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CTE Electronics Literacy Toolkit


Career Custer: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Pathway: Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technicians
Andrew Borriello
EDU755 Utilizing Literacy Strategies in CTE
University of New England
Professor Leon Levesque
12/15/2014

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Table of Contents
Part 1 Seven Components (6 strands) ..................................................................................... 4-22
Reading: Exemplars Industry Specific ........................................................................................ 4-13
Readings to Motivate: ................................................................................................................... 14
Writing: Exemplars ................................................................................................................... 14-16
Presenting: Video Exemplars ..................................................................................................................... 16
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Scenarios .............................................................................................. 17
Vocabulary Development: Technical Terms Professional Foods (TEJ)................................................... 18-21
Research Exemplars (Think Aloud) ............................................................................................................. 22

Part 2 Literacy Rich Examples and Exemplars for Professional Foods ....................................... 23
Reading Strategy and Examples ............................................................................................... 23-25
Writing Strategy and Examples ......................................................................................................... 26
Vocabulary Development Strategy and Examples ................................................................................ 27-28

Speaking/Presenting Strategy and Examples .......................................................................... 29-30


Critical Thinking Strategy and Examples ....................................................................................... 31-32
Research/Inquiry Strategy and Examples ............................................................................................. 32-33
Literacy Development in a Lab/Shop .......................................................................................................... 33
Literacy and Technology Model .................................................................................................................. 34

Part 3 Lesson Planning/Retooling................................................................................................ 35


Lesson .................................................................................................................................................... 35-39

Part 4 Unit Planning/Retooling .................................................................................................... 40


Unit Plan................................................................................................................................................. 40-41
Lesson 1.................................................................................................................................................. 41-43
Lesson 2.................................................................................................................................................. 44-46
Lesson 3.................................................................................................................................................. 46-48

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CTE presents a unique opportunity to reinforce core skills such as literacy. The days of reading
and writing in only English class are over and CTE courses need to take an active role in improving all
core skills to prepare students for the 21st century global work force. Students should be reading
literature that relates directly to the lesson being taught. All too often I have seen educators assign
reading for the sake of assigning reading, however, the outcome is never a positive one. Students will
understand if the reading does not pertain to the lesson being taught and will be less likely to read next
time. But if the teacher can relate the reading to the lesson it will help connect the dots. At the same
time students should be given a choice. It is believed that students who choose what they read from a
number of options are more likely to actually read. This is not an easy task. Finding multiple reading
that directly relate to the specific topic can be challenging, but once they are found you can hold on to
them.
CTE has an important role in teaching literacy. Reading is an important skill and its importance
will only increase. Despite non-traditional certification routes, CTE teachers are becoming more active
in teaching literacy; but these CTE teachers need help. These teachers have received limited instruction
on how to teach reading. However, the opportunity is there and must be acted upon. Students in a CTE
class typically chose to be there. They will find the subject matter interesting, and studies show students
are much more likely to read and comprehend material that interests them. CTE teachers can connect
reading to hands on solutions to real life problems. CTE teachers have the opportunity to prepare
students with the most marketable job skill, reading.

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Part 1 Seven Components


Exemplar 1: Class Lab
An Ohm's Law Experiment
For this experiment, we want to use a 9 volt battery to power an LED. LEDs are fragile and can only
have a certain amount of current flowing through them before they burn out. In the documentation for
an LED, there will always be a current rating. This is the maximum amount of current that can flow
through the particular LED before it burns out.

Materials Required
In order to perform the experiments listed at the end of the tutorial, you will need:

A multi-meter
A 9-Volt battery
A 560-Ohm resistor(or the next closest value)
An LED

NOTE: LEDs are whats known as a non-ohmic devices. This means that the equation for the
current flowing through the LED itself is not as simple as V=IR. The LED introduces something
called a voltage drop into the circuit, thus changing the amount of current running through it.
However, in this experiment we are simply trying to protect the LED from over-current, so we will
neglect the current characteristics of the LED and choose the resistor value using Ohms Law in
order to be sure that the current through the LED is safely under 20mA.
For this example, we have a 9 volt battery and a red LED with a current rating of 20 milliamps, or
0.020 amps. To be safe, wed rather not drive the LED at its maximum current but rather its
suggested current, which is listed on its datasheet as 18mA, or 0.018 amps. If we simply connect the
LED directly to the battery, the values for Ohms law look like this:

Therefore:

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And since we have no resistance yet:

Dividing by zero gives us infinite current! Well, not infinite in practice, but as much current as the
battery can deliver. Since we do NOT want that much current flowing through our LED, were going
to need a resistor. Our circuit should look like this:

We can use Ohms Law in the exact same way to determine the resistor value that will give us the
desired current value:

Therefore:

Plugging in our values:

Solving for resistance:

So, we need a resistor value of around 500 ohms to keep the current through the LED under the
maximum current rating.

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500 ohms is not a common value for off-the-shelf resistors, so this device uses a 560 ohm resistor in
its place. Heres what our device looks like all put together.

Success! Weve chosen a resistor value that is high enough to keep the current through the LED
below its maximum rating, but low enough that the current is sufficient to keep the LED nice and
bright.
This LED/current-limiting resistor example is a common occurrence in hobby electronics. Youll often
need to use Ohms Law to change the amount of current flowing through the circuit. Another
example of this implementation is seen in the LilyPad LED boards.

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With this setup, instead of having to choose the resistor for the LED, the resistor is already on-board
with the LED so the current-limiting is accomplished without having to add a resistor by hand.

Exemplar 2: Reading Content


Circuit Basics
Voltage and how it Works
Youve probably heard that a battery or a wall outlet has a certain number of volts. This is a
measurement of the electrical potential produced by the battery, or the utility grid connected to the
wall outlet.
All those volts are sitting there waiting for you to use them, but theres a catch: in order for
electricity to do any work, it needs to be able to move. Its kind of like a blown-up balloon; if you
pinch it off, there is air in there that could do something if its released, but it wont actually do
anything until you let it out.
Unlike air coming out of a balloon, electricity can only flow through materials that can conduct
electricity, such as copper wire. If you connect a wire to a battery or wall outlet (WARNING: the
voltage in a wall outlet is dangerous, dont do this!), you will be giving the electricity a path to follow.
But if the wire isnt connected to anything else, the electricity wont have anywhere to go and still
wont move.

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What makes electricity move? Electricity wants to flow from a higher voltage to a lower
voltage. This is exactly like the balloon: the pressurized air in the balloon wants to flow from inside
the balloon (higher pressure) to outside the balloon (lower pressure). If you create a conductive path
between a higher voltage and a lower voltage, electricity will flow along that path. And if you insert
something useful into that path like an LED, the flowing electricity will do some work for you, like
lighting up that LED. Huzzah!

So, where do you find a higher voltage and a lower voltage? Heres something really useful to
know: every source of electricity has two sides. You can see this on batteries, which have metal
caps on either ends, or your wall outlet that has two (or more) holes. In batteries and other DC
(Direct Current) voltage sources, these sides (often called terminals) are named positive (or +),
and negative (or -).
Why does every source of electricity have two sides? This goes back to the idea of potential, and
that you need a voltage difference in order to get electricity to flow. It sounds silly, but you cant have
a difference without two things to be different. In any power supply, the positive side will have a
higher voltage than the negative side, which is exactly what we want. In fact, when we measure
voltage, we usually say that the negative side is 0 volts, and the positive side is however many volts
the supply can provide.
Electrical sources are like pumps. Pumps always have two sides, an outlet that blows something out,
and an inlet that sucks something in. Batteries and generators and solar panels work the same way.
Something inside them is hard at work moving electricity towards the outlet (the positive side), but all
that electricity leaving the device creates a void, which means that the negative side needs to pull
electricity in to replace it.*
What have we learned so far?

