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The word Abacus is derived from

the Greek word 'abax', meaning


'calculating board' or 'calculating
table'. The first Chinese Abacus
was invented around 500 B.C. The
abacus, as we know it today, was
used in China around 1300 A.D.

Oughtred also introduced the ""


symbol for multiplication as well as the
abbreviations "sin" and "cos" for the
sine and cosine functions.

Blaise Pascal along with Wilhelm


Schickard was one of two inventors of
the mechanical calculator in the early

Napier's bones is a manuallyoperated calculating device created by


John Napier of Merchiston for
calculation of products and quotients
of numbers. Napier published his
version in 1617 in Rabdologi, printed
in 4Edinburgh, Scotland, dedicated to
his patron Alexander Seton.

The Rev. William Oughtred (5 March


1574 30 June 1660) was an English
mathematician and Anglican minister.
it was Oughtred who first used two
such scales sliding by one another to
perform direct multiplication and
division; and he is credited as the
inventor of the slide rule in 1622.

17th century. Pascal designed the


machine in 1642.
In 1671 the German mathematicianphilosopher Gottfried Wilhelm von
Leibniz designed a calculating
machine called the Step Reckoner. (It
was first built in 1673.) The Step
Reckoner expanded on Pascal's ideas
and did multiplication by repeated
addition and shifting.
The Analytical Engine was a proposed
mechanical general-purpose computer
designed by English mathematician
Charles Babbage.[2]

The Analytical Engine was a


proposed mechanical general-purpose
computer designed by English
mathematician Charles Babbage. It
was first described in 1837 as the
successor to Babbage's difference
engine, a design for a mechanical
computer.

Herman Hollerith (February 29, 1860


November 17, 1929) was an American
statistician and inventor who
developed a mechanical tabulator
based on punched cards to rapidly
tabulate statistics from millions of
pieces of data. He was the founder of
the Tabulating Machine Company that
later merged to become IBM. Hollerith
is widely regarded as the father of
modern machine data processing.[3]
His invention of the punched card
evaluating machine marks the
beginning of the era of automatic data
processing systems, and his concept
dominated the computing landscape
for nearly a century.[4]