You are on page 1of 74

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

EXPLORING CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING


CURRICULUM
BY
ALICIA BAGLEY

A CAPSTONE PROJECT PROPOSAL PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE


ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AUGUST 2015

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

2015 Alicia Bagley

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank all of my professors for their help during this journey. Thank you
Elizabeth Delacruz and Michelle Tillander for guiding me along the way. I would also
like to thank my friends and family for their support and Dale Cobler for helping me with
it all.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

ABSTRACT OF CAPSTONE PROJECT PRESENTED TO THE COLLE OF THE


ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIA IN PARTIAL FULLFULLLMENT OF THE
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS

EXPLORING CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING


CURRICULUM
By
Alicia Bagley
August 2015
Chair: Elizabeth Delacruz
Committee Member: Michelle Tillander
Major: Art Education
Abstract
This study examines how as a secondary art educator, I might engage contemporary
social issues into an advanced high school drawing class to transmit change. The data
obtained through my research consists of examination and analysis of resources on
contemporary drawing methods and artists, contemporary activist artists, and selected art
museums. This data was then applied to create a curated archive of resources and
teaching materials found on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/u/alicia-bagley-1), Delicious
(https://delicious.com/bagleya2), Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/abagley0619/) and
on a professional webpage (http://aliciabagley.weebly.com/exploring-contemporaryissues.html). Findings from the research have allowed me to establish a curriculum art
unit to be implemented in future drawing courses. My curriculum unit plan was shared
with peer art teachers for their review and their advice was used to improve the unit plan.
This Capstone paper describes my research process, findings, and recommendations. First

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


I describe the problem at hand and the goals of my study. Questions were created to help
assist in the process. My literature review and my researched methodology are discussed
next. Following this information is my findings from the study and finally, I share my
recommendations. My recommendations include an art curriculum unit plan that will
engage contemporary drawing methods to help promote awareness on issues and engage
my high school students to become engaged citizens.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Table of Contents

Title Page.............................................................................................................................1
UF Copyright Page..............................................................................................................2
Acknowledgments...............................................................................................................3
UF Formatted Abstract........................................................................................................4
Table of Contents.................................................................................................................6
Introduction..........................................................................................................................8
Statement of the Problem.........................................................................................8
Purpose and Goals of the Study...............................................................................9
Research Questions................................................................................................10
Significance of the Study.......................................................................................10
Assumptions...........................................................................................................11
Limitations.............................................................................................................11
Definition of Terms................................................................................................11
Literature Review..............................................................................................................12
Methodology......................................................................................................................20
Peer Reviewers......................................................................................................22
Research Site.........................................................................................................22
Data Collection Procedures and Instrumentation..................................................22
Data Analysis Procedures......................................................................................23
Findings.............................................................................................................................24

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

First Finding: Ways to Explore Contemporary Social Issues................................25


Second Finding: Learning What Should be Explored...........................................27
Third Finding: Activist Artists and Their Art.........................................................29
Summary Across Findings.....................................................................................33
Discussion and Conclusion................................................................................................34
Interpretation of Findings......................................................................................34
Significance, Implications, and Recommendations...............................................35
Conclusion.............................................................................................................36
References..........................................................................................................................37
Appendix A........................................................................................................................41
Appendix B........................................................................................................................47
Appendix C........................................................................................................................58
Appendix D........................................................................................................................59
Appendix E........................................................................................................................60
Appendix F........................................................................................................................63
Appendix G........................................................................................................................68
List of Figures with Figure Captions.................................................................................70
Author Biography..............................................................................................................71

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Throughout my time at the University of Florida, Ive had one professor that
inquired as to what it is from my lessons that leaves a lasting impression? That same
professor later asked the class if your students remembered anything about your course
what would it be? These questions compelled me to think deeper about the subject
matter and how I teach my students. Yes, my students enjoy my art class and learn a lot
about artistic styles or techniques but what else? Does my drawing content provide
students with opportunities to challenge the way they think? Does it prepare them for a
real world? Does the art taught open new perspectives? Sadly it does not. Simply put, my
curriculum provides students a chance to problem solve using creativity and artistic
techniques. This realization led me to my Capstone Project. My Capstone Project has
allowed me to investigate how I can effectively incorporate contemporary social issues
into a unit of study in drawing for my high school Drawing II students.
Statement of the Problem
Gude suggests that art educators have the ability to foster student participation in
democratic society (2009). It is the responsibility of educators to provide students with
the ability to experience the pleasures, anxieties, and responsibilities of democratic life
(Gude, 2009, p. 8). Gude also observes that many art teachers often teach art the way they
were taught in school (2000). I have always taught students in a studio format based
purely on different drawing techniques, which is how I learned. I have realized that a
high school art curriculum should present students with greater abilities than learning
mediums and art making skills. Art classes should provide opportunities that better the
students skills and mind. As a teacher in a developing community and a diverse nation, I
believe my curriculum should interest students in being a part of the democratic society.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

This ideal has left me with a dilemma; I have not had a chance to study how foster and
promote conditions for development of engagement. Further, I was not familiar with how
to teach such a lesson.
Purpose and Goals of the Study
The purpose of this study is to develop a way to create a beneficial drawing
curriculum that will be more meaningful while at the same time exploring contemporary
social issues that students face on a daily basis. Students that I work with in the past are
not prone to talk about various social issues in society and the local community. Many
pupils gather their knowledge through second-hand sources, social networking, and
through peer persuasion. Adolescents are developing tremendously at this age; they are
easily influenced and are going through a tough part of their school life. Teaching
contemporary social issues through drawing in the secondary art room will provide
students with an opportunity to explore various matters in a safe environment while
creating a more grounded understanding of their society. My goal is to establish a
drawing curriculum unit that will incorporate contemporary social issues and offer
students an activity to express their self in a secondary art environment through activist
art. Through research I built upon my knowledge of curriculum development. I also want
to deepen my understanding of contemporary art and issues prevalent to todays society.
Also through my research and resulting curriculum I allow students a chance to develop
conscious awareness of the issues of interest and the many ways art (drawing) can
negotiate the human experiences.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

10

Research Questions
Reflecting on my art curriculum and current teaching practices has led me to
investigate a new curriculum unit that is relevant to the students needs. This unit of study
will focus primarily on contemporary social issues and engage students in activist art.
The following research questions guided my investigation:
1.

How can contemporary social issues be explored in a high school drawing course?

2.

Why should contemporary social issues be addressed in the art curriculum?

3.

What contemporary social issues could be addressed in the high school drawing
class?

4.

How do contemporary artists address contemporary social issues in their drawings


and paintings?
Significance of the Study
Researching contemporary social issues alone will not provide justice and clear
understanding to societies needs as well as incorporating it with art can. My findings
indicate that incorporating contemporary activist art on relevant issues to my high school
students will enable them to learn and become better citizens to their community and
society. Introducing contemporary artists, contemporary social issues, and research into
my art classroom will allow students to use critical and creative thinking skills learned
from previous classes on a new level while becoming more engaged on their own beliefs.
This incorporation will also heightened student awareness on matters occurring in
society.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

11

Assumptions
In my research I assumed that I would find many resources available on
contemporary social issues and on activist art lessons plans. I also speculated that
creating a work of art based on an issue would prepare students to become more engaged
citizens of society. Students would be allowed to convey their thoughts in an engaging
manner through their artworks. Lastly I considered those contemporary artists who create
activist works of art would be abundant and guide me in my research.
Limitations
The time frame of completing my Capstone Project has limited my study and the
examination of the curriculum unit. Due to completing my research during the summer
semester I was not able to implement the unit to establish what works sufficiently and
what should be adjusted. This limitation also prohibits me from knowing if the lesson in
deed would create a lasting impact on my students. In addition finding contemporary
artists and addressing issues that are not overtly controversial was a minor limitation.
Working in a public school district discourages me from touching on certain issues that
are deemed to controversial as well as showing particular artists.
Definition of Terms
Activist art. Any form of art that is created and draws attention to a particular
injustice and in one way or another encourages others to take part as active observers
(Whittaker, 1992).
Contemporary art. Contemporary art is a range of art and practices in different
styles and media dating from the recent past to the present (The J. Paul Getty Trust online
dictionary, 2000).

