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Citation: 102 Cong. Rec. A6294 1956

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A6294

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD JUNE 15, 1956.

Miss MARY FLEMING,


Flushing, N. Y.
DEAR MISS FLEMING: Thank you for your
communication with respect to the drug
addiction problem.
I have for some time now been concerned
with the growing amount of drug addiction
in this country, particularly among our
young people. The very factor of their youth
makes the chances for their successful rehabilitation so much better that, I feel we
should do all we can to increase available facilities and services to attain that end.
I think you might be interested in reading the remarks on this topic that I made
on the floor of the Senate recently. I am enclosing a copy for your information.
Thank you for writing me as you did, setting forth your views on this problem.
Yours very sincerely,
FLUSHING, N. Y., May 15, 1956.
Hon. Senator HERBERT F. LEHMAN,
Senate Office Building,
Washington,D. C.
DEAR SENATOR LEHMAN: I was glad to read
today of the approval of the bill cracking
down on the drug traffic and heroin selling
especially. Several months ago I read an
excellent proposal to wipe out illegal narcotics traffic. This suggestion was originally made by a group of doctors in New York
State. They recommended, I believe, that
any drug addict be supplied with the drug
he craves free of charge by his physician.
The drugs could be paid for by the Government. This would wipe out the profits of
the drug racketeer and make it worthless to
smuggle drugs into the United States. It
would encourage addicts to seek legal treatment and encourage them to try to be cured.
I believe it would make addiction easier to
cure because the addict would never be
forced to steal to procure the drug, and
would know he could be given it as medicine.
This should lessen the desperation of many
addicts.
I think this would be an excellent provislon to add to this narcotics bill.
Sincerely yours,
MARY FLEMING.
JUNE 15, 1956.
Mr. MICHAEL ALEXANDER,
New Hyde Park,N. Y.
DEAR MR. ALEXANDER: Thank you for your
communication with respect to the drug-addiction problem.
I have for some time now been concerned
with the growing amount of drug addiction
in this country, particularly among our
young people. The very factor of their
youth makes the chances for their successful
rehabilitation so much better that I feel we
should do all we can to increase available
facilities and services to attain that end.
I think you might be interested in reading the remarks on this topic that I made on
the floor of the Senate recently. I am enclosing a copy for your information.
Thank you for writing me as you did, setting forth your views on this problem.
Yours very sincerely.
NEW HYDE PARK, N. Y., May 13, 1956.
Senator HERBERT LEHMAN,
Washington, D. C.
DEAR SIR: After hearing today's Town
Meeting
debate
between
Congressman
BAKER and Dr. Berger on the drug-addiction
problem, I am greatly moved to urge you to
support the so-called clinic plan for the
treatment of drug addiction.
I am convinced that the spread of addiction among our young people is largely due
to the necessity of drug addicts to themselves become sellers of narcotics In order
to get the money to satisfy their needs.

August 6

APPENDIX

The clinic plan would remove the economic basis for the spread of addiction, and
would substitute treatment for punitive
methods. Experience has shown that neither legal nor any other kind of punishment
will solve the problem.
Yours truly,
MICHAEL ALEXANDER.

A Year Since Geneva


EXTENSION OF REMARKS
OF

HON. JOHN J. SPARKMAN


OF

ALABAMA

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

Resolution Memorializing the Congress


of the United States Relative to the
Issuance of a Commemorative Postage
Stamp Depicting the Adams National
Historic Site
EXTENSION OF REMARKS
or

