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Running Head: Coaching Journal

Coaching Journal
Nia M. Cannon
Kennesaw State University

Running Head: Coaching Journal


Coach: Nia Cannon
Teacher: Dr. Smith-Green
Session 1- February 27, 2015
Reflection on Challenges and Solution: During our initial coaching
session, Dr. Smith-Green agreed to meet with me during our
collaborative planning time to discuss how she could use some of the
technology resources in her classroom to better engage and motivate
low-level students. During our initial session, I had her complete my
coaching form so she could pinpoint her areas of need. She elaborated
that she wanted assistant is the following areas: downloading new
apps to the school technology, how to effectively use the individual
response system (Active Expressions), and linking and navigating
through old and new websites. I chose for this meeting to very informal
so that the two of us could build a professional relationship centered on
our mutual interest in teaching and technology. I wanted to seem as if
I was there to help her and not perceived as me being an authority on
the integration of technology and what she needed to do in her
classroom to engage her students, but moreover, to establish a
partnership, to gain insight into her personality and the source of her
passion for technology. With that being said, I thought it was beneficial
for both of us to share some background information on our careers in
education, but more importantly, our interest and hobbies outside of
the work. According to Knight (2007), a subtler but equally important
goal for instructional coaches is to establish emotional connections

Running Head: Coaching Journal


with collaborating teachers. Having read this in the text and actually
experienced it in my previous years of coaching, I found this to be a
beneficial way to getting my colleague to trust me. The foundation of
coaching is building relationships with a level of emotion and trust.
Skill and Affective Changes: During this initial session, Dr. SmithGreen and I talked about what are goals would be for our coaching
sessions and when we would meet for our weekly visits to share
successful practices through collaboration and reflective practice.
Identified Strategy: Building an emotional connection (Knight, p. 24)
and Employing Authentic Listening (Knight, p. 60)

2nd Session 04 March 2015:


Reflection on Challenges and Solution: At the start of todays
session, I went through the responses from her coaching form she
completed at the last meeting session and asked her if there was
anything else she would like to discuss prior to us moving forward with
our partnership. At which time she expressed her desire to proceed
with our coaching sessions.
Skill and Affective Changes: With that being the case, I shared with
Dr. Smith-Green that in my efforts to gauge her perceptions of
technology integration and to identify some potential collaborative
strategies, I would like for her to complete an Early Adopter and LoTi
survey, in which the results would not be shared with anyone without

Running Head: Coaching Journal


her permission. In addition, I reviewed the format of the questions,
how the feedback would be captured using Google Docs and when the
two surveys should be completed. At the conclusion of this session, I
expressed to her that I would like to return to her classroom to observe
her lower-level class in an effort to see what strategies we could
implement to address the learning needs of her students.
Identified Strategy: Support (p.31).

3rd Session 11 March 2015:


Reflection on Challenges and Solution: Dr. Smith-Green and I
began todays session by reviewing the results from her two surveys.
Overall, her responses indicated that she is more of an late majority
adopter and is skeptical about the use of new technology. She rather
wait until others have implemented with success before she dives into
the benefits students can receive from the learning process.
Skill and Affective Change: Dr. Smith-Green felt that the data
captured in the survey accurately described her approach to
technology. Based on my experience, one of the benefits for teachers,
such as Dr. Smith-Green, being one of the last ones to adopt new
technology in their school builds trust, collaboration and support with
the district instructional technology specialist. The reason being is
because waiting for the last round of implementation there is more
certainty the technology is bulletproof and reliable. According to

Running Head: Coaching Journal


Knight (2007), coaching is about relationship with teachers as much
as it is about instruction and to get around barriers to change, coaches
often start by working one-to-one with teachers (p. 33). After
reviewing the survey data, I provided Dr. Smith-Green with feedback
from my informal observation (which was done while my co-teacher
was in my classroom). At this present time I recommended that I could
model for her how to use ActivInspire and the ActivExpressions to
engage her students using the Power Points/ Flip charts she was
currently using. She agreed that this would be a good idea.
Identified Strategy: Modeling (Knight, p. 29)

4th Session 17 March 2015:


Reflection on Challenges and Solution: I was so engaged in last
weeks observation with Dr. Smith that I forgot to review her survey
results. I began todays session with me providing her feedback from
the LoTi questionnaire. Based on the answers provided by Dr. SmithGreen and my informal observations of her 1st period class, her level of
technology engagement is currently at LoTi 4a (Mechanical), moving
toward LoTi 4b (routine). At LoTi 4a, her students are engaged in
exploring real world issues and solving authentic problems using the
available digital resources; however the she may experience classroom
management or school climate issues that restrict full integration.

Running Head: Coaching Journal


Skill and Affective Change: During my interview with Dr. SmithGreen, she stated that her goal for next school year is to ensure that
her students are fully engaged in exploring real world issues and
solving authentic problems related to the neighborhoods in which they
reside. I noticed during this session, as well as last weeks session,
that Dr. Smith-Green welcomes feedback and is receptive to the ideas I
present as it relates to instructional technology. According to Knight
(2007), observing and providing feedback are other important way in
which instructional coaches enable teachers to teach interventions
with a high degree of fidelity to the research-validated practices. At
the conclusion of this session, Dr. Smith-Green and I established a date
(Wednesday) for me to model a science lesson using the
ActivExpressions and her Power Point presentation. I informed her that
I would like to make it more relevant to content she was currently
teaching by integrating the technology into the current unit she was
teaching. She thought that this was an excellent idea.
Identified Strategy: Observing and providing feedback (Knight, p.
29)

5th Session 24 March 2015:


Reflection on Challenges and Solution: I began this session by
getting a set of thirty-two ActivExpressions and modeling for Dr. SmithGreen how to register them using the Device Registration option in the

Running Head: Coaching Journal


ActivInspire software. After registering the first twenty-two devices, I
had Dr. Smith-Green register the remaining ten devices using the steps
I had just modeled her. While she performed the steps to register the
remaining devices, I made it a point to verbally affirm all of the correct
steps she was making. According to Knight (2007), a very valuable
service an instructional coach can provide is to start to communicate
the genuinely positive, appreciative, and admiring experience of the
teacher they observe in the classroom. After the devices were
registered, I opened a flipchart that I had previously used the year
before containing a multiple-choice review questions the reviewed the
difference between land breezes and sea breezes. I modeled for Dr.
Smith-Green how I created the multiple-choice questions and how to
conduct the lesson review using the ActivExpressions for text/short
answer responses. I then observed her conducting the lesson and was
very impressed with her ability to quickly navigate the ActivInspire
software and integrate the learner response devices. Although she
struggled with the initial linking and resetting the slides she did a
terrific job. The students were very eager to participate and to answer
correctly.
Skill and Affective Change: At the conclusion of this session we both
felt really good about the progress she was making in such a short
amount of time, especially only having seen me model the lesson one
time. She expressed her interest in more interactive hands on tools

Running Head: Coaching Journal


that she could use in the classroom. I expressed to her that I would like
to present an entire workshop for our science department on
interactive web tools for our integrated science classrooms. She
agreed that I could share my workshop at a future professional learning
community meeting.
Identified Strategy: Simplify (Knight, p. 106) and Giving a model
lesson (Knight, p. 114)

References
Knight, J. (2007). Instructional Coaching: A partnership approach to
improving instruction. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.