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PICTON HIGH SCHOOL

Preliminary MATHEMATICS
Investigative Assessment
Due Date: Friday Term 3 Week 2 2015

Assessment Name: Investigation of Trigonometry and


Calculus
Weighting: 20%

Grade: A-E (30 marks)

SYLLABUS OUTCOMES TO BE ASSESSED:


P1 demonstrates confidence in using mathematics to obtain realistic solutions to problems
P2 provides reasoning to support conclusions which are appropriate to the context
P4 chooses and applies appropriate arithmetic, algebraic, graphical, trigonometric and geometric techniques
P8 understands and uses the language and notation of calculus

DIRECTIVES TO BE ASSESSED:
Collect, Measure, Outline, Apply, Calculate, Analyse

TEXT TYPE:
Report

TASK DESCRIPTION:
SECTION 1: MEASURING WHAT YOU CANNOT SEE ( 15% OF OVERALL ASSESSMENT)
In this assessment you will have the opportunity to investigate a problem associated with non-right angle triangle
trigonometry. You can work in a group to investigate but must produce your own report.
A completed investigation report should include:

an introduction that outlines the problem to be explored

the method required to find a solution, in terms of the mathematical model or strategy to be used

the appropriate application of the mathematical model or strategy, including


the generation or collection of relevant data and/or information, with details of the process of collection
mathematical calculations and results, and appropriate representations
the analysis and interpretation of results

reference to the limitations of the original problem

a statement of the results and conclusions in the context of the original problem

1. INTRODUCTION
In this assessment you are to calculate the distance and bearing between two landmarks on the school site. The line
of sight view between the landmarks is blocked by one of the school buildings. Using appropriate equipment, relevant
measurements of both distance and (true North) bearings will be taken from a reference point from which both
landmarks are visible. The landmarks and the reference point form the vertices of a triangle, allowing for use of nonright triangle trigonometric formulae in determining distances and/or angles. The measurements obtained from this
triangle will then be compared with benchmark values obtained from a triangle using the same landmarks, but a
different reference point.

2. DEVELOPING A MODEL (METHOD)


You will find the distance between the TLS (A) and the I block gates (B) (near the lockers). Sketch the relevant
landmarks you will focus on and the surrounding (a map of the school may be handy). Before any calculations are
done, you need to do three things:

a)

Find a reference point C which is in line of sight with both A and B and is south of the line AB

b)

From C measure the distances to both A and B. Record these distances on the sketch.

c)

From C measure the true bearings of both A and B from C. Mark these on the sketch.

3. MATHEMATICAL CALCULATIONS: PART A


Using your true bearing measurements and distances calculate the distance of AB. Find the bearing of A from B.
Show all steps and working clearly.

4. MATHEMATICAL CALCULATIONS: PART B


In this part you are required to calculate a second value for the distance AB using benchmark data obtained using a
reference point north of the line AB. A surveyor located such a point (which we refer to as D). This point, like the
first reference point C, is in line of sight from both A and B (you should walk around to see for yourself that there are
many places that could have been chosen as D).

Use the benchmark data to accurately determine point D on the diagram. Find the bearing of A from D. Show all
steps and working clearly.
The following data was obtained by the surveyor:

Benchmark Data
Distance BD

= 46.4 metres

Distance AD

= 38.9 metres

True bearing of A from D

= 070

True bearing of B from D

= 168

5. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS

a) Discuss: MEASUREMENTS

Reliability, suitability, accuracy of the measuring equipment used. Would alternative apparatus
have produced better results?

What other methods using technology could be used to obtain measurements?

Measuring techniques used. How might better data have been obtained? How accurate were
the measured distances/angles?

Suitability of the location of reference point C. Did the location really matter?

b) Discuss: CALCULATIONS

Reliability of your calculations (distances and angles/bearings). Do the values obtained seem
reasonable?

How does the Accuracy of the measurements made affect the final results?

c) Discuss: CONJECTURES and POSSIBLE EXTENSIONS

What does calculating measurements from different points achieve?

Describe the range of possible locations of Point D (not only the point described, but at any
location south of the line AB). Was the benchmark location as good as any other point?
Explain.

Discuss the feasibility of determining the distance between the TLS and I block.

6. CONCLUSION
Write a brief conclusion that addresses how this task has enhanced your understanding of the practical
applications of trigonometry, accuracy and its limitations.
SECTION 2: RESEARCH THE BEGINNINGS OF CALCULUS ( 5% OF OVERALL ASSESSMENT)
Research Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton.
Answer the following questions.

When were they born


Where were they born
Name three things each was noted for
What was their contribution to the development of calculus
Compare and contrast their methods.