HON. JOHN F. KENNEDY


OF MASSACHUSETTS
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

Friday,July 27, 1956


Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, on behalf of myself and my colleague the
senior Senator from Massachusetts [Mr.
SALTONSTALLI, I present for appropriate

reference, and ask unanimous consent to


have printed in the RECORD a resolution
adopted by the Senate of the Commonweath of Massachusettts on July 19,
1956.
There being no objection, the resolution was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
RESOLUTIONS MEMORIALIZING THE CONGRESS OF
THE UNITED STATES RELATIVE TO THE IssuANCE OF A COMMEMORATIVE POSTAGE STAMP
DEPICTING THE ADAMS NATIONAL HISTORIC
SITE
Whereas the Adams mansion in Quincy,
Mass., the home of John Adams and John
Quincy Adams, an illustrious father and an
illustrious son, both Presidents of the
United States of America, has been established as a national historic site in honor
of the Adams family and the great contributions of that family to the United States
and to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts;
and
Whereas visitors from all parts of the
country pay homage to the Adamses by visiting the old Adams home, now a historic
shrine, thereby keeping alive the memory
of the two distinguished leaders of our
country who fought courageously to acquire
and to retain the freedom and rights enjoyed by Americans: Therefore be it
Resolved, That the Massachusetts Senate
respectfully urges the Congress of the
United States to authorize and direct the
Postmaster General of the United States to
issue a special commemorative postage
stamp depicting the Adams National Historic
Site; and be it further
Resolved, That copies of these resolutions
be sent forthwith by the Secretary of the
Commonwealth to the President of the
United States, to the Postmaster General of
the United States, to the presiding officer
of each branch of the Congress and to each
of the Members thereof from this Commonwealth.
Adopted: Senate, July 19, 1956.
THOMAS A. CHADWICK,
Assistant Clerk, Acting Clerk.
A true copy. Attest:
EDWARD J. CRONIN,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.

Friday,July 27, 1956


Mr. SPARKMAN. Mr. President, in
the Washington Daily News recently
there appeared a well-prepared discussion by R. H. Shackford entitled "AYear
Since Geneva-A Minus for the West."
It is thought provoking and informative.
I ask unanimous consent to have this
printed in the Appendix of the RECORD.
There being no objection, the article
was ordered to be printed in the RECORD,
as follows:
A YEAR SINCE GENEvA-A MINus FOR THE WEST
(By R. H. Shackford)
A year ago this week the leaders of the
4 great powers met for the first time In 10
years at Geneva in a mood of optimism. One
year later that optimism is badly tarnished.
But the debate over who gained, or lost
from that summit conference still goes on.
Some argue it was a major setback for the
West-that the Bolsheviks accomplished a
major objective by encouraging the Western
World to relax-which it has-and thus become easier prey.
Others argue that the Geneva meeting was
a major gain for the West-that it relaxed
international tensions and diminished the
danger of war.
The record supports the claim that the
Geneva Conference was a plus for the Soviets
and a minus for the West:

The Reds have made alarming headway

with expanded influence In south Asia and


the Middle East, and have increased the
danger of an Arab-Israeli war.
Western alliances have been creaking and
the West in general, basking in the afterglow
of the phony Geneva spirit, is letting down
its guard and indulging In the luxury of Intrafamily squabbles.
The new Soviet leaders have managedby changing only their manners-to mislead
many people into believing that the Kremlin
is sanctioning fundamental changes, though
the Soviet leaders themselves have stated
that their fundamentals will not change.
On specific subjects discussed at Geneva,
the conference and all subsequent negotiations have proved complete flops. The East
and West are just as divided as they were at
Geneva.
The foreign ministers' conference which
followed the summit meeting was, according
to the President, to be the acid test of Soviet Intentions. It was a greater flop.
Mr. Eisenhower suggested that the test of
Soviet cooperation pledges to him at Geneva
would come "in the language and terminology in which we will find speeches and
diplomatic exchange couched."
Last week Soviet delegate Andrei Gromyko
bitterly denounced the United States before
the United Nations, provoking the American
delegate to describe the speech as "in the
worst traditions of Stalinism."
A few days earlier a Soviet note absurdly
accused the United States Air Force of espionage in flights over Soviet cities.
Pravda's new spirit of conciliation and co-

operation is displayed by blaming Secretary


of State John Foster Dulles wholly for Po-

land's bread riots.

The easy answer is the one used by President Eisenhower In his recent letter to

Chiang Kai-shek: