English for Academic Purposes

English for Specific Academic Purposes
English for Specific Purposes
Testing and Examinations
Teacher Resources
and Photocopiables
Catalogue
2010
ELT for Higher Education
The independent ELT Publisher Th
Garnet
Education
www.garneteducation.com
Revised EAS series ESAP Medicine
English for
MEDICINE
in Higher Education Studies
Course Book
E D U C A T I O N a r n e t
Ros Wright
English for Global Industries: Oil and Gas
Steve Oliver
English for Global Industries
Oil and Gas
Succeed in Cambridge FCE: 10 Practice Tests d i C b id FCE 10 P
Andrew Betsis
FFFFFFFFCCCCCCCEEEE FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
Succeed in Cambridge
10 Practice Tests
Student’s Book
Fast Track to Reading F T k R di
Þeter V|ney
l A S 1
1 8 A C k
1 C
8 L A u l n C
AcceleraLed Learnlna for
LlL and LSCL SLudenLs
Course 8ook
New for 2010
Language Garden Online L G d O li Get Ahead in FCE
Andrew Betsis
FFFFFFCCCCCEEEEEE
Get ahead in
Student’s Book
IELTS Target 5.0
ESAP Mechanical Engineering ESAP M h i l E i i Access EAP: Foundations A EAP F d ti
$ue Arçent
0Iwyn AIexander
F00ß0A¡I0ß$
Access
£AF
0eurse 8eek
Safety First
Safety First
Eng||sh for Hea|th & Safety
John Chrimes
How Idioms Work H Idi W k
ESAP Public Relations ESAP P bli R l i
Revised EAS series
See page 60 for titles expected in late 2010
ESAP ICT Studies
ESAP Psychology
www.garneteducation.com 1
Contents
CATALOGUE OF TEACHING MATERIALS 2010
E D U C A T I O N

a r n e t
After an outstanding year in 2009, Garnet Education
is looking forward to even better things in 2010. We
are rapidly establishing a reputation around the world
for high-quality English for Academic Purposes (EAP),
English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) and
English for Specific Purposes (ESP) materials. In 2010,
we aim to consolidate our position as the UK's leading
EAP publisher. In addition, we are expanding our
award-winning ESAP series with a further seven titles.
This series was recently described by the English-
Speaking Union judges as "a brave commitment to
teachers and learners ... a tribute to Garnet's vision".
I would like to extend a personal word of thanks to
all our distributors, agents and customers, as well
as to our authors, staff and production teams, for
their continued support of that vision. As one of the
UK's few remaining independent ELT publishers, we
will continue working to maintain our commitment
to the highest possible standards of excellence.
Richard Peacock
General Manager
Garnet Education
EnglishforAcademicPurposes The Skills in English Series ..................................................................................................... 4
The English for Academic Study Series .................................................................................10
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK) ............................................................................... 20
Access EAP: Foundations......................................................................................................24
EAP Essentials ...................................................................................................................... 25
Passport to Academic Presentations .................................................................................... 26
Upgrade ................................................................................................................................ 27
EnglishforSpecificAcademicPurposes Banking, Business Studies, Environmental Science, ICT Studies, Language and Linguistics,
Law, Management Studies, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Psychology,
Public Relations, Tourism and Hospitality ............................................................................. 28
EnglishforSpecificPurposes English for Global Industries: Oil and Gas ............................................................................. 36
English for the Energy Industries: Oil, Gas and Petrochemicals ............................................ 38
Safety First ............................................................................................................................ 39
Take-Off ................................................................................................................................ 40
Take-Off Interactive Course Book ..........................................................................................41
TestingandExaminations i-Test ..................................................................................................................................... 42
IELTS Target 5.0 .................................................................................................................... 44
Get Ahead in FCE ................................................................................................................. 46
Succeed in Cambridge FCE: 10 Practice Tests .....................................................................47
Talking Trinity ........................................................................................................................ 48
TeacherResourcesandPhotocopiables Fast Track to Reading ........................................................................................................... 50
Language Garden ................................................................................................................. 52
English Practice Grammar .................................................................................................... 53
ESOL Practice Grammar: Entry Levels 1–2 & 3 .................................................................... 54
How Idioms Work ................................................................................................................. 56
Versatile Vocabulary, Get Going with Grammar .................................................................... 57
Better Writing ........................................................................................................................ 58
Reference Journals and Academic Papers ............................................................................................ 59
Forthcomingtitles Coming Soon ........................................................................................................................ 60
HowtogetGarnetEducationbooks Agents, Bookshops and Suppliers ........................................................................................ 61
GAD0003_ GE Catalogue 2010_V2.indd 1 05/11/2009 11:38
www.garneteducation.com 2

COMMON EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK AND IELTS EQUIVALENCIES
Levels Chart
Beginner Pre-Intermediate Intermediate Upper Intermediate Advanced Proficiency
Common European Framework (CEF)/IELTS A1/2.0 A2/3.0 B1/4.0+ B2/5.0+ C1/6.5+ C2/7.5+
English for
Academic Purposes
Starting Skills in English
Skills in English Level 1
Skills in English Level 2
Skills in English Level 3
EAS Reading
EAS Writing
EAS Extended Writing & Research Skills
EAS Listening
EAS Speaking
EAS Pronunciation
EAS Vocabulary
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Access EAP: Foundations
EAP Essentials
Passport to Academic Presentations
Upgrade
English for
Specific Academic
Purposes
English for Banking
English for Business Studies
English for Environmental Science
English for ICT Studies
English for Language and Linguistics
English for Law
English for Management Studies
English for Mechanical Engineering
English for Medicine
English for Psychology
English for Public Relations
English for Tourism and Hospitality
www.garneteducation.com 3
The language levels given in this catalogue are intended as a guide only. Your local Garnet Education representative will be pleased to give you specific advice about levels and how they relate to your teaching situation.
Levels Chart
Beginner Pre-Intermediate Intermediate Upper Intermediate Advanced Proficiency
Common European Framework (CEF)/IELTS A1/2.0 A2/3.0 B1/4.0+ B2/5.0+ C1/6.5+ C2/7.5+
English for
Specific Purposes
English for Global Industries: Oil and Gas
English for the Energy Industries
Safety First
Take-Off
Take-Off: Interactive Course Book
Testing &
Examinations
i-Test
IELTS Target 5.0
Get Ahead in FCE
Succeed in Cambridge FCE: 10 Practice Tests
Talking Trinity: Initial
Talking Trinity: Elementary
Resources Fast Track to Reading
Language Garden
English Practice Grammar
ESOL Practice Grammar: Entry Levels 1-2
ESOL Practice Grammar: Entry Level 3
How Idioms Work
Versatile Vocabulary
Get Going with Grammar
Better Writing
www.garneteducation.com 4
Terry Ph||||ps
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t

TITLES IN THE SERIES
Starting Skills in English Part A
• Listening and Speaking
• Reading and Writing
• Vocabulary and Grammar
Starting Skills in English Part B
• Listening and Speaking
• Reading and Writing
• Vocabulary and Grammar
Skills in English Level 1
• Listening
• Speaking
• Reading
• Writing
Skills in English Level 2
• Listening
• Speaking
• Reading
• Writing
Skills in English Level 3
• Listening
• Speaking
• Reading
• Writing
The award-winning Skills in
English series is a university
preparation course at four
levels, providing academic
skills and language training
from false beginner to upper
intermediate.
It is a truly flexible, fully
featured course providing:
• targeted skills for mixed-
ability groups or skills
classes
• paired skills for specific
development, e.g., the
productive skills
• integrated skills for all-
round performance
The Skills in English series
focuses on the real grammar
found in academic texts
and teaches academic skills
from the lowest level using
accessible, relevant and
motivating texts based on
ten key knowledge areas:
education, daily life, work
and business, science and
nature, the physical world,
culture and civilization,
technology, art and literature,
sport and leisure, and
nutrition and health.
The Skills in English Series
A flexible, four-level course to prepare students for English-medium studies in higher education
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • FALSE BEGINNER TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE • CEF LEVELS A1 TO B2/IELTS 2.0–6.0
*Flesch-Kincaid is a government-recognized system, used within programs such as Microsoft Word, which grades the level of
difficulty of listening and reading texts.

y
“The common-core knowledge
in this series is the next big
step for ELT to take in the
21
st
century.”
David Crystal
“Extremely well-planned and
constructed and very
impressive.”
Duke of Edinburgh ESU English Language
Award judges
TitIe LeveI SkiII Audio FIesch-Kincaid LeveI* Text Length (max.)
Starting Skills CEF: A1 to A2
IELTS: 2.0-3.0
FaIse beginner to
eIementary
Listening 3 hours - up to 400 words
Speaking 2 hours - short paragraph
Reading - - up to 250 words
Writing - - short paragraph
Level 1 CEF: A2 to B1
IELTS: 3.0-4.5
Pre-intermediate to
intermediate
Listening 4 hours FK 4-6 400 words
Speaking 1 hour - 1 paragraph
Reading - FK 4-6 250 words
Writing - - 1-5 paragraphs
Level 2 CEF: B1 to B2
IELTS: 4.0-5.5
Intermediate to
upper intermediate
Listening 4 hours FK 6-8 800 words
Speaking 1 hour - 5 paragraphs
Reading - FK 6-8 500 words
Writing - - 5-10 paragraphs
Level 3 CEF: B2
IELTS: 5.0-6.0
Upper intermediate
Listening 5 hours FK 8-9 1,000 words
Speaking 2 hours - 5-10 paragraphs
Reading - FK 8-10 700 words
Writing - - short essay
HIGHLY COM
M
ENDED
The Duke of Edinburgh’s English-Speaking Union
English Language Award
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
|eve| 2

Terry Ph||||ps and Anna Ph||||ps
Oourse Book
D U C A T I OO N
a r nn e tt
|eve |eve| 2 | 2

ryy Phh||| ||pppss aannd AAnna Ph||||ps
ourrsee BBBo Booook ok
Level 1 Listening
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Course DVD
Skills in English Combined Editions
• Level 1 Part A
• Level 1 Part B
• Level 2 Part A
• Level 2 Part B
• Level 3 Part A
• Level 3 Part B
Test packs are available for all levels.
Develops underlying skills
for IELTS preparation
ESU
Award
HI GHLY COMMENDED
www.garneteducation.com 5
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“We have finally found a textbook
which caters for international
students at tertiary level.”
Sophia Michael, Intercollege, Cyprus
Part A Listening and Speaking
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 803 2
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 804 9
CD (x2) ....................................................... 978 1 85964 806 3
Part A Reading and Writing
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 807 0
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 808 7
Part A Vocabulary and Grammar
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 809 4
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 810 0
Part B Listening and Speaking
Course Book ................................................978 1 85964 811 7
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 812 4
CD (x2) ........................................................978 1 85964 814 8
Part B Reading and Writing
Course Book ................................................978 1 85964 815 5
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 816 2
Part B Vocabulary and Grammar
Course Book ................................................978 1 85964 817 9
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 818 6
Test packs
For ordering information, contact sales@garneteducation.com
KEY FEATURES
• Ideal for false beginners,
i.e., students who have not
achieved their full potential
in English at school
• Listening texts a maximum
of 400 words
• Reading texts a maximum
of 250 words
• Speaking and writing tasks
are short paragraphs
• Teacher’s Books containing
full answer keys, language
and culture notes,
methodology notes and
transcripts of listening
material
• Allows beginners
immediate access to study
of academic English skills
• Available as three books –
Listening and Speaking,
Reading and Writing,
Vocabulary and Grammar –
at two levels
Starting Skills in English
A skills course providing immediate access for false beginners to study academic skills
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • FALSE BEGINNER TO ELEMENTARY: CEF LEVELS A1 TO A2/IELTS 2.0–3.0

Lesson 1: Listening
Ạ Look at the three pictures. What is the
connection between them?
ạ Look at Picture 1.
1
a
Listen and find.
2
a
Listen. Say Yes or No.
3
a
Listen. Give information.
4
a
Listen. Say Yes, No, or give information.
Ả Look at Picture 2.
1
a
Listen and find.
2
a
Listen. Say Yes or No.
3
a
Listen. Give information.
4
a
Listen. Say Yes, No, or give information.
ả Look at Picture 3.
1
a
Listen. True or false?
2
a
Listen. Say Yes, No, or give information.

a
Listen to a short lecture about customs
in the UK.
What is one custom when a person …
• has a birthday? • gets married? • dies?
ấ Do you have the same customs in your culture?
26 STARTING SKILLS IN ENGLISH, LISTENING AND SPEAKING – THEME 6: Culture and Civilization
THEME
6
Culture and Civilization
Skills Check
Identifying questions
• There are two main types of questions.
1 Some questions ask for the answer Yes or
No. They begin with Do, Did, Is, Are, Was,
Were, etc.
2 Some questions ask for information. They
begin with When, Where, Who, What, etc.
Examples:
questions answers
1 Are you married? Yes, I am. /
No, I’m not.
2 When did you get married? In 2003.
Study the intonation pattern of each type of
question.
1 Are you married?
2 When did you get married?
• Note:
1 the down / up at the end.
2 the high start and the low finish.
STARTING SKILLS IN ENGLISH, LISTENING AND SPEAKING – THEME 6: Culture and Civilization 27
Lesson 2: Listening
Look.
1
A
Listen.
2
A
Listen. Which word?
Look at Table 1. Work in pairs.
1
A
Listen and write numbers in the boxes.
Student 1: Complete the green boxes.
Student 2: Complete the blue boxes.
2 Ask and answer to complete the table.
Study Table 2.
The information in the table is not in order. Guess.
Which continent has …
1 the highest birth rate?
2 the highest death rate?
3 the fastest growth rate?
4 the lowest birth rate?
5 the lowest death rate?
6 the lowest growth rate?
Look at Table 2. Work in pairs.
1
A
Listen and write numbers in the boxes.
Student 1: Complete the green boxes.
Student 2: Complete the blue boxes.
2 Ask and answer to complete the table.
Look at Table 2.
1 Which continents have a rising population?
2 Which ones have a falling population?
3
A
Listen and check.
4 Complete the final column.
Complete Figure 1 with information from Table 2.
country marriages
Cuba
Philippines
Bangladesh
2 . 9 t p y g E
USA
Syria
China
UK
France
Argentina 3.9
Table 1: Marriage rates around the world (per 000)
Table 2: Birth rates and death rates by continent (per 000)
birth marriage death
continent births deaths difference
Africa
Europe
North America
South America
Asia
Australasia
Figure 1: Birth rates and death rates by continent
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
Births
skills checks allow students
to learn independently
n 27
35 40
academic topics presented
clearly and simply
www.garneteducation.com 6
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“Attractively presented, with
interesting topics and a number of
language tasks which engage the
students’ interest and enhance the
four language skills.”
Buckinghamshire Chilterns University
“The topics are very interesting
because they reflect today’s world and
what surrounds our students.”
Daniela Rizzuti, University of Calabria, Italy
KEY FEATURES
• Listening texts a maximum
of 400 words
• Reading texts a maximum
of 250 words
• Speaking tasks of one
paragraph, with writing
assignments between one
and five paragraphs
• Test booklets containing
theme tests, a revision test
after five units, plus an
end-of-course test
• Teacher’s Book containing
full answer keys,
methodology notes and
transcript of listening
material
• All lectures available on
DVD
While the course as a whole
takes an integrated approach
to skills, each skill has
been separately targeted,
recognizing the ‘jagged’
skills profile of learners who
may be weaker at certain
language skills.
Skills in English Level 1
Preparing students for entry into colleges and universities
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0–4.5
Listening Level 1
Course Book .............................................. 978 1 85964 770 7
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 774 5
DVD .............................................................978 1 85964 473 7
Speaking Level 1
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 771 4
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 775 2
Reading Level 1
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 772 1
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 776 9
Writing Level 1
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 773 8
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 777 6
Test packs and audio material
For ordering information, contact sales@garneteducation.com.

A Combined Edition is also available – see page 9.
112 LEVEL 1 – THEME 7: They Made Our World, A Brief History of Travel – Section 2: Speaking
Lesson 4: Applying new speaking skills
Ạ Work in pairs. Say the words below. Make sure your partner can hear the difference.
1 she’s cheese
2 ship chip
3 shoes choose
4 shop chop
5 shore chore
6 wash watch
7 wish which
8 dish ditch
ạ Ask the teacher about the meaning of any new words in Exercise A.
Echo any words that you don’t understand (Skills Check 2 on page 13).
Ả Practise saying these sentences in pairs.
1 Which cheese did she choose? 3 Is that a chip shop?
2 You wash the dishes, I’ll watch TV. 4 Was the ship near the shore?
ả Work in pairs. You have both done some research into transport and found some interesting information.
1 Read your own information. Cover your partner’s information.
2 Work in groups of people with the same information. Ask for help with any new words.
3 Work in pairs again. Tell your partner your information. Use language from Lesson 3.
4 Listen to your partner’s information. Ask about anything you didn’t understand or didn’t believe.
Use language from Lesson 3. Make notes.
Invention The motorcar
Date 1885
Name Karl Benz
Nationality German
Born 1844
Facts • called his first car a ‘motor carriage’
• produced and sold the cars himself
• continued to work in his own company
until 1903, when he retired
Died 1929
shoes chip
dish
chop
Invention The helicopter
Date 1939
Inventor Igor Sikorsky
Nationality Russian, but worked in America for a large
part of his life
Born 1889
Facts • began work on helicopters in 1910
• started his own aircraft company in 1923
• from 1925 to 1939, built flying boats
= planes that could land on water
Died 1972
In this section, you are going to read two texts about the history of
space travel.
Lesson 1: Vocabulary for reading
You are going to learn some vocabulary you will need to understand the texts.
Ạ Read the title of the article on the next page. Which of the red vocabulary words
are connected with this topic?
ạ Read this text, which includes the green vocabulary words. Label the diagram
above.
The Sun is a star at the centre of our Solar System. Nine planets orbit the Sun.
Mercury is the planet closest to the Sun. Venus is the second planet. It is the
hottest. The Earth is the third planet from the Sun. It is the planet that we
live on. It has a natural satellite, the Moon. The Moon orbits the Earth. Mars
is the fourth planet. It is sometimes called the red planet.
The next four planets are giant balls of gas. Jupiter, the fifth planet from
the Sun, is the largest planet in the Solar System. Saturn is the sixth planet
from the Sun. It has large rings. Uranus is the seventh planet and Neptune is
the eighth planet from the Sun.
Pluto is usually the furthest from the Sun. It is the smallest planet. In fact,
it is so small that some scientists say it is not a planet at all.
Ả What is the name of each object in the Solar System in your language?
LEVEL 1 – THEME 7: They Made Our World, A Brief History of Travel – Section 3: Reading 113
accident (n)
airport (n)
arrive (v)
bicycle (n)
boat (n)
bus (n)
bus stop (n)
car (n)
come (v)
drive (v)
driver (n)
fly (v)
go (v)
land (v)
leave (v)
passenger (n)
pilot (n)
plane (n)
road (n)
sail (v)
sailor (n)
ship (n)
street (n)
take off (v)
traffic (n)
train (n)
planet (n)
satellite (n)
Solar System (n)
space (n)
star (n)
the Earth (n)
the Moon (n)
the Sun (n)
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________ ___________
___________
THEME
7
They Made Our World A Brief History of Travel Section 3: Reading
___________
sentences in texts are basic
Subject-Verb-Object structure
ding 11 113 113 13 11
COMBINED
EDITION ALSO
AVAILABLE
colourful and vibrant texts have been deliberately
designed to build students’ confidence
Combined
Edition Resource
Book features
extra grammar
consolidation
www.garneteducation.com 7
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“Very appropriate for mixed-ability
groups having different degrees of
confidence in their English abilities.”
Aston University, UK
“We are now using this series very
successfully.”
Judith Sclare, EFL Unit, University of Glasgow
Listening Level 2
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 780 6
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 784 4
DVD .............................................................978 1 85964 474 4
Speaking Level 2
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 781 3
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 785 1
Reading Level 2
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 782 0
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 786 8
Writing Level 2
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 783 7
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 787 5
Test packs and audio material
For ordering information, contact sales@garneteducation.com
A Combined Edition is also available – see page 9.
KEY FEATURES
• Reading texts a maximum
of 500 words
• Listening texts a maximum
of 800 words
• Speaking tasks up to five
paragraphs, with writing
assignments between five
and ten well-structured
paragraphs
• Test booklets containing
theme tests, a revision test
after five units, plus an
end-of-course test
• Teacher’s Book containing
full answer keys,
methodology notes and
transcript of listening
material
• All lectures available on
DVD
Skills in English Level 2
Preparing students for entry into colleges and universities
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • INTERMEDIATE TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS B1 TO B2/IELTS 4.0–5.5
Climate in Aswan, Egypt
Temperature in °C (°F) Rainfall in cm (in)
50 (122) 16 (6.0)
40 (104) 14 (5.5)
30 (86) 12 (4.7)
20 (68) 10 (3.75)
10 (50) 8 (3.0)
0 (32) 6 (2.36)
-10 (14) 4 (1.6)
-20 (-4) 2 (0.79)
-30 (-22) 0
J F M A M J J A S O N D
Lesson 4: Applying new skills
Ạ Match the beginnings and endings of the DIGEST
process.
1 Define a a successful solution
2 Imagine b alternative possibilities
3 Generate c people your decision
4 Evaluate d the best one
5 Select e the possibilities
6 Tell f the problem
ạ You are going to read another article about making
decisions. Can you predict any of the content?
Study the items from the article. After looking at
each item, discuss predictions with your partner.
Ả Read each paragraph of the article on page 9 of
the Reading Resources book. After reading the
paragraph, do the activity below.
Para 1 Define management style.
Para 2 Follow the instructions.
Para 3 Follow the instructions.
Para 4 Look at the table you made after
reading Para 3. What is your
management style?
Para 5 What is the best style to use in
‘managing’ family and friends?
ả Imagine you have just got your first job. What
management style would you like your boss to
have? Why?
autocratic
participatory
democratic
Are You an
Autocrat
or a
Democrat?
It’s all a matter of style
18 READING SKILLS LEVEL 2 – THEME 3: Work and Business, How to Make Decisions
Table 1: An autocratic management style
Stages Me Them
D ✓
I ✓
G ✓
E ✓
S ✓
T ✓
Table 2: A participatory management style
Stages Me Them
D ✓
I ✓
G ✓ ✓
E ✓ ✓
S ✓
T ✓
Table 3: A democratic management style
Stages Me Them
D ✓
I ✓ ✓
G ✓ ✓
E ✓ ✓
S ✓ ✓
T ✓
What is your management style?
How can you identify your normal
management style?
Imagine that you have to make a decision
that involves other people.
The old style of management in business
was autocratic.
So what are you – autocratic, participatory
or democratic?
READING SKILLS LEVEL 2 – THEME 4: Science and Nature, Chains, Webs and Pyramids 19
THEME
4
Science and Nature Chains, Webs and Pyramids
graph (n)
laboratory (n)
science (n)
scientific (adj)
table (n)
test (v)
climate (n)
desert (n)
living thing (n)
plant (n)
polar (adj)
tropical (adj)
Figure 1: World climate areas
source: www.worldclimate.com
Polar
Tundra
Cool temperate
Warm temperate
Mountain
Desert
Monsoon
Tropical
In this theme you are going to read entries from an encyclopedia.
Lesson 1: Vocabulary
You are going to learn some of the vocabulary you will need to
understand entries about science and nature in an encyclopedia.
Ạ Discuss these questions. They use the red words.
1 What does a scientist do in a laboratory?
2 What can you put in a table?
3 What does the graph on this page show?
ạ Can you work out answers to these questions? They include the green words.
Look at the map, the pictures and the graph.
1 What does climate mean?
2 What is the source of the map?
3 What is the climate in your country?
4 In which climate area do you expect to see penguins? What about cacti?
5 In which climate area are the rainforests of the world?
6 Living things mean animals and what else?
7 What animals do you expect to see in polar areas?
8 What about desert areas?
9 What plants do you expect to see in tropical areas?
Ả Draw a climate graph of your area. Guess the information, or do some research.
ả Make a list of animals and plants that you find in your area.
A
B
C
D
E
vocabulary lists introduce new words
and recycle words already encountered
interesting topics promote student engagement
www.garneteducation.com 8
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“The Skills in English Listening
books fill a big gap in the market.”
Morna Lawson, Academic English Tutor,
Glasgow Caledonian University
“The single most useful tool you
could buy, if you are going to invest in
a resource for embedding ESOL into a
mainstream Science or other study
curriculum, or if you are resourcing a
Language Support provision.”
Liverpool Community College
Listening Level 3
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 790 5
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 794 3
DVD .............................................................978 1 85964 475 1
Speaking Level 3
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 791 2
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 795 0
Reading Level 3
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 792 9
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 796 7
Writing Level 3
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 793 6
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 797 4
Test packs and audio material
For ordering information, contact sales@garneteducation.com
A Combined Edition is also available – see page 9.
KEY FEATURES
• Listening texts a maximum
of 1,000 words
• Reading texts a maximum
of 700 words
• Speaking tasks between
five and ten paragraphs
with short essay-type
writing assignments
• Test booklets containing
theme tests, a revision
test after five units, plus
an end-of-course test
• Teacher's Book containing
full answer keys,
methology notes and
transcript of listening
material
• All lectures available on
DVD
Skills in English Level 3
Preparing students for entry into colleges and universities
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVEL B2/IELTS 5.0–6.0
m