Voltage is potential, but electricity needs to flow to do anything useful.


Electricity needs a path to flow through, which must be an electrical conductor such as
copper wire.
Electricity will flow from a higher voltage to a lower voltage.
DC voltage sources always have two sides, called positive and negative, with the positive
side a higher voltage than the negative side.

The Simplest Circuit

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Were finally ready to make electricity work for us! If we connect the positive side of a voltage
source, through something that does some work such as a Light Emitting Diode (LED), and back to
the negative side of the voltage source; electricity, or current, will flow. And we can put things in the
path that do useful things when current flows through them, like LEDs that light up.

This circular path, which is always required to get electricity to flow and do something useful,
is called a circuit. A circuit is a path that starts and stops at the same place, which is exactly what
were doing.
Click this link to see a simulation of current flowing through a simple circuit. This simulation requires
Java to run.

*Benjamin Franklin originally wrote that electricity flows from the positive side of a voltage source to
the negative side. However, Franklin had no way of knowing that electrons actually flow in the
opposite direction - at the atomic level, they come out of the negative side and loop back to the
positive side. Because engineers followed Franklins lead for hundreds of years before the truth was
discovered, we still use the wrong convention to this day. Practically speaking this detail doesnt
matter, and as long as everyone uses the same convention, we can all build circuits that work just
fine.

Short and Open Circuits


What is a Load?
The reason we want to build circuits is to make electricity do useful things for us. The way we do that
is by putting things in the circuit that use the current flow to light up, make noise, run programs, etc.
These things are called loads, because they load down the power supply, just like youre loaded
down when youre carrying something. The same way you could be loaded down with too much
weight, its possible to load down a power supply too much, which will slow down the current flow.
But unlike you, its also possible to load down a circuit too little - this may let too much current flow
(imagine running too fast if you werent carrying any weight), which can burn out your parts or even
the power supply.

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Youll learn all about voltage, current, and loads in the next tutorial: Voltage, Current, Resistance,
and Ohms Law. But for now, lets learn about two special cases of circuit: short circuit, and open
circuit. Knowing about these will help tremendously when youre troubleshooting your own circuits.

Exemplar 3: Online Article


http://ecmweb.com/code-basics/switches-receptacles-and-panelboards

Switches, Receptacles, and Panelboards


Feb 1, 2012Mike Holt, NEC Consultant | Electrical Construction and Maintenance

Article 404 of the NEC applies to switches of all types, although the Code doesnt include a
specific definition for a switch. However, six types of switches are defined in Art. 100, which
gives us a pattern to follow.
A dictionary definition of a switch is a device that opens or closes a circuit, or changes the
connections from one circuit to another. In this regard, a circuit breaker is a special kind of
switch and is included in the scope of Art. 404 (click here to see Fig. 1).

Neutrals
When wiring lighting circuits supplied by a grounded general-purpose branch circuit, the
2011 NEC now requires you to provide a neutral conductor at nearly every switch point
[404.2(C)]. The purpose for this is to complete a circuit path for electronic lighting control
devices, such as occupancy sensors. For many such devices, you must provide standby
voltage and current at the switch. When neutral conductors are not installed at switches, the
unfortunate result is the equipment grounding conductor (EGC) may be used to fulfill the
function of the neutral conductor. While the current from an electronic lighting device on
the EGC is typically less than 0.50mA, the installation of many electronic control devices at
switch locations in a building can result in an accumulation of excess current on the EGCs.
With this Code change, gone are the days of using dead-end 3-way switches and 2conductor switch loops. You are allowed to omit the grounded conductor if:
1. Using a raceway that is sized to accommodate an added neutral. The use of a raceway
obviously allows the installer to pull in a neutral conductor should the need arise in the
future, provided the raceway is large enough [404.2(C) Ex 1].
2. For cable wiring methods, if an additional cable can be fished into the switch location in the
future without removing finish materials, such as drywall. This would require access
through a framing cavity that is open at the top or bottom or through a wall, floor, or ceiling
that is unfinished on one side [404.2(C) Ex 2] (click here to see Fig. 2)

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Grounding Switch Plates
The metal mounting yokes for switches, dimmers, and similar control switches must be
connected to an EGC of a type recognized in 250.118, whether or not a metal faceplate is
installed [404.9(B)] (click here to see Fig. 3).
A few years ago, a listed switch constructed entirely of plastic entered the market. These
switches dont allow a metallic faceplate to be installed on them. Because a plastic
(nonconductive) component is inherently safer than a metal component connected to an
EGC, a new exception allows for this product [404.9(B), Ex 2].
Another exception addresses the use of wiring devices with integral enclosures. Similar to
the switches discussed above, these have nonmetallic faceplates and dont allow for the
attachment of metallic ones [404.9(B), Ex 3].

Receptacle Replacements
Receptacle requirements are in Art. 406 (see Article 406 on page 29). New requirements
have been added for the replacement of receptacles to address replacements in areas
requiring AFCI protection, tamper-resistant receptacles, or weather-resistant receptacles
[406.4(D)].
As aging wiring systems have become a growing concern in the electrical industry, the Code
is taking a proactive approach to providing protection of these systems. Many areas of a
dwelling now require the use of AFCI protection to help avoid electrical fires.
When AFCIs were first introduced into the NEC, the substantiation for their inclusion was
based largely on electrical fires in older homes. However, the Code began by protecting new
and future wiring systems but didnt address the older ones that contained many of the fires
discussed in the AFCI arguments. The 2011 NEC expands the AFCI requirements to older
homes. Because older homes often dont contain an EGC, installation of an AFCI circuit
breaker does little in the way of protecting the branch circuits. The receptacle-type AFCIs
also provide a significantly lower level of protection, but they will be required nonetheless.
The 2008 NEC introduced the concept of tamper-resistant receptacles in dwelling units.
The requirements of that section (406.11, now 406.12) apply to new installations. The 2011
Code now also requires that on existing dwelling units, any receptacles that are replaced will
be replaced with tamper-resistant receptacles.

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A similar change was made for weather-resistant receptacles, using the same logic as that
used for tamper-resistant receptacles.

Wet Locations
For receptacles in wet locations, the 2011 Code includes a new requirement for extra-duty
outlet box hoods [406.9(B)(1)]. All 15A and 20A receptacles installed in a wet location must
be within an enclosure thats weather-proof when an attachment plug is inserted. For other
than one- or two-family dwellings, the outlet box hood must be listed for extra-duty use if
supported from grade (click here to see Fig. 4). All nonlocking type 15A and 20A, 125V and
250V receptacles in a wet location must be listed as weather resistant.
Exposed plastic surface material of weather-resistant receptacles must have UV resistance
to ensure that deterioration from sunlight is minimal or prevented. In testing, receptacles
are subjected to temperature cycling from very cold to very warm conditions, and then
subjected to additional dielectric testing. The rapid transition from the cold to warm
temperatures will change the relative humidity and moisture content on the device. The
dielectric test ensures that this wont create a breakdown of the insulation properties.
Exception: Receptacles rated 15A and 20A that are subjected to routine high-pressure
washing spray may have an enclosure thats weatherproof when the attachment plug is
removed.