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

12

Contemporary Issues. This term relates to any issue that is relevant to the
present time (Whittaker, 1992).
Social Issues. This term refers to problems that occur in the world that involve
people or groups of people in society that deem it as being undesirable. (Whittaker,
1992).
Literature Review
Visual arts are a vital part of the curriculum, but a curriculum founded on
primarily artistic techniques is not enough. The development of intellect with a heavy
emphasis on skill has been the main purpose of art education for some time now (Foshay,
1998). Art education can do more than just allow opportunities for learning new art
techniques; it can promote change. An art curriculum taught with an approach to
contemporary social issues provides an outlet for students to contribute to social life and
have the opportunity to learn through art. A democratic art education approach can make
a lasting difference in student learning. Contemporary social issues addressed in art
lessons allow the teachers to extend past technical quality. Education is, by its very
nature, an agent in the development and maintenance of social beliefs, behaviors, and
values (Hicks, 1994, p. 49). Addressing contemporary social issues in the art curriculum
can help establish links between local communities, national concerns, and political
concerns. An established curriculum permits students to learn, experience, and become a
link to civil society (Delacruz, 2005). This sort of curriculum can also reveal
complexities, diversities, and reconstruct belief (Freedman, 2000).
A developed art curriculum with the inclusion of contemporary social issues
permits teachers to view how students construct meaning and personal beliefs.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

13

Contemporary social issues in art can initiate deeper conversations about critical topics. It
will grant the students to explore their world, get to know themselves, understand the
relationships, and become better human beings (Albers, 1999). An established program
can help develop a connection that provides a developed capacity of self-awareness
through which one vividly notices and interacts with a world of ideas. Art lessons can
help promote intense awareness with a strong sense of self and deeper inner engagement
with feelings. Students can tolerate a sense of isolation, work through anxiety associated
with the art process, and sustain a sense of identity. Individuals are also able to pursue
investigations, utilize meaning, and reformulate existing meaning (Gude, 2009). This
approach is a contributor to a social perspective; construction of meaning towards a
broader, more sophisticated understanding of visual culture and issues (Freedman, 2000).
Adolescent Development
Students in high school all have something in commontheir developmental
patterns. Adolescents are starting to approach adulthood and gain an understanding of
adult art practices. Cognitive thought is being developed as students are developing a
degree of skill and intellect. Teenagers in high school, between ages 13-17 years old, can
think abstractly and have a capacity for metacognitive activity (Simpson, Delany, Carroll,
Hamilton, Kay, Kerlavage, & Olson, 1998). Adolescents emotional, moral, and social
development can be a cause for some concern. As students reach puberty, they begin to
experience more stress and a lack of understanding due to their increased hormone levels.
Teens start to seek acceptance from their peers that enables their decisions to be adversely
influenced by their peers (Lin, 2010). Students at this age are going through a difficult
time (Hawkes, 2010). As they begin to develop a sense of self and grow into their

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

14

immediate community, students often venture into risky behaviors (Simpson, et al.,
1998). Peers easily persuade adolescents; this results in a social reliance that impacts their
thought making process. Students need to be aware of how their decisions are constructed
as they develop. At the secondary level, students should be presented with social issues
(p. 298). Students attempt to comprehend the world through social issues and rationalize
their thoughts through visual expression.
Incorporating Contemporary Social Issues into the Curriculum
As educators we create citizens of a democratic society we should create
experiments of pleasure and anxiety (Gude, 2009, p. 14). The curriculum should allow
students to question assumptions, consider moral citizenship in a society (Milbrandt,
2002), challenge social and structural inequality, as well as promote social and cultural
diversity (Stuhr, 1994). Quality art projects will aid the students in exploring their sense
of being while introspectively examining how complex families, social, and media
impact their experiences. Through a quality curriculum, students should be in a position
to sense, examine, and identify important themes. Play in art and investigation with
pupils allows them to develop learning skills. The curriculum should pertain to everyday
life, consider barriers, pose problems, and explore life issues (Gude, 2007). The material
examined needs to be meaningful to the students, grounded in authentic practice, foster a
critical, reflective attitude, and pursue pluralist perspectives (Sullivan, 1993).
Curricular Approaches
There have been numerous recommendations in the profession of art education on
how to incorporate contemporary social issues into the art curriculum. Darts (2006)
shares a curriculum he developed and implemented with his high school students. His

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

15

student driven unit began by the students generating a list of various social and
contemporary issues that were relevant to them. The students proceeded by splitting into
groups and researching one concept in detail. The students were then responsible for both
initiating classroom discussion and providing instruction on the creation of artworks that
addressed the issue at hand.
Buffington (2007) examines the work of a contemporary artist and provides
guidelines to assist in creating a unit around contemporary social issues. The suggested
steps involve generating a list of issues that students are interested in. The students would
then choose an issue and analyze how their personal artistic style can heighten the
message that it portrays. The learners would begin by creating thumbnails that
incorporate their issues into a meaningful, communicative work of art following the
completion of the aforementioned steps. In addition, the students would reflect their
thoughts and ideas in their sketchbook. Students will discuss their work with peers, selfreflect, and share their findings throughout the process. Buffington also provides
educators and readers with suggestions on how to assess the work. Educators should be
seeking formative assessment by monitoring the process of the students and their
reflections. Summative assessment evaluations come from examination of the final artist
statement and a rubric. The suggested rubric addresses the materials used to share the
concept, how well the art communicates the idea, and how change is being integrated into
the artwork.
Another method mentioned addressing contemporary social issues in the high
school art classroom is through art-based research. Marshall and DAdamo (2011)
examine an art based research model in depth and how it contrasts with conventional

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

16

ways of teaching. Art-based research stresses critical thinking, creative process,


conceptual skills, and research compared to art making techniques. Art-based research
combines three different learning approaches together for a greater impact: experiential
learning, inquiry-based learning, and project-based learning. Sketchbooks assume a new
role to analyze concepts and become springboards for learning. Sketchbooks and other
methods in visual journals provide students with an opportunity to learn at a self-guided
pace as well as motivating their individual interests. These springboards allow students to
collect and record data in various formats. Art-based research is similar to other art
learning methods because it promotes metacognition but differs because it highlights and
extends the research process to include non-verbal understandings. In art-based research,
the process allows for emerging concepts. Individuals will observe an issue, collect data,
analyze the data, and interpret the information into their artwork. This approach is more
laid back in structure and less linear but provides students with more opportunities for
improvisation, exploring, and serendipity. A child gains a better sense of self by being
able to play freely without strict guidelines (Gude, 2007).
Another approach worth considering is contextualism. This aesthetic theory is
ideal for teachers who wish to guide their students artistic explorations of identity
construction, social issues, and visual culture (Guadelius & Spiers, 2002, p. 159). This
approach to curriculum emphasizes the context of the artist. Contextualism is a method
used to communicate with viewers in direct and active ways about contemporary social
issues. Contextualism focuses on collaborative experiences, social issues and the
communicative value of the work rather than the beauty. This approach requires students
to analyze visual culture and reflect on their thinking. By choosing a topic that is

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

17

relatable, the students can explore alternative views and rethink their initial assumptions
(Guadelius & Spiers, 2002).
Meaning Making in Drawing Using Contemporary Social Issues
Art reveals students beliefs about their self, roles in society, social locations, and
imagination (Albers, 1999). Incorporating social and contemporary issues into the art
room makes the art no longer about individual emotions but the personalization of social
issues (Freedman, 2000). Artist Tyree Guyton uses his upbringing in Detroit, Michigan to
influence his art. Guytons art is influenced by various personal stories and one can notice
it in many of his public artworks around Detroit. The Dotty Wotty House (19932001) (Buffington, 2007, p. 26) was constructed to beautify a declining residential area.
The painted house was covered with a variety of colorful polka dots in many different
sizes. The polka dot idea came from his grandfather, but the concept came from a quote
by Martin Luther King Jr. We are all the same color on the inside (Buffington, 2007, p.
26). Guytons variety of polka dots represents the diversity in the world. In Calling All
Cars (2002) Guyton created a drawing on how the community does not have enough
police cars to respond to situations (Buffington, 2007, p. 32). Guyton claimed that the
work takes on a cartoon effect because of the humor of police reaching anyone in a
timely fashion (Buffington, 2007). Additional activist artist can be found in my resources
created (see Appendix A)
In another example of engaging social issues, a group of pre-service teachers in
Los Angeles divided up into different groups to document issues relevant to themselves
as individuals. One of the groups that were mostly parents focused on the violence being

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

18

exposed to children through mass media. The teachers constructed an environment for a
child that attempted to provide a cozy and inviting atmosphere presenting soft colors with
a teddy bear. Upon further examination it became apparent that the bedspread was a quilt
consisting of different CD and video game covers that depict violent images associated
with war. The bedside had a gift wrapped in G.I. Joe paper and a coloring book with
violent images to color. Rashes of shootings lead another group to focus on the violence
and the innocent victims. This group created a large cardboard sculpture to resemble a
realistic 9mm pistol aimed at two targets. Recent headlines from the news were being
discharged from the pistol representing ammunition. The targets are composed of images;
one target displays pictures of the innocent victims while the other target displays images
of the guilty and the shooters.
In looking for contemporary art that also addresses social issues, the PBS series
and website Art 21 allows viewers to become familiar with different contemporary artists
who address a collection of relevant topics. Most of the topics addressed can be relatable
to students in a high school art class. In an episode focusing on artistic change, Art 21
recognizes several artists who work to promote engagement in current situations around
the world. For example, one of the artists featured in the Art 21 artists, Ai Weiwei, is a
Chinese artist and human rights activist. Weiwei has been arrested and held for three
months for his outspoken actions. His artwork consists of sculptures, photographs, and
public art all examining Chinese political as well as social issues. His art examines social
issues over time with the use of sarcasm and symbolism. Catherine Opie is another artist
mentioned in the Art 21 change episode. Opie is an Ohio native and explores her

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

19

surroundings through photography. Her photography provides a view on social issues in


America and the way that people react to their surroundings (Sollins et al., 2012).
Regardless of the medium or form the art takes, individuals seem to have a
personal connection to contemporary social issues. This connection is important, and so
is the nature in which they work. Ianni (1968) states that if the artist wants to act as an
agent of social and cultural change he must work with and within the society he hopes to
change.
What Contemporary Social Issues Could Be Addressed
Education must face every social issue and come to grips with life in all of its
stark reality (Milbrandt, 2002, 141). A great way to include contemporary social issues
is to gauge the needs of the local environment and establish a relationship within the
community. Another important aspect of an issue-based curriculum is to pay attention to
the diversity of the students and the community. When students are personally invested
in a topic they are more inclined to engage with it in meaningful ways (Darts, 2006, p.
7). According to Darts (2006), Hicks (1994), Gude (2007), and Buffington (2007)
students are more personally invested when they can relate to the topic. Each of the
articles mentioned had the students compile a list of topics to address.
In summary this research has increased my belief that contemporary social issues
have a place in the art room and are important topics that should be addressed. My aim is
to implement contemporary social issues into my curriculum, increase awareness in the
students, promote diversity, and limit unfamiliarity. Addressing contemporary social
issues will require students to think, reflect, research, and become open to new