WRITING SKILLS LEVEL 3 – THEME 5: The Physical World, Extraction Industries 25
I
n ancient times, there were many theories about the
origins of gold. People in some countries believed
that gold was produced by volcanoes. Other people
thought that it grew from a certain kind of earth.
Some were said it was created by lightning, while others
were believed that at one time it was rained gold.
In fact, gold was formed in the centre of the Earth.
It was flowed up like a river and formed ‘veins’ or lines
within rock. In some places, the rock was eroded by
rain and wind, and the gold was washed into streams.
Gold was probably the first metal that people were
discovered. People found small pieces of gold in river
beds. They were made the gold into jewellery and
coins. The earliest gold jewellery dates from about
3000 BCE. It was found by archaeologists in the area
between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in southern
Iraq. We know that the ancient Egyptians had gold
mines, which were probably at Wadi Hammamat near
Naqada. Gold was also mined for thousands of years
in India, Turkey and China.
In 1848, a small quantity of gold was discovered by
John Sutter in California. This discovery was led to a
‘gold rush’. Thousands of people left their jobs and
their homes. They were travelled to the area to make
their fortunes. There were similar gold rushes after
discoveries in Australia in 1851, and in other parts of
the United States, including Alaska, in 1899.
There are three ways of extracting gold. They _____
called panning, surface mining and underground mining.
In panning, rivers with particles of gold _____ diverted
through a number of lakes. After each lake, the water
____ passed through a sieve, which catches the
particles of gold. In ancient times, the coat of a sheep
was used instead of a sieve. In surface mining, the rock
and earth above a vein of gold _____ dug away and
the gold vein _____ uncovered. In underground
mining, vertical shafts _____ dug down into a vein of
gold. Then horizontal shafts __ dug to follow the vein.
Gold has many special properties. It is beautiful to
look at ________ easy to work with. You can pull it
into very long wires. You can ________ beat it into very
thin sheets. Gold does not rust or lose its colour,
________ it is very long-lasting. It is ________ a very
good conductor of heat and electricity.
We can make a large number of products from
gold. The main product is still jewellery, ______ gold is
flexible and beautiful. Gold is _______ used to make a
wide range of products, ______ include teeth and
parts of electronic devices. For example, the battery
connectors on your mobile phone are probably made
of gold. Gold lasts a long time, _______ it is also used
to make coins and medals.
The main producer of gold in the world is South
Africa. The country produces around 350,000 kilos per
annum, _______ is just over a third of world
production of gold. South Africa has reserves of
approximately 36 million kilos, ______ is around 40%
of world reserves.
The main gold-mining area of South Africa is the
Witwatersrand region, _____ was the site of the first
discovery of gold in the country in 1884. A gold rush
started, ______ Johannesburg was founded in
Witwatersrand in 1886 as a gold-mining town.
The future for South African gold mining does not
look good. Most of the gold is extracted from
underground mines, _______ are up to 3.8 kilometres
deep, _______ production costs are high. For example,
it costs $7.83 to extract one gram of South African
gold, _______ it only costs $5.96 for one gram of
Canadian gold.
24 WRITING SKILLS LEVEL 3 – THEME 5: The Physical World, Extraction Industries
Lesson 2: Writing
Ạ Imagine you have to write about gold mining. What topics
could you include?
ạ Read the topic sentences in the green box from an essay
about gold. They form a summary of the essay.
1 Complete the topic sentences with a noun from the
yellow box. Make any necessary changes.
2 What information do you expect to find in the rest of
each paragraph?
3 Check your answers to 1 and 2 with the text opposite.
Ả Look at the second sentence in the first paragraph of the text
opposite.
1 What form is believe in?
2 What about produce?
ả Look at Paragraphs 1 to 4. There are some mistakes with the
verbs. Cross out was or were in eight places.
Ấ Look at Paragraph 5. Write is or are in front of each past
participle to make the correct passive form.
ấ Read Paragraphs 6 to 10. Write a linking word in each space.
Lesson 3: Learning new skills
Ạ Read each topic sentence in Lesson 2 Exercise B again. What
information appeared in each paragraph?
ạ Paragraphs 2 and 5 describe processes.
1 Illustrate each process.
2 Cover the text. Write one paragraph about each process.
Ả How can you continue each sentence in the blue box?
1 Read the Skills Check.
2 Think of a possible ending, then check with the text opposite.
3 Cover the text and complete each sentence with
something suitable.
a The ancient Egyptians had gold mines, which ...
b The water is passed through a sieve, which ...
c Gold is also used to make a wide range of products,
which ...
d South Africa has reserves of approximately 36 million
kilos, which ...
e The main gold-mining area of South Africa is the
Witwatersrand region, which ...
f Most of the gold is extracted from underground
mines, which ...
1 In ancient times, there were many
________ about the origins of gold.
2 In fact, gold is formed in the
____________________ of the Earth.
3 Gold was probably the first
__________ that people discovered.
4 In 1848, a small _________________
of gold was discovered by John
Sutter in California.
5 There are three _________________
of extracting gold.
6 Gold has many special __________.
7 We can make a large number of
______________________ from gold.
8 The main _____________________
of gold in the world is South Africa.
9 The main gold-mining _________ of
South Africa is the Witwatersrand
region.
10 The future for South African
______________ does not look good.
area centre gold mining metal
producer product property
quantity theory way
Skills Check
Joining sentences (2)
You can sometimes join two
sentences with which. You can do
this if the object of Sentence 1 is the
subject of Sentence 2.
Examples:
Sentence 1 Sentence 2
The country 350,000 kilos
produces around , which per annum is just
350,000 kilos over a third of
per annum. world production
of gold.
Note: Change the full stop at the
end of Sentence 1 to a comma and
delete the subject of Sentence 2.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
semi-authentic reading texts
with a maximum of 700 words
carefully scaffolded writing tasks
www.garneteducation.com 9
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“The topics and tasks are appropriate
for all learners and the course is
preparing them well for future
university study.”
Helen Armstrong, University of Teesside
KEY FEATURES
• Each level available
separately in two sections,
Part A and Part B
• Each section provides 80
hours of teaching
• Resources Book containing
reading texts, transcripts and
grammar resources
• Additional syntactic grammar
practice in Resources Book
• Updated web resources,
including blended learning
for listening and reading
• Free downloadable unit test
packs
• All lectures available on DVD
• Interactive Skills Practice
CD-ROM included with the
Combined Edition Course
Book for Level 3. Provides
students with further self-
study listening and speaking
activities for IELTS and TOEFL
exam preparation
Skills in English Combined Editions
A combined skills edition of the best-selling course for academic study
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE • CEF LEVELS A2 TO B2/IELTS 3.0–6.0
1
The oil flowed more quickly
after the water
has
had
been injected into the extra wells.
2 The organisms
hadn’t
hasn’t
always been covered by sand.
3 By the time the Egyptians
sealed
had sealed
their pyramids, the Sumerians found
petroleum was useful in building.
4 The Arabs
were
had been
distilling petroleum for years when they
invaded Spain.
5 Iranians
had been
had
discovered oil some years before Kuwaitis.
6 Wells are drilled
in
on
many locations.
7 Oil floats
at
on
water.
8
Steam injection is still in
development
in
at
Canada.
9 The wildcat wells are found
at
in
the North.
10 Diesel oil is seen in the diagram
below
at
the kerosene.
11 People used to think
the gold
gold
was from volcanoes.
12 There were
a gold rush
gold rushes
in Australia and the States.
13 The rock and earth above
a vein
vein
of gold was dug away first.
14 It is
a very
very
good conductor of heat and electricity.
15
Battery
The battery
conductors for cell
phones
are likely to be made of gold.
16 Venezuela
will have been relied on
will be rely on
for extra oil by the end of the century.
17 A quarter of the field will have
been
being
tapped before this point is reached.
18 The pressure can
maintain
be maintained
if water is pumped into them.
19 Electricity will
been generated
be generated
every second it is switched on.
20 Petroleum products
were used
been used
as weapons thousands of years ago.
THEME
5
The Physical World Geology Grammar Skills
Read the sentences. Circle the correct word in each case.
36 RESOURCES BOOK LEVEL 3A – GRAMMAR SKILLS – THEME 5
Combined Edition Level 1 Part A
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 856 8
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 862 9
Combined Edition Level 1 Part B
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 857 5
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 863 6
DVD A/B ......................................................978 1 85964 473 7
Combined Edition Level 2 Part A
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 858 2
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 864 3
Combined Edition Level 2 Part B
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 859 9
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 865 0
DVD A/B ......................................................978 1 85964 474 4
Combined Edition Level 3 Part A
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 933 6
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 866 7
Combined Edition Level 3 Part B
Course Book and Resources Book ............... 978 1 85964 934 3
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 867 4
DVD A/B ......................................................978 1 85964 475 1
Audio material
For ordering information, contact sales@garneteducation.com.
Develops underlying skills
for IELTS preparation
Level 1 Listening
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Course DVD
Ạ Look at the rules below. Complete Table 1 with the correct form of the verbs.
The past perfect simple (subject + had + past participle) is used to talk about:
• actions that took place before another action or state in the past.
• situations or states that existed before another action or situation in the past.
The past perfect continuous (subject + had + been + ~ing form verb) is used to talk about:
• actions or situations that started in the past and continued until another point in the past.
• the duration of the action, emphasizing it.
• past situations or repeated actions which explain another present/past action or situation.
Table 1: Past perfect (simple and continuous)
A gold rush started in California after Sutter (find: pps) ______________ gold in the late 1840s.
Gold (extract: pps passive) ___________________ underground mines were dug in the 1860s.
by panning before
When the first Chinese goldminers arrived Australians (mine: ppc) _________________
in 1853 there for two years.
South Africa (produce: ppc) __________________ cheaper Californian gold became available.
most of the gold until
The lakes were panned for gold after the panners
(divert: pps) ____________________ the river
through four lakes.
ạ Read the explanation below. Then choose the correct option to complete Table 2.
Prepositions/prepositional phrases tell us where something happens, or where something/someone is.
Table 2: Prepositions of place
Durban is located at / on the coast.
Lesotho is surrounded by / with South Africa.
The major mines are in / on the North.
Taking metals found under / below the ground is called ‘extraction’.
The pyramids are east of the river on / in the southern border.
Ả Read the rules below. Then look at Table 3.
We use the indefinite article a/an:
• to talk about something unspecific.
• to talk about something for the first time.
• to classify things.
We use the definite article the:
• when there is only one of something, to talk about something previously mentioned, or in superlative
expressions.
• with buildings, rivers, seas and some countries (where the name has a noun, e.g., the United States).
• with an adjective when we are talking about a group of people (e.g., the young, the helpless).
We use the zero article:
• to talk about abstract nouns, plural countable & uncountable nouns when we are generalizing.
• with languages and most place names/countries.
• with certain expressions.
1 Complete Table 3 with the, a, an or Ø.
2 Which rule is shown?
3 Now complete the Why? column with the reason.
RESOURCES BOOK LEVEL 3A – GRAMMAR SKILLS – THEME 5 37
in
at
Canada.
at
in
the North.
m
below
at
the kerosene.
the gold
gold
was from volcanoes.
a gold rush
gold rushes
in Australia and the States.
a vein
vein
of gold was dug away first.
a very
very
good conductor of heat and electricity.
conductors for cell
phones
are likely to be made of gold.
will have been relied on
will be rely on
for extra oil by the end of the century.
e
been
being
tapped before this point is reached.
maintain
be maintained
if water is pumped into them.
been generated
be generated
every second it is switched on.
were used
been used
as weapons thousands of years ago.
R SKILLS – THEME 5
The lakes w
ạ Read the expl
Prepositions/p
Table 2: Prep
Durban is lo
Lesotho is s
The major m
Ta TT king meta
The pyramid
Ả Read the rules
We use the in
• to talk abo
• to talk abo
• to classify t
We use the d
• when there
expressions
• with buildi
• with an ad
We use the z
• to talk abo
• with langu
• with certai
1 Complete T
2 Which rule
3 Now comp
72 LEVEL 3A – THEME 5: The Physical World, Geology – Section 1: Listening
Lesson 2: Practising listening
Ạ You are going to hear a lecture about natural
disasters.
a
Listen to the introduction. What exactly are
you going to hear about in this lecture?
1 Tick one or more of the points in the green
box.
2 Number the points in the order that you will
hear about them.
3 Make an outline for notes on the lecture.
ạ Discuss these questions.
1 What were some early theories about
earthquakes?
2 What is the real cause of earthquakes?
Ả a
Listen to the first part of the lecture.
1 What were some of the early theories about
the cause of earthquakes?
2 What was Aristotle’s theory?
3 What is seismology? How did it get the name?
ả a
Listen to the second part of the lecture.
1 Take notes.
2 Ask about any important information that you
missed.
Ấ What do you expect to hear in the next part of
the lecture?
1 Tick one or more of the following:
• information about different earthquakes
around the world ___
• ways of measuring earthquakes ___
• information about famous seismologists ___
• the real cause of earthquakes ___
2
a
Listen to the third part and check your
ideas.
ấ Look at the two world maps. What is the
relationship between them?
1 Discuss.
2
a
Listen to the fourth part and check your
ideas.
Ầ What is the real cause of earthquakes?
a
Listen to the fifth part and draw a diagram
from the information.
Pacific
Plate
Antarctic Plate
South
American
Plate Australian Plate
North
American
Plate
Eurasian Plate
Caribbean
Plate
Arabian
Plate
African Plate
Pacific
Plate
Philippine
Plate
Scotia Plate
Nazca
Plate
Cocos
Plate
Indian
Plate
Juan
De
Fuca
Plate
• a famous earthquake ___
• a famous volcanic eruption ___
• early theories about earthquakes ___
• early theories about volcanoes ___
• the real cause of earthquakes ___
• the real cause of volcanoes ___
World seismicity: 1975–1995
534 SIE Comb CB L3A(4)
five integrated themes in each
part mean knowledge is transferred
across the Skills course
www.garneteducation.com 10
The English for academic
study (EAS) series comprises
seven separate EAP course
books, covering the essential
skills for English-medium
study: Listening, Speaking,
Reading, Writing, Vocabulary
and Pronunciation, as well as
Extended Writing & Research
Skills. The series has been
designed for students on
pre-sessional and foundation
courses within an IELTS range
of 5.0 to 7.0.
The EAS series has been fully
revised and updated, taking
into account more than two
years of feedback from the
field. A new user-friendly
layout helps both students
and teachers navigate
effectively through the units,
enabling learners to make
the best use of the resources
available.
EAS Reading and EAS Writing
share a companion Source
Book – which can be bought
separately – comprising eight
authentic texts specially
chosen for university study.
The English for Academic Study Series
A university preparation course published in collaboration with the University of Reading
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
REVISED
EDITIONS
www.garneteducation.com 11
“EAS Speaking usefully fills a gap in
the market, with up-to-date EAP
seminar skills material with an audio
component. There is virtually nothing
else that has come on the market in
the last ten years that touches it. ”
Chris Copland, CELT, University of York
“I really enjoy using these valuable
resources. Everything you need is
contained within the books. I am
using the Extended Writing &
Research Skills book this term very
thoroughly as the students are
working on a personal eight-week
project. There is a wealth of useful
information in this book.”
Catherine Damon, University of Buckingham
The EAS Teacher’s Books
provide users with a variety
of routes through the books
so they can be adapted to a
range of teaching situations,
from short courses to more
extended timetables.
Contemporary methodology
reflects the most recent
developments in EAP
teaching based on practical
experience in the EAP
classroom.
Multimedia support: free
audio material is included
where appropriate, featuring
authentic transcripts of
realistic length with a variety
of accents. The extracts from
lectures for EAS Listening are
also available on DVD.
A series website features
a variety of teacher and
student resources, including
interactive activities for EAS
Speaking and EAS Extended
Writing & Research Skills.
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
www.garneteducation.com 12
68 English for academic study
2.2 In groups, compare the points you noted in Ex 2.1. Discuss the possible significance of
the following.
• The existence of other lingua francas on Zambia’s borders.
• Local languages that overlap the borders of Zambia and her neighbours.
• Local languages that continue to be spoken by the vast majority of Zambians.
2.3 Look at the following possible developments and prioritize them in order from 1 to 5
(1 = most likely, 5 = least likely). In groups, discuss the order you have chosen.
LANGUAGES I N ZAMBI A
Zambia is a developing landlocked country situated in Central Africa. The population, approximately
9.7 million, is made up of 98.7 per cent African people, 1.1 per cent European and 0.2 per cent
other (The World Factbook, 1999 – Zambia). The African population consists of four main tribal
groups. There are also a number of subsidiary groups. As a result, there is a wide variety of tribal
languages and dialects. There is also a significant number of other permanent residents in Zambia
whose first language is not a Zambian tribal language or dialect. For example, there are first-
language speakers of English, Swahili, Hindi and Afrikaans. Because of this, it has been necessary for
Zambia to have a common language of communication for a range of social, political, educational,
technical and economic reasons. Zambia is part of Anglophone Africa, and therefore the common
language (lingua franca) is English. Approximately 78 per cent of the population over the age of 15
can read and write English. There are also at least seven major dominant vernacular languages and
approximately 70 other indigenous languages.
Zambia is surrounded by neighbouring countries, each having a major
European lingua franca as well as official tribal languages. These countries
are Tanzania, Malawi, Zimbabwe and Namibia, where the lingua franca is
English; Angola and Mozambique (Portuguese) and
the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire),
where the lingua franca is French. In all these
countries, therefore, like Zambia, there is
multilingualism, e.g., Zambians communicate
through the lingua franca as well as through
at least one of the official vernacular
languages. Several of the local languages
transcend borders. For example, Bemba is
spoken in Northern Zambia and in the south
of the Democratic Republic of Congo; Nyanja
in Eastern Zambia and Malawi, etc.
IN THE FUTURE
English will take over entirely as the only language spoken in Zambia.
Language conflicts will develop between English speakers and
other language communities.
English will increasingly become the language of the elite, and
non-fluent speakers will be seriously disadvantaged.
The situation is likely to remain as it is, i.e., multilingualism with
languages coexisting in order to serve different purposes.
English will be replaced by some other official language.
7
The new linguistic order
69 Reading
Text 7-1 The new linguistic order (Source Book pp. 56–64)
You are now going to read Text 7-1. As you read, you will need to think about what information
would be relevant for completing the following assignment:
What futur e significant language developments might occur in a country such
as Zambia?
You will need to make notes as you are reading and will have to make decisions about how to do
this. By the end of the unit, you will be expected to have produced notes on part of the text relevant
to the assignment.
Tasks 3 and 4 will make use of the first part of the text in shorter stages before the main reading
focus in Task 5.
2.4 Read Text 7-1 in the Source Book. As you read, think about what information would be
relevant to the Focus task and make notes.
Task 3: Understanding subject-specific vocabulary
It is normal in an academic situation for a student to have a working vocabulary of a particular subject
or topic that has been learnt either from the lecture or seminar environment or from reading subject
materials. Such a working vocabulary of subject-specific words should help the reader understand any
relevant text they are asked to read.
3.1 Read Paragraphs A–C and find the words or phrases in
the box. Then match them with the definitions a–e below.
1 mother tongue 2 globalization 3 official language
4 regionalization 5 local language
a) A process in which a language is used in neighbouring countries, particularly for
business or official reasons, but also for educational, social or recreational purposes.
b) This is used in business, in government and law courts; it may also be the national
language.
c) Used in part of a country or region mostly as a first language, usually for personal, social
or commercial reasons; sometimes for official or educational reasons.
d) The first language to be acquired at home.
e) A process involving worldwide interaction in trade, politics, recreation, education, etc.
3.2 The following terms (1–10) all appear in Text 7-1. In groups, discuss what these
terms mean, then try to match them with the definitions a–j.
1 first language 2 pidgin 3 multilingual 4 lingua franca 5 vernacular
6 minority language 7 working language 8 immersion language
9 neologism 10 standardized language
“Excellent selection of reading
materials with some extremely
valuable exercises in vocabulary
comprehension and critical
(evaluative) thinking.”
Rob Naish, University of West of England
“EAS Reading proved a godsend to
our university pre-sessional course.
Student course evaluations of
materials rose significantly after we
used it.”
Oxford Brookes University, Oxford
“I liked the integrated approach
immensely.”
Joanna Rawlinson, Bath Spa University
English for academic study: Reading
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 484 3
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 501 7
Reading & Writing Source Book ....................978 1 85964 518 5
KEY FEATURES
• The Strategies Approach
includes the use of
skills such as skimming,
scanning, search reading,
careful reading and
browsing.
• The Task-Based Approach
attempts to mirror authentic
reading demands and
purposes and suggests
that effective readers are
motivated by the desire to
acquire knowledge in order
to perform a task.
UNITS
• Academic achievement
• Early human development
• The environment today
• Statistics without tears
• Human activity and
climate change
• The global village
• The new linguistic order
Separate Source Book
contains all the texts featured
in the Course Book
English for Academic Study: Reading
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
JOHN SLAGHT AND PADDY HARBEN • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
tasks focus on full-length texts on authentic and
contemporary topics available in separate Source Book
www.garneteducation.com 13
“... a well thought out course with
strong theoretical foundation ...”
Martin White, University of Auckland
“A welcome addition to any EAP/ESP
library.”
Mark Krzanowski, ESP SIG Coordinator
“... a variety of topics to discuss ...
plenty of activities to keep students
busy ... offers a range of possibilities
for use in many writing courses.”
Singapore Tertiary English Teacher’s Society
English for academic study: Writing
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 485 0
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 502 4
Reading & Writing Source Book ....................978 1 85964 518 5
KEY FEATURES
The course adopts a four-
fold approach to reflect
the complex demands of
academic writing:
1. The process approach
2. The development of critical
thinking in writing
3. The micro-skills of writing,
e.g., effective introductions
and conclusions, and
effective paragraphing
4. The importance of genre
UNITS
• Academic achievement
• Early human development
• Telemedicine
• Statistics without tears
• Human activity and climate
change
• The global village
• The new linguistic order
Separate Source Book
contains all the texts featured
in the Course Book
English for Academic Study: Writing
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
ANNE PALLANT • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
source material shared with the EAS Reading course is designed to develop critical thinking
Situation:
Problem(s):
Solution(s):
Implication(s):
Evaluation:

64 English for academic study
1.3 Read the following article about global migration. Identify how the pattern described
in Ex 1.1 and 1.2 is used in the article.
GLOBAL MI GRATI ON
The movement of populations across borders has
increased to such an extent as to produce a global
migration crisis. As a result of this development, a
number of ethical issues have arisen, such as the
proportion of ethnic groups within a country, the national
identity of a country, racism, the effect of a multicultural
society and the distribution of wealth. It is mainly the
governments of the host countries that seek to solve
these problems by establishing language programmes,
cultural exchange and awareness-raising programmes
and, where possible, employment opportunities.
However, if this pattern of migration continues, there needs to be more openness and
willingness on behalf of the native population to accept and receive migrants into their
society, and to realise the benefits that a multicultural society can bring. The implications of
this suggestion are wide, and not without problems: many older people are resistant to
change, and the working population are resistant to outside competition for employment
opportunities. There also needs to be a much higher level of cooperation between the host
country and the country of origin in order to establish a clear identity for the migrants.
It is obvious that any solution to the problems mentioned above will involve much greater
cooperation at the levels of citizens, ethnic groups and political bodies; it will also take
many years for any adjustment to take place. However, it is hoped that over time and with
greater understanding of the global picture and the possibility of a global governing body
that is fair to all global citizens, the problems resulting from the issues of global migration
will be minimized.
1.4 Complete the flow diagram using information from the text above.
1.5 Compare your answers with another student.
7
The new linguistic order
65 Writing
1.6 Is there a further problem created by the proposed solution in the text?
1.7 What language do you think it is appropriate to use when giving an evaluation?
Text 7 The new linguistic order (Source Book pp. 56–64)
This text comes from an article in the magazine Foreign Policy and contains information relevant to
your essay.
Task 2: Writing your essay
2.1 Read Text 7. Then re-read Text 6 entitled The global village. These will help you
respond to the following tasks.
You should use the information from both texts, and any of your own texts, to support the
ideas in your essay.
2.2 Choose one of the following essays, then brainstorm your ideas.
The pr ocess of globalization has given rise to a number of pr oblems. Identify
one of these pr oblems, explain the situation which gave rise to the pr oblem
and offer some solutions. You should also evaluate your solutions.
It could be said that globalization has incr eased the gap between the ‘haves’
and the ‘have nots’, and that this is a pr oblem. Explain how this situation has
arisen and offer some solutions to this pr oblem. You should also evaluate your
solutions.
Ther e ar e a number of pr oblems associated with the rise of English as a world
language. Outline some of these pr oblems, explain how they ar ose, offer some
solutions and evaluate your pr oposed solutions.
2.3 Plan your essay, thinking about the order and grouping of your ideas.
• Try to arrange your ideas in a logical order.
• Decide how your points can be grouped together, so that each group has one main
or unifying idea.
• Decide how your groups of points can be arranged effectively in a
Situation Problems Solutions Implications Evaluation pattern.
2.4 Exchange plans with another student and evaluate her/his plan.
2.5 Write the first draft of your essay. Aim to write at least 1,000 words.
2.6 When you have finished your first draft, find another student who has finished and
exchange drafts.
a) Evaluate her/his draft.
b) Write your second draft, aiming to improve the development of your ideas.



