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SARS

Severe Acute
Respiratory Syndrome

Once exposed, SARS


may incubate in the body
for 210 days.

An individual with SARS


may be contagious up to
10 days after the fever
and respiratory
symptoms have
subsided.

Illness was reported in


more than 30 countries
and on five continents.

Everything you need to know about SARS

Transmission

Treatment and
Prevention

SARS is thought to be spread


through close person-to-person
contact.
SARS is most effectively spread
through respiratory droplets emitted
when an infected individual coughs
or sneezes. These droplets may be
transferred through the air when
breathing close to an infected
individual and by touching an area
covered with the droplets.

What is SARS? Where


did it come from?
Severe
acute
respiratory
syndrome (SARS) is a serious
form of pneumonia. It is caused
by a virus that was first identified
in 2003.
World
Health
Organization
(WHO) physician Dr. Carlo
Urbani identified SARS as a new
disease in 2003. He diagnosed it
in a 48-year-old businessman
who had traveled from the
Guangdong province of China,
through Hong Kong, to Hanoi,
Vietnam. The businessman and
the doctor who first diagnosed

Signs and Symptoms


o

Early-onset fever (38C or more)

Headache and body aches

Diarrhea

A dry, nonproductive cough,


which may lead to hypoxia (low
oxygen levels in the blood) and
may require ventilation

There is currently no specific


treatment for SARS.

It is recommended individuals
infected with SARS be treated with
the same techniques as any other
severe pneumonia.

Always wash hands with soap and


water or use an alcohol-based
hand sanitizer.

Pneumonia
o

Avoid touching anything or anyone


with unwashed hands.

Cover mouth and nose when


coughing or sneezing, and
encourage others to do so.