Tamper-Resistant Receptacles in Dwelling Units


Receptacles installed above 5 ft obviously dont pose the same risk to small children as
those below that elevation. Likewise, receptacles that are rendered inaccessible by
equipment and those that are part of luminaires dont pose the same risk. The 2011
Code recognizes these facts and includes relevant exceptions for them [406.12 Ex]. This
exception also makes an allowance for replacements of nongrounding receptacles, because
there are currently no tamper-resistant receptacles that are nongrounding.
The 2011 Code changes include the term nonlocking to describe the types of receptacles to
which this rule applies. Only those receptacles that are of the straight blade configuration
must comply with the tamper-resistant requirements of 210.52 and 406.12.
Guest rooms and guest suites often have children staying in them; therefore, tamperresistant receptacles have been added as a requirement for these locations as well [406.13].
Guest suites that provide complete facilities for living, sleeping, cooking, and sanitation are

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considered dwelling units by the NEC. As such, they were already required to provide
tamper-resistant receptacles. The 2011 NEC explicitly requires tamper-resistant receptacles
in all guest rooms and guest suites.
Many children spend a great deal of time in child care facilities, yet the 2008 NEC required
tamper-resistant receptacles only in dwelling units. Proponents of these devices
immediately began hoping for expansion of these receptacles to other areas that have
children as occupants. The 2011 Code now requires areas such as schools and day care
facilities to use these receptacles [406.14]. Other areas where the rules arent quite as clear,
however, include hospitals and other medical centers.
What exactly is a child care facility? A new definition in Art. 406 defines it as a structure
used for educational, supervision, or personal care services for more than four children
seven years in age or less [406.2].

Marking panelboards
The 2008 Code added a requirement to 408.3(F)(1) that panelboards installed in high-leg
systems be marked accordingly. While a high-leg system does present some challenges for
electricians particularly those who have never worked on one the challenges
encountered working on an ungrounded system are even greater. Due to the unusual
characteristics of an ungrounded system, panelboards must now be marked to warn
qualified persons that the panelboard theyre about to work on is installed as part of an
ungrounded system [408.3(F)(2)].
Another issue arises in large commercial and industrial facilities, which may have dozens of
panelboards in a single building. In such buildings, its often difficult to determine from
where a given panelboard receives its electrical supply. Unfortunately, this may result in
electricians working on energized panelboards, simply because they cant locate the
disconnecting means needed to de-energize the equipment. The 2011 NEC now requires that
all panelboards (other than one- and two-family dwellings) be marked to indicate where
their source of supply is [408.4(A)]. This change should greatly reduce the risk encountered
on service calls and maintenance work.

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Reading to Motivate
First Article:
How to reach Reluctant Learners
By Nancy Barile
May 27, 2014
Published by: Education Week: Teacher
Website: http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/05/27/ctq_barile_motivating.html
Rational:
This is a great article with a top 10 list of ways to motivate and improve student attention/ retention.
The list give focuses on personality and demeanor. The teacher is the leader of the classroom and need
to challenge students respectfully.

Second Article:
Motivating Reluctant Readers
By Cathy Puett
Date Unknown
Published by: Education World: Connecting Educators to What Works
Website: http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/columnists/miller/miller004.shtml
Rational:
Cathy Puett is known as the "Literacy Ambassador," Cathy Puett Miller has a library science degree from
Florida State University. She uses Intrinsic and Extrinsic motivational techniques to motivate children to
improve reading skills. Extrinsic motivation is the incentive to participate in an activity as a means to an
end. Intrinsic motivation, on the other hand, is the higher calling. It demands a greater commitment,
because it relates to a developmental process rather than to isolated tasks.

Writing: Exemplars
Cheryl Rice, the author of, "How Do You Expect Me To Teach Reading and Writing?" argues there are
three types of writing in a CTE class: writing to learn, writing to demonstrate learning, and authentic
writing. Each type of writing has a specific purpose that will benefit learning in a CTE environment.
Writing to learn is generally, writing-to-learn activities are short, impromptu or otherwise informal
writing tasks that help students think through key concepts or ideas presented in a course. Often, these
writing tasks are limited to less than five minutes of class time or are assigned as brief, out-of-class
assignments (What is Writing to Learn, n.d.). Writing to demonstrate learning has the purpose of

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ascertaining whether the students have learning what was being taught. Open ended questions are a
good example of writing to demonstrate learning (Writing to Learn vs. Writing to Demonstrate Learning,
n.d.). Authentic writing is for real purposes for a real audience, this type of writing emulates real life
everyday writing (Comprehensive K-12 Literacy Model, n.d.)
CTE teachers can do a lot to improve writing in a CTE environment: make writing an integral part of
instruction; provide class time for writing; provide resources such as reference materials; give students
choices about what they write about; provide clear and concise feedback on what they can do to
improve; help students develop a technical vocabulary so they can write about the content area. There
are many things CTE teachers can do to help facilitate writing in a CTE environment.

Model 1:
Ask students to write about lab procedures and processes (procedural writing) in their own words. This
can be done before the lab is begun to ensure students understand to procedure. The effects of this
would be executing the lab safely and efficiently. It can also be done after the lab is done and you can
ask students to suggest ways to improve the procedure of the lab, this will also provide useful feedback
to improve lab organization and structure.

Activity 1 ENERGY DETECTIVE


CONCEPT Energy is around us every day, but "What is Energy?".
GOAL Students will look for energy, collecting "energy evidence," and then come up with their
own definition of energy.
MATERIALS Copies of Detective Data Sheet, copies of clues
ACTIVITY
I. Give each student group a copy of the Detective Data Sheet and a copy of the clues. Point out
that their goal is to search for the answer to "What is energy?"
2. Based on the clues given in the hand-out, students go in search of evidence that will help them
find the answer.
3. Once they have written each clue onto their Data Sheet, have each group come up with a
definition.
4. Have each group share their definition with the rest of the class.
ASK NEW QUESTIONS
1. Discuss with students: Can you feel energy? (Heat waves or energy in wind can move us
around on a windy day or cause a sailboat to skip across a lake.) Can you see energy? (Yes,
sunlight.) Can you hear energy?
2. Have students look up the definition of energy in the dictionary (the capacity for vigorous
activity; available power) and compare with the physics definition (the ability to do work).
Discuss how these definitions compare with the definition students came up with.
3. Have students make up a list of clues that they can find at home that support the definition,
"Energy is the ability to do work." (Examples: electricity causes the light bulbs to glow and get

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hot, sunlight causes plants to follow it, running water causes left over food to be rinsed from the
plate when held under it, etc.)

Model 2:
Ask students to reflect on a reading or on a lesson taught. This will confirm absorption of the
information and can act like an assessment. Giving students the opportunity to explain the lessons in
their own words is a great way to incorporate writing in an Electronics classroom. This is an example of
descriptive writing.

Please read the following Article and in your own words describe 4 components of an Electrical Panel
http://www.thecircuitdetective.com/basic_house_wiring.htm

Presenting: Video Exemplars


Exemplar 1:
This is a video introduction to the tools needed in an Electronics class. The majority of students in most
Electronics courses no not have any prior knowledge. I find it is important to spend some time early in
the course laying the foundation for future success. This video does this very well. In just 9 minutes
students are introduced to the tools they will be working with over the next school year and if they
choose to continue, over the next three years.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kv7Y8nAOoFE&list=PL9CDF91EC3585AAD9
Exemplar 2:
This presentation describes resistors and how to interpret the color code. It describes the process of
how to use the color code system and it also requires student participation. It is not just giving
information, but it asks for students to use the information to indicate the value of Resistance. It asks
you to pause when zoomed in on each resistor so the students can attempt to decode the values. I feel
that is an important concept. It is requiring students to be active participants in the video, and not just
spectators.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrZZMhWZiFk&index=8&list=PL9CDF91EC3585AAD9

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Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Scenarios:


Scenario 1:
Today we will use this period to build paper towers to develop critical thinking skills. See the Board for
your groups and go to your work stations. There you will find material provided for you to create your
tower. Each group has the same amount of material. The goal is to create a paper tower that can hold a
ping pong ball at the top. The group that can raise the ball the highest is the winner and will receive one
free homework pass. You have 30 min and at the end I will measure and record the heights. The group
from all of the c4 of my classes that raises it the highest will receive a test grade of 100% averaged in to
their test average. Good luck!
NOTES TO SELF: You may want to do this lab two days in a row and note the changes they make to the
towers. Do not give the students any help, and encourage them to be creative. Move from group to
group and encourage them to work together if one person looks like they are doing all the work

Scenario 2:
During this lab you will discuss and record ideas to make the United States energy independent by the
year 2050. You can use the IPads to research green energy types and make an argument for what is the
best way to get it done. Consider cost and other resources to get it done. We will debate in groups
tomorrow.
NOTES TO SELF: You may want to give a list of green energy sources and have each group choose a few
to research to avoid redundancy. Require them to come up with cost per watt and average cost be what
when using fossil fuels.