www.garneteducation.com 14
“Excellent set of texts for preparing
international students for the
demands of undergraduate/
postgraduate study.”
Rob Naish, University of West of England
English for academic study: Reading & Writing
Source Book ................................................978 1 85964 518 5
KEY FEATURES
• Authentic academic texts
• Modified for appropriate
length and language
• Provides students with
authentic challenges
• Styled to promote reader
interest
• Updated for 2009 edition
UNITS
• Academic achievement
• Early human development
• The environment today
• Telemedicine
• Statistics without tears
• Human activity and
climate change
• The global village
• The new linguistic order
English for Academic Study: Reading & Writing Source Book
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
JOHN SLAGHT, PADDY HARBEN AND ANNE PALLANT • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B1 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.0
56 English for academic study
Text 7-1: The new linguistic order
/-2402(
+10,)1*/1%4
3.'2.4
7
The new linguistic order
57 Reading & Writing Source Book
Text 7-1: The new linguistic order cont.
As vou rond fhIs sonfonco, vou nro ono of npproxImnfoIv l.6 bIIIIon poopIo
nonrIv ono-fhIrd of fho worId`s popuInfIon who wIII uso IngIIsh In somo form
fodnv. AIfhough IngIIsh Is fho mofhor fonguo of onIv 380 mIIIIon poopIo, If Is fho
Inngungo of fho IIon`s shnro of fho worId`s books, ncndomIc pnpors, nowspnpors,
nnd mngnzInos. AmorIcnn rndIo, foIovIsIon, nnd bIockbusfor fIIms oxporf
IngIIsh-Inngungo pop cuIfuro worIdwIdo. Moro fhnn 80 por conf of fho confonf
posfod on fho Infornof Is In IngIIsh, ovon fhough nn osfImnfod 44 por conf of
onIIno usors sponk nnofhor Inngungo nf homo. Þof surprIsIngIv, bofh fho gIobnI
suppIv of nnd fho domnnd for IngIIsh InsfrucfIon nro oxpIodIng. Whofhor wo
consIdor IngIIsh n 'kIIIor Inngungo` or nof, whofhor wo rognrd Ifs sprond ns
bonIgn gIobnIIznfIon or IInguIsfIc ImporInIIsm, Ifs oxpnnsIvo ronch Is undonInbIo
nnd, for fho fImo boIng, unsfoppnbIo. Þovor boforo In humnn hIsforv hns ono
Inngungo boon spokon (Iof nIono somI-spokon) so wIdoIv nnd bv so mnnv.
WIfh unprocodonfod ronch comos n form of unprocodonfod powor. AIfhough
Inngungo Is svnonvmous wIfh noIfhor IdooIogv nor nnfIonnI Inforosf, IngIIsh`s
roIo ns fho modIum for ovorvfhIng from hIgh-sfnkos dIpIomncv fo nIr frnffIc
confroI confors corfnIn ndvnnfngos on fhoso who sponk If. IrodomInnnfIv
IngIIsh-sponkIng counfrIos nccounf for npproxImnfoIv 40 por conf of fho
worId`s gross domosfIc producf. Moro nnd moro compnnIos worIdwIdo nro
mnkIng IngIIsh compofoncv n proroquIsIfo for promofIons or nppoInfmonfs.
Tho succoss of poIIfIcInns nround fho worId nIso IncronsIngIv doponds on fhoIr
fncIIIfv In IngIIsh. Whon nowIv oIocfod Cormnn chnncoIIor Corhnrd Schroodor
nnd Ironch prosIdonf Jncquos ChIrnc mof In Sopfombor fo dIscuss fufuro
coopornfIon, fhov spoko noIfhor Ironch nor Cormnn, buf IngIIsh. And IngIIsh
Is fho offIcInI Inngungo of fho Iuroponn ConfrnI Innk, dospIfo fho fncf fhnf fho
!nIfod KIngdom hns nof joInod fho Iuroponn Monofnrv !nIon, fho bnnk Is
Iocnfod In Irnnkfurf, nnd onIv l0 por conf of fho bnnk`s sfnff nro IrIfIsh. Tho
prodomInnnco of IngIIsh hns bocomo such n soro poInf wIfhIn fho Iuroponn
!nIon fhnf Ifs IondorshIp now provIdos InconfIvos for sfnff mombors fo Ionrn
nnv ofhor offIcInI Inngungo.
Yof profossIonnI IInguIsfs hosIfnfo fo prodIcf fnr Info fho fufuro fho furfhor
gIobnIIznfIon of IngIIsh. HIsforIcnIIv, Inngungos hnvo rIson nnd fnIIon wIfh fho
mIIIfnrv, oconomIc, cuIfurnI, or roIIgIous powors fhnf supporfod fhom. Iovond
fho obb nnd fIow of hIsforv, fhoro nro ofhor ronsons fo boIIovo fhnf fho IngIIsh
Inngungo wIII ovonfunIIv wnno In InfIuonco. Ior ono, IngIIsh ncfunIIv ronchos
nnd Is fhon ufIIIzod bv onIv n smnII nnd nfvpIcnIIv forfunnfo mInorIfv.
Iurfhormoro, fho kInds of InforncfIons IdonfIfIod wIfh gIobnIIznfIon, from frndo
fo communIcnfIons, hnvo nIso oncourngod rogIonnIIznfIon nnd wIfh If fho sprond
of rogIonnI Inngungos. ArnbIc, ChInoso, HIndI, SpnnIsh, nnd n hnndfuI of ofhor
rogIonnI fonguos nIrondv commnnd n sIgnIfIcnnf ronch nnd fhoIr mnjor growfh
Is sfIII nhond. IInnIIv, fho sprond of IngIIsh nnd fhoso rogIonnI Inngungos
coIIocfIvoIv nof fo monfIon fho swoopIng forcos drIvIng fhom hnvo cronfod n
squoozo offocf on smnII communIfIos, producIng pockofs of nnxIous IocnIIznfIon
nnd IocnI-Inngungo rovIvnI rosIsfnnf fo gIobnI chnngo.
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
/-2402(4+10,)1*/1%43.'2.
3
&
A
3
B
3
C
text length suitable for academic study - example
text extends over eight pages
www.garneteducation.com 15
“There is a wealth of useful
information in this book.”
Catherine Damon, University of
Buckinghamshire
“Ideal for our Master’s preparation
course.”
Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge
“... very impressive, everything I need
in a well-trialled and useful format.”
Morna Lawson, Glasgow Caledonian University
English for academic study: Extended Writing &
Research Skills
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 486 7
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 503 1
KEY FEATURES
• Step-by-step process for
completing written tasks
• Detailed advice and model
answers
• Authentic source materials
used to produce a piece
of extended writing
• Dedicated website with
interactive activities

UNITS
• Introduction to the skills
of extended writing and
research to support
your ideas
• Using evidence to support
your ideas
• Structuring your project
and finding information
• Developing your project
• Developing a focus
• Introductions, conclusions
and definitions
• Incorporating data and
illustrations
• Preparing for presentations
and editing your work
English for Academic Study: Extended Writing & Research Skills
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
JOAN McCORMACK AND JOHN SLAGHT • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.5–7.0
38 English for academic study
As you read more about your topic and take relevant notes, you will be able to make connections
between ideas that will help you plan and structure your writing. The more you think about what you
are reading, the better you will be able to write an evaluative report.
Task 4: Choosing sources
We are now going to look at why the texts in Appendix 4 were chosen for you to refer to when
completing your first project. Those students not completing this project will also benefit from the
analysis.
4.1 Look at the example notes below, analyzing the text Settlement changes in LEDCs
from Appendix 4 (pages 127–131). Check the five reasons using the text reference and
the text itself. Evaluate each reason and discuss with a partner.
TEXT E.||c~-Eco|!, /., E|cJc:, l., lccccc|, !., |cc|.co, w. + |.Jco!,
l. |°°°ì. íccc|c, c|ccc: ccJ !|c~c:. C»!c-J: lc.cc~ccc.
Why it was chosen I! .c: coc|.:|cJ .c !|c |c:! |´ ,cc-:.
I! .c: coc|.:|cJ c, cc c:!cc|.:|cJ coc|.:|.co cc~ccc,:
lc.cc~ccc.
I! ccc!c.c: .c-.co: cc:c :!oJ.c: Jcc|.co ..!| !|c c- cc|c~: c!
o-ccc.zc!.cc ccJ |c. !c :c|.c !|c:c c- cc|c~:.
|ccJc-: ccc cc~cc- c !|c :.!oc!.cc .c J.!!c- cc! c.!.c: .c
J.!!c- cc! cc-!: c! !|c .c-|J. ¯|.: o..c: !|c~ !|c cccc-!oc.!,
!c J.:co:: !|c ccc!cc!:, cc! :.~c|, Jc:c-.cc !|c~.
I! ccc!c.c: :c~c o:c!o| c|c!co-cc|: ccJ !cc|c:.
TEXT
Why it was chosen
4.2 Make similar notes of your own on three of the other texts from Appendix 4. Be
prepared to compare and discuss your notes.
focuses on key skills for students
about to study at university
d i 15
3
Structuring your project and finding information
39 Extended Writing & Research Skills
TEXT
Why it was chosen
TEXT
Why it was chosen
Task 5: Finding information
Finding information in textbooks
Many students experience difficulties in choosing the most appropriate texts to read when beginning
their academic studies. This is because there seem to be so many texts they have to read to find
information and ideas they want. Time becomes a real matter of concern as deadlines for completing
assignments draw closer.
You are more likely to find what you are looking for if you have a clear idea of your purpose, as
mentioned already. If you have a clear focus, you can look for the specific type of information you
need. Textbooks are one source; you may find several textbooks that could interest you, and you can
follow a particular procedure to determine the usefulness of each one and save time. This is the first
stage in reading critically.
www.garneteducation.com 16
“Once again the publishers have
come up with a winner.”
iT’s for Teachers
“The material and teaching
approach are excellent and
thorough.”
Elizabeth Morrison, Massey University,
Wellington, New Zealand
English for academic study: Listening
Course Book and audio CDs (x2) .. 978 1 85964 482 9
Teacher’s Book ............................ 978 1 85964 499 7
DVD (includes CD audio material) . 978 1 85964 967 1
KEY FEATURES
• Varied lecture styles, topics and
international accents
• Extended authentic listening
texts of up to ten minutes
• Audio CDs for further self-study
or homework
• Separately available DVD provides
a realistic learning environment,
showing how visual prompts aid
understanding and presentation
• Ideal for classroom or media
centres
UNITS
• Listening and lectures
• Introductions to lectures
• Identifying key ideas in lectures
• Note-taking: part 1
• Note-taking: part 2
• Introducing new terminology
• What lecturers do in lectures
• Digressions
English for Academic Study: Listening
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
COLIN CAMPBELL AND JONATHAN SMITH • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
E n gl i s h
f o r
ac ade mi c
s t u dy :
Listening
Co u r s e DV D
20 English for academic study
2.4 CD1 – 18 Listen to Part 1 Section 2 again. In pairs, discuss what the following terms
mean in the context of the lecture.
franchisor franchisee trademark trade name
package untrained person continual assistance
2.5 CD1 – 19 Listen to Part 1 Section 3 again.
a) What does the franchisor provide to the franchisee?
b) What does the franchisee give in return?
Task 3: Distinguishing key points from examples
The lecturer begins Part 2 of the lecture by saying: ‘There are a number of issues that you need
to consider when deciding whether or not to franchise your business.’
3.1 With a partner, discuss what you think the lecturer will talk about in Part 2 of
the lecture.
3.2 CD1 – 20 Listen to Part 2 of the lecture.
a) Make brief notes in your notebook on the three or four points
made by the lecturer, maximum 15 words for each point.
b) Compare your notes with a partner and see whether you
have identified the same points.
3.3 Look at the transcript for Track 20 on page 68 and find examples of language
used by the lecturer to signpost key points.
For example, the lecturer signposts the first point by saying:
‘Firstly, there needs to be …’
3.4 CD1 – 21/22 Listen to Part 2 Sections 1 and 2 again and answer the following
questions.
Section 1
a) To support his key point, the lecturer gives two reasons and two examples. What are they?
b) Do they help make his point clearer? If so, how?
Section 2
a) What point does the lecturer make about buying
supplies in bulk?
b) How is this point related to the key point in this section?
c) Now look at the text on the next page. Having
made the key point, the speaker repeats the idea
twice. Underline the words where he repeats the idea.
3
Identifying key ideas in lectures
21 Listening
3.5 CD1 – 23 Listen to Part 2 Section 3 again, where the lecturer talks about training
and support; the operating manual; and developing skills quickly.
a) How are the above three ideas related to one another?
b) What point does the lecturer make about previous experience?
Task 4: Signposting key points
In Part 3, the lecturer continues to discuss some of the issues that need to be considered
when trying to decide whether or not to franchise your business.
4.1 CD1 – 24 Listen to Part 3 of the lecture. Make notes on
the key points in your notebook. Then compare your notes
with a partner. Have you identified the same key points?
4.2 CD1 – 25 Listen to Part 3 Section 1 again and complete the
excerpt with one to three words in each space.
Note: Notice that again the lecturer uses signposting language
to indicate he is beginning a new point.
4.3 CD1 – 26/27 Listen to Part 3 Sections 2 and 3 again. Make notes on the different
ways in which brands can be protected.
In addition – and this is fairly obvious – you will need a fairly wide margin between cost
and income. Remember that the gross margin needs to provide a return on the investment
to both the franchisor and the franchisee. So you will need to keep costs low and prices as
high as the market will bear. One advantage of a franchise operation is that supplies can be
bought in bulk across the whole franchise, which will help to keep costs down. But you
can see that franchising would be unsuitable in a market where the margin between cost
and income is very narrow.
One further issue you may need to consider is whether the
business is to another geographical
area. If you have developed your business serving one
particular part of the country and you want to set up a
franchise network covering a ,
the whole country for example, another thing you will
have to consider is whether there is a
for your product or service in different regions. It may be,
for example, that competition in other parts of the country
may be so that it is difficult for
franchisees to , or that for localized
or reasons the
business may not be as profitable.
Study tip
A technique often used by
lecturers to highlight ideas
is to stress key words or
phrases. Trying to identify
where the speaker does
this can help you recognize
key points in a lecture.
www.garneteducation.com 17
“... tackles the whole process of
how to achieve objectives in
different contexts.”
iT’s for Teachers
English for academic study: Speaking
Course Book and audio CD ............ 978 1 85964 483 6
Teacher’s Book ............................. 978 1 85964 500 0
KEY FEATURES
• Topic-led units develop
presentation and seminar
participation skills
• Reading and listening texts
help generate ideas
• ‘Useful language’ sections
support discussions and
presentations
• Regular review units and learner
diary sections to consolidate
work
• Audio CDs for further self-study
or homework
• Useful 21-page Appendix
UNITS
• Communication in academic
situations
• Seminars and discussions
• Examining underlying
assumptions
• Reading into speaking
• The use of data
• Supporting your point of view
• Collecting and presenting data
• Thinking rationally
• The importance of reflection
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
English for Academic Study: Speaking
JOAN McCORMACK AND SEBASTIAN WATKINS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
www garneteducation com 117
8 English for academic study
1.2 Compare your experiences with a partner using your answers to Ex 1.1.
Give details of:
a) where you had each experience;
b) how it was organized, (e.g., how many students were involved and how long
the speaking turns were);
c) what kinds of topics you covered.
1.3 Discuss your attitude to the situations in Ex 1.1. Which ones do you find, or
think you will find, the most difficult to do in English? Can you say why?
This course will help you develop the confidence and the skills necessary to participate
effectively in the academic situations outlined in Ex 1.1.
Task 2: Your attitude to speaking English
2.1 Look at the following statements. Do you agree or disagree with them?
Which statements are important to you?
a) I want to speak English with a perfect native-speaker accent.
b) I want to speak English without a single grammatical mistake.
c) I feel as though I am a different person when I speak English.
d) My pronunciation is not as important as grammatical accuracy.
e) If I can communicate my meaning effectively, it does not matter
if I make mistakes.
f) I don’t like working in groups during English lessons because I
may learn incorrect English from my classmates.
g) I want to speak English for social reasons as well as for academic reasons.
2.2 In groups, discuss each statement from Ex 2.1. Appoint one student to note
which statements are the most controversial for your group, i.e., which
statements caused the most disagreement.
2.3 1 Listen to another group of students reporting back on their discussion
of the points in Ex 2.1. Which statements do they refer to?
2.4 The following words were used in the recording in Ex 2.3.
Mark the stress.
Example: co'mmunicate
discussion controversial disagreement provoke
2.5 Report back to the class on the most interesting/controversial
points from your discussion in Ex 2.2.
Study tip
When reporting back to the
class, try to keep comments
clear and to the point. Get
used to using standard
expressions for agreement
and disagreement.
1
Communicating in academic situations
9 Speaking
Useful language: Reporting back
Our group thought the most controversial point was …
Point X provoked the most discussion.
Point X was the most controversial point.
There was some disagreement about point X.
Task 3: Agreeing and disagreeing
3.1 Read the following statements. Do you agree (A), disagree (D) or partly agree (P)
with each one?
a) If you want to succeed at university, you really need to manage your time well.
b) It’s important to do a lot of reading around before you choose a focus for your essays.
c) The best time to revise for exams is just before the exam, when the pressure is on.
d) The same study skills are necessary on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.
e) If you’ve completed an academic course in one country, you should be able to cope
with a course in another country.
f) People have different learning styles. It helps you learn more quickly if you’re aware
of how you learn best.
3.2 2 Listen to two students discussing these statements. Does the second
speaker agree, disagree or partly agree with each statement? Underline the
correct alternative in the opinion column below.
Opinion Useful language
a agree/disagree/partly agree
b agree/disagree/partly agree
c agree/disagree/partly agree
d agree/disagree/partly agree
e agree/disagree/partly agree
f agree/disagree/partly agree
3.3 2 Listen to the discussion again.
a) In the useful language column above, write down the exact words the second
speaker uses to agree, disagree or partly agree.
b) Try to say the phrases as they are pronounced in the recording.
3.4 Look at the statements in Ex 3.1 again. Work with a partner as follows:
Student A: Read a statement.
Student B: Respond, using one of the useful language phrases from the table in Ex 3.2.
Give your own opinion and a supporting reason.
www.garneteducation.com 18
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“A welcome and valuable addition
to the materials available for
helping pre-sessional students
deal with their pronunciation
issues in and out of the
classroom.”
Deborah Stevenson, Brunel University
English for academic study: Pronunciation
Study Book and audio CDs (x2) ..........978 1 85964 487 4
KEY FEATURES
• Pronunciation of individual
sounds
• Syllables and word stress
• Understanding word stress
patterns
• Sentence stress and
speaker choice
• Sounds in connected
speech
UNITS
• Vowel sounds 1, word
stress and weak forms
• Vowel sounds 2, word
stress patterns
• Consonant sounds 1,
sentence stress
• Consonant sounds 2,
word stress on two-syllable
words
• Diphthongs 1, sounds in
connected speech
• Consonant clusters 1,
tone units 1
• Diphthongs 2, tone units 2
• Consonant clusters 2,
intonation
English for Academic Study: Pronunciation
ANNETTE MARGOLIS AND JONATHAN SMITH • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
Academic vocabulary
pronunciation practice using
words and phrases from the
General Service List and the
Academic Word List.
}æ} }e} }i} }ɒ} }n} }ə}
plan end big job sum the
}υ} }ɑ:} }s:} }i:} }ɔ:} }u:}
good car her fee law too
8 English for academic study
1
Vowel sounds 1, word stress
and weak forms
In this unit you will:
• learn which phonemic symbols represent certain vowel sounds;
• practise recognizing and producing these vowel sounds;
• learn about the concepts of the syllable and word stress;
• practise producing words with the correct word stress;
• practise recognizing weak forms of function words when listening.
These are the 12 vowel sounds in English. In this unit, we will focus on the six sounds shaded in this table.
Task 1: Vowel sounds
1.1 CD1 – 1 Listen to the difference in the pronunciation of these pairs of words.
In each of them, the vowel sound is different.
a) }i} }i:} c) }æ} }ɑ:}
fit feet hat heart
dip deep match march
hit heat pack park
b) }æ} }e} d) }e} }s:}
mass mess ten turn
band bend head heard
had head went weren’t
Listen again and repeat the words.
1.2 CD1 – 2 You will hear some of the words from Ex 1.1. Listen and circle the phonemic
transcription that matches the pronunciation of the word you hear.
Example: }hed} }hs:d}
a) }pæk} }pɑ:k} f) }dip} }di:p}
b) }Ien} }Is:n} g) }hæd} }hed}
c) }mæs} }mes} h) }hæI} }hɑ:I}
d) }hiI} }hi:I} i) }bænd} }bend}
e) }wenI} }ws:nI}
1
Vowel sounds 1, word stress and weak forms
9 Pronunciation
1.3 CD1 – 3 Listen to six more words and do the following exercises.
a) Listen and circle the phonemic transcription that matches the pronunciation of the
word you hear.
1 }siI} }si:I}
2 }mæI} }meI}
3 }hs:I} }hɑ:I}
4 }íɑ:} }ís:}
5 }liv} }li:v}
6 }sæd} }sed}
b) Write the words, with the correct spelling, in the spaces next to the phonemic transcriptions.
Task 2: Syllables
For pronunciation purposes, words can be divided into syllables. A syllable contains only one vowel
sound, which may be preceded or followed by consonants. Remember that some consonants are
pronounced as vowels; for example, heavy is a two-syllable word, because the y is pronounced
as a vowel.
2.1 CD1 – 4 Listen to these examples of words with one, two and three or more syllables.
a) one-syllable words
aid quote source fee
b) two-syllable words
cred•it ac•cept heav•y e•quate
c) words with three or more syllables
pol•i•cy (3) sim•i•lar (3) en•vi•ron•ment (4) i•den•ti•fy (4) in•di•vid•ual (4)
2.2 CD1 – 5 Listen to these words and decide how many syllables there are in each of them.
Syllables Syllables
a) specific f) consequent
b) alter g) framework
c) resource h) significant
d) preliminary i) adapt
e) available j) differentiate
Pronunciation note
There is some variation in the way people pronounce words. For example, some people
pronounce preliminary with four syllables – /pri'liminri/, while other people pronounce it with
five syllables – /pri'liminəri/.
www.garneteducation.com 19
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“A comprehensive text that
usefully introduces students to
the Academic Word List, with
relevant activities.”
Loughborough University
“Well designed, extremely
impressive and clearly of
excellent use for vocabulary
development.”
Wayne Trotman, Izmir Higher Technology
Institute, Turkey
English for academic study: Vocabulary
Study Book ...................................... 978 1 85964 488 1
KEY FEATURES
• Academic vocabulary from
approximately 500 high-
frequency word families
taken from both the General
Service List and the
Academic Word List
• Two-part structure, with
vocabulary topic analysis
followed by focused practice
• Systematic practice in
the use of dictionaries
encourages learner
independence
• Study tip and language note
boxes give essential self-
study tips for revising
• Diagnostic test for
self-assessment and
improvement
UNITS
• Multi-meaning words
• Word classes
• Word families and word
parts
• Collocations
• Word grammar
• Academic word lists
(five units practise the
five topic areas)
• Appendices: answer key,
achievement test and full
lists of academic words
found in Units 6–10
English for Academic Study: Vocabulary
COLIN CAMPBELL • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C1/IELTS 5.0–7.0
19
8 There are still numerous one-party states around the world.
a) the condition of a person or thing at a particular time
b) a country or nation
c) an area within a country that has its own legal and political powers
9 Young people today have a greater degree of independence than 30 years ago.
a) an amount of something
b) a unit for measuring the size of an angle
c) a recognition awarded by a university
10 The government plans to introduce a system of identity cards.
a) to bring a plan, product or system into operation for the first time
b) to tell an audience about a performance or speaker they are going to see or hear
c) to formally tell people each other’s names when they meet for the first time
1.2 Here are ten more words to guess in context. Choose the correct meaning,
as in Ex 1.1.
1 My brother has strong views about the best way to deal with the increase in violent crime.
a) one’s opinions or beliefs about something
b) what you are able to see from a particular place
c) a picture or photograph of a place
2 The terms of the contract must be acceptable to both sides.
a) a word or expression used to refer to something
b) the conditions of an agreement
c) one of the periods of time that the school or university year is divided into
3 It is difficult to disagree with his argument that oil has been the main reason for a
number of recent military conflicts.
a) a dispute between two or more people, usually angry
b) a set of reasons offered as proof that your opinion is right
4 It is quite certain that the continued rise in the temperature of the oceans will
lead to catastrophe sooner or later.
a) confident that something is true
b) sure to happen
c) used to talk about a particular person or thing without naming them or
describing them exactly
5 There are no simple solutions to the problem of global warming.
a) a way of solving a problem
b) the correct answer to a problem in mathematics or a puzzle of some kind
c) a liquid in which a solid or gas has been dissolved
12 English for academic study
1
Multi-meaning words
13 Vocabulary
6 A large number of conditions can be treated with this drug.
a) a word or sign that represents a quantity or an amount
b) a quantity of, e.g., things or people
c) a single item in a performance, e.g., a piece of music
7 The word ‘comedy’ is used in its broadest sense here.
a) one of the five natural abilities – sight, hearing, feeling, taste and smell
b) a feeling based on instinct rather than fact
c) the meaning of a word, phrase or sentence
8 The regulations were introduced in order to safeguard the interests of local people.
a) activities or subjects you enjoy in your spare time
b) the things which bring benefits
c) amount, usually a percentage, paid for the use of someone’s money
9 There is a strong case for increasing tax on luxury items.
a) an example of something happening
b) a set of reasons why something should happen or be done
c) a legal matter that will be dealt with in court
10 The patient was in a very bad way after the operation.
a) a method of doing something
b) condition
c) a route you take to go somewhere
Task 2: Different word class, different meaning
Words can sometimes belong in different classes. For example, mean can be a noun, adjective
or verb. Some of these words can have a different meaning depending on the word class.
Example:
Word Meaning
mean (noun) • an average
mean (verb) • to have a particular meaning
mean (adjective) • unwilling to spend money
2.1 Choose the correct word class for the words in bold. Then check your answer
by looking at the definitions.
Example:
The article addresses the issue of over-fishing in the North Sea.
a) noun: where someone lives
b) verb: to begin trying to solve a problem
Study tip
Use a dictionary to clarify the
word class(es) that individual
words belong to. With most
words, you will also need to
check the context in which
they are used.
www.garneteducation.com 20
MODULES
1 - Key Foundation Skills
2 - Academic Culture
3 - Seminars and Tutorials
4 - Team-Working
5 - Problem-Solving
6 - Critical Thinking
7 - Introduction to IT Skills
8 - Essay Writing
9 - Scientific Writing
10 - Research and Referencing
11 - Presentations
12 - Examination Technique
“A very important awareness-raising
package for all who use it – including
teachers and professors. ...
a must for every university and
academic institution where overseas
students are studying for a degree.”
Duke of Edinburgh ESU English Language Award
judges
The Transferable Academic Skills Kit
(TASK) is an innovative learning resource
for academic study skills. The modular
nature of the course enables teachers
to construct either a full foundation
programme or select individual modules
according to their students’ needs.
Transferable: Carefully designed to link
learning with outcome. Skills transferable to:
• all faculties
• the professional world
• an international audience
Flexible: Takes into account the wide-
ranging needs of institutions around
the world.
• Modular design: available as a boxed
set containing all 12 modules, or as
individual modules
• Can be used as a taught course or
for self-study
Motivating: Designed with student
motivation in mind.
• Scaffolded activities for maximum
student involvement
• Clear outcomes
• Web links for further study
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
A modular academic skills course developed in collaboration with the University of Reading
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
ANTHONY MANNING, CLARE NUKUI ET AL • INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B1 TO C1/IELTS 4.0–7.0
s Kit
source
ular
rs
les
k
e to:
eading
MEDIATE AA TO ADVAN VV CED: CEF LEVELS B1 TO C1/IELTS 4.0–7.0
each module provides 12 hours of
focused support for developing
academic skills
ESU
Award
SHORTLI STED
Ordering information for individual modules can be found on pages
21–23
Boxed edition (x12) .......... 978 1 85964 927 5
Teacher’s Book .................... 978 1 85964 928 2
www.garneteducation.com 21
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
d i 21
1 Key Foundation Skills
Key Features
• Identifies key transferable skills for higher
education study
• Establishes students’ existing skills, strengths
and weaknesses
• Helps students improve their organization
and efficiency
• Provides support with time management
Units
• What are transferable skills?
• Skills self-assessment
• How organized are you?
• Time management
2 Academic Culture
Key Features
• Familiarizes students with key terminology
• Identifies important issues in the transition
to higher education
• Examines students’ expectations of their
learning experience
• Discusses issues related to misunderstandings
and miscommunications
• Evaluates effective and appropriate
communication techniques
• Examines students’ attitudes to and beliefs
about teaching and learning
Units
• Understanding academic culture
• The transition to higher education
• Expectations of higher education institutions
• Critical incident analysis
• Cross-cultural communication
• Philosophy of teaching and learning
3 Seminars and Tutorials
Key Features
• Familiarizes students with key features of
seminars and tutorials
• Familiarizes students with typical seminar
activities
• Teaches students to prepare for topics through
research and reflection
• Teaches communication strategies needed
to participate confidently and effectively
• Practises contributing and responding in
an academic environment
• Considers other types of academic sessions
Units
• About seminars and tutorials
• What happens in seminars?
• Subject knowledge
• The language of seminars and tutorials
• Participation
• Different types of seminars and tutorials
4 Team-Working
Key Features
• Teaches students about the different skills and
roles involved in teamwork
• Explores the benefits and problems of teamwork
• Examines verbal and non-verbal strategies
• Considers the differences in culture and
interaction patterns
• Considers how strategies and techniques can
encourage and discourage effective teamwork
• Teaches students about the benefits of
collaborative study
Units
• Teamwork in action
• Why teamwork?
• Effective team membership
• Interactive dialogue
• Encouraging interaction
• Ways of working with others
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Key Foundation Skills ............978 1 85964 915 2
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Academic Culture ..................978 1 85964 916 9
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Seminars and Tutorials ..........978 1 85964 917 6
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Team-Working ....................978 1 85964 918 3
“The glossaries are particularly helpful as
are the many references to websites which
develop ideas mentioned in the text.”
Duke of Edinburgh ESU English Language Award judges
www.garneteducation.com 22
5 Problem-Solving
Key Features
• Looks at different types of problems
• Teaches students to evaluate different problems
and deal with them effectively
• Develops an awareness of problem-solving
procedures and techniques
• Teaches students how to break down a problem
and gather information to solve it
• Improves students’ ability to evaluate a solution
• Teaches students how to think more creatively
Units
• What is problem-solving?
• Problem-solving strategies
• The problem-solving process
• Elaborating the problem
• Finding the best solution
• Creative thinking
6 Critical Thinking
Key Features
• Familiarizes students with the basics
of evaluation
• Teaches students how to construct a sound
argument
• Teaches students how to recognize poor
reasoning
• Explores the manipulation of argumentation
• Considers important questions about selection
and presentation of materials
• Practises the skills learnt in the module so far
by preparing for and taking part in a seminar
Units
• What is critical thinking?
• Recognizing strong or sound arguments
• Recognizing poor arguments
• Persuasion through language or pressure
• Detecting bias
• Putting it into practice
7 Introduction to IT Skills
Key Features
• Teaches students to use the toolbar effectively
• Practises highlighting text in order to modify
and move it around
• Familiarizes students with academic
conventions
• Improves students’ confidence in storing
documents and sending attachments by e-mail
• Explores the benefits of using spreadsheets
• Teaches students how to create charts and
graphs
Units
• Creating a document
• Modifying and manipulating text
• Word-processing academic documents
• Filing and sending documents
• Understanding and using spreadsheets
• Creating charts and graphs
8 Essay Writing
Key Features
• Teaches the basic principles of academic essay
writing
• Teaches students how to plan their writing
• Helps students to arrange their arguments
in a logical sequence
• Explores how to close an argument and draw
conclusions
• Practises using appropriate language
• Provides guidelines for future essay writing
assignments
Units
• Getting organized
• Getting started
• The body of the essay
• Summaries and conclusions
• Academic style and register
• Guidelines for the future
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“Exceptionally
clear, motivating
and highly relevant
to student
achievement.”
Duke of Edinburgh
ESU English Language
Award judges
“It’s fantastic.”
Barbara Betinelli, Milan
State University, Italy
“Equips students
with skills which
are necessary and
transferable to
work contexts.”
IATEFL Voices
Newsletter
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Problem-Solving ...................978 1 85964 919 0
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Critical Thinking ................... 978 1 85964 920 6
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Introduction to IT Skills ......... 978 1 85964 921 3
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Essay Writing ....................... 978 1 85964 922 0
www.garneteducation.com 23
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
9 Scientific Writing
Key Features
• Teaches students how to structure and
timetable a report
• Explores how to include appropriate content
• Practises how to write a Results section,
including tables and figures
• Familiarizes students with the conventions
for writing numbers and abbreviations
• Discusses how to write other sections
of a report effectively
• Practises editing and revising report content
Units
• Structure and schedule
• The Materials and Methods section
• The Results section
• Writing numbers and abbreviations
• The Discussion, Introduction, Bibliography and
Title sections
• Editing and revising your report
10 Research and Referencing
Key Features
• Explains why other sources of information
strengthen essays
• Familiarizes students with the range of
information available
• Explores the use and importance of a
bibliography
• Familiarizes students with the APA referencing
system
• Teaches students what plagiarism is
• Enables students to identify relevant information
in their research notes
Units
• Why research?
• The research process
• Writing a bibliography
• Referring to other sources in your essay
• Plagiarism
• Using supporting arguments
11 Presentations
Key Features
• Familiarizes students with the process of
preparing to give a presentation
• Teaches the specific skills needed for giving
a group presentation
• Evaluates how to plan the topic, focus and
content of a presentation
• Teaches the language and delivery skills needed
for a competent presentation performance
• Explores the use of visual aids
• Familiarizes students with presentation software
Units
• About presentations
• Group presentations
• Content
• Communication
• Visual aids
• Slideshow tutorial
12 Examination Technique
Key Features
• Teaches students how to prepare a revision
schedule
• Allows students to find out how they learn best
• Familiarizes students with a range of study aids
and revision techniques
• Teaches students to maximize their exam
performance
• Explores how to recognize what an exam
task requires
• Discusses techniques for managing exam
nerves
Units
• Planning for examinations
• Memory styles and active learning
• Revision strategies
• Understanding the exam paper
• Understanding exam tasks
• Managing exam stress
“Very useful in
helping to promote
learner autonomy,
critical reflection
and intercultural
competence.”
Cynthia Sikorski,
University of Lausanne,
Switzerland
“The most up-to-
date and student-
friendly collection
of skills-based
workbooks.”
Dr Monika Foster,
Napier University
23
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Scientific Writing .................. 978 1 85964 923 7
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Research and Referencing ....978 1 85964 924 4
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Presentations ....................... 978 1 85964 925 1
Transferable Academic Skills Kit (TASK)
Module Course Books
Examination Techniques ....... 978 1 85964 926 8
www.garneteducation.com 24
$ue Arçent
0Iwyn AIexander
F00ß0A¡I0ß$
Access
£AF
0eurse 8eek
KEY FEATURES
• Functional syllabus linked
to a series of academic
themes
• Integrated tasks and
language practice
• Focuses on key language
and skills in a specific
academic context
• Improves students’ ability
to tackle and succeed in
IELTS and other gateway
examinations
• ‘Simulated authentic’
texts targeted to present
specific functions and
vocabulary
• Written by EAP trainers
from Heriot-Watt
University
UNITS
• Preparing for university
studies: purposes and
expectations
• Orientation week: finding
the way
• Starting a course: first
steps and new routines
• Finding information
• Starting a course: new
ideas and new concepts
• Borrowing and using ideas
• Something to say
s
ACCESS EAP: Foundation s Unit 1 4 ACCESS EAP: Foundation s Unit 1 5
Lesson 2
Language study
Aims:
t to use key words from lesson 1
t to understand and use language patterns for purpose statements
t to recognize and practise simple purpose statements
Task 1: Usingkey words correctly
a) Complete the word families for the useful key words below. Put the correct word
forms in the empty spaces in the noun and verb columns in the table.
b) Choose a noun or a verb from the left-hand column to complete these sentences
correctly. You may need to change the form of the word.
noun verb sentences
1 discussion
The class ___________________________ the reasons for speaking to other students at
university. This ___________________________ took about five minutes.
2 studies
Maysoun and Chen decided to ___________________________ English for university
___________________________.
3 expectation
Maysoun ___________________________ to read a lot on her course. However, Chen’s
___________________________, that he will not have to write much on a Computer
Science course, is probably not correct.
4 choice
Maysoun went online to ___________________________ a computer. She also discussed
her ___________________________ with Chen.
5 introduce
It is important to ___________________________ yourself to other students when you
are at university. The first part of an essay is called the ____________________________.
Task 2: Matching
Match the beginnings and endings below to make purpose statements about students.
Write the correct letter in each box. The first one has been done for you.
a Students work hard at school in order to
b Maysoun and Chen studied in the summer to
c Guy is studying International Business in order to
d Students start conversations order to
e Chen is studying Computer Science so that
f Maysoun chose her course to
g Students often work in groups so that
1 he can get a good job with a high salary.
2 pass exams
3 they can learn from each other
4 learn about environmental issues in developing
countries.
5 learn English for university studies.
6 get a job where he can travel and meet people.
7 get to know each other