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

20

perspectives. Milbrandt (2002) states issues should be addressed in the classroom to


better the students and prepare them for a democratic life. An art lesson that combines
multiple two-dimensional mediums and contemporary issues can do just that.
Methodology
My examination of the works of contemporary artists that engage in activist art
assisted me in the development of a unit of study focused on contemporary social issues
that would be relevant to the interests of each individual student. Several teaching
methods were explored and implemented into the unit of lessons constructed. Some of
these teaching methods include thematic teaching where students concentrate on topics
that include inquiry-based investigation, project-based learning, the use of diverse
assessments, and individual work.
I created a unit of study titled Exploring Contemporary Social Issues Through
Activist Art (see Appendix B) using the Backward Design model, the curriculum unit
designed by Watson (2012) and the National Visual Art Standards. I started with the
model proposed by McTighe and Thomas (2003), Backwards Design, that promoted
contemporary art assessment and enhanced learning. The first step was to identify what I
wanted my students to master with this unit of curriculum and determine desired results.
This mastery is based on understanding on the big ideals. My students are already
familiar with contemporary drawing techniques from previous classes so after some
thought, I really wanted my students to be able to create an activist work of art and
engage with their peers on social and contemporary issues. The new parameters of this
lesson were unfamiliar to both the students and I. Adequate preparation for this unit of

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

21

curriculum necessitated additional research on activist artists, contemporary artists, and


contemporary social issues. My research helped me create summative assessments to
analyze what would be the main focus--determining acceptable evidence. Formative
assessments were designed to gauge the progress of the students while they were
working. The last step consisted of developing experienced based instruction. Using the
National Visual Arts Standards, that have an infinity to Backwards Design model I
focused on the big ideas. Create, Present, and Respond are three of the main categories
used to establish art curriculum units. With these categories I created a wide range of
resources to help me teach students about contemporary artists, contemporary social
issues, and activist artworks with my collected data.
Watson (2012) shared a framework completed with his students and described
how he implemented the lesson by breaking it into three stages. The first stage of learning
consisted of knowledge building; learning about artists, performance improvisation,
history, location specific art, and creative flows. Watson noted that different educational
materials engage viewers and that this is relevant to meeting students needs. The unit I
designed begins with a review on contemporary art, contemporary artists, and a chance to
experiment with a wide range of mediums to create their own mini-contemporary
drawing. The next step this unit includes information on historical activist artworks and
activist artists. In order to reach all levels of learning in my class, I incorporated many
different materials and aids such as presentations, videos and handouts. The other two
parts of Watsons curriculum unit are split into planning and execution, which were
constructed using the Backwards Design model.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

22

Gude (2013) focused on encouraging students to engage themselves and utilize


their skills as well as investigate to create meaningful art. Amorino (2009) examined how
sensory stimulation, emotional responses, and expressive impulse all contribute to a more
personalized work of art. Amorino also reviewed how students in high school are affected
by peer pressure, their environment, and puberty. These collaborative observations
encouraged me to have the students choose a topic that is meaningful to them. Students
that select a topic that is meaningful to them are more likely to engage in the work
through deeper investigation, increased concentration, and by further applying
themselves in their art.
Peer Reviewers
The unit of curriculum was sent to seven high school art teachers, both in my
district and in the neighboring county (see Appendix C, D), after it was created. The
teachers were asked to look over my art unit plan and provide me with any suggestions
that they had. They were also asked to inform me if they thought this unit would be
beneficial for our high school students. Five out of the seven teachers provided responses.
Communication between each of the teachers and I took place to support my research and
the curriculum development.
Research Site
My research took place during the end of the school year and the majority of it
was conducted over the summer. Therefore my research site consisted primarily of my
own home office. Some research was performed in my classroom. Conversations with
other art educators took place online or over the phone.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

23

Data Collection Procedures and Instrumentation


My research was sourced from various books, websites, and essays established
by education specialists, museums, and artists. Community art sites, art journals, web
resources and other documents aided me in my research. The collection of data helped me
develop an art curriculum unit for my drawing class that will promote student learning
and enhance understanding. I looked for artists that would be engaging and appropriate to
show high school students as I searched through many resources. I wanted the artworks,
artists, and issues that I found to be relatable to the students. I also explored many
educational articles to see what curriculum units have been published to help me in the
creation of my drawing unit. My intent was to gather this information and to document it
on my professional webpage. With the approval of the IRB (see Appendix E),
participatory collection procedures with peer reviewers took place through emails, text,
and in person communications. Once the lesson plan and data analysis were complete, a
basic form detailing my project was given to colleagues in the school district requesting
their feedback.
Data Analysis Procedures
The data was analyzed and classified into categories based on the content once the
collection procedures were complete. The variety of artworks and artists that I found
were collected and categorized on different Pinterest boards. Art museums that display
contemporary art were documented on a PDF and on a Delicious account to be easily
accessed. I also was able to identify some videos and activist art exhibits that would make
great resources in implementing this lesson. I compiled these works on to Scoop.it site.
My research referenced material from essays and scholarly published articles. These were

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


gathered and used in creating my lesson plan.

Figure 1. Screenshot of my Pinterest Page

24

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

25

Figure 2. Screenshot of my Scoop.It! page


Findings
The main purpose of my study was to create an art curriculum unit that would
help promote awareness of contemporary social issues and encourage students to become
socially engaged, civil citizens. My main research questions through the study were: (a)
How can contemporary social issues be explored in a high school drawing course? (b)
Why should contemporary social issues be addressed in the art curriculum? (c) What
contemporary social issues could be addressed in the high school drawing class? (d)
Finally, How do contemporary artists address contemporary social issues in their
drawings and paintings? In the following section I will explain some of my findings I
discovered in conducting this research.
First Finding: Ways to Explore Contemporary Social Issues.
The analysis of the collected data intrigued my interest. I found so many unique
ways that one could explore contemporary social issues in an art curriculum. Some of the
most useful data I found on how to examine issues was through articles established by
other professionals. I was able to determine what teaching strategies could be useful in

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

26

my curriculum unit by studying art lessons taught by Darts (2006), Watson (2012), and
information analyzed by Milbrandt (2002) addressing issues of society. Each of these
articles provided me with some insight on what I wanted to do and what I did not think
would work for my situation. Darts (2006), despite being a good unit, would not work for
my situation because I was not able to devote an entire semester to one content area.
Watson (2012) offered some very useful insight on how to engage students and was
considered when I created my lesson. Milbrandts (2002) study allowed me to
conceptualize what other art educators deemed relevant and appropriate for students in
the classroom. All of this information and much more was analyzed and documented in
my field notes.
Another useful source I discovered that helped me personally explore these
matters through art was the Art21 website created by PBS. This website was a
tremendous tool to take advantage of in my research. The sources on this webpage were
endless. Videos on a range of issues with focus on particular artist were extremely
informative. The website also offers biographies of the artists and educators resource
guides to use along with screening the video. One particular matter that I found to be
interesting was the Change segment from the Season Six episode. Hearing artist Ai
Weiwei and El Anatsui discuss their art and how it could be transforming seemed to be an
engaging topic, one that I could see students enjoying. I created a PowerPoint that would
help students explore matters in a new light using this episode and the educator resource
PDF download.
The peer responses provided me with insightful information. My original
curriculum unit was pretty sparse. The response from my peers who participated included

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

27

suggestions that I provide the students with more resources to explore. I had originally
designed a Pinterest board with various artists all collected in a few boards; feedback
suggested that I still allow students to research artists and topics but provide them with
some direction. I revamped the Pinterest site to make it more navigable and created a
Delicious account for the students to find more contemporary artists through museum
links. I also collected additional artists webpages and compiled them into a document to
assist students (see Appendix F).

Figure 3. Screenshot of my webpage.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

28

Figure 4. Screenshot from my Delicious page.


