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" i " ^ ^ I ^ M B n V H M ^ H

JANUARY 8TH,

FLIGHT

1942.

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25

/Uiiestvnes

A S far back as 1935 the designers of Miles light


^"monoplanes had foreseen the need of the
R.A.F. for low-wing monoplane trainers to provide
training on aeroplanes with similar characteristics
to the operational aircraft of monoplane design.
The first stage in the development of their theory
was the adaptation of a Miles Hawk Major as a
primary trainer.
But by 1937 their plans were complete for
an advanced trainer for pilots of aeroplanes
in the Hurricane and Spitfire class.
It embodied the Rolls-Royce Kestrel
engine of 745 h.p. and appeared at the
R.A.F. Hendon Display in that year.
In the meantime the Magister, a natural
development of the Hawk Trainer,

was in production. This monoplane trainer was


again accepted by the R.A.F., the Irish, New
Zealand and Turkish Air Forces. It is in use at
primary training schools in South Africa, Egypt,
Latvia, Estonia, India, Australia, etc.
The acceptance of Miles Training Aircraft by
the R.A.F. was an achievement that amply
justified the designers' faith in their beliefs,
when it is realised that the British Government's policy since 1922 was against wooden
aircraft of any type.
All Miles Aircraft to date are of
all-wood construction, even the nowfamous Miles Master-fast advanced
Monoplane Trainer for the Monoplane
Pilots of the R.A.F.

Gift feaenusfy to

IfottttfentFund
CONSTRUCTED

BV

A I R C R A F T
PHILLIPS

POWIS

AIRCRAFT

LIMITED

SOMEWHERE

IN

ENGLAND

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