Notice the language patterns for purpose statements:

in order to
}
+ verb e.g. learn so that
}
+ sentence e.g. he can get a good job with a high salary
to
Task 3a: Practisinglanguage patterns: writing
Complete the sentences below using the language patterns on page 6.
a Chen and Miriam studied in the summer ____________________________________________________________________.
b Chen is studying Computer Science _________________________________________________________________________.
c Maysoun chose her course _________________________________________________________________________________.
d Guy is studying International Business _______________________________________________________________________.
e Students often work in groups ______________________________________________________________________________.
Task 3b: Practisinglanguage patterns: speaking
Read the first part of one of the statements above to your partner. Ask ‘Why?’ Your
partner should give a suitable answer using to, in order to or so without looking at her/
his book. Take turns to ask and answer.
Task 4: Readingquickly tofindinformation
This text is from a page for international students on the Gateway University website.
Its purpose is to explain three important features of Gateway University. Read the text
for one minute only. Tick these three features in the list below.
university location help with study academic subjects
sport and fitness social life health computer facilities
Key words
LECTURERS
THEINTRANET
ANAPPOINTMENT
SYSTEM
THEHEALTHCENTRE
PROBLEMS
ORGANIZES
SOCIALEVENTS
CLUBS
TRIPS
THENOTICEBOARD
ADVERTIZE
PARTNERS
1 In some universities, this is called ‘Fresher’s Week’.
G
U
GATEWAY UNI VERSI TY
International
Students
INFORMATION
The lecturers put their lecture notes and coursework on
the intranet so that you can complete any missed work,
and they all have an appointment system so that you
can get help if needed.
The University Health Centre has an open day in the first
week of term to show students what to do and where to
go if they have health problems.
In Orientation Week , the university organizes social
events so that students can get to know each other and
join university clubs. For example, the International Club
organizes trips and talks, so that students can learn
about [Summertown], and students can use the club´s
notice board to advertise for language partners in order
to practise the languages they want to learn.
Access EAP: Foundations
An integrated EAP language and skills course for lower intermediate learners.
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
SUE ARGENT AND OLWYN ALEXANDER • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVEL A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0–5.0
NEW
Written by the authors of the highly
successful EAP Essentials, the first
part of this two-level course teaches
academic language and competence
to pre-intermediate and intermediate
learners.
Access EAP: Foundations
Course Book and audio CDs (x2) ..................978 1 85964 524 6
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 571 0
www.garneteducation.com 25
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
EAP Essentials: A teacher’s guide to principles and practice
A new handbook of best practice for teachers of English for Academic Purposes
OLWYN ALEXANDER, SUE ARGENT AND JENIFER SPENCER
Chapter 3: Course design 106
Methodology
The previous section dealt with the what of EAP, i.e., the way in which students’
language needs can be incorporated into a coherent syllabus. This section looks
at the how of EAP, i.e., the methodology for achieving the aims and objectives
of the syllabus. This aspect has tended to receive less attention from EAP writers
and researchers.
56
The teacher’s role is to support students in identifying and
learning the language they need to achieve their rhetorical purposes and to
provide scaffolding and feedback for their performance in communicative tasks.
Basturkmen
57
summarizes methodologies in English for Specific Purposes (ESP)
in terms of the relationship between input, i.e., the point at which students are
exposed to samples of language use, and output, i.e., the point at which they
use the language in productive tasks. Either students are first presented with
models of language use which they are then required to produce themselves, or
they follow a ‘deep-end strategy’
58
in which they struggle to communicate and,
in so doing, recognize the gaps in their language and strategic knowledge. An
example of the former is a text-based approach,
59
whereas the latter follows a
task-based approach.
60
Both these approaches emphasize the collaborative and
experiential nature of teaching and learning. These approaches are illustrated
in the following case study of a writing lesson.
Task 12
Which parts of the lesson belowseemto you to be text-based (i.e., input s
before output) or task-based (i.e., output before input) or collaborative?
Where in the lesson does the teacher focus on grammatical form? s
Case study C:
Students in an EAP writing class have been working on data
commentary, a sub-genre usually contained within a report or
research article. In a previous lesson they have been introduced to
the concept of data in tables and graphs and how these are used to
represent relationships between real world entities or variables. They
have analysed several example texts and are now ready to write a
commentary.
Lesson phase 1: The teacher explains that the aim of this lesson is to
construct a data commentary which could be used in an information
pack for new students who might be interested in reading about
changes in higher education in the UK. She shows on a visual display
Chapter 3: Course design 107
a pie chart showing the proportions of students at university in the UK
who have to pay tuition fees.
61

She asks the students if they are represented on the chart and they
locate the segments which show the proportion of overseas students
paying full fees or European students paying home fees.
Lesson phase 2: The teacher divides the students into groups of
four and asks them to prepare, with their group members, a general
statement that describes the main relationship in the pie chart. A scribe
in each group prepares their statement for a visual. The teacher notices
that students in some groups are discussing what to write but in two of
the groups the scribe is writing and the other group members are not
contributing. Each group then presents their statement and the class
decides which one best represents the data in the chart. The class
chooses the following statement:
The chart shows students who pay tuition fees and students who do
not pay is the same.
Lesson phase 3: The teacher gives feedback by asking the questions
below:
Are the students really the same? s
Are the numbers exactly the same? s
No, not
required to
pay fees
47%
Yes, required to pay all tuition
fees (£1,025 for UK resident)
36%
Yes, required to
pay part of tuition
fees, after being
means tested
10%
Yes, required to pay full
tuition fees as I am an
international student
5%
Yes, required to pay full tuition
fees as I am resitting a year/
not eligible for funding
2%
KEY FEATURES
• The latest research
adapted for classroom use
• Practical approach allows
teachers immediate
engagement with EAP
materials
• Real case studies
document classroom
experience of teachers
and students
• CD-ROM includes original
ideas and well-trialled
materials for teaching
in a variety of contexts
• Written by practising EAP
trainers from Heriot-Watt
University
UNITS
• The EAP context
• Text analysis
• Course design
• Reading
• Vocabulary
• Writing
• Critical thinking
• Student autonomy
• Assessment
EAP Essentials
Teacher’s Book & CD-ROM ..........................978 1 85964 419 5
“For teachers who find themselves
catapulted into devising and running
international courses, this book could
be a godsend.”
Charles Rankin, for English Teaching
Professional
“Well thought-out, useable, making
excellent models for teachers to work
from.”
Michael Hind, INTO University of Exeter
t d ti 25 2
www.garneteducation.com 26
Passport to Academic Presentations
A course for students giving oral academic presentations in English-speaking colleges and universities
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
DOUGLAS BELL • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
3
2
.
.
.
U
n
i
t

1
G
e
t
t
i
n
g

S
t
a
r
t
e
d
1 Reasons for Giving Oral Presentations
1.1 People are often asked to give oral presentations, not only in Higher Education but also in the
workplace. Why do you think this is? Discuss your ideas with a partner or in small groups.
1.2 Can you think of any hidden benefits of learning to give oral presentations? Again, discuss
your ideas with a partner or in small groups.
2 The Structure of Oral Presentations
Unlike a spontaneous conversation, which can develop in any number of different directions
depending on the speakers, an oral presentation tends to follow a fairly predictable structure
with clearly marked stages. This is because in an oral presentation, it is very important that
the listeners are able to follow – and later remember – what was said. Structuring an oral
presentation in a logical and clear way really helps the listeners to do this.
2.1 Five typical stages of an academic oral presentation are listed in the shaded box below, but their
order has been mixed up. Decide the order in which these different stages should occur and then
write them in the spaces provided.
The Body The Chance For Discussion The Overview The General Introduction The Conclusion
STAGE 1:
STAGE 2:
STAGE 3:
STAGE 4:
STAGE 5:
2.2 Now match the following descriptions of what happens to each different stage.
a) The speaker talks about the presentation topic in detail.
b) The speaker lets the audience know that he/she is going to finish the presentation.
c) The speaker greets the audience and introduces him/herself.
d) The speaker gives the audience the opportunity to ask questions.
e) The speaker tells the audience what the topic of the presentation will be.
3 Opening an Oral Presentation
3.1 gYou will now hear the openings of two quite different oral presentations. In each case,
as you listen, make a note of:
a) What the speaker intends to talk about.
b) Whether or not the audience already knows the speaker. How can you tell?
3.2 Look carefully at the example openings in the Language Focus box below and discuss
the following questions with a partner or in small groups:
• Which tenses can speakers use to let the audience know what they are intending to do?
• Which verbs can speakers use to show this intention?, e.g., look at, describe ...
Make a list of as many such verbs as you can think of.
In my presentation today, I’m going to look at some of the issues
affecting tourism in Thailand.
In this presentation, I’ll be describing the main forms of cancer
that we are currently finding in women over the age of 40.
For the next ten minutes or so, I’d like to give you some of the
reasons why most modern historians think the First World War started.
In my talk this morning I’m going to focus on three of Monet’s
paintings.
In my presentation, I’ll talk about four key effects that acid rain
is having on our environment.
3.3 Match appropriate prepositions from the box below with the presentation verbs i) – vi). The first
one has been done for you, but be careful – not every one of these verbs needs to be followed
by a preposition.
In this first unit, you will be looking at the following:
. Reasons for giving oral presentations
. The structure of oral presentations
. Opening an oral presentation
. Main themes & sub-themes in oral presentations
L
a
n
g
u
a
g
e
F
o
c
u
s
1
Opening Phrases
Passport to Academic Presentations
Student's Book & audio CD ........................ 978 1 85964 400 3
DVD (includes audio CD material).... ............ 978 1 85964 416 4
Teacher’s Book .......................................... 978 1 85964 415 7
KEY FEATURES
• Audio CD for further
self-study and listening
practice
• Tips for successful
presentations
• Step-by-step coverage
of the oral presentation
process
• Focus on key language
and pronunciation areas
• DVD includes extended
learning through filmed
presentations
UNITS
• Getting started
• Organizing your material
• Dealing with questions
and answers
• Creating more impact
• Using visual aids
• Giving persuasive
presentations
• Review
P
a
s
s
p
o
r
t
P
r
e
s
e
n
t
a
t
i
o
n
s
t
o

a
C
a
d
e
M
i
c
D
o
u
g
l
a
s

B
e
l
l
S
t
u
d
E
n
t
,
s
B
o
o
k
carefully
graded tasks
“A springboard for students to deliver
their own presentations.”
EL Gazette, April 2009
s
p
nn
tttt
aaaaa
ttttt
iii
oo
nn
i
c
l
l
SS
t
S
t tt
uuu
d
u
d d
EE
nn
t
,
s
B
o
o
k
www.garneteducation.com 27
ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
RICHARD HARRISON • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.5-5.0
Upgrade
A first course in English for higher studies
Upgrade
Course Book ...............................978 1 85964 705 9
Teacher’s Book ...........................978 1 85964 707 3
Activity Book (with answers)........978 1 85964 706 6
Activity Book (without answers) ...978 1 85964 708 0
CDs ............................................978 1 85964 704 2
“... teaches English in a lively,
relevant way. The material in
each unit is well integrated,
and the Teacher’s Book is
packed full of ideas – a very
useful pre-college base for
higher studies.”
English Teaching Professional
KEY FEATURES
• 15 topic-based units plus three
review units
• Extensive skills practice with
tasks such as: reading an article
and completing a bar chart;
writing an e-mail; listening to
directions; giving a presentation
• Study tips throughout the course
to help develop essential study
skills and independent learning
• Ten-page word list of essential
vocabulary covered in each unit
• Activity Book containing
imaginative extended practice
of the language and topics in
the Course Book, for use in the
class or for self-study
• Teacher’s Book, including tests,
transcripts and answers
UNITS
• Campus • Time • My way
• At home • Around the world
• In class • World cities
• The world of computers
• Work • Famous names
• International English
• Summer vacation
• How to study • Free time
• What’s next?
www.garneteducat tion ion on ion.co com com com 27 27 t d tttiii 27 7
a pre-intermediate course designed for young adults who need to use
English-language resources as part of a higher education course
www.garneteducation.com 28
English for Specific Academic
Purposes is a series of skills-based
courses designed specifically for students
about to enter English-medium tertiary
level studies, covering a wide range of
academic subjects.
Teacher’s Books contain full
methodology notes for all lessons with
introductions and closures, and keys for
all exercises including model answers for
open-ended activities. The books also
include over 40 pages of photocopiable
resources, with activity banks, model texts
and vocabulary and grammar reviews.
KEY FEATURES
• Systematic approach to developing
academic skills through relevant content
• Focus on receptive skills (reading and
listening) to activate productive skills
(writing and speaking) in subject area
• Eight-page units combine language and
academic skills teaching
• Vocabulary and academic skills banks
in each unit for reference and revision
• Audio CDs for further self-study or
homework
• Series edited by Terry Phillips
The English for Specific Academic Purposes Series
A faculty-specific series for students in higher education
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
SERIES EDITOR: TERRY PHILLIPS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
NEW
TITLES
English for
BANKING
in Higher Education Studies
Course Book
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Marie McLisky
www.garneteducation.com 29
“The Garnet Education series
covering English for Specific
Academic Purposes focuses on very
specialised academic learning needs.
Garnet have shown a brave publishing
commitment to teachers and learners
and they have delivered consistent
and high-quality courses and learning
content across a wide range of
specialised areas. The entire series
is a tribute to Garnet’s vision and
a worthy winner of the 2009 Duke
of Edinburgh ESU English
Language Award.”
Duke of Edinburgh ESU English Language
Award judges
“Invaluable as a resource for teachers
involved in teaching English for
academic and specific purposes.”
Alice U, Auckland University of Technology
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
The Duke of Ed|nburgh
Eng||sh-Speak|ng Un|on
Eng||sh Language Award