Second Finding: Learning What Should be Explored
Curriculum should be relevant to the students. When the curriculum pertains to
everyday life, is meaningful to the students, and grounded in authentic practice (Gude,
2007; Sullivan, 1993) students will make a greater connection. From five years of
practicing teaching, this was an already established piece of information. Experience has
taught me that when the project or assignment is geared towards a students individual
interests, they are more likely to be engaged and cooperative with the assignment. This
information is what guided me in the creation of my unit of study established for the
project. Presenting multiple issues to the students will help them become aware of the
different matters that society faces; allowing them to decide what they want to focus on
makes it more unique and genuine to the individual.
After I created my lesson and sent it to some teachers in my district, they provided
me with some additional insight on what should be explored and what should be
withheld. The one particular teacher who cautioned me has had sufficient years of

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

29

teaching in the same county and has seen negative reactions from certain topics. This left
me debating what in particular I should be allowed to discuss in class. From this point I
decided that approval from the administration was a necessary item to obtain. It was
suggested that I draft a letter to parents explaining that the students will be exploring
contemporary social issues in their drawing class and will be creating an activist work of
art. If there were any parents who wanted their child not to explore any particular issue,
the student could be given a refined list of topics to choose from. Depending on the
students in the class any topic could be approached if on a sensitive level. Some of the
topics that I believe are appropriate are: advertising, discrimination, conservation,
consumerism, delinquency, bullying, eating disorders, etc. (see Appendix G for full list).
The abundant amount of artists available provided me with more options and a
chance to be selective on the content that I show my students. Working in a public high
school has certain limitations. Works of art by Kara Walker or Robert Mapplethorpe,
albeit very nice and illustrative of social issues, would not be appropriate for my high
school students. Artworks that are appropriate and artists sites that were not too
controversial such as, Scott Erickson, Bjorn Richter, Pawel Kuczynski, Sue Coe etc. were
saved to my compilation of pins and to my resources list (see Appendix A for full list).
Third Finding: Activist Artists and Their Art
As previously stated in the data analysis section, I organized the information on
artists and issues found into subcategories. I pulled a few of the artists from the list and
did further research on them to create PowerPoints. These PowerPoints will be used as a
way to introduce the lesson and display how different artists work to address social
issues.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

30

A few considerations were made when debating which topic I should introduce to
the students. First to contemplate was the community I teach in, Fort Mill, South Carolina
is a very diverse growing community located directly south of Charlotte, North Carolina.
A lot of Charlottes employees commute from Fort Mill, which contributes to the
diversity within our schools. Fort Mill, once a very small town first inhabited by Native
Americans, is very rich in morals and the small town culture. Even with the growing
diversity in the small town it still remains pretty friendly with very few issues. Another
aspect worth considering is what is relevant in the news and world today. One of the most
recent topics in the news over the past few months has been racism. This is all a subject
my students are familiar with through school lessons and the social media broadcasts. My
experience teaching at this school for five years and growing up near this city leads me to
believe that this is not a particular issue that the students deal with on a regular basis.
Therefore, I decided to use this as a topic to introduce to them. I began my additional
research by finding credible sources that have non-biased statistics on racism and plugged
in the graphs to a PowerPoint. I even managed to find a video on an organizations page
about how racism became an issue in North America.
I proceeded by finding some contemporary artists that address racism and racist
stereotypes into their art. Among the first piece I found and included was Girl with a
Bamboo Earring, by Awol Erizku. This work is a recreation of Girl With a Pearl Earring
by Vermeer but alters the models race and jewelry, representing race between African
Americans and Caucasians. The Reconcile Mural by Gregg Deal is another piece I found
to display. From my experience, when students think about racism their mind jumps to
white or black when the issue is more complex than that. Gregg Deal is a Native

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

31

American whose works of art address how history has been unkind to Native Americans.
This piece in particular showcases how land was taken and then reconciled by giving a
professional football team an Indian Mascot (Redskins). Another work of art I chose
was What are you looking at? by Masami Teraoka. This piece is quite different than the
rest because it addresses Asian culture and American culture. Several pieces of Teraokas
work addresses interracial relationships and the sometimes-strained relationship Asians
may have with Americans.

Figure 5. The Reconcile Mural, Gregg Deal, 2014, photo by Dakota Fine
After creating an example on researching a social issue, I created a list of social
issues to refer to if needed to motivate student thinking. I also created some PowerPoints
focusing primarily on one artist with some background information. I found two new
favorite artists during the gathering of my research. Scott Erickson is a working studio
artist who brings art and important matters to the publics attention. Erickson works on

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

32

many different projects but what I found the most interesting was his work with nonprofit organizations. The ideal behind his Orphan Art Project is what captured my
attention the most. He first heard about the orphan situation in Swaziland in 2011 and
wanted to help in some way. Erickson has spent some time in Swaziland and has seen the
conditions of the children. Approximately 41 % of the population is HIV positive and
kills off most of the adult population; in his video on YouTube
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtzqNGAxsK0) he has found research that by 2020
there will be no adults left if conditions remain the same. Erickson started the Orphan Art
Project (orphanartproject.com). This project began with orphan children painting
canvases and then Scott completed the paintings back in the United States. All proceeds
of the prints go to an orphanage in Swaziland (Erickson, 2011).

Figure 6. Swazi Art 5 from Orphan Art Project 2010


Another artist whose work I found and thoroughly enjoyed was Chris Jordan. I
believed this artist to be relatable to the students. Jordan is a photographer and has a
series of art that captures some of the devastating issues America is facing and portrays it

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

33

in a shocking way. A particular series of art is called Running the Numbers: An American
Self-Portrait. This series is broken into two parts but both capture the same concept:
Americas rate of consumption. The image below, Cigarette Butts, depicts 139,000
cigarette butts. This number is equal to the number of cigarettes that are smoked and
discarded every fifteen seconds in the United States. Cigarette butts are the number one
littered item found in public spaces. Much of his work addresses items that are consumed
by students or that students have some association with. It is a sad realization but Jordan
does a great job at showing how a serious topic can be displayed in a way to engage
student thought without being overtly controversial.

Figure 7. Cigarette Butts, by Chris Jordan, 2013 60x72


Summary Across Findings
In retrospect, the common thread throughout my findings is how my sense of
awareness grew. My curriculum research required me to further my knowledge on the
topics of contemporary social issues. I became more comfortable with contemporary art

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

34

while exploring answers to my main questions for this project. Learning about new artists
also allowed me to collect more resources to make a curriculum unit more relevant to
each students individual needs.
Discussion and Conclusion
In this Capstone Project, I wanted to create an art unit for my drawing class that
would explore contemporary social issues as well as make them more engaged, civil
citizens. I wanted to research different artists and the reasons why this was important to
my students. Scholars recommend that teachers should promote civil leadership and
engagement at a younger age. Education is an agent in the structure and maintenance of
beliefs, values and behaviors (Hicks, 1994). Contemporary social issues explored in an
art class allows students to identify and rethink their beliefs about their role in the larger
world (Albers,1999). Social reconstruction education prepares students to challenge
social, structural inequality and to promote the coal of diversity (Stuhr, 1994). Creating
an art unit of curriculum geared towards contemporary art and contemporary social issues
through arts-based research and curriculum development has allowed me to create a
series of lessons that will promote learning and individual character development.
Interpretation of Findings
Based on the findings from this Capstone Project, I believe that teaching
contemporary social issues will not be as challenging as what I first perceived.
Resources referenced through this process and communication with peers has provided
me with more awareness to implement a lesson on a controversial, yet needed topic.
There are many practicing art teachers that believe contemporary social issues should be
explored in an art class. The biggest hesitance for these teachers is in knowing how to

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

35

implement them in a safe manner (Milbrandt, 2002). I am pleased to have found multiple
resources to aid me on my journey and to share with other art educators. This is not a new
idea or approach to teaching but something that should be considered.
Significance, Implications, and Recommendations
I believe that exploring contemporary art and contemporary social issues is a good
practice. This research has provided me with insight for when I implement the lesson. I
will feel confident and secure with the role of facilitating student learning on these topics.
The understandings gained from the arts-based research have proven to me to be the most
intuitive choice of methodology for this project. The resources created to aid me in
teaching will prove to be the most important component of the lesson. These resources
will not only engage all students but also provide them with many different abilities while
cutting back on disturbances and downtime during research. Lists of activist artists,
drawing artists, contemporary artists, and contemporary art museums will enhance
student learning and growth. This amount of exposure will allow students the opportunity
to find what interests them most and what will help guide them in developing their own
artistic style. These teaching aids are so valuable that they can be applied to many other
lessons and different art studio courses as well.
Art educators can use this research and the resources created to help initiate their
own unique lesson to suit their needs. Art teachers can help promote student awareness
and increase knowledge on contemporary art techniques by utilizing the Capstone Project
created. Activist art can be a tool for developing a sense of community within the class
and school for many art teachers. This lesson can also promote community awareness to
make a positive impact.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

36

In looking ahead, I would encourage all art educators to become familiar with the
various issues. Knowing your class is a very key element in the unit. In order to teach this
unit and be effective, the classroom environment must be a safe place and allow students
to feel comfortable in expressing their individual ideals. An atmosphere such as this will
allow students to be respectful of others even if their beliefs contrast their peers. Having a
response plan set up in the chance things get out of hand would be a great idea to
consider. I would also encourage any art educator to speak with their administration to
establish guidelines for what may be considered too controversial for that particular
school. Lastly, I would recommend any art educator to understand that this lesson has not
yet been exercised, which will be essential in understanding its full potential.
Conclusion
Creating this Capstone Project has been an enlightening experience. I have grown
to learn more about my personal artistic interests and beliefs on contemporary social
issues. It has been a self-discovery in a way I did not think possible. It is my opinion that
once I implement this art unit into my curriculum, it will create more engaging students. I
also think that it will provide the other departments in my school some new light on how
art can be beneficial to the students. As I proceed, I look forward to seeing what amazing
pieces my students will create and how they will continue to amaze me. My complete
body of work can be located at www.aliciabagley.weebly.com. This website houses all
resources and links to references mentioned.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

37

References
Albers, P. (1999). Art education and the possibility of social change. Art Education,
52(4), 6-11.
Amorino, J. (2009). The artistic impetus model: A resource for reawakening artistic
expression in adolescents. Studies in Art Education, 50(3), 214-231.
Buffington, M. (2007). Art to bring about change: The work of Tyree Guyton. Art
Education,60(4), 25-32.
Darts, D. (2006). Art education for a change: Contemporary issues and the visual arts.
Art
Education, 59(5), 6-12.
Delacruz, E. (2005). Art education in civil society. Visual Arts Research, 31(2), 3-9.
Erickson, S. (2011). Orphan art project. Retrieved from
www.scotterickson.com/projects/
Freedman, K. (2000). Social perspectives on art education in the U.S.: Teaching visual
culture in a democracy. Studies in Art Education, 41(4), 314-329.
Foshay, A. W. (1998). Problem solving and the arts. Journal of Curriculum &

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

38

Supervision, 13(4), 328-338.