Scenario 3:
In groups you will create a miniature vehicle that will run on solar energy. Provided in the kits is a Solar
cell and motor. You will need to build a chassis using wire, and you will need to create/or bring in
wheels that will be efficient. Please spend some time today to create and submit a design proposal. Be
sure to remember that weight and aerodynamics will be a part of your success.
NOTES TO SELF: This is a long lab and it is easy for them to procrastinate. Work the room and make
sure everyone is working. Suggest that each member record their contributions. If a group is having
trouble coming up with a concept you can allow them to find a model online for them to follow.

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Vocabulary Development: Technical Terms Electronics


Triple Entry Journal
Word in Context
Cable: a type of linear
transmission medium.

Definition in Student Words


A cable is a set of wires, usually
encased in an outer protective
sheath.

Memory Aid/Word Association

Appliance: A non-lighting item


that, by its resistance,
consumes electricity rather
than just passing it on.
Arcing: Current passing
(through air) across a gap, that
is, using the air itself like a wire.

A machine that consumes


electricity

fax machine, garbage disposal,


even a wired-in smoke alarm

Circuit: An arrangement or
connection of circuit devices
and components to perform a
specific objective.

Intended pathway of electricity

Circuit breaker: A circuit


protection device that opens
the circuit automatically when
an overload or short circuit
occurs.

Can disconnect electricity


automatically in case of an
issue

Conductor: A low-resistance
material to provide a path for
current. Used to interconnect
components in a circuit.
Current: (I) The rate of flow of
electrons through a conductor
or component; measured in
amperes.
Digital: Generally in
electronics, refers to signals,
devices, or circuits that are
binary

Something that can easily


transfer electricity

Jumping electricity without


wires

intensity of the electron flow

Uses binary code

Wire, cable, metal

The symbol (I) stands for intensity


of the electron flow

0011100010101

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Electromechanical: A
classification of actions or
devices whereby a mechanical
action is caused by the forces
of attraction or repulsion
created when current flow
generates magnetic fields
Field Effect Transistor (FET): A
transistor type that uses
voltage to control current
through the device. See JFET
and MOSFET.
Fuse: A protective device
designed to interrupt current
flow (open) through a circuit
when current exceeds a rated
value.
Generator: A device that
converts mechanical energy to
electrical energy.

Electricity that creates


movement

Ground: The common return


path for current in an electrical
circuit.

A pathway for excess


electricity to leave safely

Heat sink: A device attached to


a component to aid in the
dissipation of heat.

Keeps electronics from


overheating.

Insulator: A material that has a


high resistance to current flow.
Integrated Circuit (IC) The
placement of numerous
components and circuits on to
a silicon chip.

A material that electricity


cannot pass through
Resistors and compositors on
a chip

Joule: The basic unit of


electrical, mechanical, and
thermal energy.

Unit of energy

Controls current by using


voltage

Stops current if it goes to high

Uses motion to create energy

Plastic, rubber

Borriello: Toolkit Page 20


Lamp: A light producing device
consisting of a filament placed
in a vacuum.

A old light bulb

Load: A device or apparatus


that uses the energy of a circuit
to perform work.
Magnet: An object which
produces a magnetic field in
the surrounding space.

the power used by a device

Memory: The part of a


computing device where data
and instructions are stored.

The amount of data that a


computer can hold

Microprocessor: A CPU that is


manufactured on a single
integrated-circuit (IC) chip.

The brain of a computer

Modem: A device that converts


data from one form into
another, as from one form
usable in data processing to
another form usable in
telephonic transmission.
Multimeter: An instrument
that can measure current,
voltage, and resistance on
various ranges.

Connects to the internet

Parallel circuit: A circuit with


two or more loads (or sources)
connected such that all have
the same voltage but different
currents.

Can connect multiple loads,


but turn off each one
individually.

Attracted to metal

A device to measure electricity

Anything that plugs in

Borriello: Toolkit Page 21


Power: The rate at which
energy is consumed. In
electronics it refers to the
consumption of electrical
energy in joules over time;
measured in watts.

How much energy is used

Resistor: An electrical
component designed to
provide a specific resistance.
Available in many formats such
as fixed, tapped, and variable.
Series circuit: A circuit
arrangement of two or more
loads (or sources) connected
end-to-end only allowing for
one current path.

Changes the amount of Ohms

Switch: A device used to open


(turn off) and close (turn on)
electrical circuits that can be
designed to operated by
numerous actions

Connects and disconnects


electricity

Wiring diagram: A graphic


representation of how circuit
components are connected.

Shows you how something is


wired

If electricity is stopped to one


load, all electricity if stopped.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 22

Research: Think Aloud


There are many types of research someone in the field of electronics and electrical contracting will have
to do. Two examples is an electrician researching the correct codes and a computer engineer
researching the cost if hardware to build a computer. An electrician must be able to stay current on the
changes made to electrical code. If he does not he risks the work not being passed by the inspector or
even worst putting people in danger. A computer engineer must be able to find the correct hardware
that is compatible and cost efficient. Much of this research can be done online.

Think Aloud 1:
Ok class, today we are going to research and report on changes to the electrical code for 2015. I want
each of you to take the new 2015 NJ State Code books and spend some time looking through them. Get
yourself comfortable and use a highlighter to key in on changer from 2014-2015. Once you have located
the changes come up with logical reasons as to why they have decided to change them. We will discuss
it together when we are all finished.

Think Aloud 2:
Everyone take an IPad and a list of components and return to your stations. You are to research the
components on the iPads and find the best deals. Please make sure you are getting the correct models,
there will be a lot of choices and they all have slight variations. Record the cost. Once you have the
prices of every component, add up the total bill. The student who can find all of the correct
components for the least amount of money will receive a quiz grade of 100 averaged into your average.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 23

Part 2 Literacy Rich Examples and Exemplars for


Electronics
Reading Strategy
Anticipation Reaction Guide: A questioning strategy that assesses prior knowledge and assumptions at
the pre-reading stage and evaluates the acquisition of concepts and use of supporting evidence after
reading.
Purpose:
-

Forecast and cue major concepts in the text to be read


Motivate students to want to read text to see if prior knowledge is confirmed or disproved
Require students to make predictions
Activate students existing background knowledge and set purpose for reading text
Focus readers on the main ideas present in text
Help readers asses for misconceptions and reader text discrepancies
Create active integration between reader and text
Provide pre and post assessment information

Before Reading
Agree Disagree Statement

After Reading
Pages where
Agree Disagree
evidence is found

Rational:
Utilizing the Anticipation Reaction Guide in a CTE classroom can be very beneficial. Typically students do
not have any prior knowledge of electronics, and using this guide will allow teachers to see what
students know before beginning a lesson. It will also allow teachers to understand the level of
absorption of information by the students after a reading. With this information you can increase or
decrease the level of the reading as necessary.