English for
MEDICINE
in Higher Education Studies
Course Book
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Ros Wright, Patrick Fitzgerald and Marie McCullagh
www.garneteducation.com 30
ANW Bank plc
Annual Review and Summary
5 BANK PERFORMANCE
English for Banking Studies – Copyright © 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd. 39
iii
Consolidated Financial Statements – Summary
The following is a summary of the information which appears in the full annual report and accounts.
For further information, please consult the full annual report on our website, or request a free copy
from the address on the back cover.
2006
2007
–10,000 –5,000 0 5,000 10,000 15,000
$m
ANW Bank plc
Annual Review and Summar y page xi
net profit
before-tax profit
tax
total income
other income
net interest
income tax
total expenses
doubtful debts
personnel expenses
occupancy expenses
general expenses
Figure 1 ANW Bank — Financial performance 2006 and 2007
Table 1 ANW Bank — Statement of financial performance for the year ended 31st March 2007
2007
$m
2006
$m
%
change
Interest income
Interest expenses
Net interest income
Other banking income
Total income
Personnel expenses
Occupancy expenses
General expenses
Provision for doubtful debts
Total expenses
Before-tax profit
Income tax
Net profit
18,560
–11,890
6,670
4,730
11,400
–3,210
–530
–2,815
–275
–6,830
4,570
–1,364
3,206
–11,260
6,520
10,970
–480
–2,710
–380
–6,585
_______
3,070
4.4
5.6
6.3
6.5
3.9
3.7
4.2
ANW Bank plc Annual Review and Summar y
essay types • complex sentences with passives • definitions 8.2 Reading
64 English for Business Studies – Copyright © 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
A Look at the products in the blue box.
1 What type of production process is most
likely to be successful for each product?
2 What could go wrong in the production
process in each case?
3 How can companies ensure the quality
of their products?
B Look at the four essay types on the right.
1 What should the writer do in each type?
2 Match each essay type with one of the
questions below the slide (A–D).
3 What topics should be covered in each
essay question?
C Read the title of the text on the opposite
page and the first sentence of each
paragraph.
1 What will the text be about?
2 Choose one of the essay questions
in Exercise B. Write four research
questions which will help you to
find information for your essay.
D Read the text.
1 Using your own words, make notes
from the text on information for
your essay question.
2 Work with another person who has
chosen the same essay question as you.
Compare your notes.
E Study the highlighted sentences in the text.
1 Underline all the subjects and their
verbs.
2 Which is the main subject and verb for
each sentence?
F Study the table on the right.
1 Match each word or phrase with its
meaning.
2 Underline the words or phrases in the
text which the writer uses to give the
definitions.
See Vocabulary bank
What are the advantages and disadvantages of
lean production for non-Japanese organizations?
‘There is no business or activity for which
lean techniques are unsuitable.’ To what extent
do you agree with this statement?
Explain why Japanese management practices
have become such an important approach in
business today.
What questions do companies need to ask
when considering their efficiency? Describe how
one or two companies have found answers to
such questions.
A
B
C
D
a bag of crisps a cruise ship
a laptop a motorbike
parts for a car a sandwich
There are four main essay types in
business studies:
G descriptive
G analytical
G comparison
G argument
Word/phrase Meaning
1 Total Quality
Management
a system for stopping a production
line when there is something wrong
2 just-in-time getting rid of anything which
reduces efficiency
3 poka-yoke making efforts all the time to meet
the needs of customers better
4 jidoka
a way of involving the whole
company in ensuring that the right
quality is achieved
5 kaizen
a system designed to prevent errors
6 lean a very economical way to manage
quantities of stock
“The book helped students to become
more independent in their approach
to studying in English ... The
Teacher’s Book is excellent ... The
units provided a wide variety of
topics and up-to-date material.”
Lionello Fabris, University of Udine, Italy
“What has been needed is a book that
applies foundational academic
English language skills to business
content and concepts. English for
Business Studies does just that.”
Elizabeth Morrison, Massey University, New
Zealand
“... it has all the language as well as
the academic skills.”
Clark Stoppia, Lorrach Berufs Academy,
Germany
UNITS
• The business of business
• The organization of work
• Getting the work done
• The world of technology
• People and markets
• Products and strategies
• Operations: producing the goods
• Operations: efficiency, costs and quality
• Managing financial accounts
• Funding company activities
• External influences
• Strategy and change
English for Business Studies
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) .................... 978 1 85964 936 7
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 944 2
“... extremely well presented, with
engaging diagrams and graphs.”
EL Gazette, November 2008
“I wish that I had had access to
something like this when I did my
banking training!”
Ghazi Al-Shareef, Independent Schools, Qatar
English for Banking
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) .................... 978 1 85964 935 0
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 943 5
ESAP: English for Business Studies ESAP: English for Banking
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
CAROLYN WALKER • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
MARIE McLISKY • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
English for Business Studies – Copyright © 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
t
rase with its
phrases in the
ses to give the
3 poka-yoke making efforts all the time to meet
the needs of customers better
4 jidoka
a way of involving the whole
company in ensuring that the right
quality is achieved
5 kaizen
a system designed to prevent errors
6 lean a very economical way to manage
quantities of stock
© 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd. 39 39
yy pa agge xxi
English for
BANKING
in Higher Education Studies
Course Book
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Marie McLisky
New 13
th
unit dealing with the
recession and the ongoing
financial crisis, available online.
UNITS
• What is banking?
• The origins of banking
• Banking institutions
• Computers in banking
• Bank performance
• Central banks
• International banking
• Offshore banking
• Banking in developing countries
• Banking and ethics
• Influences on banking standards
• Banking governance
www.garneteducation.com 31
A You are a student in the Environmental Science Faculty
of Hadford University. The title of the first lecture is
What is environmental science?
1 Write a definition of environmental science.
2 What other ideas will be in this lecture? Make some
notes.
See Skills bank
B Listen to Part 1 of the talk. What does the lecturer
say about environmental science? Tick one or more of
the following.
a It is the same as the Earth sciences.
b It is different from the Earth sciences.
c Geomorphologists only work in the
Earth sciences.
C In Part 2 of the talk, the lecturer mentions greenhouse
and web.
1 What is the connection between the general English words
and their use in environmental science?
2 Listen and check your ideas.
D In Part 3 of the talk, the lecturer describes different
branches of environmental science.
1 How many branches can you think of?
2 What are the main areas covered by each branch?
3 Listen and check your ideas.
4 What will the lecturer talk about next?
E In the final part of the talk, the lecturer gives a
definition of environmental science, and some
examples. Listen and mark each word in the box D if it is
part of the definition and E if it is part of an example.
F Write a definition of environmental science.
G Look back at your notes from Exercise A. Did you predict:
• the main ideas?
• most of the special vocabulary?
• the order of information?
preparing for a lecture • predicting lecture content • making notes 1.2 Listening
8
human process solution activity
identify change flood plain
overlap record intervention
measure illustrate
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
UNITS
• What is ICT?
• ICT in the workplace
• Introduction to ICT systems
• ICT in education
• History of ICT
• The Internet
• Hardware design and development
• Software development
• HCI – Human Computer Interaction
• E-commerce
• Contentious issues in computing
• The future of ICT
English for ICT Studies
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ....................978 1 85964 519 2
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 520 8
UNITS
• What is environmental science?
• What do environmental scientists do?
• The atmosphere
• Computers in environmental science
• Energy resources
• Soil as a resource
• Recycling waste
• Ecosystems
• Preserving biodiversity
• Pollution
• Agriculture
• Sustainability
English for Environmental Science
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 444 7
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 445 4
ESAP: English for ICT Studies ESAP: English for Environmental Science
PATRICK FITZGERALD AND MARIE McCULLAGH • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
RICHARD LEE • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
using research questions 2.2 Reading
Modern technology is here to stay.
New technology, then, offers a range of benefits.
Faculty: ICT
Assignment
Do some research into the use of ICT in the
workplace.
Make notes to answer these questions.
1 How is ICT used in the workplace?
2 What are the advantages for businesses
using ICT?
3 What factors do businesses have to
consider before they invest in ICT?
A Discuss the questions.
1 How do you use ICT in your work or studies?
2 Why do you use ICT? What are the advantages?
Can you think of any disadvantages?
B Look at the pictures on this page.
1 How is ICT being used in the pictures?
2 Which picture shows people using ICT to communicate
with other people?
3 Which pictures show ICT systems doing work that
people once did?
4 How was this work done before ICT was introduced?
C You are going to read a text. What should you do before
you read a text in detail? See Skills bank
D This text is about ICT in the workplace.
1 Think of some research questions before you read.
2 Compare your questions with those in the Hadford
University assignment on this page.
E Study these topic sentences from the text and answer the
questions below.
1 What types of businesses are discussed?
2 Where do you expect to find the answer to each
question in the Hadford University assignment?
Write 1, 2 or 3 next to the topic sentence.
3 What sort of comments do you expect to find in
the first and last paragraphs?
F Read the text on the opposite page and check your ideas.
See Skills bank
12 English for ICT Studies – Copyright © 2007 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
ICT plays a key role in business today.
Firstly, ICT is a faster and more efficient way for people to communicate.
ICT is also used to input, store and manage information.
Another area where ICT is important is the retail industry.
Manufacturers use new technology to design and build products.
However, it is important to understand that there are
costs, as well as benefits.
1
2
3
4
tal science.
rcise A. Did you predict:
?
flood plain
intervention
rate
Do some research into the use of ICT in the
workplace.
Make notes to answer these questions.
1 How is ICT used in the workplace?
2 What are the advantages for businesses
using ICT?
3 What factors do businesses have to
consider before they invest in ICT?
es are discussed?
o find the answer to each
d University assignment?
the topic sentence.
s do you expect to find in
raphs?
site page and check your ideas.
English for ICT Studies – Copyright © 2007 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
NEW
www.garneteducation.com 32
identifying subject–verb–object in long sentences • paraphrasing 6.2 Reading
A Discuss these questions.
1 What do you find the most difficult aspect of
communicating in another language?
2 What factors affect students’ ability to
communicate in a second or foreign language?
B Study Figure 1. Match the communicative competencies
in the diagram with the descriptions on notes A–D.
C Look at the illustration, the title, the introduction and
the first sentence of each paragraph on the opposite
page. What will the text be about?
D Write some research questions, using your ideas from
Exercises A, B and C above.
E Read the text. Does it answer your questions?
F Study the highlighted sentences in the text. Find
and underline the subject, verb and the object or
complement in each sentence. See Skills Bank
G Two students paraphrased parts of the text.
1 Which parts of the text do they paraphrase?
2 Which paraphrase is better? Why?
H Work in groups. Each group should write a
paraphrase of a different part of the text.
48
Supporters of eclecticism in ELT advise
against unrestrained pluralism.
They recommend that teachers should
adapt teaching in line with a student
needs analysis.
This allows the teacher an altogether
more principled choice of approach.
The guiding principles of an approach
need to match the learning situation.
As a result, the 'anything goes' mentality
can be avoided.
ELT teachers who believe str ongly in an
eclectic appr oach r ecommend that it should
only be used in a principled way.
It is important to take into account the
needs of tar get students when adapting the
teaching appr oach.
In this way, a teacher can avoid the pr oblems
which arise when eclecticism is used without
principles.
To sum up, contextualization is fundamental
in the choice of appr oach ...
... because it ensur es that pr ocedur es ar e
or ganized, not random.
Student B
Student A
Figure 1: Communicative competence
Source: P. McKenzie-Brown
www.languageinstinct.blogspot.com
The ability to combine
a language’s elements in
order to speak or write.
This is also known as
fluency.
The use of verbal and
non-verbal strategies to
allow for lack of skill in
the other three areas.
The skill of using
language appropriately
according to particular
social situations.
The extent to which
the features and rules
of the language have
been learnt.
A
B
C
D
Sociolinguistic
competence
Grammatical
competence
Strategic
competence
Discourse
competence
2 LANDMARKS IN LAW
Judicial precedent can be
defined as the principle
whereby judges are
required to follow the
decisions made in
previous cases which
have sufficient similarity.
Cases decided by lower
courts must always
follow the precedent set by higher courts. The
aim of stare decisis (Latin for ‘the decision must
stand’) is to provide consistency and predictability
in the decision-making process of various courts.
The judgment may fall into two parts: the ratio
decidendi (the reason for the decision) and the obiter
dictum (something said by the way). The ratio decidendi
always applies to the precise facts of the case and is
binding. In other words, it sets a precedent that must
be followed. The obiter dictum is where a judge
speculates on what might have happened if the facts
had been different. This part of the judgment is
persuasive rather than binding and so does not have
to be followed. In the High Trees case, Lord Denning
decided that the plaintiffs were entitled to payment of
the full rent only after the war had ended. This was
the ratio decidendi. He speculated that the plaintiffs
would not be entitled to the full rent from the start of
the war as they had promised to cut the rent by half to
ease the defendants’ financial difficulties. However, as
this was not based on the strict facts of the case, this
part of the decision was obiter dictum.
The court hierarchy dictates the way in which
judicial precedent operates. Under section 3(1) of the
European Communities Act, the decisions made on
matters of European Community Law are binding on
all courts within the English legal system, including
the Supreme Court. If matters of European
Community Law are not involved, the Supreme Court
is the highest court in the land. The Supreme Court is
bound by its own decisions unless the court decides in
a particular case that this is not right. This was laid
down by Lord Gardiner in the Practice Statement in
1966. Supreme Court decisions are binding on all
lower courts.
The Court of Appeal (Civil Division) must follow
the decisions of the Supreme Court even if it is
considered wrong to do so. In Young v Bristol Aeroplane
Co Ltd [1944] KB 718, CA, the Court of Appeal decided
it is also bound by its own decisions except where:
• previous decisions in the Court of Appeal conflict.
It must then decide which one to follow.
• a decision of its own conflicts with a Supreme
Court decision, even if that decision has not been
expressly overruled by the Supreme Court.
• a decision of its own was made per incuriam; in
other words, by mistake.
The Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) generally
has the same rules of stare decisis as the Civil Division.
However, because decisions might affect the liberty of
the individual, the rules of precedent are not followed
as rigidly. This principle was laid down in R v Taylor
[1950] 2KB 368, where it was held that if questions
involving the liberty of a subject had either been
misapplied or misunderstood, the court should
reconsider the decision.
The High Court is bound by decisions of the
Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal. It is not
bound by previous High Court decisions. However,
these are of strong persuasive authority and are
usually followed. Decisions of High Court judges are
binding in the county courts. Decisions made on
points of law by judges in the Crown Court are not
binding. They are only of persuasive authority, so
other Crown Court judges need not follow them. The
decisions of the county courts and the magistrates’
courts are not binding.
Courts can avoid following a binding precedent in a
case by using a legal device called ‘distinguishing’.
Cases can be distinguished on either the facts or the
points of law. In a case involving a joint enterprise,
where two people take part in a robbery, and in the
course of the robbery one of the people kills the
person they are stealing from, the person who does
not actually do the killing may still be liable if he could
foresee that this action was likely to follow. If someone
is armed with a gun, murder is more foreseeable than
if someone is armed only with a stick. In R v Powell
(Anthony) and English [1999] 1 AC 1, HL, Lord Hutton
made this distinction.
Judicial precedent provides stability and
consistency within the legal system. However, there
are cases where its rigidity has led to injustices. The
arguments are whether these injustices should be
rectified by Parliament through a change in the law, or
whether it is up to judges to use their skills to avoid a
precedent where it would, in the circumstances of the
case, be unjust to follow it.
Judi ci al precedent
Judi ci al precedent page i x
19
Lord Denning
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
“Especially useful on pre-sessional
courses.”
EL Gazette, July 2009
UNITS
• What is linguistics?
• Developments in linguistics
• Language acquisition and learning
• Language and technology
• Language and society
• English language teaching
• Language testing
• The spread of English
• Translating and interpreting
• Discourse analysis
• Pronunciation and phonology
• Grammar
English for Language and Linguistics
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 938 1
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 946 6
ESAP: English for Language and Linguistics
ANTHONY MANNING • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
UNITS
• Law and order
• Landmarks in law
• Crimes and civil wrongs
• Computers in law
• Theft 1: the Theft Act
• Theft 2: appropriation
• Contract law 1: consideration
• Contract law 2: misrepresentation
• Employment law
• Homicide
• International law
• Human rights law
English for Law
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ....................978 1 85964 417 1
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 418 8
ESAP: English for Law
JEREMY WALENN • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
Supreme Court is
he court decides in
t. This was laid
ice Statement in
binding on all
on) must follow
even if it is
g v Bristol Aeroplane
made this distinction.
Judicial precedent provides stability and
consistency within the legal system. However, there
are cases where its rigidity has led to injustices. The
arguments are whether these injustices should be
rectified by Parliament through a change in the law, or
whether it is up to judges to use their skills to avoid a
precedent where it would, in the circumstances of the
case, be unjust to follow it.
page i x
19
should write a
rt of the text.
adapt teaching in line with a student
needs analysis.
Th This all llows th t the te h acher lt an alt th ogether
more p princippl d h led choice off appr pp oach.
The gu d iding principles of an approach
need to match the learning situation.
As a result, the 'anything goes' mentality
can be avoided.
tion is fundamental
...
t pr ocedur es ar e s ar e
“Provides a good mix of law and
language learning ... ample
opportunity to practise relevant
language skills.”
Cornelia Hacke, Humbolt-Universität, Berlin
“The units are well structured, they
introduce a lot of interesting and
useful vocabulary.”
Joanna Skibicka, University of Gdansk, Poland
www.garneteducation.com 33
lecture organization choosing the best form of notes 1.3 Extending skills
A What can you …
1 keep? 4 fill? 7 draw on?
2 see? 5 set? 8 evaluate?
3 come up with? 6 make? 9 implement?
B How can you organize information in a lecture? Match the beginnings and endings.
1 question and contrast
2 problem and definition
3 classification and disadvantages
4 advantages and effect
5 comparison and events
6 cause and supporting information
7 sequence of process
8 stages of a solution
9 theories or opinions then answer
C How can you record information during a lecture?
Match the illustrations with the words and phrases in the box.
D Match each organization of information in Exercise B with a method of note-taking
from Exercise C. You can use one method for different types of organization.
E Listen to some lecture introductions. Choose a possible way to take notes from
Exercise C in each case.
Example:
You hear: Today I am going to talk about the different branches of management.
There are four main branches…
You choose: tree diagram
tree diagram flowchart headings and notes spidergram table timeline two columns
1 WHAT IS MANAGEMENT?
9
1.
1 . 1
1. 2
18
th
19
th
1920
4 5 6
7
3 2 1
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
UNITS
• What is leadership?
• Culture and change
• Organizations and operations
• Production management
• Strategy and the business environment
• Finance for strategy
• Budgets, decisions and risk
• People as a resource
• Developing people
• Industrial relations
• Marketing management
• Management information systems
English for Management Studies
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 440 9
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 441 6
UNITS
• What is engineering?
• Engineering achievements
• Forces on materials
• Computers in engineering
• MEMS and nanotechnology
• Friction
• The future of cars: battery power
• Engineering and sustainability
• Health and safety
• Accident analysis in construction
• Wind turbines
• Laboratory reports
English for Mechanical Engineering
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) .................... 978 1 85964 939 8
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 947 3
ESAP: English for Management Studies
TONY CORBALLIS AND WAYNE JENNINGS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
ESAP: English for Mechanical Engineering
MARIAN DUNN, DAVID HOWEY AND AMANDA ILIC • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
A Study the slides from a lecture about forces on materials in engineering.
1 What do you expect to learn in this lecture? Make a list of points.
2 Write down some key words you expect to hear.
3 Check the pronunciation of the key words, with other
students or with a dictionary.
4 How are you going to prepare for this lecture?
B Listen to Part 1 of the lecture.
1 What exactly is the lecturer going to talk about? Tick
the topic(s) you heard.
characteristics of
materials
reactions of
materials
2 What reason does the lecturer give for talking about
materials?
3 What is a good way to organize notes for this lecture?
C Listen to Part 2 of the lecture.
1 What is the main idea of this section?
2 What is the meaning of stress in mechanical engineering?
3 What is the natural law which the lecturer mentions?
4 What examples from everyday life does the lecturer
give to help you visualize stress?
5 What do you expect to hear in the next part of the lecture?
D Listen to Part 3 of the lecture about forces on
materials in engineering.
1 How could you write notes for this part?
2 What are the key words and definitions?
E Listen to Part 4 of the lecture.
1 Check your definitions.
2 What research must you do now?
F Listen and say whether the sentences are true or false.
1 3 5
2 4 6
G Look at Slides 1–4 and read these phrases.
Write a, b, c, or d in each red box.
a deformation due to stress
b equal and opposite force
c not in equilibrium
d permanent deformation
3.2 Listening
Slide 1
stre
ss
strain
elastic limit
24
preparing for a lecture • predicting lecture content • making notes
Slide 2
Slide 3
Slide 4
using materials
making materials
stress
rmation in Exercise B with a method of note taking
e method for different types of organization.
uctions. Choose a possible way to take notes from
alk about the different branches of management.
9
he sentences are true or false.
5
6
hese phrases.
box.
s
Slide 4
NEW
www.garneteducation.com 34
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
UNITS
• What is medicine?
• Achievements in medicine
• Basic principles in medicine
• Computers in medicine
• Causes and effects of disease
• Basic medical sciences – biology,
biochemistry & pharmacology
• Clinical setting: acute care
• Clinical setting: primary care
• Non-clinical setting: public health
• Evidence-based medicine
• Current issues in medicine
• The future of medicine
English for Medicine
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 442 3
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 443 0
ESAP: English for Medicine
ROS WRIGHT, PATRICK FITZGERALD AND MARIE McCULLAGH • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO
PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
UNITS
• What is psychology?
• Branches of psychology
• Psychology in practice
• Psychology and computers
• Freud and Jung: dreams and personality
• Vygotsky and Piaget: thought and
language
• Memory and forgetting
• Madness: popular myths about mental
health
• Personality
• Mental health: modern compulsions
• Parapsychology
• With the future in mind
English for Psychology
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 446 1
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 447 8
ESAP: English for Psychology
JANE SHORT • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
A Read the text. The red words are probably familiar to you in general English. But can you think of a
different meaning for each word in the field of psychology? Change the form if necessary (e.g.,
change a noun into a verb).
It takes both vision and analysis to construct a new building. On such a project, the architects
will stress the way the structure stimulates the imagination; while the contractors will be more
conscious of daily working conditions.
B Read these sentences from psychology texts. Complete each sentence with one of the red words from
Exercise A. Change the form if necessary (e.g., change a noun into a verb).
1 Freud’s experiments in psycho ________________ gave rise to his ‘dreamtheory’.
2 In Pavlov’s experiments with dogs, the conditioned ________________ was a light.
3 Hallucinations, or ________________, are a common symptomof mental disorder.
4 Overstimulation of the organismcan lead to emotional tension or ________________.
5 Kelly was an early proponent of Personal ________________ Theory.
6 Skinner’s experiments in operant ________________ were based on behaviourism.
7 Attributing your feelings to another person is known as ________________.
8 The ________________ mind is the most accessible level of mental activity.
C Study the words in box a.
1 What is the connection between all the words?
2 What is the base word in each case?
3 What do we call the extra letters?
4 What is the meaning of each prefix?
5 Can you think of another word with each prefix?
D Study the words in box b.
1 What is the connection between all the words?
2 What is the base word in each case?
3 What do we call the extra letters?
4 What effect do the extra letters have on the base
word?
5 Can you think of another word with each suffix?
E Using words from this page to discuss the pictures on the opposite page.
guessing words in context • prefixes and suffixes
1
WHAT IS PSYCHOLOGY?
1.1 Vocabulary
6
antisocial biochemical conscience
extrasensory immature interneuron
misbehaviour neurobiological
parapsychology physiological
psychoanalytical stereotype
subconscious transactional unfeeling
a
agoraphobia emotional
hypnotic identity inhibition narcissism
neurosis psychiatrist psychotic
psychogenic regressive reinforcement
b
U