Gaudelius, Y. & Speirs, P. (2002). Contemporary issues in art education. Upper
Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Getty, J. P. (2000). The J. Paul Getty Trust. [Online Dictionary and Thesaurus]. Retrieved
from http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/aat
Contemporary. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster online dictionary. Retrieved from
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contemporary
Gude, O.(2000). Investigating the culture of curriculum. Real-World Readings in
Art
Education:Things Your Professor Never Told You. (p.75-81), United
Kindgom: Falmer Press.
Gude, O. (2007). Principles of possibility: Considerations for a 21st century art & culture
curriculum. Art Education, 60(1), 6-17.
Gude, O. (2009). Art education for democratic life. Art Education, 62(6), 6-11.
Gude, O. (2013). New school art styles: The project of art education. Art Education,
66(1), 6-15.
Hawkes,T.E.(2010).Betweenselfandhorde:Theschool.Schools:Studiesin

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

39

Education,7(2),184229.
Hicks, L. (1994). Social reconstruction and community. Studies in Art Education,
35(3),
149-156.
Ianni, F. (1968). The arts as agents for social change: An anthropologists view. Art
Education, 21(7), 15-20.
Kimpston, R. & Rogers, K. (1986). A framework for curriculum research. Curriculum
Inquiry 16(4), 463-474.
Lin,X.(2010).Identifyingpeereffectsinstudentacademicachievementbyspatial
autoregressivemodelswithgroupunobservable.JournalofLaborEconomics,
28(4),825860.
Marshall, J. & DAdamo, K. (2011). Art practice as research in the classroom: A new
paradigm in art education. Art Education, 64(5), 12-18.
McTighe, J. & Thomas, R. (2003). Backward design for forward action. Educational
Leadership, 60(5), 52-55.
Milbrandt, M. (2002). Addressing contemporary social issues in art education: A survey

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

40

of public school art educators in Georgia. Studies in Art Education, 43(2),


141157.
Simpson, J., Delany, J., Carroll, K., Hamilton, C., Kay, S., Kerlavage, M., & Olson, J.
(1998). Creating meaning through art: Teacher as choice maker.
Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.
Sollins, S., Dowling, S., Ortega, E.-L. M., Atlas, C., Tatge, C., Sutton, M., Kentridge, W.,
...Public Broadcasting Service (U.S.). (2009). Art:21: Art in the twenty-first
century. New York: Art21 Inc.
Stuhr, P. (1994). Multicultural art education and social reconstruction. Studies in Art
Education, 35(3), 171-178.
Sullivan, G. (1993). Art-based art education: Learning that is meaningful, authentic,
critical, and pluralist. Studies in Art Education, 35(1), 5-21.
Watson, J. (2012). We turned your world upside down: Contemporary art practice in the
high school classroom. Art Education, 65(1), 33-39.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


Whittaker, B. (1993). The arts of social change: Artistic, philosophical, and managerial
issues. Journal of Arts Management, Law & Society, 23(1), 11-16

41

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

42

Appendix A
List of Activist Artists
Robert Ernst MarxPaints and sculpts to personify the human condition. His favorite themes to
address is power, the exclusivity of church and state, and abuse.
http://roberternstmarx.com/
Masami Teraoka
Draws images to represent globalization and the clash between cultures.
http://masamiteraoka.com/archive/biography.php
Pawel Kuczynski
Illustration artist whose works convey many messages and meanings. His art
addresses war, social media, politics, etc.
http://www.pawelkuczynski.com/index.php
Young Soon Min
Los Angeles artist from Korea. Her art consist of many themes that deal with
issues of representation, cultural identities, history and memories.
http://www.yongsoonmin.com/biography/
Dread Scott
Draws, sculpts, photographs, and performance art are the genres he works in. His
topics range from adolescent youth, stereotypes, exploitation, and suffering.
http://www.dreadscott.net/about/
Chris Jordan
Photographic artist whose works portray human consumption and the impact it
has on the environment.
http://www.chrisjordan.com/gallery/rtn2/ - bees
Bjorn Richter
An artist/illustrator, graphic designer, and sculptor. His art addresses many social
issues mainly concerned with the environment and the use of resources.
http://bjornrichter.no/richter_hovedsider.htm
Gregg Deal
A Native American artist who addresses his heritage, culture, prejudice among
Native Americans.
http://greggdeal.com/
Sue Coe

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

43

Mixed media artist who addresses various issues. Most of her work documents the
protest animal rights and some of her work addresses politics, rape, foreign
policy, greed, and more.
http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=1170
http://www.artnet.com/artists/sue-coe/
Scott Erickson
A visual artist who works with non-profits to help raise funds and awareness. His
art has dealt with AIDS, orphans, cultural differences, etc.
http://scottericksonart.com/about/
Ricardo Levins Morales
Considers himself an artist/activist and addresses many topics in his work. His
favorite medium is scratchboard. You can find art about education, different
cultures, politics, consumption, gender, etc on his website.
http://www.rlmartstudio.com/
Mel Chin
A conceptual visual artist motivated largely by political, cultural, and social
circumstances.
http://www.melchin.org/
Wayne Gilbert
Uses oil and human cremated remains to create works of art on life and age.
http://www.waynegilbert.com/about/
Ai Weiwei
A Chinese contemporary artist who addresses human rights, political issues, and
government corruption.
http://aiweiwei.com/
Allora and Calzadilla
Through a wide range of mediums and work these artist concentrate on political
tension and the public.
http://www.lissongallery.com/artists/allora-and-calzadilla
Hank Willis Thomas
Contemporary African-American artist whose particular interest deals with race,
advertising, and popular culture.
http://www.hankwillisthomas.com/
Arman Pierre Fernandez
An artist who addressed many topics and was influenced from Pop Art and
Dadism. Some of his well known work address consumerism and the amount we
waste.
http://www.armanstudio.com/arman-biography-1-eng.html

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

44

Dhruvi Acharya
Her art addresses the aspects of an urban womans life. Her art is also addresses
death, love, and the environment.
http://www.dhruvi.com/
Rokni Haerizadeh
Dubai based artist whose work addresses social and public gatherings in Iran.
http://www.ivde.net/artists/rokni_haerizadeh/biography
Banksy
A graffiti street artist whose work often addresses many controversial issues.
http://banksy.co.uk/in.asp
Mike Edwards
A typographic artist whose images incorporate text to portray various meanings.
http://mikeedwards.co.uk/index.htm?nbtn=0
Kryzysztof Wodiczko
An artist who creates many of his many and images through projections upon
monumental architecture. Art ranges in topics from political to homelessness.
Mark Vallen
American activist artist whose art addresses many issues from globalization to
war.
http://www.art-for-a-change.com/Vallen/vallen.htm

Other Activist Artists to Look Into


EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM
Elana Mann
http://www.elanamann.com/
Kate Clark
http://www.kateclark.com/
Sarah Sze
http://www.sarahsze.com/
Tabitha Vevers
http://tabithavevers.com/
Brian Kenny
http://briankenny.blogspot.com/
Suzanne Lacy
http://www.suzannelacy.com/
Anthony Freda
http://www.anthonyfreda.com/
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh
http://www.tlynnfaz.com/
Alexsandro Palmobo
http://www.alexsandropalombo.com/
Aunia Kahn
http://auniakahn.com/
Pablo Llana
http://www.pablollana.com/
Pian Shankong
http://www.actionagainstpoisoning.com/HERO-OF-THE-YEAR.html
Maria Acha Kutscher
http://www.acha-kutscher.com/
David Maisel
http://davidmaisel.com/
Aida Sulova
http://www.sulova.com/ - !about/c1x9v

45

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Olafur Eliasson
http://www.olafureliasson.net/
Amanda Schachter
http://www.architalx.org/levi-schachter/
Naziha Mestaoui
http://www.electronicshadow.org/nm/
Mathilde Roussel
http://www.mathilderoussel.com/
Mary David Hobson
http://marydanielhobson.com/
Ester Hernandez
http://www.esterhernandez.com/
Vik Muniz
http://vikmuniz.net/
Ales Nabaum
http://www.alexnabaum.com/
Paulo Grangeon
http://www.papiermache.co.uk/gallery/artist/580/
Thomas Saliot
http://www.thomassaliot.com/
Anna Westfall
http://art.unm.edu/anna-westfall/
Megan Jacobs
http://www.meganjacobs.com/
Cathy Whysocki
http://cathywysocki.com/
Vincent Leandro
http://hansonhowardgallery.com/2011/07/meet-vincent-leandro/
Kenji Nakayama
http://kngee.com/

46

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Christopher Hope
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/christopher-hope.html
Heather Soltz
http://sewingstories.com/
Dylan Taverner
Jerry W. Miller
http://jerrymillerart.com/
Laura Dunn
http://www.lauradunnart.com/
Chelsea Briganti
Marc Clamage
http://www.ipaintwhatisee.com/

47

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

48

Appendix B
Curriculum Unit (as adapted from my district)
Exploring Contemporary Social Issues in a High School Drawing Curriculum
Grade Level: 10-12 (Drawing 2)
Length of unit: 3-4 weeks
Task Description:
Students will identify and examine various contemporary social issues in their
own lives and in their local and global community.
Students will choose a topic relevant to them and will plan and create a work of
art that investigates meaning to the theme/idea. Students will identify, locate and
examine the work of contemporary artists who have addressed this theme.
After in-progress class critiques, students will revise and complete their art and
write an artist statement. Students will then curate and display their art around
school grounds.
Instructional objectives aligned with the National Visual Arts Standards:
Creating:
Experiment/Imagine/Identify
1. Students examine and identify themes in contemporary artworks.
2. Students summarize the themes in contemporary artworks.

