes in the teaching approaches.
It requires a lot of effort from teachers and
administrators
Math education is fragmented.

An ideal math learning process would.


1. Be easily incorporated into the existing
curriculum
2. Teach pupils tools that are transferable
3. Be effective
4. Allow teachers to teach a variety
5. Not require an enormous amount of training

How to find such a learning method?


1. We can learn from good pupils
2. They do well regardless of the topic
3. The grade
4. The teacher
5. They have a generic process to solve problems
What is the consequence of this thinking based
model?
1. The main purpose of teaching math is to teach
children how to think
2. Since thinking is not learned by only listening,
teachers must become facilitators!

.
Finding the common set of thinking skills

1. While there are many skills that are necessary to


learn math effectively, we need to focus on the
ones that cover a significant number of topics
2. The working hypothesis is that the necessary
skills evolve as students make progress within a
given topic
3. So first we need to determine how math
knowledge is built.

Hierarchy of math knowledge


1. Factual / terminology
2. Simple rules
3. Multi-rule problems
4. Application problems
Structured
Semi structured

A proposed set of necessary thinking skills pupils can


do are the following:
1. Memorization
2. Inductive reasoning
3. Deductive reasoning
4. Breaking down problems
5. Analyzing

The relationship between the hierarchy of math


knowledge and their required thinking skills
1. Factual / Terminology
Memorization
2. Simple Rules
reasoning )

Finding patterns ( inductive

3. Multi-rule problems
Applying generic rules
to specific steps ( deductive reasoning)
4. Application problems
Breaking down
problems into smaller problems

How information is presented matters!


- Discuss some of the problems associated with
presenting math problems in the traditional
approach?

The way the lesson is presented affects the learning


of the pupils. When traditionalists insist that its most
important for kids to know their math facts, we might
respond not only by challenging those priorities but by
asking what is meant by know. The key question is
whether understanding is passively absorbed or actively
constructed. In the latter case, math actually becomes a
creative activity. Once the subject is defined this way,
there isnt much mystery as to what technique will be
used. When the process of learning in arithmetic is
conceived

to be the mere acquisition of isolated,

independent facts, the process of teaching becomes that


of administering drill. You do one problem after another
until youve got it down cold. It may make you dread the
whole subject (and avoid it whenever possible), but thats

the way it has to be done. Moreover, doing math is pretty


much the same in a high-school algebra lesson as it is in a
first-grade addition lesson.

The teacher begins by

demonstrating the right way to do a problem, then assigns


umpteen examples of the same problem (except with
different numbers), the idea being for students to imitate
the method they were shown, with the teacher correcting
their efforts as necessary.
If students have trouble producing the right answer, that is
taken as evidence only of the need of further drill. This,
as weve seen, is exactly how the failure of direct phonics
instruction is explained away: the more it doesnt work,
the more you obviously need it. And, also like traditional
ways of teaching children to read, most math classrooms
are predicated on the transmission model: students are
simply given facts and procedures by the teacher and the
textbook. Math textbooks, in fact, are often regarded
by student and teacher alike as the source of Truth a
cryptic but authoritative document -- such that everyones
job is to figure out what it wants you to do.

The ABC model


Information must be broken down to make it
easier to absorb
But at the same time it has to be connected to
make sense as a big picture
So Analyze
Breakdown
Connect
The guiding principle is to present the thinking
skills as a set of connected chunks of information
Thinking skills

ABC Model

PROBLEM SOLVING MAPS


ABC
ModelThink
ing skills

Thinking skills and their corresponding problem


solving map
Thinking skills
Finding patterns
(inductive reasoning)
Applying generic rules to
specific steps (deductive
reasoning)
Breaking down problems

Problem solving map


Example-Conclusion
graph
Multi-rule branch

Math Breaker

RAYMOND T. MORALES
MARULAS CENTRAL SCHOOL
GRADE 6 TEACHER

EXAMPLE-CONCLUSION GRAPH
Volume of Rectangular Prism
Example 1

9 cm

V = Bh
= lwh
= 5 cm x 3 cm x
9 cm

V = 135 cm3
3 cm

5 cm

Example 2

Conclusion

4 dm
2 dm

11 dm
V = Bh
= lwh
= 11 dm x 2 dm x 4 dm

The volume of a
rectangular prism is equal to
the product of the area of the
base (B) and its height (h).

V = 88 dm3

Example 3
A garden plot is 12 m by 16 m.
If it is to be raised by 0.5 m of
soil, how many cubic meter of
soil is needed?
V = Bh
V = lwh
= 12 m x 16 m x 0.6 m

V = 96 m3

Your Example

RAYMOND T. MORALES
MARULAS CENTRAL SCHOOL
GRADE 6 TEACHER

MATH BREAKER
Solving Word Problems Involving
Measurement of surface Area

Problem: A fish tank is 55 cm long, 20 cm wide and 18 cm high.


What is the surface area of the fish tank?

What is the surface area of the fish tank?


SA = 2lh + 2hw + 2lw
SA = 1980 cm2 + 720 cm2 + 2200 cm2
SA = 3800 cm2

What is the area of the lateral


faces (front & back faces) of the
tank?

What is the area of the lateral


faces (left & right) of the tank?

What is the area of the bases (top


& bottom) of the tank?

A = 990 cm2 + 990 cm2

A = 360 cm2 + 360 cm2

A = 1100 cm2 + 1100 cm2

A = 1980 cm

A = 720 cm

A = 2200 cm2

What is the area


of the front
face?

What is the area


of the back?

What is the area


of the right face?

What is the area


of the left face?

What is the area


of the top?

What is the area


of the bottom?

A= lh
A= 55 cm x
18 cm
A= 990 cm2

A= lh
A= 55 cm x
18 cm
A= 990 cm2

A= wh
A= 20 cm x
18 cm
A= 360 cm2

A= wh
A= 20 cm x
18 cm
A= 360 cm2

A= lw
A= 55 cm x
20 cm
A= 1100 cm2

A= lw
A= 55 cm x
20 cm
A= 1100 cm2

RAYMOND T. MORALES
MARULAS CENTRAL SCHOOL
GRADE 6 TEACHER

MULTI RULE BRANCH


SURFACE AREA OF CYLINDER
Find the surface area.
r = 10 cm
h = 15 cm

SA = 2r2 + 2rh

SA = 2r2 + 2rh
= 2(3.14) (10cm)2 +
2(3.14)(10cm)(15 cm)

SA = 2(3.14) (10cm) +
2(3.14)(10cm)(15 cm)

SA = 628 cm2 + 2442 cm

SA = 3070 cm3

Formula of the
surface area of a
cylinder

Area of the bases

Area of the
lateral face

Sum of the areas


of the faces