20
Guessing words in context
Using related words
Sometimes a word in general English has a special meaning in medicine..
Example:
patient, dress / ing, theatre
If you recognize a word but don’t understand it in context, think:
What is the basic meaning of the word? Does that help me understand the special meaning?
Example:
Water can drip from a tap. A drip means a tiny flow of liquid. If a doctor puts a patient on a
drip it means that they receive a tiny flow of some type of liquid, usually in the form of a
drug, such as an antibiotic.
Removing prefixes
A prefix = letters at the start of a word.
A prefix changes the meaning of a word.
Example:
imbalance – not balanced
misdiagnose – diagnose incorrectly
If you don’t recognize a word, think:
Is there a prefix? Remove it. Do you recognize the word now? What does the prefix mean?
Add it to the meaning of the word
Removing suffixes
A suffix = letters at the end of a word.
A suffix sometimes changes the part of speech of the word.
Example:
consult [arrow] consultation = verb [arrow] noun
biology [arrow] biological = noun [arrow] adjective
A suffix sometimes changes the meaning in a predictable way
Example:
path +ology – the study of disease
path +ologist – specialist in the study of disease
cardi +ology – the study of the heart
cardi +ologist – heart specialist
If you don’t recognize a word, think: Is there a suffix? Remove it. Do you recognize the word
now?
What does that suffix mean? Add it to the meaning of the word.
Vocabulary bank
the heart
alist
rd, think: Is there a suffix? Remove it. Do you recognize the word
n? Add it to the meaning of the word.
English for
MEDICINE
in Higher Education Studies
Course Book
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
Ros Wright, Patrick Fitzgerald and Marie McCullagh
each case?
a letters?
letters have on the base
word with each suffix?
to discuss the pictures on the opposite page.
neurosis psychiatrist psychotic
psychogenic regressive reinforcement
NEW NEW
www.garneteducation.com 35
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
ACADEMIC
PURPOSES
UNITS
• What is public relations?
• Public relations activities
• Public relations research
• Careers in public relations
• PR for non-profit organizations
• Crisis communication
• Public relations regulation
• Public relations and marketing
• Public relations for corporate
responsibility
• Financial public relations
• Current issues in public relations
• Strategy and change
English for Public Relations
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 532 1
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 533 8
UNITS
• What is tourism?
• What’s your kind of tourism?
• Hospitality research
• Careers in tourism and hospitality
• Tourism marketing
• The business of events tourism
• The business of fun
• Hospitality marketing
• Tourism and culture
• Managing people and money
• External influences
• Information strategy and change
English for Tourism and Hospitality
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 942 8
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 950 3
ESAP: English for Tourism and Hospitality
HANS MOL • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
ESAP: English for Public Relations
MARIE McLISKY • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY:
CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0–7.5+
A Read the eight sentences below. The red words are probably familiar to you in general English. Can
you think of a different meaning for each red word in English for public relations?
1 Hip hop culture grew froman African American origin into an international phenomenon.
2 Senior editors usually make the editorial decisions for a publication.
3 Even a brief exposure to radiation is very dangerous.
4 To obtain the juice for winemaking the grapes go through a press.
5 News Year’s Day is a public holiday in many countries.
6 America threatened to break off diplomatic relations with North Korea over their nuclear program.
7 The earth spins on its axis.
8 The police are trying to establish the series of events leading up to the murder.
B Read part of a book review. Complete each sentence with one of the red words from Exercise A.
Change the form if necessary.
Edward L. Bernays, the subject of Larry Tye’s book ‘The Father of ______’ is generally seen as the first
representative of the public ________ profession.
Bernays understood the mass _________ of the time. He pioneered many of the PR industry’s
techniques including the development of media _______. He believed that, with the right ______,
public opinion couldbe manipulated. Bernays helped improve the _____ perception of United States
presidents Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover. This led to the perception of PR as propaganda, i.e.
as creating favourable _____ for clients by securing positive media coverage, for example _______ in
a wide range of media.
C Study the words in box a.
1 What is the connection between all the words?
2 What is the base word in each case?
3 What do we call the extra letters?
4 What is the meaning of each prefix?
5 Can you think of another word with each prefix?
D Study the words in box b.
1 What is the connection between all the words?
2 What is the base word in each case?
3 What do we call the extra letters?
4 What effect do the extra letters have on the
base word?
5 Can you think of another word with each suffix?
E Use words from this page to discuss the pictures on the opposite page.
guessing words in context • prefixes and suffixes
1
WHAT IS PUBLIC RELATIONS?
1.1 Vocabulary
6
co-ordinate disseminate embody
ensure exclusive informal international
misinform nonverbal overcome
outbid proactive rewrite
under-estimate unlimited
a
accessible coverage editorial
effective instrumental interviewee
management perception professional
propagandist publicity relationship
scientifically useful verifiable
b
identifying subject–verb–object in long sentences • paraphrasing 6.2 Reading
A Discuss these questions.
1 How do ‘events’ relate to tourism? What type of
tourism events can you think of? List and order
them according to popularity.
2 How would you define ‘tourist’ in this context?
3 What aspects do you think are most important in
the organization of such events?
B Study Figure 1.
1 What do you think the figure represents?
2 What title would you give this figure?
3 Where does research come into events management?
C Look at the illustrations, the title, the introduction and the first
sentence of each paragraph on the opposite page. What will the text be about?
D Using your ideas from Exercises A, B and C above, write
some research questions.
E Read the text. Does it answer your questions?
F Study the highlighted sentences in the text. Find and underline the subject, verb
and the object or complement in each sentence.
G Two students paraphrased parts of the text.
1 Which parts of the text do they paraphrase?
2 Which paraphrase is better? Why?
H Work in groups. Each group should write a paraphrase of a different part of the text.
See Vocabulary bank
48 English for Tourism and Hospitality Studies – Copyright © 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
experiences
value
leisure
income
technology
age
1 Festivals are huge events, with many
people involved, complicated logistics,
management and considerable
investment.
2 The tourism sector has seen a
significant increase in these unique
mega ventures, creating the need for
professional events managers.
3 The rule of thumb seems to be that
events can be as complicated as people
can afford. Events can be real or
virtual.
4 Theories claim that big events provide
a forum for such celebrations as
people age.
5 Added to ageing and technology,
increased income and leisure time also
form a recipe for growth in events
tourism.
1 Festivals are major events which are attended by
large groups of people; they are highly complex
from an organizational point of view, and are
expensive to put on.
2 The demand for professional events managers has
increased as the number of big events has grown.
3 There is no limit to what tourism events can look
like, and they can be virtual as well as real.
4 One theory says that ageing contributes to the
growth of events tourism.
5 Apart from age and technology, income and
increased leisure time contribute to this growth as
well.
Student B
Student A
Figure 1
t d ti 35 35
oup should write a paraphrase of a different part of the text.
English for Tourism and Hospitality Studies – Copyright © 2008 Garnet Publishing Ltd.
g g gy,
increased income and leisure time also
form a recipe for growth in events
tourism.
chnology, income and
contribute to this growth g as
y
“Tourism is extremely well covered,
with topics including marketing,
hospitality and culture. The
vocabulary is highly appropriate,
with a vast range of academic skills.”
EL Gazette, July 2009
“I like using it and so do my
Panamanian students ... the
Teacher’s Book is very helpful.”
Margaret Rohmeder, University Center César
Ritz, Brig, Switzerland
in each case?
tra letters?
ra letters have on the
er word with each suffix?
to discuss the pictures on the opposite page.
effective instrumental interviewee
management perception professional
propagandist publicity relationship
scientifically useful verifiable
NEW
www.garneteducation.com 36
English for Global Industries: Oil and Gas
A study book for industry professionals
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
STEVE OLIVER • UPPER INTERMEDIATE TO PROFICIENCY: CEF LEVELS B2 TO C2/IELTS 5.0-7.5+
KEY FEATURES
• Up-to-date technical
content
• Professional in look and
feel
• Clear layout, with full-colour
photographs and diagrams
• Advice and practice in
appropriate learning skills
• User-friendly answer key
with suggestions for further
practice on the Internet
UNITS
• The Business of Oil and
Gas
• Working on a Rig
• Drilling Operations
• Geophysical Services
• Producing and Delivering
NEW
4
Oil and Gas is a global industry. As a worker in this industry you are
part of a vast international network. As you travel with your work,
you will meet people from many different countries and will need to
be able to discuss issues affecting the oil and gas industry. This unit
focuses on the vocabulary which will help you to converse in English
about those issues.
T
h
e

8
u
s
in
e
s
s

o
l

O
il
a
n
d

C
a
s
S
e
c
t
i
o
n

1
U
n
i
t

1
The Business of Oil and Gas
A Global Giant
Word pairs. Pead lhis inlroduclion lo lhe oil and gas induslry, which you mighl
lnd in any online encyclopaedia. Nolice lhe pairs ol words (e.g., 'oil and gas' or
'mergers and acquisilions'). Make a nole ol any olhers you can lnd.
A
Focused reading
The oil and gas industry is one of the largest in the world. It is made up of a small number of
conglomerates and a very large number of smaller independent companies. Generally speaking, the
industry is divided into two areas. Upstream operations involve exploration and production, often
known as E & P, while downstream operations involve transportation, refining, and sales of products to
consumers.
Relationships between companies can be very complex. They can be competitors with each other or
they can be suppliers and customers of one another. Large companies make joint ventures with each
other for specific projects and there are frequent mergers and acquisitions. Since the integration of oil
and gas technology, this happens even more often.
Oil and gas production takes place onshore and offshore. Oil and gas companies are engaged
in a constant search to discover new reserves and to obtain extraction rights in proved reserves.
Construction of drilling wells and rigs is an enormous risk and companies need to calculate supply and
demand in order to be certain that an operation will be profitable before it comes on stream.
7KH RL O JDV L QGXVWU \
B
C
Getting the facts straight. Pead lhese exlracls lrom inlernel websiles relaling
lo lhe oil and gas induslry. Which ol lhese slalemenls are.
1 purely laclual?
2 inlended lo show lhe imporlance ol lhe oil and gas induslry lo lhe global economy?
3 inlended lo promole one parlicular oil company?
S
e
c
l
io
n

!

U
n
i
t

1

O
il
a
n
d

G
a
s
5
Website accuracy. ln many online encyclopaedias, readers can edil inlormalion
lhemselves il lhey believe lhe inlormalion is lalse.
ll you read lhese slalemenls, would you wish lo aller lhem? Use a search engine, such as
Coogle, lo research and check your answers.
a The world produces and consumes 75 million barrels ol oil a day.
b The USA consumes 25 per cenl ol lhe world's supply ol oil.
c China is lhe second largesl consumer.
d 68 per cenl ol lhe world's oil reserves are in lhe Middle Lasl.
e The price ol a barrel ol oil quadrupled lrom USS3 lo S!2 in lhe !973 oil crisis.
f The Thunder Horse plallorm in lhe Cull ol Mexico was hil by lwo hurricanes
in 2005.
g The biggesl oil leld in lhe world is in Venezuela.
h Oil and gas conglomerales employ 70 per cenl ol lheir resources on upslream
operalions.
i Sakhalin 2 was lhe lrsl inlegraled oil and gas projecl in Pussia.
a 'As lhe global economy evolves and expands, il presenls enormous opporlunilies
lor lhe energy induslry. We eslimale lhal lhe world's oil and gas needs will grow
lorly percenl by 2030' (Pex W. Tillerson, Chairman and CLO, LxxonMobil).
b 'Proved reserves ol oil are generally laken lo be lhose quanlilies lhal geological
and engineering inlormalion indicales wilh reasonable cerlainly can be
recovered in lhe lulure lrom known reservoirs under exisling economic and
geological condilions' (www.bp.com).
c 'Wilhoul oil and nalural gas, qualily ol lile would decline and people in
developing nalions would nol be able lo improve lheir slandard ol living'
(www.spe.org).
d 'Slrong demand lrom oil and gas producers has pushed rales lor ollshore
drilling rigs lo record highs, prompling many companies lo build new rigs lo
meel lhe slrong demand' (www.reulers.com).
e 'Shell L&P is engaged in lhe upslream aclivilies ol acquiring, exploring,
developing and producing oil and gas' (www.shell.com).
40.5
59.9
103.5
117.2
144.4
742.7
MiddleLasl
Proved reserves
at the end 2006
Thousand million barrels
40.5
Asia Pacilc
59.9
Norlh
America
103.5
S.& Cenl.
Amerika
117.2
Alrica
144.4
Luropa &
Lurasia
vocabulary introduced in context through
authentic quotations and documents
www.garneteducation.com 37
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
English for Global Industries: Oil and Gas
Study Book ................................................ 978 1 85964 506 2
FORTHCOMING TITLES
IN THE ENGLISH FOR GLOBAL
INDUSTRIES SERIES
Steve Oliver
English for Global Industries
Oil and Gas
‘put it to work’ activities in each unit
encourage learners to use the language
English for Global Industries
Construction
Global Industri
English for Global Industries
Fashion
& Textiles
English
Consstru rucctti tioo
& Textiles
English for Global Industries
Pharmaceuticals
• Construction
• Pharmaceuticals
• Fashion and Textiles
• Financial Services
• Maritime Studies
6
S
e
c
l
io
n

!

U
n
i
t

1

O
il
a
n
d

G
a
s
Verb Noun (abstract) Noun (person)
operale operalion operalor
exlracl
compelilion
acquisilion
consumer
produce
explore
sub-conlracl
supply
lransporl
Partnerships and prepositions. A word parlnership is where lwo or more words are used
logelher ollen enough lo be considered as a lxed expression. Preposilions, or linking words, have
an imporlanl role lo play in word parlnerships.
Here are a number ol word parlnerships in senlences. Wrile eilher ol lhe preposilions 'ol' or 'lor'
in lhe space, and highlighl lhe parl ol each senlence you lhink is a word parlnership. The lrsl is
done lor you.
a Demand oil will conlinue lo increase unlil 20!5.
b The markel liqueled nalural gas is growing sleadily.
c Consumplion lossil luels has declined slighlly in recenl years.
d The supply Norlh Sea Oil can be mainlained unlil around 2024.
e Transporlalion oil presenls many securily risks.
f Peserves nalural gas are being lound almosl daily.
g Drilling oil and gas is a major parl ol our upslream operalions.
h The exlraclion oil al lhe 8urgan leld began in !946.
i Lxploralion oil and gas has been going on lor over !00 years.
j Produclion gas lrom deep-waler reserves is our main area ol experlise.
Word families. A word lamily is where a number ol words can be made lrom lhe same rool
word. Complele lhis lable wilh words lrom lhese lamilies, which are laken lrom lhe locused
Peading lasks AC, on lhe previous page.
for
Vocabulary-building activities
A
B
7
S
e
c
l
io
n

!

U
n
i
t

1

O
il
a
n
d

G
a
s
a locale localed localing localion localions
b group grouped grouping group groups
c explore explored exploring explorer exploralion
d own owned owning owner ownership
e relne relned relning relnery relneries
f markel markeled markeling markel
g consume consumed consuming consumer consumers
RRReeeeefreshh!!!
Put it to work!
Describe aspects of the oil and gas
industry in your country of origin.
Using one of the strategies for
consolidating and storing new
vocabulary recommended in the
Introduction, refresh what you
have learnt in this unit before
going on to the ‘Put it to work!’
activity opposite.
London is where BP’s corporate headquarters are (a) , and
the UK is therefore a centre for many of its mainstream business functions. The UK
is also home to three of BP’s major global research and technology
(b) .
Our (c) and production business in Europe covers the North
Sea – both the UK and Norway – and also The Netherlands. In Russia, we have an
important joint venture through our 50 per cent (d) of TNK-
BP, a major oil company with the majority of its assets in Russia. We are involved
in a number of E&P projects in Azerbaijan, and are leading the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan
(BTC) pipeline project.
Refining and marketing activities are spread throughout Europe, with BP owning or
having a stake in nine (e) across the region. BP retail sites
are a common sight in several European countries. In Germany, we
(f) under the ARAL brand. We also sell lubricants and other
oil products in Europe to both (g) and business customers.
Fill in the blanks. 8P is an example ol an oil and gas company operaling globally. This is an
exlracl lrom ils websile describing ils operalions in Lurope. There are a number ol words missing
lrom lhe documenl. lill in lhe blanks wilh lhe righl word lrom each group ol words given below.
C
English for Global Industries
Maritime
Studies
tim
Studies
English for Global Industries
Financial
Services
www.garneteducation.com 38
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
English for the Energy Industries: Oil, Gas and Petrochemicals
An English course for employees in the oil, gas and petrochemicals industries
PETER LEVRAI WITH FIONA McGARRY• PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0-5.0
English for the Energy Industries
Course Book ................................................978 1 85964 911 4
CDs (x2) ......................................................978 1 85964 913 8
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 912 1
“A well-designed ESP teaching and
learning resource that would be an
excellent teaching tool to any EFL/
EAP tutor who has a limited
knowledge of this cognate area.”
Journal of the English for Specific Purposes
Special Interest Group
212 ENGLISH FOR THE ENERGY INDUSTRIES – Review Unit 8: Describing processes and procedures ENGLISH FOR THE ENERGY INDUSTRIES – Review Unit 8: Describing processes and procedures 213
Unit 8: Describing processes and procedures
Complete the conversation with the verbs in the past simple or present
perfect tense.
1 A: you (have) previous experience in the oil industry?
2 B: Yes. I (work) onshore and offshore as an operator.
3 A: When you (work) offshore?
4 B: From 1999 to 2002. In 2002, I (work) onshore.
5 A: Why you (change) from offshore to onshore?
6 B: A better position (become) available onshore.
7 A: And you (like) working offshore?
8 B: I (like) the people, but not the rotation. I sometimes
(find) it difficult to work six weeks.
9 A: And you (make) any plans to change your
position again?
10 B: Not at the moment.
Look at the pictures and discuss what has happened. B
A
Put the sentences below into a logical order to make a newspaper report
about the incident.
What else would you like to know about the incident? Write four questions
to ask your instructor. They will try to answer them.
D
C
1 22 essential crew members have stayed on the rig to maintain the facility.
2 The facility has now been shut down and made operatively safe.
3 Thick white smoke was seen coming froma gas storage facility off the East Yorkshire
coast this morning.
4 At lunchtime, a spokesperson commented, “Asmall fire has been extinguished.”
5 Two workmen were reported to be suffering fromminor burns and shock.
They were immediately taken to hospital.
6 60 non-essential crew members were airlifted to shore this afternoon.
1 2
3 4
Accident at Britain’s largest
offshore gas storage facility
KEY FEATURES
• Essential expressions
and language used in
the industry
• Constant recycling of
high-frequency technical
terms and vocabulary
• Real-life listening and
reading texts
• A communicative
approach to oral accuracy
and fluency
• Over 140 hours of skills
practice activities
• A glossary of over 160
key terms
UNITS
• Giving basic information
• Calculating and measuring
• Describing equipment
• Giving instructions and
warnings
• Describing systems
• Talking about safety
• Making comparisons
• Describing processes
and procedures
• Giving advice
each unit comprises ten double-page lessons followed by revision
tests and self-assessment objectives for students to complete
ideal for students who need to use technical and semi-technical vocabulary in the workplace
PETER LEVRAI
WITH FIONA MCGARRY
English for the
ENERGY
INDUSTRIES
Oil, Gas and Petrochemicals
English for the
ENERGY
INDUSTRIES
Oil, Gas and Petrochemicals
PETER LEVRAI
WITH FIONA MCGARRY
www.garneteducation.com 39
Safety First: English for Health & Safety
A new course for professionals who do potentially unsafe or dangerous jobs in industry
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
JOHN CHRIMES • INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVEL B1/IELTS 4.0–5.0
g
Objective: To practise asking for and giving
personal information and filling in forms.
1
5 4
3 Personal Information 2 Alphabet A–Z
Unit 1 Basics of Health and Safety
Clue Full Question Student
last name What is your last name?
first name
employee #
current address
phone
how long address
emergency contact
D.O.B.
certifications
personal information
personal information
Objective: To practisenaming and spelling objects and places connected
with health and safety, and to pronounce English letters correctly.
1. Point & say
Work in groups. Take it in turns to point to the
letters and say themcorrectly. See who can
name all the letters in the shortest time.

B

P

N
s

2. Name A-Z Item
Each itemin the picture below starts with a dif-
ferent letter of the alphabet. Work in groups to
write a list of each itemin alphabetical order.
See which group can finish first.
3. Name A-Z Item
In pairs (A and B), practise spelling out
some of the key words and expressions
fromthis unit.
a Student A should dictate the letters of
five words, without pausing between
words.
b Student B should write down the let-
ters and then decide where each word
begins and ends.
c Swap roles.
2. Ask and write.
Read the prompts and write the full ques-
tions. Then talk to a partner and write down
their answers.
3. Tell the class.
Tell the class about the student you talked to.
The class can then ask that student more de-
tailed questions.
1. Listen and write.
You are going to listen to Health & Safety lectures throughout this course. Your lecturer is Richard.
Listen to Richard introduce himself and fill in his EIC.
KEY FEATURES
• Provides practice in
industry-specific skills
such as form-filling and
understanding complex
instructions
• A wide variety of interesting
activity types to engage
the learner
• Systematic recycling
to activate workplace
vocabulary
• Builds communications
skills and raises awareness
of different registers through
use of authentic language
• Puzzles and games to help
with critical thinking skills
• Includes audio CDs
UNIT TOPICS
• Health and Safety
• Risk Assessment
• PPE
• Hand-held Equipment
• Mechanical Equipment
• Transport Safety
• Working at Height
• Manual Handling
• Fire Safety
• Chemical Safety
• Electrical Safety
• First-Aid and Injury
Safety First
Course Book & audio CDs ........................... 978 1 85964 553 6
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 561 1
NEW
Safety First
Eng||sh for Hea|th & Safety
John Chrimes
www.garneteducation.com 40
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
“The twelve chapters – sometimes
with an aeronautical industry slant –
are more than sufficient to form a
useful, comprehensive and certainly
interesting all-round course, or just
to dip into as needed.”
Richard Tily, Sprachkom, Germany
KEY FEATURES
• Practical skills developed
for dealing with oral and
written instructions and
documentation
• Task-based approach
ensures achievable lesson
outcomes
• Variety of texts and
tasks on a wide range
of aeronautical topics
• Two review sections to
consolidate skills and
vocabulary knowledge
• Glossary and electrical
symbol appendix
• Audio CDs for further
self-study and homework
UNITS
• Design and innovation
• Manufacturing techniques
• Frameworks
• Control systems
• Engine and fuel systems
• Review I
• Safety and emergency
• Air and gas
• Electrical systems
• Communication
• Maintenance
• Review II
Take-Off
Course Book & audio CDs (x3) ....................978 1 85964 974 9
Workbook ................................................... 978 1 85964 976 3
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 975 6
Take-Off: Technical English for Engineering
A practical course for students studying technical English in the aviation industry
DAVID MORGAN AND NICHOLAS REGAN • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2–B2/IELTS 3.0–6.5
S
D
T
TAKE-OFF
Technical English
for Engineering
David Morgan
and Nicholas Regan
Course Book
Take-off Unit 5 Lesson 7: A new idea 95
The main components of a turboprop engine are the intake, the compressor, the
combustion chamber and the turbine. Air is drawn into the intake and compressed by
the compressor. Fuel is then added to the compressed air in the combustion chamber
and is ignited by a spark. The hot combustion gases expand through the turbine, to
provide power to the turbine by exerting pressure on the blades, causing the central
shaft to rotate. Some of this rotary power drives the compressor, and the propeller is
driven by the remaining power via a reduction gearbox. In some turboprop designs,
the exhaust gases are expelled directly from the rear and can provide additional thrust.
2 Underline an expression in the text which has a similar meaning to each of the
expressions in Exercise 3.
Language
1 Complete each of the following phrases with a
preposition.
a draw something
b add something
c provide power something
d exert pressure something
e expel something somewhere
2 Look at the Language Box. How many examples of by can you find in the text? Are
they all passive sentences?
Speaking
1 Look at the diagrambelowof the Pratt & Whitney PT6 engine. Look carefully at the labels:
propeller shaft, reduction gearbox, etc. Discuss the following questions with a partner.
a Where is the air intake?
b What is the path of the air through the engine?
c Are there any other differences between this engine and the description in the text?
2 Work with your partner to test him
on his knowledge of this engine.
Ask and answer questions like:
What does the … do?
What happens after … ?
Where is the … ?
Workbook pages 76/77
Language Box
by
In passive sentences, the person or thing
which does the action is sometimes
mentioned. If so, the preposition by is
used.
For example:
the propeller is driven by the remaining
power
similar to the ones that are used by
piston engines
propeller
shaft
power
turbines
compressor
turbine
multistage
compressor
reduction
gearbox
exhaust
duct
combustion
chamber
air
intake
10
15
Take-off Unit 5 Lesson 7: A new idea 94
Vocabulary and speaking
1 Complete the words for parts of an engine by filling in the missing letters.
a p p ll r c exh st e sh t g t r ne i in ke
b g rb x d c b s i n f ch m r h c pr ss r
2 This is a cutaway diagram of a gas turbine engine. Work with a partner to put the
words from Exercise 1 in the right places.
3 Look at the path of the arrows through the engine. Discuss with your partner what it
shows. Use these expressions.
air goes into push the turbine blades
the compressor acts on the air the propeller uses the power
the air is mixed with fuel the exhaust gases go out
the hot gases drive the turbine
Reading
1 Read the text and see if your ideas in Exercise 3 above were right.
The turboprop engine
The next stage in the design of aircraft engines was the development of the turboprop
engine. This engine is a type of gas turbine which has a propeller very similar to the
ones that are used by piston engines, but which is driven by the combustion of gas in
a single combustion chamber instead of several cylinders. Turboprop engines are
usually fitted to small or medium-sized aircraft where speed is not the primary
requirement.
5
systematic focus on vocabulary development
focused grammar support
scaffolded activities support student engagement
www.garneteducation.com 41
KEY FEATURES
• Digital Course Book with
embedded audio for display
using a datashow projector
• Easy-to-use tools enable
teachers to use Course
Book pages to suit
individual lessons
• Additional interactive
activities
Take-Off
Interactive Course Book ...............................978 1 85964 476 8
Take-Off: Interactive Course Book CD-ROM
A classroom management tool to support the teaching of Take-Off
ENGLISH FOR
SPECIFIC
PURPOSES
DAVID MORGAN AND NICHOLAS REGAN • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2–B2/IELTS 3.0–6.5
drag zoom to target specific
sections of page
audio play,
including tapescript
highlighter
and draw tools
stopwatch for timed activities
notebook for teacher’s personal
notes on individual lessons
sticky notes create moveable
text box for writing on page
additional interactive activities
e
e
additional interactive activities
41
TTTTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAA FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF TTTTTTTTTTTTAAAAA TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF EEEEEEEE OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE-------------------------------------------------------------------------------OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF TAKE-OFF
Technical English
for Engineering
David Morgan
and Nicholas Regan
Interactive
Course Book
CD-ROM
S
D
T
www.garneteducation.com 42
KEY FEATURES
• Randomized item banking enables
testing in one location
• Easy, fast and reliable
• Tests reading and writing skills
from CEF A2
• Universally applicable – not bound
to specific purposes
READING
• Very short, simple Subject-Verb-
Complement sentences with be
• Short, simple Subject-Verb-Object/
Complement/Adverb sentences with
a range of verbs
• Long Subject-Verb-Object/
Complement/Adverb sentences with
coordination, introductory structures
and prepositional phrases
• Long, complex sentences with passives,
subordination, non-finite clauses,
elliptical structures and pseudo-cleft
sentences
• As above, with embedding: past perfect
structures and stance adverbials
i-Test: Online student placement test
An interactive placement test of competence and performance in reading, listening and usage of English
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
TERRY PHILLIPS AND ANNA PHILLIPS • ALL LEVELS
www.garneteducation.com 43
i-test CD-ROM
For more information and to purchase a licence, please visit
www.garneteducation.com.
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
LISTENING
• Recognizing words in isolation
• Recognizing vowel sounds
• Recognizing words in context
• Recognizing questions and
appropriate response
• Predicting and recognizing
the next word
• Following a talk
USAGE
• Producing numbers in isolation
from visual prompts
• Producing words in isolation
from visual prompts
• Producing sentences from
visual prompts
• Recognizing the correct form
to complete a sentence
• Dictation
www.garneteducation.com 44
IELTS Target 5.0: Preparation for IELTS General Training – Leading to Academic IELTS
A preparation course for the General Training IELTS examination with bridging to Academic IELTS
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
CHRIS GOUGH • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.5–5.0
NEW
IELTS Target 5.0 addresses the needs of students who are
entering IELTS study between Band 3 (extremely limited user)
and Band 4 (limited user). The General Training Module of IELTS
has been chosen, along with five bridging units to Academic
IELTS, as the most suitable for students at this level. Such
students might need to raise their IELTS score to:
• satisfy criteria set by the institution in which they study
• work towards a score of 5.0 – required for many non-academic
training courses
• lay the foundation for further study of the Academic Module
with a view to university entrance
IELTS Target 5.0 acknowledges the very special requirements of such
students and focuses on guidance, scaffolding and analysis of typical
errors. Model answers are used frequently to provide guidance, and
tasks have been devised to focus attention on the content of good and
poor model answers.
Grammar is dealt with when it is integral to the exam skill, for example,
the use of the passive as part of a writing task. Vocabulary has been
carefully selected to focus on items that are core to IELTS and essential
for use at the level.
IELTS Target 5.0 consists of four sections, each containing five
core units plus a review unit. Each core unit includes consolidation
and mini exam practice activities. Further complete mock exams
are included as supplementary material. Each section comprises
60 hours of teaching, a total of 240 hours.
3
Exam Practice
IBLTS Tærget S.0 42
LIstemImg
A You will hear three people talking about working from home.
Before you listen, talk to a partner. What are some of the good
things and bad things about working from home?
ExantIp: In the IELT8 Liatening ModuIe, you wiII not have
a picture and you wiII not be abIe to taIk about the aituation
before you Iiaten. But you wiII have time to Iook at the queationa
and ahouId predict aa much aa you can.
B Look through the questions carefully. Then listen and
answer the questions.
For questions 1 and 2, choose the correct answer a, b or c.
1. S|mon started work|ng from home because ...
a. he wanted to.
b. h|s company wanted h|m to.
c. h|s fam||y wanted h|m to.
2. Why are S|mon`s company happy for h|m to work from home?
a. They can pay |ess money.
b. Now they can move to a sma||er off|ce.
c. The ma|n off|ce |s too sma||.
OuestIon type tIp: 8ometimea you need to chooae a number of anawera
from a Iarger number of optiona.
For questions 3–8, choose six answers from A–J. Which of these points
do the speakers mention when they talk about working from home?
A Peop|e |n the off|ce somet|mes stop you work|ng.
B You a|ways do more work when you are at home.
O At home, you somet|mes start work |ater than you p|anned.
D lt`s easy to waste t|me watch|ng Tv.
E Your fam||y don`t a|ways |et you do your work.
F Most peop|e wear a su|t when they work from home.
G You don`t need to |ook smart when you work from home.
H There are more techn|ca| prob|ems w|th computers.
l Not see|ng other peop|e a|| day can be d|ff|cu|t.
J You get a |ot of phone ca||s when you work from home.
3. ___ 4. ___ 5. ___ 6. ___ 7. ___ 8. ___