Investigate/ Plan/Make
3. Students plan, experiment, and shape an artistic investigation on a social or
contemporary issue
4. Students select and use a contemporary art making approach to create a work of
art.
Reflect/Refine/Continue
5. Students share, explain, and discuss in-progress artwork.
6. Students critique and use feedback to make decisions about revising and/or
refining art work.
7. Students compose an artists statement.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

49

Presenting:
Select/Analyze
1. Students identify and apply criteria for selecting art and artifacts for an exhibit
or display.
2. Students explain reasons for selecting key art and artifacts for an exhibit or
display.
Prepare/Curate
3. Students investigate and identify a site or space for installing an exhibit or
display.
4. Students compare a variety of factors and methods when planning an exhibit or
display.
Exhibit/Share
5. Students work with others to plan and create a physical or digital exhibit or
display of selected works of art and/or artifacts for an identified audience.
6. Students evaluate what they learned from the process of curating and
presenting the exhibit or display.
Responding:
Perceive /Analyze
1. Students identify approaches for shaping interpretations.
2. Students analyze responses to works of contemporary art.
Enduring Understandings in alignment with standards:
Creativity and innovative thinking are essential life skills that can be developed.
Artists and other presenters consider various techniques, methods, venues, and
criteria when selecting works for presentation.
Artists and designers shape artistic investigations, following or breaking with
traditions in pursuit of creative art making goals.
Vocabulary:
Artist Statement

Artist investigation

Contemporary Art

Contemporary issues Social issues

content

Context

Curate

Critique

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


Engage

Innovative thinking

50

Activist art

Materials:
Color pencils

Graphite pencils

Tortillions

Erasers

drawing paper (various sizes) Ink

Newsprint

Newspaper

Color pencil blenders


Colored drawing paper

other supplies as needed

Resources:
Art 21 http://www.pbs.org/art21/
Artist websites/ museum websites/ blogs /Pinterest
My personal Pinterest collection and Scoop.it board
http://www.scoop.it/u/alicia-bagley-1
https://www.pinterest.com/abagley0619/
Instructional Procedures:
Lesson 1 (Introduction and the research)
Day 1
Students will begin class by responding to writing prompt What do you know/remember
about contemporary drawing? Following sufficient time for each student to respond in
his or her sketchbook, the teacher will then initiate a class discussion on contemporary
drawing. Following this the teacher will then present a PowerPoint to the class on
Contemporary drawing based off of the book Contemporary Drawing: Key Concepts
and Techniques by Margaret Davidson. (Contemporary Drawing PowerPoint located on
website).
For the remainder of class students will be given the opportunity to play in their
sketchbook. The class will be able to experiment with various mediums available to
create mini-contemporary drawings.
Day 2
Students will begin class by responding to a questionnaire form (attached). The form will
encourage students to begin thinking about various issues.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

51

After ample time has been given to the students, the teacher will then present a
PowerPoint to students on social, contemporary issues and activist art.
(Contemporary/Social Activist Art Project located on webpage under lesson plan)
As a class we will compile a large list of topics that fall into the categories. Each student
will be allowed/required to go to the list on the smart board and write down a few topics.
Some class discussion will guide the students and help create a brief understanding of
such topics.
Students will then be introduced to Art21 on PBS. Students will watch a small clip of
from season four on change and will respond to some questions in a PowerPoint
(questions are from the teacher resource guide on the website and Art21 Change
PowerPoint is located on webpage)
The teacher will then present a PowerPoint created on the topic of Racism. Students will
be able to see how different artist portray race in many ways. Students will then create a
mini drawing in their sketchbook about what race means to them. (Racism PowerPoint is
located on webpage under additional resources)
Day 3-6
The teacher will begin the class with a PowerPoint titled Historical Activist Art on how
art has been used in the past to create a difference or promote change. (On website under
additional resources)
Following the brief history of art lesson the teacher will then present the students to artist,
Scott Erickson via PowerPoint/artist website and a YouTube video. The teacher will
emphasize how Erickson works with various non-profit organizations as motivation to
create a difference. During this time the students will be working in their sketchbook
taking notes. (Erickson PowerPoint on website, link to video is on Scoop.it!)
Students will then refer to the list they made as a class the previous day and pick out
some of the topics that is relevant to them and society. In their sketchbook the students
will document how their chosen topics are relevant to them and society.
For the remaining of class and the next four days the students will be allowed access to
individual laptops (checked out from the library) to construct their research. Guidelines
of the research will be presented/reviewed from the PowerPoint showed on Day 2.
Guided resources will be provided to students on various artists and museums to look out
through handouts, Art21, Pinterest, Scoop.it, Delicious, and the teachers website.
Note: Days 2-4 will begin with a recap of what is required and introduction to a new
artist.
Goals by days (to keep students on track, **some adjustments may be made)
All information will be dated and recorded in the students sketchbook.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

52

Day 1 of research: Narrow down your list of topics to one strong topic
you wish to work with
Day 2 of research: Locate and document a minimum of two strong
sources that inform you of your chosen topic and find a minimum of
one artist with annotation. (All must be in your sketchbook)
Day 3 of research: Locate further information required and find at least
two more artists that work within your theme.
Day 4 of research: Find additional artists as required, post research on
artists to Pinterest. Finish collecting any data needed.

Lesson 2 (Day 7-9)


This day will begin by presenting another artist to the student and discussing their work
and techniques used. (PowerPoint on Chris Jordan)
The class will then discuss what they have learned through out their research. What ways
did the artist make the work effective? How can art promote change? What ideas does
this provide them with?
Students will then begin creating various thumbnails on the topic they chose. These
thumbnails will be constructed in their sketchbook and will help them work through any
dilemma they may occur.
Following the completion of four various thumbnails the students will seek advice from
their peers. Each student will approach a minimum of three classmates who are unaware
of their topic and evaluate the thumbnails. They will be searching to see if the topic is
clearly understood in the artwork. Following this discussion the classmates will provide
the students with any suggestions on how to make the art stronger. Any peer feedback
given will be document in the sketchbook for the teacher to see and for the students to
look back at as they continue to work. Once the peer feedback has been addressed the
student will present the strongest two thumbnails to the teacher before proceeding to the
final paper (for their artwork). On these thumbnails will be what medium they plan to
use and what materials they will need (colored paper, paper size, etc.)
Once all suggestions have been thought through the students will then be able to begin.
Days 10-16
Students should all be working on their final paper (their final artwork) for the project. At
the beginning of each class students will be allowed 10-15 minutes to talk among their
classmates to receive in-progress criticism. Each student should seek a different
classmate each day. In the middle of class 4-6 students will be selected to receive a class
critique. (Again all criticism should be dated and documented in their sketchbook). The
final rubric will be displayed on the board for the students to reference through out the
project.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

53

In-process critiques will be provided along the way and teacher feedback will be
administered on a regular basis.
Following completion students will create an artist statement evaluating their artwork and
their understanding of the topic. Students will also include how their research on
contemporary artists and the issue assisted their artistic creative journey.
A rough checklist to keep student progress consistent:

Day 1 of the art project: Students should have completed the contour
of their drawing
By the end of day 3: Students should have 1/3 of the drawing
completed.
By the end of day 5: Students should be close to having 2/3 of the
drawing completed.
By the end of day 7: Students should be done with the project or close
to completion. What ever left to be done will be considered homework.
Finished product and artist statement will be required in two days.

Lesson 3 (Day 16-20)


Students will then scout a place around the school (or community) to display their work.
Students will think about their audience and how the location of the art will be associated
with the audience.
Students will correspond with people (admin or community members) to establish a
location and date to set up their exhibition.
Formative & Summative Assessments:
Formative assessment will consist of the teacher walking around and working with
students. I will be checking to see that all students are focused and on task at all times.
Students should be meeting daily goals provided by the teacher.
Sketchbooks will be collected every 4-5 days to evaluate that work is being done and
assessed with a checklist (provided below).
Summative assessments will be based on rubrics provided below. The research, finished
artwork, and presentation will all be analyzed by a rubric.
Accommodations:
Accommodations will be established based on the needs of the students. Most
accommodations will allow the students to have extended time on projects.
Attachments: checklists, grading instruments, questionnaire form.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

54

Formative Checklists
= meets
Items I will be looking for. (End of day 3)
=excee
ds
Mini contemporary drawing
Questionnaire worksheet
Notes from PowerPoint
Art 21 response
Mini drawing on what you think race is
Notes on any discussed artist
Historical activist notes
Narrowed list of topics
Thoughts on these topics and relevance
= meets
=excee
ds

Item I will be looking for. (End of day 7)


Notes from research day 1
Notes from research day 2
Notes from research day 3
Notes from research day 4
Contribution on Pinterest

= meets
=excee
ds

Item I will be looking for. When thumbnails are showed to teacher (around day
9)
First thumbnail thumbnail
Second thumbnail
Third thumbnail
Fourth thumbnail
Criticism from student 1
Criticism from student 2
Criticism from student 3

In progress critiques- teacher will collect sketchbooks at the end but will walk around
throughout the class to make sure student participation is checked off each day (therefore
students will not wait to the last day).
= meets
In progress critiques (Did the student acquire sufficient in progress critiques in
=excee the beginning of class from their peers and document it in their sketchbook?)
ds
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