Answers should be clear and concise. Limit ONE A4 page.


You must include a bibliography and Harvard System referencing.
For referencing details: http://sydney.edu.au/library/subjects/downloads/citation/Harvard_Complete.pdf

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
You will be assessed on your ability to:

understand mathematical concepts and relationships, making use of electronic technology where appropriate to aid and
enhance understanding

identify, collect, and organise mathematical information relevant to investigating and finding solutions to
questions/problems taken from social, scientific, economic, or historical contexts

recognise and apply the mathematical techniques needed when analysing and finding a solution to a question/problem in
context

interpret results, draw conclusions, and reflect on the reasonableness of these in the context of the question/problem

communicate mathematical reasoning and ideas, using appropriate language and representations

Assessment Policy This is only a brief outline, you must check your assessment booklet for further details.
Assessment tasks must be submitted on the due date. A zero mark will be awarded for work submitted late. If you know that
you will be absent on the day of an assessment task, and have a valid reason, eg. compulsory work placement, representative
sport, you must advise your teacher, IN WRITING, before the task is due. If the absence is unexpected due to illness, a doctors
certificate will be required. Other absences due to exceptional circumstances may be deemed acceptable by the principal.
Where an absence is considered justified, your teacher, in consultation with the Head Teacher, may decide
a) to let you do the task at the first opportunity when you return or
b) to give you an alternative task or
c) to give you an estimate based on your performance in similar tasks.
* Students who are absent due to participation in school representational activities must follow the above procedures or risk a
zero mark.

CHECKLIST:
Use this checklist to make sure that you have included all elements of the assignment:
SECTION 1:

an introduction that outlines the problem

a diagram/map with appropriate measurements and notation

detailed generation or collection of relevant data and/or information, with details of the process of collection (photos
as supporting evidence may be included)

mathematical calculations and results, and appropriate representations

the analysis and interpretation of results

reference to the limitations of the original problem

a statement of the results and conclusions in the context of the original problem

SECTION 2:

When were they born

Where were they born

Name three things each was noted for

What was their contribution to the development of calculus

Compare and contrast their methods

ASSESSMENT MARKING CRITERIA


Criteria SECTION 1: Measuring what you cannot see

Grade

Exhibits extensive knowledge of the content and skills appropriate to obtain realistic solutions to
problems
Uses sophisticated multi-step reasoning
Exhibits excellent problem solving skills and selects appropriate mathematical techniques to find
solutions to complex problems
Communicates effectively using appropriate mathematical language, notation, diagrams and graphs
Exhibits sound knowledge of the content and skills appropriate to obtain realistic solutions to
problems
Uses multi-step logical reasoning in both numerical and theoretical contexts
Exhibits a wide range of problem solving skills and selects appropriate mathematical techniques to
find mostly correct solutions to unfamiliar problems.
Communicates effectively using mathematical language, notation, diagrams, and graphs
Exhibits the manipulative skills and knowledge base appropriate to obtain realistic solutions to
problems
Uses logical reasoning in both numerical and theoretical contexts
Identifies appropriate approaches to the solution of problems and answers routine problems
mostly correct.
Communicates using mathematical language, notation, diagrams and graphs
Exhibits basic knowledge of the content and skills appropriate to obtain realistic solutions to
problems
Attempts to interpret problems and partly selects appropriate mathematical techniques to solve
simple problems, generally incorrect

Communicates using some mathematical language and notation

Exhibits limited understanding of the content and skills appropriate to obtain realistic solutions to
problems
Limited or no reasoning
Approach to problem solving is limited, with little to no accuracy
Recalls some language or notation

A
13-15

B
10-12

C
7-9

D
4-6

E
0-3

ASSESSMENT MARKING CRITERIA


Criteria Part 2: Research of Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton

Grade

Exhibits an extensive understanding and efficiently uses the language and notion of calculus
Highly effective communication of key ideas and reasoning using appropriate mathematical
language to support conclusions
All work suitably referenced

A
13-15

Exhibits well developed understanding and correctly uses the language and notion of calculus
Effective communication of key ideas and reasoning using appropriate mathematical language to
support conclusions
All work suitably referenced

B
10-12

Exhibits sound understanding and uses mostly correct language and notion of calculus
Appropriate communication of key ideas and reasoning using appropriate mathematical language
to support conclusions
All work referenced, mostly correct

C
7-9

Exhibits basic understanding and uses some language and notion of calculus
Some appropriate communication of key ideas and reasoning using some mathematical language to
support conclusions
Some work referenced

D
4-6

Exhibits limited understanding and uses minimal language and notion of calculus
Attempted communication of key ideas and reasoning using some mathematical language to
support conclusions
No work referenced

E
0-3