Example:
What are "series" and "parallel" circuits?
Circuits consisting of just one battery and one load resistance are very simple to analyze, but they are
not often found in practical applications. Usually, we find circuits where more than two components
are connected together.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 24


There are two basic ways in which to connect more than two circuit components: series and parallel.
First, an example of a series circuit:

Here, we have three resistors (labeled R1, R2, and R3), connected in a long chain from one terminal of
the battery to the other. (It should be noted that the subscript labeling -- those little numbers to the
lower-right of the letter "R" -- are unrelated to the resistor values in ohms. They serve only to identify
one resistor from another.) The defining characteristic of a series circuit is that there is only one path
for electrons to flow. In this circuit the electrons flow in a counter-clockwise direction, from point 4 to
point 3 to point 2 to point 1 and back around to 4.
Now, let's look at the other type of circuit, a parallel configuration:

Again, we have three resistors, but this time they form more than one continuous path for electrons
to flow. There's one path from 8 to 7 to 2 to 1 and back to 8 again. There's another from 8 to 7 to 6 to
3 to 2 to 1 and back to 8 again. And then there's a third path from 8 to 7 to 6 to 5 to 4 to 3 to 2 to 1
and back to 8 again. Each individual path (through R1, R2, and R3) is called a branch.

The defining characteristic of a parallel circuit is that all components are connected between the
same set of electrically common points. Looking at the schematic diagram, we see that points 1, 2, 3,

Borriello: Toolkit Page 25


and 4 are all electrically common. So are points 8, 7, 6, and 5. Note that all resistors as well as the
battery are connected between these two sets of points.
And, of course, the complexity doesn't stop at simple series and parallel either! We can have circuits
that are a combination of series and parallel, too:
In this circuit, we have two loops for electrons to flow through: one from 6 to 5 to 2 to 1 and back to 6
again, and another from 6 to 5 to 4 to 3 to 2 to 1 and back to 6 again. Notice how both current paths
go through R1 (from point 2 to point 1). In this configuration, we'd say that R2 and R3 are in parallel
with each other, while R1 is in series with the parallel combination of R2 and R3.
This is just a preview of things to come. Don't worry! We'll explore all these circuit configurations in
detail, one at a time!
The basic idea of a "series" connection is that components are connected end-to-end in a line to form
a single path for electrons to flow:
The basic idea of a "parallel" connection, on the other hand, is that all components are connected
across each other's leads. In a purely parallel circuit, there are never more than two sets of electrically
common points, no matter how many components are connected. There are many paths for electrons
to flow, but only one voltage across all components:
Series and parallel resistor configurations have very different electrical properties. We'll explore the
properties of each configuration in the sections to come.
REVIEW:
In a series circuit, all components are connected end-to-end, forming a single path for electrons to
flow.
In a parallel circuit, all components are connected across each other, forming exactly two sets of
electrically common points.
A "branch" in a parallel circuit is a path for electric current formed by one of the load components
(such as a resistor).

Before Reading
Agree Disagree Statement
Usually, we find circuits where more than
two components are connected together.
In a purely parallel circuit, there are never
more than two sets of electrically
common points.
The defining characteristic of a parallel
circuit is that all components are
connected between the same set of
electrically common points.

After Reading
Pages where
Agree Disagree
evidence is found

Borriello: Toolkit Page 26

Writing Strategy
Two-Column Note Taking: can be used with any type of presentation to help students organize their
thinking. Can also be referred to as double entry journal. It is a good way to get a student to compare
and contrast.
Purpose:
-

Create a user friendly system to record ideas, related details, and the relationship between
concepts.
Help students remember important points and deepen understanding of content.
Help students organize information and thoughts for thinking, writing, studying, or presenting

Topic
Circle one:

Lecture

Text

Film

Presentation/Demonstration

Rational: Two Column Note Taking is a great way to organize your thoughts and compare and contrast
two similar ideas. Often in electronics there are two concepts that are similar yet different and giving
students the opportunity to write it out in a Two Column format will help them compartmentalize the
information correctly. Students can hold on to these notes as study guides, to support writing essays or
summaries, or to take notes from films.
Example: Watch this film and using a Two Column Note Taking Template, compare and Contrast Series
and Parallel Circuits.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2EuYqj_0Uk
Topic Series vs. Parallel Circuits
Circle one:
Lecture
Text
Series Circuit
- Electricity flows in a linear line
- In a series circuit light are not as bright
- If we add more resistance we will
decrease current
- Current will be the same in each
component
- When junction is split energy will not
flow.
- Sum of the voltage drop will equal total
volts
- Uses less energy
- Old school Christmas lights

Film
Presentation/Demonstration
Parallel Circuit
- Loops that electricity can take.
- Parallel pathway
- Two light bulbs will be equally as bright
- More amps, energy will move more
quickly
- Electricity flows faster because voltage
drop does not occur
- Braches receive equal current
- If one branch is broken, the other is not
effected.
- Voltage remains the same on each
thread
- Uses more energy
- New Christmas lights, can have break
and others will work.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 27

Vocabulary Development Strategy


Triple Entry Vocabulary: is a strategy for learning new vocabulary that uses a three-column note taking
format with columns for a word in context, definition in ones own words, and a picture memory aid, or
phrase related to the word.
Purpose:
-

Help students understand key word when reading text that may limit comprehension if they are
not known.
Provide a more interactive way to learn new vocabulary than assign, define, and test.
Provide a way for students to cognitively process new words, resulting in more retention
Help students develop a customized glossary to the text that provides words in context,
applicable definitions, and personalization memory/study aids.

Word in context

Definition in my words

Picture, memory aid, phrase

Rational: There will be many new word that students will be introduced to in Electronics. Using a Triple
Entry Template will allow a quick guide for students to access to help retain the information. I
particularly like the idea of students writing the definition in their own words and having a memory aid
accessible.
Example: Create a Triple Entry Guide for the following words: circuit, parallel circuit, series circuit, load,
wiring diagram, switch, resistor, muti-meter. The using the iPads read the following website:
http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/story/chapter04.html. Make sure to click on the four fold outs on the
bottom: Circuit Experiment, An Electrical Circuit, Parallel Circuit, and Electric Motors
Word in context
Circuit: An arrangement or
connection of circuit devices
and components to perform a
specific objective.

Definition in my words
Intended pathway of electricity

Switch: A device used to open


(turn off) and close (turn on)
electrical circuits that can be
designed to operate by
numerous actions

Connects and disconnects


electricity

Picture, memory aid, phrase

Borriello: Toolkit Page 28


Series circuit: A circuit
arrangement of two or more
loads (or sources) connected
end-to-end only allowing for
one current path.

If electricity is stopped to one


load, all electricity if stopped.

Resistor: An electrical
component designed to provide
a specific resistance. Available
in many formats such as fixed,
tapped, and variable.
Wiring diagram: A graphic
representation of how circuit
components are connected.

Changes the amount of Ohms

Load: A device or apparatus


that uses the energy of a circuit
to perform work.
Series circuit: A circuit
arrangement of two or more
loads (or sources) connected
end-to-end only allowing for
one current path.

the power used by a device

Parallel circuit: A circuit with


two or more loads (or sources)
connected such that all have
the same voltage but different
currents.

Can connect multiple loads, but


turn off each one individually.

Shows you how something is


wired

If electricity is stopped to one


load, all electricity if stopped.

Anything that plugs in

Borriello: Toolkit Page 29

Speaking Presenting Strategy


Save the Last Word for Me: This small group discussion protocol supports collaborative discussion of a
text.
Purpose:
-

To support Students interactions with text


To promote reading comprehension.
To clarify and deepen thinking about content

Rational: Save the last word for me provides students the opportunity to speak in small groups.
Students can discuss topics current in electronics using langue and terminology used in industry.
First Quote

Pg. #___
Reason for selecting

Second Quote

Pg. #___
Reason for selecting

Third Quote

Pg. #___
Reason for selecting

Borriello: Toolkit Page 30


Example:
NAME:________________________________________________ DATE:____________________
TITLE OF ARTICLE: Benefits of Renewable Energy
Read the text provided and while reading, record 2 quotes that were interesting to you and the page
number/area where you found it. Then write the reason you selected that quote. When finished report
to your groups and share your quotes and your reason for selecting that quote.
Text: http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_energy/our-energy-choices/renewable-energy/public-benefits-ofrenewable.html#.VI9BaDHF8fE
First Quote:
Electricity production accounts for more than one-third of U.S. global warming emissions, with the
majority generated by coal-fired power plants, which produce approximately 25 percent of total U.S.
global warming emissions; natural gas-fired power plants produce 6 percent of total emissions [1, 2].
In contrast, most renewable energy sources produce little to no global warming emissions.
Pg. #: 3rd Paragraph
Reason for selecting
A great reason to explore green energy even though it is more expensive to produce.