Day 6
Thoughts on these topics and relevance

Rubric for Art Work and Artist Statement


Student Name:_______________________________________________
Yes
No Points Comments
Experiment (10 possible points)

Forms new creative work


based on inspiration (5)
Selects a range of
materials and work
methods (5)

Investigate (10 possible points)

Organizes ideas and


develops a plan in their
sketchbook (thumbnails)
(10)

Reflect (30 possible points)

Participates in critique
constructively (5)
Revises works (5)
Connects work to personal
interest/theme/idea and
provides description (20)

Technique (30 possible points)

Student mastered the use


of the medium as
previously learned (20)
Student addresses
composition and craft (10)

Interpret/Apply (20 possible points)

Evaluates the effectiveness


of art in artist statement
(10)

Interprets and presents an


issue contextual
information in artworks (5)
Applies relevant criteria to
evaluate art(5)

Total

55

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

56

Teacher
Comments_______________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________

Rubric for Research


Student Name: ______________________________
Exceeds Standards (3) Meets Standards (2)
Sketchbook/journal
contains research to
support the
development of
artwork

Sketchbook/journal
shows a variety of
possible solutions and
approaches
Sketchbook/journal
shows personalization
of the topic selected

Sketchbook/journal
makes connections
between theme and
contemporary artworks

Student has identified


their chosen topic.
Student has found an
exceptional amount of
information on their
topic (including
statistics,
organizations, and
outreach programs).
Student used reliable
sources to gather
information and
included their sources
Student has created
multiple thumbnails
on around their topic
and sought criticism
from multiple
classmates
Thumbnails and
designs illustrate clear
understanding and
several personal
connections to the
topic.
Students have
identified a minimum
of four contemporary
artworks by various
artists that address the

Student has identified


their chosen topic.
Student has found
adequate information
from reliable sites.

Needs Improvement
(1)
Student has identified
their chosen topic.
Research lacks
statistics,
organization or other
key information.

Students created 1-2


Students created 1
thumbnails on their
thumbnail.
topic. Students sought
criticism from 1-2
classmates
Thumbnails and
designs show some
personal connections
to the topic.

Thumbnails show
little to no personal
connection.

Students have
identified a 2-3
contemporary
artworks by various
artists that address the

Students lack
adequate research on
artists.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


topic they chose to
research.

57

topic they chose to


research.

Total
Teacher
Comments:______________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________

Rubric for Presentation


Student Name:_________________________________
Date:_______________________
Standards
Evidence
Not Observed
Analyze, select,
Analyzed and
and curate
curated
artifacts and or
completed art
artworks for
works in
presentation and preparation for
preservation
preservation and
presentation and
includes artist
statements.
Analyze and
Analyzed and
evaluate the
evaluated the
reasons and ways effectiveness of
an exhibition was the chosen plan
presented.
and location for
displaying works
of art and
provides
rationale.

Observed

Comments

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Questionnaire form

58

Name:_________________________

For a daily grade based on completion and genuine answers please answer the following
questions to the best of your ability. Underdeveloped answers will not receive credit.
1.Have you ever done a project that addresses a social issue or problems in the world?
Briefly explain.

2. Do you like talking about social issues, or problems in the world? Why or why not?

3. How do contemporary social issues present in what we see today affect how we think?

4. In addition to the 1 thing you would change in the world if given the
chance, what other social or contemporary issues are important to you?
(You cannot say I do not know {or any sort of answer in that way}, you
must answer).

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

59

Appendix C
Email Participant From
Dear ________,
I am attending the University of Floridas Distance Learning program to complete a
masters degree in Art Education. I am currently working on my capstone in lieu of a
thesis. My research is titled Exploring Contemporary Social Issues in a High School
Drawing Curriculum. For my capstone I will be designing a curriculum unit for a
secondary art drawing unit that will explore contemporary social issues. I would
greatly appreciate some feedback and suggestions on my curriculum unit. Any
feedback would be appreciated I am particularly interested in feedback on the
assessment and the students individual research portion.
Participation in this study is voluntary and there are no risks with participation.
The rewards for participation in this research will inform the discipline of art
education for a high school art class. All identities of participants in this study will
remain confidential. There is no compensation for participation and there are no
direct benefits to me for participating. If you are willing to participate and agree to
the procedure I have attached the permission form. Once I have received your form I
will supply you with my curriculum unit. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Regards,
Alicia Bagley

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

60

Appendix D
Teacher Consent Form
Consent for Teachers:
Exploring Contemporary Social Issues in a High School Drawing Curriculum
Purpose of the research study:
The purpose of this study is to create a curriculum for an art drawing unit.
What will you be asked to do in the study:
I will be creating a drawing unit of study to implement in the future. This drawing unit
will explore contemporary social issues. Participants will be asked to review and
provide advice and feedback to the curriculum at their availability. Participation will
take approximately twenty minutes.
Participation, Risks and Rewards:
Participation in this study is voluntary. There are no risks with participation. The
rewards for participation in this research will inform the discipline of art education for
a high school art class. All identities of participants in this study will remain
confidential. There is no compensation for participation and there is no direct benefits
to me for participating.
Right to withdraw from the study
You have the right to withdraw from the study at anytime without consequence.
Who to contact if you have questions about the study
Alicia Bagley, Graduate Student, College of Art, University of Florida
Bagleya2@ufl.edu; Supervisor, Michelle Tillander, PhD, Assistant Professor,
College of Art. PO Box 115801, Gainesville, FL 32611-5801 Office Phone:
352.392.9977 Fax: 352.392.8453 mtilland@ufl.edu
Who to contact about your rights as a research participant in the study
IRB02 Office Box 112250, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2250 phone 392-0433.
Agreement:
I have read the procedure described above. I understand as a volunteer, my participation in
this study is not required and my identity will remain confidential. I voluntarily agree to
participate in the project and I understand that the feedback will be provided through
emails, phone conversations, and in person dialogue.
Participant Name:_________________________________ Date:________________________
Participants Signature: ___________________________________________________________

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

61

Principal Investigator: ___________________________________ Date: _________________

Appendix E
IRB Protocol Submission Forms

UFIRB 02 Social & Behavioral Research


Protocol Submission Form

THIS FORM MUST BE TYPED. DO NOT STAPLE. Send this form and the supporting documents to IRB02, PO Box 112250, Gainesville, FL
32611. Should you have questions about completing this form, call 352-392-0433.

Title of Protocol:
Principal Investigator:

Exploring Contemporary and Social Issues in a Secondary Drawing Curriculum

Bagley
(Last Name)

Degree / Title:

Masters of Art Education

Alicia
(First Name)
Mailing Address: (If on
campus provide PO Box
address):

Department:

School of Art and Art History

UFID #:********

**********

Email:
Bagleya2@ufl.edu
Telephone #:
***-***-****

Co-Investigator(s):
Coordinator:
Research Asst.:

UFID#:
(Last Name)

(First Name)
Mailing Address(If on

Degree/Title

campus provide PO Box


address):

Department:

Supervisor (If PI is
student):

Telephone #:

Tillander
(Last Name)

Degree / Title:
Department:

Email:

Michelle
(First Name)

PhD

Mailing Address:

School of Art and Art History

School of Art & Art History,


University of Florida
PO Box 115801, Gainesville,
FL 32611-5801
Office Phone: 352.392.9977
Fax: 352.392.8453

UFID#
****-****
Email :

mtilland@ufl.edu
Telephone #:
757-619-4444
352-392-9977

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Dates of Proposed
Research:

62

Summer 2015

Source of Funding (A copy of the grant proposal must be submitted with


this protocol if funding is involved): NOTE: If your study has current or
pending funding, AND your research involves comparison of different
kinds of treatment or interventions for behavior, cognition or mental
health, you must submit the Clinical Trial Assessment Form.
Describe the Scientific Purpose of the Study:

No funding sources

To create an art drawing curriculum unit.

Describe the Research Methodology in Non-Technical Language:


I will analyze and use scholarly, educational, and artistic sources to create a drawing curriculum unit. I will share the curriculum
unit with selected teachers for their review and advice. I will ask selected teacher participants to critique and offer suggestions
about my curriculum unit. Participants and I will communicate by e-mail, by phone, and in person. I will keep their feedback in
the form of notes that I keep based on conversations with participants, any written advice that they provide to me, and through
records of emails. This data will be stored at my home working station and on my personal laptop computer. Based on their
feedback I will improve the curriculum unit. The identities of participants in this study will remain confidential.

Describe the Data You Will Collect:


I will interview selected teacher participants in person, by email, and by phone. Data
collected will include any written information they provide to me, and my notes
based on conversations and interviews.

Please List all Locations Where the


Research Will Take Place:

Online questions/ phone conversations/


or in person conversations.

Describe Potential Benefits:


The feedback provided from the participants will be collected and used to inform and adjust my curriculum unit.
Describe Potential Risks:
There are no risks with participation.

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

63

Describe How Participant(s) Will Be Recruited:


Participants involved will be based on their expertise and availability. High school art teachers within the county I teach will be
invited to provide me feedback.

Maximum
Number of
Participants (to
be approached
with consent)

Age Range of
Participants:

24-50

Amount of
Compensation/
course credit:

No Compensation

Describe the Informed Consent Process.


Teachers will be asked to volunteer to provide feedback in this research. Teachers will be asked to volunteer to the study via
email. Participants who agree to volunteer will then be provided with an electronic consent form or a hard copy in person.