Second Quote
Increasing renewable energy has the potential to create still more jobs. In 2009, the Union of
Concerned Scientists conducted an analysis of the economic benefits of a 25 percent renewable
energy standard by 2025; it found that such a policy would create more than three times as many
jobs as producing an equivalent amount of electricity from fossil fuelsresulting in a benefit of
202,000 new jobs in 2025 [16].
Pg. #: 16th paragraph
Reason for selecting
Green energy is not only a solution to global warming but also to the unemployment rate.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 31

Critical Thinking Strategy


Question Answer Relationship (QAR): This strategy involves students in assessing the thinking demands
of a passage and developing answers for four types of questions: right there (questions directly stated in
text); think and search (answer is in test, but not stated directly); author and me (the answer in not in
the text, but derived from integrating the authors information with ones own background knowledge
and experiences); and on my own (the answer is not in the text; the reader must develop the answer
solely from background knowledge).
Purpose:
-

Characterize questions and know how to contrast the answers using the text, where applicable.
Become more analytical and evaluative about responding to questions
Separate factual, implied, inferred, and predictive information while reading
Determine the supporting evidence for responses to questions

Rational: Question and Answer Relationships require a higher order of thinking. Students need to not
only read and retain information, but also read between the lines and understand what the author is
inferring. This level of thinking is important in an Electronics class. There are times when students must
recall background information previously learned to understand the new information. As students
become more proficient you can introduce and ask on my own questions and require students to think
critically and come up with an answer that cannot be found in the reading.
Example:

Circuit Lab
As a boy, Edison built a small laboratory in his cellar. His early experiments helped develop a very inquisitive
mind. His whole life was spent thinking about how things work and dreaming up new inventions. The light
bulb and movie projector are just two of dozens of inventions.
You can build a very basic electrical circuit similar to what Edison may have crafted as a boy. And you can find
out what happens when a current is "open" compared with when
it's "closed."
Here's What You need:
1. Penlight bulb
2. Flashlight battery
3. Two 6" pieces of insulated wire (any kind will work)
4. Tape to keep the wire on the end of the battery
5. A small piece of thin flat metal to make a "switch"
6. Small block of wood
Here's What to Do
1. To make a switch:
Take the block of wood and stick one thumb tack in.
Push the other thumbtack through the thin piece of flat metal.
Push the thumb tack into the wood so that the piece of metal can touch the other thumb tack
2. Connect the first piece of wire to a thumbtack on the switch.
3. Place the light bulb in the center of this wire piece.
4. Tape the end of the first piece of wire to one end of the battery.
5. Tape your second piece of wire to the opposite end of the battery.
6. Attach the end of your second piece of wire to the remaining thumbtack on the switch.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 32


Example (continued):
Right there
The directions tell me what to do
Author and me
I have to follow the directions, but also need to
know what the words mean

Think and Search


I have to read the directions and also look at the
illustrations.
On My Own
When the lab questions says, what do you
think, its a cue that I have to figure it out. The
answer wont be in the book.

Research/Inquiry Strategy
Analytic Graphic Organizer: This strategy uses a visual format like charts, diagrams, and graphs to help
students explore the characteristics, relationships, or effects of a complex topic. This supports students
to organize their thought and contrast meaning from text.
Purpose:
-

Provide a visual way to analyze how information and ideas are linked
Help organize information from note-taking, learning, and recall
Show specific relationships, such as cause and effect, sequence, or compare and contrast.
Synthesize information from different locations in the text or from multiple texts
Convey understanding of information and concepts so misconceptions can be seen.

Rational: We previously discussed how often in electronics that we must compare and contrast similar
ideas. An analytic graphic organizer is a great way to accomplish that. Students can easily organize
differences and similarities, and refer back to it as needed.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 33


Example: Organize what you know about Series Circuits and Parallel Circuits into this Analytical Graphic
Organizer.

Literacy Development in the Lab or Shop


Asking Electronics teachers to incorporate literacy in a lab or shop class is not an easy sell. Electronics
teachers, who may have never received training on teaching reading or writing, may find the demands
to incorporate literacy into their class room daunting. However I find it as an opportunity to prepare our
students for both post-secondary education and industry (Stie-Buckles, 2013).
Ways to incorporate Literacy in a Lab or Shop
-

Providing a reading to preface what will be done in the lab


Students will keep a daily journal of conclusions from labs
Students will fill out Anticipation Reaction Guide prior to starting a lab. It will have hypotheses
on the conclusions of the lab. Students will mark whether they agree or disagree this the
hypotheses and then mark whether they were correct or not.
Students will use a Save the Last Word for Me template to record finding and discuss with the
groups. This will encourage collaboration and improve speaking skills.
Before beginning a Lab, students will fill out a Triple Entry Vocabulary form for new vocabulary.
Students will be required to describe the terms in their own words and provide a memory aid or
phrase to remember the term.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 34

Using Technology to Support Literacy Development


The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for learning, teaching and leading
in a digital age set the criteria for best practices in all three areas. The ISTE have many goals for students
including preparing them for the global job market, improving critical thinking, improving online learning
environments, guiding the direction of change in digital learning, and providing models for digital age
collaboration.
They have separate standards for students, teachers, administrators, computer science educators, and
Coaches. Each standard is based on improving learning and changing instruction in the digital age. The
standards for teachers are summarized as the standards for evaluating the skills and knowledge
educators need to teach, work and learn in an increasingly connected global and digital society. This has
many implications for CTE educators. Technology has a role in every CTE classroom, not only as a
method of instruction but also as the topic. Each and every CTE class is designed around some type
technology. It is of the utmost importance for the teacher to be up to speed on the most recent
technology to prepare students for the global job market (International Society for Technology in
Education, 2014).
Ways to use Technology to Develop Literacy:
-

Use iPads in class to conduct research, complete WebQuest, and access labs.
Require students to set up a Google Docs account to submit lab reports and other types of class
work.
Use Prezi to conduct class lessons, making sure to give students access to the lessons online so
they can retrieve them from a location other than the classroom.
Require students to email you so they can experience communicating through email, similarly to
how a business would communicate.
Teach students how to use items specifically designed for the electronics industry (multi-meter).

Borriello: Toolkit Page 35

Part 3: Lesson Planning/Retooling


Lesson topic: Resistors
CTE program area: Electronics
Instructors name: Borriello
Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

Students will listen and take notes on Ohms, Resistance, and Tolerance.

Students will be able to follow shop safety procedures.

Students will demonstrate proper technique when using tools to calculate resistance.

Students will learn the resistor color coding system and be able to produce values using the
formula.

Students will formulate the value of each resister to calculate the complete ohms in each circuit.
Students will be able to measure the resistance, ohms, and tolerance of resisters in series.

Students will be able to work together to solve problems and complete tasks.

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:


New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
9.4.12B.6
Evaluate and use information resources to accomplish specific occupational
tasks.
9.4.12B.(1).10

Demonstrate understanding of principles, conventions, standards, applications,


and restrictions pertaining to the manufacture and use of construction materials,
components, and assemblies, and incorporate this understanding into project
design.