(SIGNATURE SECTION)
Principal Investigator(s)
Signature:

Date:
5/5/2015

Co-Investigator(s) Signature(s):

Date:

Supervisors Signature:

Date:
5/5/2015

Department Chair Signature:

Date:

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Appendix F
List of Some Contemporary Drawing Artists
Gala Bent
http://galabent.com/
Robert Birmelin
http://robertbirmelin.com/
Kiki Smith
http://www.artnet.com/artists/kiki-smith/
William Kentridge
http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=7919
Barbara Fugate
http://www.barbarafugate.com/
Robert Ernst
http://roberternstmarx.com/
Shaun Tan
http://www.shauntan.net/
Robert Flexner
http://whitney.org/Exhibitions/2010Biennial/RolandFlexner
Joseph Pentheroudakis
http://jpentheroudakis.com/
Louise Hopkins
http://www.mummeryschnelle.com/pages/louisebiog.htm
Agnes Denes
http://www.agnesdenesstudio.com/
Peter Millett
http://www.gregkucera.com/millett.htm
James Valerio
http://forumgallery.com/artist/james-valerio/
Ellen Gallagher
http://www.hauserwirth.com/artists/7/ellen-gallagher/biography/

64

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


Zhi Lin
http://art.washington.edu/art/art-faculty/zhi-lin/
Stephen Fisher
http://www.stephenfisherartist.com/
Daniel Zeller
http://www.soskine.com/artists/daniel-zeller
Barbara Robertson
http://www.barbararobertsonart.com/
Jeff Koons
http://www.jeffkoons.com/
List of other contemporary Artist
Gherhard Richter
https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/
Damien Hirst
http://www.damienhirst.com/
Olafur Eliasson
http://www.olafureliasson.net/
Keith Harring
http://www.haring.com/
Yayoi Kusama
http://www.yayoi-kusama.jp/e/information/
Mariana Abramovic
http://www.art21.org/artists/marina-abramovic
Thomas Schutte
http://www.thomas-schuette.de/website_content.php
Richard Prince
http://www.richardprince.com/
Francesco Clemente
http://www.francescoclemente.net/
John Baldessari
http://www.baldessari.org/

65

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Anish Kapoor
http://anishkapoor.com/
Wolfgang Thomas
http://www.saatchiart.com/gaeg
Takashi Murakami
http://www.gagosian.com/artists/takashi-murakami
Mike Kelly
http://mikekelley.com/
Ida Applebroog
http://idaapplebroog.com/
Anselm Kiefer
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/kief/hd_kief.htm
Steve McQueen
http://www.mariangoodman.com/artists/steve-mcqueen/
Pieere Huyghe
http://www.mariangoodman.com/artists/pierre-huyghe/
Thomas Hirschhorn
http://www.art21.org/artists/thomas-hirschhorn
Marlene Dumas
http://www.marlenedumas.nl/
Richard Serra
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/richard-serra
Vija Celmins
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/vija-celmins
Matthew Barney
http://www.cremaster.net/
Bruce Nauman
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/bruce-nauman
Albert Oehlen
http://www.skarstedt.com/artists/albert-oehlen/

66

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


Odd Nerdrum
http://forumgallery.com/artist/odd-nerdrum/
Rirkrit Tiravarija
http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=7479
Carl Andre
http://www.carlandre.net/
Jenny Saiile
http://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/jenny_saville.htm
Louise Bourgeois
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/louise-bourgeois
Lawrence Weiner
http://www.lissongallery.com/artists/lawrence-weiner
Tom Friedman
http://www.stephenfriedman.com/artists/tom-friedman/
Dan Graham
http://www.lissongallery.com/artists/dan-graham
Rita Ackermann
http://www.ritaackermann.com/
Chuck Close
http://www.pacegallery.com/artists/80/chuck-close
Sol LeWitt
http://www.massmoca.org/lewitt/
Franz West
http://www.gagosian.com/artists/franz-west
Edward Ruscha
http://www.artnet.com/artists/ed-ruscha/
Sigmar Polke
http://www.artnet.com/artists/sigmar-polke/
Mariko Mori
http://www.skny.com/artists/mariko-mori/
Jo Baer

67

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM


http://www.jobaer.net/
Rachel Whiteread
http://www.gagosian.com/artists/rachel-whiteread
Lucian Freud
http://www.artnet.com/artists/lucian-freud/
Neo Rauch
http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/neo-rauch/
Martin Creed
http://www.martincreed.com/

68

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

69

Appendix G

Abortion

Battered Women

Corporal
Punishment

Academic Freedom

Binge Drinking

Corporate
Downsizing

Adoption

Birth Control

Advertising

Bisexuality

Crime

Affordable Care Act


(Obamacare)

Blogging

Criminal Justice
System

Ageism / Age
Discrimination

Body ARt

Cults

Bulimia Nervosa

Cyber Bullying
(Cyberbullying)

Date Rape

Death Penalty

Depression

Diet

Air Pollution

Bullying

Airport Screening
Procedures

Campus Crime

Cancer

Capital Punishment /
Death Penalty

Airport Security

Alcoholism

Americans with
Disabilities Act

Animal Rights

Anorexia Nervosa

Anti-Muslim
Discrimination

Celebrity Culture

Discrimination

Cell Phones

Diversity

Censorship

Disaster Relief

Chemical Weapons

Domestic Violence

Child Abuse

Drinking and Driving

Child Labor

Driving While Black

Child Molesting/porn

Climate Change

Drug Abuse / Drug


Addiction

Drug Legalization

Drunk Driving

Eating Disorders

Ebola Virus Disease

Arms Control

Artificial Intelligence

Assisted Suicide

Attention Deficit
Disorder

Cloning

Autism

Colorisim

Baby Boomers

Cloud Hacking

Bankruptcy

Computer Hacking

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Elder Abuse

Global Warming

Elections

Globalization

Endangered Species

Graffitti

Energy
Conservation

Energy Resources

Environmental
issues

70

Meth
Labs (Methampheta
mine Laboratories)

Militarization of
Police

Gun Control

Minimum Wage

Gun Rights

Minorities

Hate Crimes

National Debt

Hazing

Environmental
Pollution

Health Care
Disparities

National Rifle
Association

Noise Pollution

Environmental
Racism

Health Care Reform

Nuclear Weapons

Equal Pay

HIV / AIDS

Nutrition

Equal Rights

Homelessness

Euthanasia / Mercy
Killing / Assisted
Suicide

Homophobia

Obamacare
(Affordable Care Act)

Obesity

Honor Killings

Oil Spills

Human Trafficking

Hunger

Organ and Body


Donation

Identify Theft

Organized Crime

Illegal Immigration

Outsourcing Jobs

Interracial
Dating/Marriage

Overpopulation

Ozone Layer

Legalization of
Marijuana

Patriot Act

Patriotism

Excessive Force By
Law Enforcement

Famine

Fast Food

Firearms

Felony

Feminism

Gambling

Gang Violence

Gay Rights

Genetic Engineering

Genetically Modified
Food

Juvenile
Delinquency

Mall Shootings

Pet Overpopulation

Mass Murder

Pedophilia

Mentally Disabled

Photobombs

Physical Fitness

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Plagiarism

Riots

Police Brutality

Rock Music

Police Militarization

Same-Sex Marriage

Political Corruption

Pollution

71

Texting While
Driving

Texting While
Walking

Sex Trade

Unemployment

Sexism

Vandalism

Popular Culture

Sexual Abuse

Vegetarianism

Pornography

Sexual Harassment

Veterans

Poverty

Sexting

Video Games

Prayer in Schools

Shopping While
Black

Vigilantism

Pregnancy

Violence in Schools

Prisoners Rights

Violence in Music
Videos

Privacy

Prostitution

Violence in Video
Games

Race

Voter
Disenfranchisement

Racial Disparities in
Sentencing

Voting Rights
Restrictions

Racial Profiling

War Crimes

Racism

Waste Pollution

Rap Music

Weapons

Rape

Welfare Reform

Retail Profiling

White Supremacy

Recycling and
Conservation

Wilderness
Preservation

Wildlife conservation

Women in the
Military

Womens Rights

Single Parenting

Sleeper Cells

Smoking / Tobacco
Use

Social Networking
and Privacy

Spousal Abuse

Stand Your Ground


Laws

Steroid Use in
Sports

Stereotyping

Suicide

Sweat Shops

Teen Pregnancy

Refugees

Teen Suicide

Religion

Right to Work

Television and
Violence

Terrorism

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

Working Parents

Workplace Violence

72

EXPLORING ISSUES IN A SECONDARY DRAWING ROOM

73

List of Figures with Figure Captions

Figure 1. Screenshot of my Pinterest


Page..24

Figure 2. Screenshot of my Scoop.It! Page...


..24

Figure 3. Screenshot of my
webpage..27

Figure 4. Screenshot of my Delicious


Page27

Figure 5. The Reconcile Mural, Gregg Deal, 2014, photo by Dakota Fine...
31

Figure 6. Swazi Art 5 from Orphan Art Project 2010.


32

Figure 7. Cigarette Butts, by Chris Jordan, 2013 60x72.


33

Author Biography

My name is Alicia Bagley and I am a fifth year high school art teacher. I

am 27 years old and one of three art teachers at Nation Ford High School in Fort Mill,
South Carolina. I completed my undergraduate studies at Winthrop University in Rock
Hill, South Carolina.

I consider myself to be an art educator and working artist. I like to work

with the students and play with different mediums. My personal work captures my idea of
beauty into photographs, paintings, or drawings. I also enjoy traveling and finding hidden
gems that also is noted in my personal art.