9.4.12B.75

Use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery,


equipment, and resources to accomplish project goals.

9.4.12B.73

Employ planning and time management skills and tools in the classroom and/or
worksite to enhance results and complete work tasks.

9.4.12B.74

Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to plan
a project.

9.4.12B.48

Employ organizational skills to foster positive working relationships and


accomplish organizational goals in the classroom and/or worksite.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 36


9.4.12B.1

Demonstrate language arts knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range
of postsecondary education and career opportunities.

9.1.12.A.1

Apply critical thinking and problem-solving strategies during structured learning


experiences.

9.1.8.F.1

Demonstrate how productivity and accountability contribute to


realizing individual or group work goals within or outside the classroom.

9.4.12.O.(2).4

Use scientific and mathematical problem-solving skills and abilities to develop


realistic solutions to assigned projects, and illustrate how science and
mathematics s impact problem-solving in modern society.

Brief description of the lesson:


Students begin by reading the article provided (http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/resistor/res_2.html)
and fill out a Triple-Entry Vocabulary Journal Template using the key vocabulary terms below. Students
will learn and understand how resistors work and how to distinguish the value by interpreting the color
code on the resistor.
After the reading and Triple-Entry Vocabulary Journal Template students will individually calculate the
resistance on three different resistors by using the formula provided.
Then in groups students will receive painted resistors with no color code on them. They will apply
voltage by using an 8 volt battery and a circuit board. They will then measure, using a volt meter, the
reduced voltage. Using the same formula and algebra they will show the resistance of the blank
resistor. Students will then show the correct color code of the resistor.
Description
1. Students will be given detailed instructions on how to read resistance on a resistor.
2. Students will be given a written test to check knowledge gained. Students will then correct any
incorrect statements.
3. Student will then be given instructions on gathering materials needed to read the color code on
the resistors.
4. Students will then work individually read resistance.
5. Students will practice reading resistance.
6. After this individual practice is complete students will get in groups of two-three.
7. Students will use Algebra and the formula to show the blank resistance.

Key vocabulary terms:


Resistor
Resistance
Ohms
Tolerance
Resistor Color Code

Borriello: Toolkit Page 37

Anticipated length of the lesson: 3 class periods / Total: 126 minutes


To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include:
Reading
Writing
Speaking (in group work)
Vocabulary
Critical Thinking
Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or
link to required templates):
Triple-Entry Vocabulary Journal Template :

Work in Context

Definition in My Words

Picture, Memory Aid, Phrase

Required Vocabulary: Resistor, Resistance, Ohms, Tolerance, Resistor Color Code

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:


http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/resistor/res_2.html
Resistor Chart (SEE BELOW)
Resistors
Whited Out Resistors
Volt Meter

Borriello: Toolkit Page 38


Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:
Rubric:
CATEGORY

Student is able to
describe the
vocabulary so the
explanation is clear.

Description is a little
difficult to
understand, but
includes critical
components.

Description is
difficult to
understand. Student
is unsure of
Vocabulary use and
meaning

Triple-Entry
Vocabulary Journal
Template

Student is able to
describe the
vocabulary so the
explanation is
detailed and clear.

Color Coded
Resistors

All 4 Color Codes are 3 Color Codes are


correct
correct

2 Color Codes are


correct

1 Color Code is
correct

Blank Resistors

All 4 Color Codes are 3 Color Codes are


correct
correct

2 Color Codes are


correct

1 Color Code is
correct

Safety

Procedural safety
measures were
followed

Procedural safety
measures were not
followed.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 39

Borriello: Toolkit Page 40

Unit Planning/Retooling
UNIT of Study: Circuits
CTE program area: Electronics
Instructors name: Borriello
Essential Questions/Big Ideas of the Unit:
What is a Circuit?
What is a Series Circuit?
What is a Parallel Circuit?
Brief Overview of the Unit:
Students will be introduced to different types of circuits and how they are used. They will read, watch
videos, and conduct laboratory experiments pertaining to different types of circuits.

Number of Lessons in the Unit:


List each lesson with the topic/title (Remember that a lesson could span more than one day but
comprises a distinct chunk of the unit):
1. Simple Circuits
2. Series Circuits vs. Parallel Circuit
3. Demonstration of Simple, Series, and Parallel Circuits and Presentation
To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the unit will include all of the
following as noted:
Reading _4___# of times
Writing to Learn__7___# of times
Speaking/Presenting/Demonstrating _2___# of times
Research ___2__# of times
Explicit vocabulary learning _2__# of times
Critical Thinking __2__#of times
Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the unit and number of times each will be used:
Name of Literacy Strategy
Number of times used in the unit
Triple Entry Vocab
1
Question Answer Relationship
1
analytic graphic organizer
1
2 column note form
1
Anticipation Reaction Guide
1
Save the Last Word for Me Document
1
Group Summery Chart

Borriello: Toolkit Page 41


Unit performance assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric):
Project and Rubric:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1X7N0ebJbAnBofdUKrVpnwQV5SAx7rD2W2t6XEO4l
30w/edit?usp=sharing

Lesson Plan 1

Lesson topic: Simple Circuits


CTE program area: Electronics
Instructors name: Borriello
Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)
Students will be able to understand what a simple circuit is and how it works.

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:


New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
9.4.12B.75
Use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery,
equipment, and resources to accomplish project goals.
9.4.12B.73

Employ planning and time management skills and tools in the classroom and/or
worksite to enhance results and complete work tasks.

9.4.12B.74

Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to


plan a project.

9.4.12B.1

Demonstrate language arts knowledge and skills required to pursue the full
range of postsecondary education and career opportunities.

9.1.12.A.1

Apply critical thinking and problem-solving strategies during structured learning


experiences.
Brief description of the lesson:
Students will complete a Triple Entry Vocab Journal Form:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1w6D5Bu_H9oMyH2NQnO3qnweVg5bAdtg3KIU7HP
gYjQM/edit?usp=sharing
Students will complete a reading:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1citjko0S7RVwZpIwIG0mvqWY8H4r3YfSv4kcNjLZ8Uo
/edit?usp=sharing

Borriello: Toolkit Page 42


Teacher will present lecture on simple circuits and students will take notes.
Students will Complete the Activity #1 and take pictures to document for their final presentation:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1wPzSGDn7cVVCzN9UivS9UAZtXM93kECwt8i1G9L4Y
y0/edit?usp=sharing
Students will complete Activity #2 and take pictures to document for their final presentation:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1eFFjLVb6UVpUocEsRwIlA5CuiTJK4KBt3Uzrs83RTCM
/edit?usp=sharing
Teacher will use QAR below to provoke Critical Thinking:
Right there
Think and Search
The directions tell me what to do
I have to read the directions and also look at the
illustrations.
Author and me
On My Own
I have to follow the directions, but also need to
When the lab questions says, what do you
know what the words mean
think, its a cue that I have to figure it out. The
answer wont be in the book.
Key vocabulary terms:
Circuit
Switch
Series circuit
Resistor
Wiring diagram
Load
Anticipated length of the lesson: 4 days
To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all
that apply):
Reading
Writing
Research
Vocabulary
Critical Thinking
Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or
link to required templates):
Triple Entry Vocabulary Journal:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1w6D5Bu_H9oMyH2NQnO3qnweVg5bAdtg3KIU7HP
gYjQM/edit?usp=sharing

Borriello: Toolkit Page 43


Question Answer Relationship:
Right there
The directions tell me what to do
Author and me
I have to follow the directions, but also need to
know what the words mean

Think and Search


I have to read the directions and also look at the
illustrations.
On My Own
When the lab questions says, what do you
think, its a cue that I have to figure it out. The
answer wont be in the book.

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:


Reading:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1citjko0S7RVwZpIwIG0mvqWY8H4r3YfSv4kcNjLZ8Uo
/edit?usp=sharing
Materials:
Simple Circuits: (one each for seven groups)
2 wires
Battery (in battery holder)
Bulb holder
Light bulb
Penlight bulb
Flashlight battery
Two 6" pieces of insulated wire (any kind will work)
Tape to keep the wire on the end of the battery
A small piece of thin flat metal to make a "switch"
Small block of wood

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:


Formative Assessment, 10 multiple choice questions on simple circuits.
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1U1MM25mk181hlLPxIseYw3uqsUPfOeI453E6tvkdnw/edit?usp=sharing

Borriello: Toolkit Page 44


Lesson Plan 2

Lesson topic: Series vs. Parallel Circuits


CTE program area: Electronics
Instructors name: Borriello
Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)
Students will be able to differentiate between Series and Parallel Circuits.

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:


New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
9.4.12B.6
Evaluate and use information resources to accomplish specific occupational
tasks.
9.4.12B.(1).10

Demonstrate understanding of principles, conventions, standards, applications,


and restrictions pertaining to the manufacture and use of construction
materials, components, and assemblies, and incorporate this understanding
into project design.

9.4.12B.75

Use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery,


equipment, and resources to accomplish project goals.

9.4.12B.73

Employ planning and time management skills and tools in the classroom and/or
worksite to enhance results and complete work tasks.

9.4.12B.74

Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to


plan a project.

9.1.8.F.1

Demonstrate how productivity and accountability contribute to


realizing individual or group work goals within or outside the classroom.

9.4.12.O.(2).4

Use scientific and mathematical problem-solving skills and abilities to develop


realistic solutions to assigned projects, and illustrate how science and
mathematics s impact problem-solving in modern society.
Brief description of the lesson:
Students will complete the following reading:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1ORpIAIrYh0sY43kjeNMD-RANTCSqbWBWYLtxUGGcl8/edit?usp=sharing
Students will Fill out the Anticipation Reaction Guide based on the reading:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1WRuAxHvaljF3yBnHvHZo1uN7nq78gbCyWEGwGrz
mIo0/edit?usp=sharing

Borriello: Toolkit Page 45

Students will watch a video and complete a two column note taking form:
Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2EuYqj_0Uk
2 column note form:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1i40KcJ6XRoBFwEFZl36i4lYw8Kp8brQehlbdZ1ebUW4
/edit?usp=sharing
Students will complete the two Activities in the Series vs. Parallel Circuit Lab and take pictures to
document for their final presentation:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1j5cyzf-l9tnhyuylzpvg-wSWhOaw9lkUqN6MYVFNpU/edit?usp=sharing
Key vocabulary terms:
Series Circuit
Parallel Circuit
Anticipated length of the lesson: 6 days
To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all
that apply):
Reading
Writing
Research
Vocabulary
Critical Thinking
Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or
link to required templates):
Anticipation Reaction Guide
two column notes form

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:

Six flashlight bulbs and sockets


one switch for each of the two circuits
four "D" cells
masking tape
twenty 10-cm pieces of bell wire
Two DC ammeters of range zero amp to one amp.
Two DC voltmeters of range zero volts to five volts.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 46


Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:
This is a summative assessment. Students should be able to fill in the analytic graphic organizer with
information learned through lesson 2.
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/19I0VwhmB0q6EzeihCFv5UIeBvEgMb40PYA25ikUzi1
Q/edit?usp=sharing

Lesson Plan 3
Lesson topic: Culmination Project
CTE program area: Electronics
Instructors name: Borriello

Purpose/objective of the lesson:


(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)
Students will demonstrate understanding of all circuits by researching and presenting.
Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:
New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
9.4.12B.6
Evaluate and use information resources to accomplish specific occupational
tasks.
9.4.12B.(1).10

Demonstrate understanding of principles, conventions, standards, applications,


and restrictions pertaining to the manufacture and use of construction
materials, components, and assemblies, and incorporate this understanding
into project design.

9.4.12B.73

Employ planning and time management skills and tools in the classroom and/or
worksite to enhance results and complete work tasks.

9.4.12B.74

Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to


plan a project.

9.1.8.F.1

Demonstrate how productivity and accountability contribute to


realizing individual or group work goals within or outside the classroom.

Borriello: Toolkit Page 47

Brief description of the lesson:


Students will research independently uses for different types of Circuits and complete a Save the Last
word for me Document to record some of their findings and present them to their group:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1PqiXlOjTP1qfem5Uifdzvl-MEKQlPcl7LQC6wsXtGA/edit?usp=sharing
Students in groups must continue to research uses for simple, series and parallel circuits and record
their finding in a group summery chart:
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1K-9b-K9aYJy5RrSfYdihVOQaXSg4wYfP_LRpBB24G8/edit?usp=sharing
Students will organize their findings into a group presentation using Prezi:
-

Students must create an account and present information on each: Simple, Series, Parallel.
They must use photos from their Labs for each: Simple, Series, Parallel.
They must show real world uses for each: Simple, Series, Parallel.

Students must present to the class their presentations. Each presentation must have a minimum of
three sections and each groups presentation must be a minimum of 8 minutes long.
Encourage students to be creative and teach them how to use Prezi
The presentation will count as their final cumulative assessment.

Key vocabulary terms:


Series Circuit
Parallel Circuit
Circuit
Switch
Resistor
Wiring diagram
Load

Anticipated length of the lesson: 5 days

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include
(circle all that apply):
Reading
Writing
Speaking/Presenting
Research

Borriello: Toolkit Page 48

Vocabulary

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach
or link to required templates):
Save the Last word for me Document
Group summery chart
Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:
Computers with internet access
Computer with projector
Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:
Summative assessment in the form of a presentation using Prezi.
https://docs.google.com/a/une.edu/document/d/1X7N0ebJbAnBofdUKrVpnwQV5SAx7rD2W2t6XEO4
l30w/edit?usp=sharing

Borriello: Toolkit Page 49


References
O'Connor, P. J. (2010). CTE teachers as content area reading teachers. Techniques: Connecting Education
And Careers, 85(2), 34-36. Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ888186.pdf.

Barile, Nancy. How to Reach Reluctant Learners. (2014, May 27). Retrieved November 13, 2014, from
http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/05/27/ctq_barile_motivating.html

Puett, Cathy. How to Reach Reluctant Learners. (2014, May 27). Retrieved November 13, 2014, from
http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/05/27/ctq_barile_motivating.html

Comprehensive K-12 Literacy Model. (n.d.). Retrieved November 2, 2014, from


http://www.salkeiz.k12.or.us/sites/default/files/salkeiz/lit_model_definitions.pdf

Rice, C. (n.d.). How do you expect me to teach reading and writing? Retrieved November 3, 2014, from
http://curriculum-maps.beaufort.schoolfusion.us/modules/locker/files/get_gro
up_file.phtml?gid=3122351&fid=18742894.

What is Writing to Learn? (n.d.). Retrieved November 2, 2014, from


http://wac.colostate.edu/intro/pop2d.cfm

Writing to Learn vs. Writing to Demonstrate Learning. (n.d.). Retrieved November 2, 2014, from
http://peroberts.weebly.com/uploads/1/5/7/9/1579338/writing-tolearn_vs._writing_to_demonstrate.ppt

Stie-Buckles, M. (2013, December 18). ELA STEM = DEVELOPING LITERACY WITH MATH AND SCIENCE.
Retrieved December 2, 2014, from http://www.nms.org/Blog/TabId/58/PostId/213/ela-stemdeveloping-literacy-with-math-and-science.aspx

Meltzer, J., & Jackson, D. (2011). Thinkquiry toolkit 1: Strategies to improve reading comprehension and
vocabulary development across content areas. Portsmouth, NH: Public Consulting Group.

International Society for Technology in Education. (2014). ISTE standards. Retrieved from
http://www.iste.org/standards