EACH UNIT COMPRISES FIVE TWO-HOUR
LESSONS, AS FOLLOWS:
Lesson 1: Vocabulary / Speaking
spelling / collocation / easily confused words / listening to model
speaking tasks / listening to speaking tasks and filling in key
words, etc.
Lesson 2: Listening
Part 1: recycling key vocabulary in context / prediction tasks /
listening tasks with guidance / focus on figures, dates, spelling,
recognizing real nouns, etc.
Part 2: mini-test / analysis of correct answers / guidance on how
to improve score
Lesson 3: Reading
Part 1: recycling key vocabulary in context / prediction tasks / reading
tasks with guidance / exam focus – topic sentence / reference, etc.
Part 2: mini-test / analysis of correct answers / guidance on how
to improve score
Authentic/complete versions of some texts are provided in the
Appendix for comparison with adapted version
Lesson 4: Writing
Part 1: features of written language – spelling / punctuation /
register / linking / referring forward and back in text / using near
synonyms, etc.
Part 2: mini-test – short piece of writing for comparison with
model answer / analysis of model answer / advice on core
writing techniques
Lesson 5: Review
Part 1: recycling vocabulary and fixed expressions
Part 2: one-hour test, simplified to students’ level
graded practice exam material
at the end of every unit
www.garneteducation.com 45
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
B Check the highlighted words and mark each sentence (P) positive
or (N) negative.
1. l th|nk my job |s very |nterest|ng. __
2. lt`s a very bor|ng job. lt`s too easy and l don`t meet anyone. __
3. lt`s very reward|ng. l can go home know|ng l`ve rea||y he|ped somebody. __
4. My job |s cha||eng|ng. l have to th|nk qu|ck|y somet|mes. Not everyone
cou|d do |t. __
5. My job |s a b|t repet|t|ve. Every day |s the same as the day before. __
6. lt`s too stressfu|. My doctor to|d me to f|nd another job soon.
F Cover Exercise E and write the six adjectives in your notebook. Check your spelling.
SpeæhImg 2t taIkIng about jobs
A Answer these questions with a partner.
1. What jobs do the peop|e |n your fam||y do?
2. Do any of your fr|ends or fam||y have a job you wou|d rea||y ||ke?
3. ls there a job you wou|d ||ke to do more than any other?
Ozannaz check
We use woµ|d and coµ|d when a s|tuat|on |s not rea|.
H|a| |oo woµ|d voµ mos| |||e? |the person w||| not rea||y have th|s jobì
Do voµ ||||| voµ coµ|d do ||s |oo? |the person w||| not rea||y try to do the jobì
PzonuncIatIon check
||sten and not|ce the pronunc|at|on of woµ|d voµ /wυu/ and coµ|d voµ
/kυu/. Pract|se say|ng the sentences.
1. What job wou|d you most ||ke?
2. Do you th|nk you cou|d do th|s job?

ExantIp: In the aecond part of the 8peaking ModuIe, you have to taIk about a topic
for about two minutea. The examiner wiII give you a card with the topic and aome
pointa to think about.You have a minute to prepare and write notea.You can aak the
examiner about anything that you don't underatand.
B Here are two typical cards for part 2 of the Speaking Module. Work with a
partner – one of you is A, the other is B. Think about the topic for a minute
and make notes.
C Take turns to speak about what’s on your card for about two minutes.

IBLTS Tærget S.0 33
WætcB outI
typIcæI errors
l`m eng|neer.
l have a good work.
Ho|| |s uncountab|e - |oo |s countab|e.
WætcB outI
typIcæI errors
Do you ||ke to work |n another
country.
Do you th|nk you can be the
pres|dent of your country
one day?

Describe a job you think is
really difficult.
Say ...
• what the job is.
• why it is difficult.
• why some people do it.
• why you wouldn’t like to do it.
What is the best job in the world?
Say ...
• what the job is.
• why it is such a good job.
• what type of person does it.
• if you think you could do it.
A B
SpeæhImg 1t taIkIng about wozk
A Look at the four photos and think about the kind of work that the people are doing.
Think for one minute about what you want to say about each photo.

B Work in pairs. Take turns to choose a photo and talk about it. Try to talk for
about one minute about each. Use phrases from the box.
VocæBuIæry 1t jobs and sayIng what you do
A Listen and write the job names. Be careful with your spelling.
1. 2. 3. 4.
5. 6. 7. 8.
B Listen again and mark the main stress on each word.
C Circle the correct preposition in each sentence.
1. l work for / as an arch|tect.
2. l work for / as an o|| company.
3. l work at / in the fash|on |ndustry.
4. l work in / on an off|ce.
5. l work with / by computers.
D Talk about your job or the job you want to do using the structures in Exercise C.
ExantIp: The examiner wiII probabIy aak you about work. Practiae aaying in
different waya what you do or wouId Iike to do. Uae a dictionary to find apeciaIiat
worda, but check with aomebody that you are uaing the worda properIy.
3
Worh
Speaking and Vocabulary
Th|s p|cture shows peop|e ... |ng. These peop|e work |n / on / for ...
Th|s |s a good job because ... l wou|d / wou|dn`t ||ke to do th|s job because ...
Th|s job |s easy / d|ff|cu|t / |nterest|ng / bor|ng because ...

IBLTS Tærget S.0 32

æ B c B
IELTS Target 5.0
Student's Book, sample tests and audio DVD. 978 1 85964 557 4
Workbook ................................................. 978 1 85964 576 5
Teacher’s Book ......................................... 978 1 85964 577 2
Interactive Course Book ............................ 978 1 85964 578 9
KEY FEATURES
• Comprehensive 240-hour
course
• General Training IELTS
ideal for students on
lower band scores
• Provides foundation for
further General Training
or Academic study
• Four sections provide
flexibility of use
• Clear, scaffolded activities
• Simplified and authentic
exam work
• Focus on real student
needs
• Includes Interactive
Course Book CD-ROM
UNITS INCLUDE:
• Life
• Learning
• Work
• Achievement
• Thoughts
• Place
• Movement
• Time
• Money
• Feelings
• Health
• Nature
• Construction
• Technology
45
extensive practice of IELTS activity types
common errors highlighted
for easy reference
www.garneteducation.com 46
KEY FEATURES
• Ideal exam preparation
for the Cambridge FCE
• Learner training component
for development of study
techniques
• Extensive coverage of
vocabulary, set phrases,
idioms and phrasal verbs
• Reading and listening
texts in a variety of genres,
topics and styles
• Pronunciation development
• Mapped to the Common
European Framework
• Full teaching notes
• Audio CDs

UNITS
• Travel and holidays
• Career and life choices
• The animal kingdom
• Education for everyone
• Art and culture
• Our fragile Earth
• People
• News and media
• A place to call home
• Technology
Get Ahead in FCE
Student's Book & audio CDs ....................... 978 1 85964 508 6
Workbook ....................................................978 1 85964 510 9
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 570 3
Get Ahead in FCE
Preparation for the Cambridge First Certificate in English
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
ANDREW BETSIS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVEL B2/IELTS 5.0–6.5
18
C|ass discussion
º What's the |ongest journey you've ever been on!
º What preparation did you have to make for the journey!
º What do you do to pass the time on a |ong journey!
Look at the two pictures be|ow. They show peop|e trave||ing. Compare and contrast these pictures and
say which person is probab|y enjoying their journey more and why.
Now |ook at the next two pictures. They show peop|e whose work invo|ves trave|. Compare and contrast
these pictures and say which job wou|d be more stressfu| and why.
º Do you |ike f|ying or are you nervous on p|anes!
º Do you have a phobia of something!
º Why do you think peop|e deve|op phobias!
Pairwork
5tudent A:
lmagihe your parIher has a phobia o! !lyihg ahd you wahI Io go oh holiday IogeIher abroad.
1ry Io persuade him or her IhaI !lyihg is sa!e ahd say why iI is Ihe besI way Io Iravel.
5tudent B:
You would like Io go abroad wiIh your !riehd buI you are a!raid o! !lyihg. Say why you are so
hervous ahd suggesI ahoIher way o! Iravellihg.
5peaking
19
U
n
it

1
T
r
a
v
e
|
a
n
d

H
o
|id
a
y
s
C|ass discussion
º What do you think about the idea of swapping your home with another fami|y as a ho|iday option!
º How wou|d you fee| about having a stranger s|eeping in your room!
º Wou|d you |eave a|| your persona| possessions out whi|e the other fami|y was |iving in your house!
º Wou|d you trust them to |ook after any pets that you may have!
Exercise A
You are going to read an artic|e about home-swapping ho|idays. 5even sentences have been removed from
the artic|e. Choose from the sentences (A-H) the one which fits each gap (1-7). There is one extra sentence
which you do not need to use.
l! you wahI Io Irade up, Ihe experIs advise SouIh A!rica, AusIralia, Cahada ahd Cali!orhia.
Make sure Io Iurh o!! all waIer ahd elecIriciIy supplies uhIil your sa!e reIurh !rom your holiday.
Doh'I !orgeI Io ih!orm heighbours ahd your home ihsurers.
1hey have all beeh di!!erehI buI hugely ehioyable.
1housahds o! 8riIs exchahge homes wiIh !amilies abroad, ahd hoI iusI Io save Ihe mohey.
No, we haveh'I gohe mad.
Ahd remember IhaI your Iravel ihsurahce woh'I re!uhd your !lighIs i! your swappers pull ouI.
l! you've goI small childreh, you probably woh'I wahI Io Irade wiIh a reIired couple.
Reading 3
ln !lese duys oí íus! llvlnv, lollduys luve become more
lmoor!un! !lun ever. we ull need !lme ou! !o reclurve our
bu!!erles. however, no! ull oí us luve !le soure cusl !o
Icrk cut on un exoenslve lollduy. hex! !lme you vo on loll
duy, low mucl would you llke !o ouy íor your uccommodu
!lon¹ how ubou! no!llnv u! ull¹
we're !ulklnv lollduy swuos. Jus! lund over !le
keys !o your be!cved bunvulow íor u week or !wo, und
move ln!o u vlllu ln Anduluclu, or un uour!men! ln Hunlu!!un.
l! reully ls us slmole us !lu! !o ve! !le lollduy oí your
dreums on u low budve! lí you ure oreoured !o le!
s!runvers s!uy ln your lome.
Huny suy !ley en}oy !le exoerlence oí s!eoolnv
ln!o somebody else's llíe und íeellnv our! oí u communl!y.
5cunds Iun - Rcw dc I start?
Severul uvencles luve websl!es on wllcl you cun brcwse
olc!ures oí !lousunds oí lomes. 0nce you're sold on !le
ldeu, you ouy u }olnlnv íee, wllcl ullows you !o uoloud your
own de!ulls und con!uc! o!ler members. 1le bes! ure lonv
es!ubllsled ooeru!ors sucl us homellnk ln!ernu!lonul
|www.lomellnk.orv.uk), wllcl lus 13,OOO members ln 65
coun!rles. l! clurves í115 u yeur und sends members u
65Oouve dlrec!ory !wlce annua!!y. 0!ler solld be!s lnclude
ln!ervuc |www.ln!er vuc.co.uk), wllcl lus 1O,OOO subscrlbers
wlo eucl ouy í75 u yeur, und home 8use hollduys
|www.lomebuselols.com), wllcl lus 3,OOO members und
clurves írom í29 oer unnum.
Where shcu!d I zc?
1yolcully, you could swuo u !wobedroom ílu! ln
London íor u !lreebedroom louse wl!l orlvu!e oool neur
Luoe 1own. Slor! breuks ure becomlnv more oooulur wl!l
swuooers. 1ry u weekend ln 8urcelonu or Ams!erdum wl!l
ou! ouylnv blvcl!y lo!el orlces.
What scrt cI pads are pcpu!ar?
All !yoes, ul!louvl oluces on !le !ourls! clrcul! sucl us
8u!l, ldlnburvl und !le Lo!swolds ure ulwuys ln demund.
Lon'! be emburrussed lí your oluce ls smull muny
Amerlcuns assume !lu! ull 8rl!lsl lomes ure !lny, und
en}oy s!uylnv somewlere 'qua!nt'. 1le key ls !o ílnd u
swuooer u! !le sume s!uve oí llíe, wl!l slmllur u!!l!udes.
1ley orobubly uren'! volnv !o luve !le íuclll!les
!lu! you ure used !o und muy need íor your íumlly. So, be
senslble wlen clooslnv your swuo. l'm sure you wouldn'!
íeel comíor!uble luvlnv your messy cllldren ln u oeríec!ly
decoru!ed ílu! wl!l exoenslve wll!e curoe!s.
Rcw dc I prepare?
ulve your oluce u !lorouvl cleun. we cun'! s!ress enouvl
low lmoor!un! !lls ls. Aí!er ull, you wouldn'! wun! !o !urn uo
on lollduy !o zrubby uccommodu!lon would you¹ lmo!y
!le írldve, cleur some wurdrobe und druwer souce, orovlde
!wo se!s oí cleun !owels und bedclo!les. wrl!e down some
useíul olone numbers und lns!ruc!lons on se!!lnv !le burvlur
ulurm.

Home-swapping boIidavs
Andrew Betsis
Get ahead in
Student’s Book
NEW
www.garneteducation.com 47
KEY FEATURES
• Reflects the actual level
of difficulty of the revised
format of the FCE
• Includes all five papers
of the FCE Test: Reading,
Writing, Use of English,
Listening and Speaking
• The tests have been trialled
under real exam conditions
with FCE candidates
• A wide range of
thematically-based units
help students build the
vocabulary required
• Audio recordings are
presented in the same
format as the Listening
exam
UNITS
• Travel & Holidays
• Jobs
• Art & Culture
• Health
• Sport
• Entertainment & Leisure
• Food
• The Environment
• Education
• Homes & Houses
Succeed in Cambridge FCE: 10 Practice Tests
Student's Book & audio CDs (x5) ................ 978 1 85964 509 3
Teacher’s Book ............................................978 1 85964 511 6
Succeed in Cambridge FCE: 10 Practice Tests
10 complete practice tests for the Revised Cambridge FCE
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
ANDREW BETSIS • UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVEL B2/IELTS 5.0–6.5
t d ti 447
Andrew Betsis
Succeed in Cambridge
10 Practice Tests
Student’s Book
NEW
13
Paper 2: Writing
P
r
a
c
t
i
c
e

T
e
s
t

1
12
Paper 2: Writing
P
r
a
c
t
i
c
e

T
e
s
t

1
need informofion obouf fhe occommodofion
Yes, sounds funl
Yes, buf nof
firsf week.
brofher's
weddinq
onswer ond
qive reosons
Are fhere
veqeforion meoIs7
... I :c. !|. : cJ.c-!. :c~cc! ccJ !|coo|! .c cco|J oc !|. : :o~~c-!
w|c! Jc ,co !|. c|´ I! :c,: !c- c.c-, !.c cJo|!:, c c|. |J ccc oc !- c c.
Lc ,co .cc! !c c-. co ,co- |. !!|c :. :!c-´ I |c.c !o|, c!! .c-|. /- c
,co !- c c !|cc´ ¯|c cJ.c-!. :c~cc! Jcc: cc! ~cc!. cc |c. ~cc, Jc,:
!|c c!!c- . : !c-, :c ~c,cc . !´: oc !c o:. I´~ oc. co !c cc|| !|c~ !c
!. cJ co! :c~c ~c- c . c!c-~c!. cc :c cc. I: !|c- c cc,!|. co ,co .cc!
~c- c . c!c-~c!. cc ccco! !|c! ,co .cc! ~c !c c:| !|c~´ I .. || cc
.c. !. co !c |cc- .|c! ,co !|. c|!
Paper 2: Writing
Writing
You answer this question. Write your answer in 120~150 words in an appropriate sty|e.
Your Lng|lsb-speaklng lrlend Tlmotby bas sent you a
|etter suggestlng tbat you go on bo|lday togetber to
Dlsney|and Parls. He bas enc|osed an advertlsement.
Carelu||y read bls |etter, tbe advertlsement and tbe
notes you bave made. Tben wrlte a |erre· to Tlmotby
uslng a|| your notes. You must use grammatlca||y correct
sentences wltb accurate spe||lng and punctuatlon ln
a sty|e approprlate lor tbe sltuatlon.
Paper 2: Writing
Write an answer to of the questions 2~4 in this part. Write your answer in 120~180 words
in an appropriate sty|e.
You bave been asked to wrlte an artlc|e lor a |oca| paper about tbe posltlve and negatlve ellects ol tourlsm
on your country. Wrlte tbe a·r|c|e, glvlng your oplnlon on tbls subject.
You bave been lnvlted to wrlte a sbort story lor a magazlne. Tbe sre·, must eltber begln or end wltb tbe words:
| knew |r was ze|nz re he a |enz and d||||ca|r ¡ea·ne,.
Wrlte a |erre· to a lrlend descrlblng a bo|lday you bave bad wblcb was partlcu|ar|y nlce or bad. Say wby you |lked
or dls|lked lt and wbat bappened to you.
Wrlte your a·r|c|e, sre·, or |erre· bere.
ACCOMMO1AI1ON 1NC11111
0N£ IR££ M£AL A BAY
F|iqhts avai|ab|c most daus oí thc wcck.
Fer every twe zdultr. ene rhild geer freell
{limited peried enly)
¥irit: Nirkey. 0enzld. 6eefy. 8zmbi. $new White. etr.
BI8N£YLANB PARI8 - 8P£6IAL 0II£R
Wrlte an artlcle Ior
We need art¡cIes Irom our readers about
the eIIect oI tour¡sm on the¡r country.
So wr¡te your art¡cIe now and send ¡t to
us at The T¡mes as soon as poss¡bIe!
www.garneteducation.com 48
KEY FEATURES
• Comprehensive listening
and speaking exam
practice with full grammar
and vocabulary support
• Eight lessons for each
grade, available in separate
books or a combined
edition
• Each lesson focuses on
one of the conversational
subjects in the revised
Trinity syllabus
• Colourful pictures and
illustrations to help young
students to talk about
subjects that motivate and
interest them
• Expert examination advice
for achieving success
LESSONS INCLUDE:
GRADE 1
• What's your name?
• Open the door
• What colour is it?
GRADE 2
• Days of the week
• In the family
• Friends
Talking Trinity: Initial Stage
Student’s Book Grade 1 .............................. 978 1 85964 731 8
Student’s Book Grade 2 .............................. 978 1 85964 732 5
Student’s Book Grade 3 .............................. 978 1 85964 733 2
Student’s Book (Combined Grades 1–3) ..... 978 1 85964 709 7
Teacher’s Book (Combined Grades 1–3) ......978 1 85964 710 3
CD (Combined Grades 1–3) .........................978 1 85964 712 7
Not for sale in Italy or Canton Ticino, Switzerland
Talking Trinity: Initial Stage
Test preparation material for the international Trinity ESOL spoken examinations, which are taken in over 60 countries around the world
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
JEREMY WALENN • BEGINNER TO PRE-INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A1 TO A2/IELTS 2.0–3.5
r
te
d
e
GRADE 3
• What do you study?
• Tell me about your town
• Where is your classroom?
www.garneteducation.com 49
KEY FEATURES
• Comprehensive listening
and speaking exam
practice with full grammar
and vocabulary support
• Eight lessons for each
grade, available in separate
books or a combined
edition
• Each lesson focuses on
one of the conversational
subjects in the revised
Trinity syllabus
• Colourful pictures and
illustrations to help young
students to talk about
subjects that motivate and
interest them
• Expert examination advice
for achieving success
LESSONS INCLUDE:
GRADE 4
• School's out
• Memorable meals
• Shop around
GRADE 5
• Dream machines
• Going for gold
• Present time
Talking Trinity: Elementary Stage
Student’s Book Grade 4 .............................. 978 1 85964 734 9
Student’s Book Grade 5 .............................. 978 1 85964 735 6
Student’s Book Grade 6 .............................. 978 1 85964 736 3
Student’s Book (Combined Grades 4–6) ..... 978 1 85964 739 4
Teacher’s Book (Combined Grades 4–6) ......978 1 85964 716 5
CD (Combined Grades 4–6) .........................978 1 85964 718 9
Not for sale in Italy or Canton Ticino, Switzerland
Talking Trinity: Elementary Stage
Test preparation material for the international Trinity ESOL spoken examinations, which are taken in over 60 countries around the world
TESTING AND
EXAMINATIONS
JEREMY WALENN • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.5–5.0
r
e
d
e
49
GRADE 6
• Season tickets
• What on earth ... ?
• Wild dreams
www.garneteducation.com 50
Fast Track to Reading: Accelerated Learning for EFL and ESOL Students
An accelerated reading programme for adult learners of English unfamiliar with the Roman alphabet
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
PETER VINEY • BEGINNER: CEF LEVEL A1/IELTS 2.0–3.0
KEY FEATURES
• Designed to facilitate
decoding of Roman script
• For students who are learning to
read in English and for students
who cannot cope with reading
at speed
• Accelerates learning in a
programmed manner
• Can be used in parallel with
a simple starter-level English
course
• Contains global reading
to enhance relevance and
motivation
• Audio CDs for further self-
study or homework
• Comprehensive teaching notes
• Introduction in four different
languages: Arabic, Farsi,
Mandarin and Urdu
19
ĐĂŶ &$1 can cat con
TOP-UP ƚŽƉͲƵƉ TIPUP Top-up 1ŽƉͲuƉ
mug MUG ŵƵŐ gum 0UG
ŚƵƚ NUT NUT Nut nut
&UP CuÞ Cup ĐƵƉ cop
ĂƚƉĞŶŵĂƉƚĞŶŶŽƚ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
ĐĂŶĐĂƉĐŽƉĐƵƚĐŽŐĐƵƉ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
ŵƵŐŵĂĚŵĞŶŵĂƉŵŝĚ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
ĚŽŐĚŝŵĚĞŶĚĂŵĚĂŶ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
ŚĂĚŚŝŵŚĂƚŚŽƚŚƵŐŚƵƚ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
con up did hod nof qof Iof him Ief
.,; +0+ /04 *(5 65 05 <7 0; .6;
$1 ,1 21 83 *27 +,0 &$1 /27 /(7 ','
at am in it up get can got get did let up can
8
ϲ
IŝŶĚ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌĚƐ
ϳ
IŝŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĚŝĨĨĞƌĞŶƚ
ǁŽƌĚ
ϵ J
kĞĂĚ ŬĞLJ ǁŽƌĚƐ
ϴ
5ĞƉĂƌĂƚĞ ƚŚĞ
ǁŽƌĚƐ
ĐƵƉ CA1 ƚŽƉͲƵƉ ŐƵŵ
u C
ĐƵƚ ŚƵŐ
at pen map ten not
ϮϬϭϬ lllA WŽƌůĚ CƵƉ
SŽƵƚŚ AĨƌŝĐĂΡ
18
8
J ϭ
kĞĂĚ ĂŶĚ ƐĂLJ
J Ϯ
NƵŵďĞƌ ĨƌŽŵ
ϭʹϳ
J ϯ
LŝƐƚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŝĐŬ
ϰ
1ƌĂĐĞ ĂŶĚ ǁƌŝƚĞ
ϱ
kĞĂĚ ĂŶĚ ůĂďĞů
1 Ƶ 2 U 3 Đ 4 C
1 Ƶ 2 Đ 3 Ă 4 ŝ 5 Ƶ 6 Ž 7 Ƶ 8 Ğ 9 Đ
10 W11 Ě 12 Đ 13 ǀ 14 C 15 G 16 1 17 G 18 C
19 U 20 C
1 ƵƉ 2 ĐĂŶ 3 ĐĂƉ 4 ĐĂƚ 5 ĐŽŐ 6 ĐŽƚ 7 ĐƵƉ 8 ĐƵƚ 9 ŐƵŵ
10 ŐƵŶ 11 ŚƵŐ 12 ŚƵƚ 13 ŵƵĚ 14 ŵƵŐ 15 ŶƵƚ
1 ƉŽƉ 2 ƉƵƉ 3 ĐĂŶ 4 ĐĂƉ 5 ŚŽŐ 6 ŚƵŐ 7 ǀĂƚ 8 ĐĂƚ
9 ŐƵŵ 10 ƵƉ 11 ŵƵŐ 12 ŵƵĚ 13 ŶŽƚ 14 ŶƵƚ 15 ŚƵƚ 16 ŚŽƚ
17 ƚƵŐ 18 ĐƵƚ 19 ĐƵƉ 20 ĐŽƉ
ŵƵŐ ŐƵŵ ŵƵĚ ŚƵŐ ĐŽŐ ŚƵƚ ŶƵƚ
ĐƵƉ ƵƉ ĐŽƚ ĐĂƚ ĐĂƉ ĐĂŶ ĐƵƚ
ƉŽƉ ƉƵƉ ŚŽŐ ŚƵƚ
ĐĂƉ ĐĂƚ ŵƵĚ ŵƵŐ
ŚƵŐ ŚŽŐ ŽƉ ƵƉ
ŐƵŵ ŐƵŶ ĐƵƉ ĐƵƚ
ƚƵŐ ƚĂŐ ĐŽƚ ĐƵƚ
ŶŽƚ ŶƵƚ ŚƵƚ ŚƵŐ
ƚŽƉ ƵƉ ƚŝƉ ƵƉ ƉŽƉ ƵƉ ƚŽƉ ƵƉ
nuf con qum cup muq
ͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺ

u C
ŵƵŐ ŶƵƚ ĐƵƉ ŐƵŵ ƚŝŶ
1 2 3 4 5
ƵƉ
activities link sound and script
variety of text types
for real-world reading
NEW
For learners unfamiliar
with the Roman alphabet
Peter Viney started teaching
English in 1971. He is the co-author
of many popular textbook
series in both British English
and American English, including
Streamline and IN English. He
has also co-authored thirteen video
courses and is the author of self-
study video-led materials. Peter was
series editor of the Storylines series
of graded readers, for which he has
written many graded readers. He
has maintained a major interest in
extensive reading. In the 1980s, he
co-wrote Learn English Handwriting
and Basic English Reading
Programme – designed to teach
initial writing and reading to
students from non-Roman alphabet
cultures. Peter has recently
revisited this area and the result
is Fast Track to Reading.
www.garneteducation.com 51
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
Fast Track to Reading
Course Book & audio CDs (x5) .................... 978 1 85964 489 8
Teacher’s Book & flashcards CD-ROM ........978 1 85964 513 0
TOPICS INCLUDE
• Numbers
• One-sound, one-letter
combinations
• More common regular and
irregular representations
of sounds and groups of
sounds, including vowels
and diphthongs
• Work on vowels alternating
with work on consonants
69
ϱ
kĞĂĚ ĂŶĚ ůĂďĞů
ϳ
IŝŶĚ ǁŽƌĚƐ ĨƌŽŵ
UŶŝƚ ϯϯ
ϴ J
kĞĂĚ͕ ƚŚĞŶ ůŝƐƚĞŶ
ĂŶĚ ĐŚĞĐŬ
ϲ
MĂƚĐŚ ƚŚĞ ƐĂŵĞ
ǁŽƌĚƐ
33
8 C L 8 C W A

ĨŽƌŬ ƐĐŽƌĞ ĚŽŽƌ ĨŽƵƌ ƚŽƌĐŚ
1 2 3 4 5
law your GRRU born
prawn saw ďŽƌŶ sporf
ODZQ four poor VKRUW
sow LAW more ĚŽŽƌ
ĨŽƵƌ SUDZQ sport MORE
your ůĂǁŶ SHORT poor
N I L C C k I n
M C k N I N G k
8 U I C M C k L
D k A W L k 5 ¥
2 Þ W k A 1 A C
8 C k N W n W U
M C 5 C C k L k
Þ k A W N Þ A W
4 I4 Ib Io I7 I9
four fourfeen fiffeen sixfeen sevenfeen ninefeen
cor / o Ford cor / four doors / o four-door cor / o four-door Ford cor
your cor / your four-door cor / o sporfs cor / o four-door sporfs cor
born / born of down / born in fhe morninq / I wos born in Moy.
sweefcorn / eof sweefcorn / prowns / sweefcorn ond prowns
o sform/ roin ond sform/ Iow/ courf / o Iowcourf / in o Iowcourf
1 ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
2 ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ
A ĨŽƵƌͲĚŽŽƌ IŽƌĚ ĐĂƌ
ϵ J
DŝĐƚĂƚŝŽŶ
68
1 Ž 2 ŽŽ 3 ŽĂ 4 Žƌ 5 ŽƌĞ
6 ŽŽƌ 7 Ăǁ
1 Žƌ 2 ĨŽƌ 3 ŵŽƌĞ 4 ĚŽŽƌ
5 ƐĂǁ н 6 LJŽƵƌ 7 ĨŽƵƌ
1 ďŽƌŶ 2 ĨŽƌŬ 3 ŵŽƌŶŝŶŐ 4 ƐŚŽƌƚ 5 ƐŽƌƚ 6 ƐƉŽƌƚ 7 ƐƚŽƌŵ
8 ƚŽƌĐŚ 9 ĐŽƌĞ 10 ĐŚŽƌĞ 11 ƐĐŽƌĞ 12 ƐƚŽƌĞ 13 ƐǁŽƌĞ 14 ƉŽŽƌ
15 ŵŽŽƌ 16 ĨůŽŽƌ 17 ĨŽƵƌ 18 LJŽƵƌ 19 ůĂǁ 20 ũĂǁ 21 ƐĂǁ 22 ĚƌĂǁ
23 ĚĂǁŶ 24 ƉƌĂǁŶ 25 ůĂǁŶ
1 ŵŽƌĞ 2 ŵŽŽƌ 3 ŵŽƌŶŝŶŐ 4 ƐĂǁ 5 ƐǁŽƌĞ 6 ƐƚŽƌŵ 7 ůĂǁ
8 ůĂǁŶ 9 ďŽƌŶ 10 ĚƌĂǁŶ 11 ƉƌĂǁŶ 12 ũĂǁ 13 LJŽƵƌ 14 ĨŽƌ
15 ĨŽƵƌ 16 ĨůŽŽƌ 17 ƚŽƌĐŚ 18 ĐŚŽƌĞ 19 IŽƌĚ
ĨŽƵƌ ĨŽƌŬ ƐĐŽƌĞ ũĂǁ ĐŚŽƌĞ ƐƚŽƌĞ LJŽƵƌ

ƉŽŽƌ ďŽƌŶ ƐƉŽƌƚ ƐƉŽƚ ƐŚŽƌƚ ƐŽƌƚ ƐŚŽƚ
ƐƉŽƌƚ ƐŽƌƚ ƐŚŽƌĞ ƐŚŽƌƚ
ƉŽƚ ƉŽƌƚ ƐŚŽƌƚ ƐŚŽƚ
ůĂǁ ůĂǁŶ ƉƌĂǁŶ ƉŽŽƌ
ĨŽƌŬ ĨŽƵƌ ĐŽƌĞ ĐŚŽƌĞ
LJŽƵƌ ũĂǁ ĚƌĂǁ ĚŽŽƌ
ƐƉŽƚ ƐƉŽƌƚ ƐĂǁ ƐƚŽƌĞ
ĨůŽŽƌ ĨŽƌ Žƌ Ğƌ
for born more morninq sow
ͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺͺ ͺͺͺͺͺͺ
J ϭ
kĞĂĚ ĂŶĚ ƐĂLJ
J Ϯ
NƵŵďĞƌ ĨƌŽŵ
ϭʹϳ
J ϯ
LŝƐƚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŝĐŬ
ϰ
1ƌĂĐĞ ĂŶĚ ǁƌŝƚĞ
33
8 C L 8 C W A
koger 5cott
w|th Anna Þh||||ps
wltb oo lottoJoctloo bv letet vloev
l A S 1
1 8 A C k
1 C
8 L A u l n C
AcceleraLed Learnlna for
LlL and LSCL SLudenLs
1eacher's 8ook
t d ti 51 5
oottoJJoocttloooo bbvv le etet v vloev
LlL LlL and and LSCL LSCL SLu SLudenL denLss
1each 1eacher's er s 8ook 8ook
55cottt
aa Þh|| |||p ps
Þeter V|ney
l A S 1
1 8 A C k
1 C
8 L A u l n C
AcceleraLed Learnlna for
LlL and LSCL SLudenLs
Course 8ook
68
Ĩ

ͺͺ
J Ϯ
NƵŵďĞƌ ĨƌŽŵ
ϭʹϳ
J ϯ
LŝƐƚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŝĐŬ
ϰ
1ƌĂĐĞ ĂŶĚ ǁƌŝƚĞ
>C<
>CE
>GE
>C=
8
8
8
8
printable flashcards on
Teachers CD-ROM
www.garneteducation.com 52
KEY FEATURES
• Fun activities focusing on
words and grammar based
around engaging stories
and poems
• Each unit focuses on
one grammar point
• Activities encourage
listening, speaking, reading
and writing
• Can be used individually
or in small groups and with
mixed-ability
• Versions for ESOL and EFL
• Suitable for use with
interactive whiteboards
• Accompanying teacher’s
guide
CONTENTS
• Five levels to suit all
students
• Each level has twelve units
• Each unit has ten activity
types
• Over 600 activities
comprising well over
200 hours of classroom
material over five levels
Language Garden
Go to www.garneteducation.com to see more and purchase
your licence.
Language Garden
An interactive grammar-based online resource for children, EFL and ESOL learners
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
DAVID WARR • BEGINNER TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A1 TO B2/IELTS 2.0–5.0+
EXAMPLE TEXT
The old man, the wise old man
lived by himself.
He lived in peace by himself.
He lived by a stony path,
a steep, stony path,
in an old hut,
an old wooden hut
on the edge of a mountain
on the side of a great mountain,
a great, snowy mountain.
“Beautifully designed and a real
original way of using technology to
promote effective use of the lexical
approach and language chunking.”
British Council Innovation Award (ELTONS) judges
&KLOGUHQ
()/
(62/
NEW
www.garneteducation.com 53
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
MICHAEL MACFARLANE • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0–4.0+
English Practice Grammar
A popular format with teachers for classroom or self-study use
39
1 Write the verbs inpositive or negative forms.
Examples: The film ___________ at 8.00. (start)
It ______________ until 11.00. (not / finish)
1 I’ve hidden the presents, so the children
__________________ them. (not / find)
2 The bridge __________________ the river here. (cross)
3 The road __________________ until next year. (not /open)
4 Ask the boys. They ____________ the job for you. (do)
5 Paul _______________ 20 until next year. (not / be)
2 Complete the offers and promises with
positive or negative forms of these verbs.
be, buy, close, forget, look after, lose, make, wash
Example: Please look after my jewellery.
Don’t worry. I _______________ it. OR
Don’t worry. I ____________ it.
1 We haven’t got any milk.
All right. I ____________ some at the shop.
2 Be sure to get there on time.
Don’t worry. I _______________ late.
3 The car is very dirty.
OK. I _______________ it.
4 Look, the windows are open.
All right. I _______________ them.
5 Try to get everything right this time.
No problem. I __________________ any mistakes.
6 Remember to take this letter and post it.
Don’t worry. I _____________________ it.
3 Complete the answers with these verbs.
Use the correct pronouns.
be, carry, cut, get, give, phone
Example: Please give your parents a call.
Yes, ____________ them now.
1 Is Simon at work now?
No, not yet. _______________ to the office at 9.00.
2 I’m thirsty.
Ask Sue. __________________ you a Pepsi.
3 This case is very heavy.
Give it to me. _______________ it for you.
4 Dad’s very late.
Don’t worry. ____________ home soon.
5 We need some wood for the fire.
OK. ____________ some pieces now.
4 Write questions and short answers.
Example: (Joe / win/ the competition) (No)
_________________________________
_______________
1 (Ann/ be / ten next week) (Yes)
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
2 (the boys / like / their new school) (No)
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
3 (Mr Hall / arrive / tonight) (Yes)
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
4 (next term/ start / on 15th April) (No)
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
5 Write the verbs in the correct forms.
Luke and his friends are planning a class river trip.
Luke: Here’s my idea. We _________ some boats and go
up the river. (take)
Andy: OK, but how much ______________ (it /cost)
Luke: I don’t know. I 1_______________ the boat
company and ask. (phone) But I’m sure it
2_______________ too expensive. (not / be)
Andy: 3____________________________________ to go?
(everybody/want)
Luke: Yes, I’m sure they 4_________
Tony: What 5________________________ to take?
(we / need)
Luke: We 6__________________ take a picnic. (have to)
Andy: 7_____________________ raincoats? (we/need)
Luke: No, we 8____________ Don’t worry. The TV
weatherman says we 9_______________ a lovely day
tomorrow, and he promises it 10_________________
(have) (not/rain)
will start
won’ t finish
’ ll look after
won ’t lose
I’ ll phone
Will Joe win the competition?
No, he won’ t.
’ ll take
will it cost?
38
Future with will Exercises
People will live in space.
Use will to express future facts.
Samwill be 20 next month. The newroad will be eight lanes wide.
Use will to predict something in the future – something that you know or
believe will happen.
One day soon people will live in space.
Don’t worry! I’m sure you’ll pass your exams.
Use will to say what you decide to do at the time of speaking.
I’ve left the window open. I’ll go back and close it.
Use will to offer, promise or threaten to do something.
That looks heavy. I’ll help you. I promise I won’t be late.
Use will to ask somebody to do something and to agree or refuse to do it.
Will you post this card for me? Yes, I’ll post it on my way home.
We use will to predict the future, so we often use it with words such as
sure, certain, probably, definitely and certainly. Note that the ly words
change position in will and won’t sentences.
He’ll definitely love Rome. He probably won’t want to come home.
Do not use will to express plans and arrangements.
I can’t see you tomorrow as I’m visiting /going to visit my parents.
( not will visit)
will often goes with verbs like expect, think and know.
I expect I’ll be late home tonight.
I don’t think he’ll agree to the idea.
We sometimes use shall/shall not (shan’t) instead of will/will not, but only with
I or we. We usually use it for suggestions, offers and asking for instructions or
suggestions.
You look terrible! Shall we call a doctor?
I’ve finished this job. What shall I do next?
15
One day soon
people will live
in space.
Statements Yes / No questions
I will start. Will I start?
u o y u o Y
He will not he
e h s e h S
t i t I
e w e W
y e h t y e h T
Wh questions Full answers
When will they build the They will start soon.
space station?
Where will the station be? It will be between the
Earth and the Moon.
Short forms: I/you/he/she/it/we/they will = I’ll,
you’ll, he’ll, she’ll, it’ll, we’ll, they’ll will not = won’t
FORMS
Network in comfort
You will find that we’ve put in place all the facilities you need
to make TECHPRO both pleasant and productive. Visitor lounges and catering facilities throughout the show will give
you the chance to catch your breath and plan the next stage of your visit.
The all-new TECHPRO TV will be constantly delivering
fast-breaking news from all around the show and its features, as well as providing reports on local traffic and weather conditions via a giant video wall in Hall 2.
TECHPRO Electronics
17-19 March 1998 NEC Birmingham, UK
21st
CENTURY
TECHNOLOGY
The new century will
bring many changes
to the way peopl e
work. The growi ng
use of i nformati on
technology will mean
that more and more
people can work from
home. This in turn will
change the pattern of
transportation. The
morni ng rush hour
will soon be a thing of
the past.
New Relationships
Dr Arthur Brookes
This book will definitely
change your life
KEY FEATURES
• Easy-to-use and
straightforward layout
enables students to find
information quickly
• Grammatical points
illustrated by authentic
examples from everyday life
• Perfect for self-study and
classroom use
• Available with and without
answer key
• Appendix includes irregular
verbs, pronunciation and
spelling tips

“... learner-friendly, comprehensive
and affordable.”
Sandie Warren, Concorde International
English Practice Grammar
International Edition (with answers) ............ 978 1 85964 131 6
International Edition (without answers) ....... 978 1 85964 703 5
French Edition (with answers) .....................978 1 85964 110 1
t d ti 53 5
explanations
and authentic
examples
illustrated
grammar
situations
example answers to help students
everyday examples in context enable
students to see grammar at work
www.garneteducation.com 54
ESOL Practice Grammar: Entry Levels 1–2
Essential grammar support for ESOL students
DAVID KING • BEGINNER TO PRE-INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A1 TO A2/IELTS 2.0–4.0
ESOL Practice Grammar
Entry Levels 1–2 ..........................................978 1 85964 472 0
KEY FEATURES
• 30 units matching
ESOL curriculum
• Graded practice activities
• Focus on language patterns
• Contextualized language
• Communicative interaction
and genuine language
development
• Database of essential
topic-based vocabulary
• For class study, self-study
or home reference
• Includes full answer key
UNITS INCLUDE
• the verb be 1
• the verb be 2
• the present continuous
• present simple 1
• present simple 2
• imperatives
• question words
• modal verbs
• have got
• quantity 1
• quantity 2
• nouns
• articles
• the definite article
• demonstratives
• pronouns
+(
K
i
[

_
d

Y
e
d
j
[
n
j
:WjWXWi['(
'+
j^_i%j^Wj%j^[i[%j^ei[
Z[cedijhWj_l[i
±j^[i[Wh[cojmei_ij[hi$
Jasmeena is showing Ling some family
photographs. Look at the green words.
B_d]0 M^e½i j^_i5
@Wic[[dW0 J^_i _i cocej^[h WdZ
j^[i[ Wh[cojme
i_ij[hi$
B_d]0 7dZ m^Wj WXekj j^Wj
ebZ f^eje el[h j^[h[5
M^e½i j^Wj5
@Wic[[dW0 E^" j^ei[ jme f[efb[
Wh[ co ]hWdZfWh[dji"
WdZ j^Wj oekd] ]_hb _i
co cej^[h

M^[dZem[ki[j^_i%j^Wj%j^[i[%j^ei[5
fW][/.
"
Complete the sentences using this, that, these or those.
1 For things and people near to us, we use j^_i for one thing or person and _______________
for two or more things or people.
2 For things and people not very near to us, we use _______ for one thing or person
and __________ for two or more things or people.
@Wic[[dW
Kd_j'+0j^_i%j^Wj%j^[i[%j^ei[ +)
FhWYj_Y[
1
Circle the correct option.

Please give me that / those plate.
a Can you move this / these chair for me, please?
b Whose are that / those glasses?
c Do you like this / these jeans?
d What’s the name of this / these vegetable?
e This / These is my friend Ibrahim.
f A: Hello, who’s that / those?
B: This / These is Petra here. May I speak to Jan?
g I’d like one of that / those cakes, please.
h This / These fish isn’t fresh.
i I like this / that car over there on the other side of the road.
2
Surinder works with old people in a care home. Write the correct word: this / that / these / those.


Can you help me with j^_i coat? a Are ____________ your glasses?
b Can you get me ____________ stick? c Would you like some of ____________ soup?
Kd_j'+0j^_i%j^Wj%j^[i[%j^ei[
lively illustrations provide
contextual support
all grammar points embedded within familiar conversational topics
“Such is the book’s attractiveness, as
well as its pedagogic thoroughness
and efficiency, that it has a lot to
offer for anyone studying English
grammar.”
Anna Cowper, Freelance Consultant Editor
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
www.garneteducation.com 55
ESOL Practice Grammar: Entry Level 3
Essential grammar support for ESOL students
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
DAVID KING • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0–5.0
“Incredibly useful – hands-on,
quick to pick up and
work through.”
Gloucestershire College
of Arts & Technology
“The example contexts
apply nicely to my ESOL
learners’ experiences.”
Lorraine Collett,
Community English School, Oxford
ESOL Practice Grammar
Entry Level 3 .................................... 978 1 85964 897 1
KEY FEATURES
• Grammar handbook for
ESOL Entry Level 3 students
• 26 units on the key grammar
structures
• Two-page units covering
each grammar point, with
explanation and discovery-
learning activities for the
form and usage, followed
by practice exercises
• Comprehensive key with
explanatory notes
UNITS INCLUDE
• Linking words
• Defining relative clauses
• Word order
• Gerunds and infinitives
• Simple reported statements
• Making questions
• Noun phrases
• Determiners
• Articles, definite and indefinite
• Tenses
• Zero and first conditionals
• Modal verbs
• Adjectives, comparatives
and superlatives
• Common phrasal verbs
• Prepositions and
prepositional phrases
• Discourse markers
Unit 7 – Present perfect 3: present perfect or past simple? 20
Complete these sentences with a verb from the box, using present perfect or past simple.
see visit have do go begin lose prepare miss wash up start
Oh dear! I’ve just missed my train!
1 A: you ever Shanghai?
B: Yes, I there last year.
2 A: When you doing karate?
B: I having lessons a year ago.
3 A: What’s the matter with Ling?
B: She her contact lens.
4 Ismail already the meal but he n’t yet.
5 A: you that programme about Somalia on the TV last night?
B: No, I n’t.
6 Vera her present cat for five years.
7 A: you your homework?
B: Yes, I it before I to work this morning.
Circle the best choice to complete this story about Hamid.
Hamid has just come / just came back fromPakistan. He has been / went there for a three-week
holiday. When he has been / was in Pakistan he has visited / visited all his relatives and he had /
has had a really great time.
He has been / went home to Pakistan three times since / for he first has come / came to live in
England two years since / ago.
He has only arrived / only arrived back in England last weekend but he has already phoned /
already phoned Rafiq to tell him about his holiday. However, he hasn’t unpacked / didn’t unpack
and he hasn’t done / didn’t do all his washing yet / ago.
Work with a classmate. Ask and answer questions about Hamid. Choose present perfect or
past simple.
Where / he / be?
Where has he been?
He’s been to Pakistan.
a How long / he / stay / Pakistan ?
b What / he / do / Pakistan?
c How many times / he / be / Pakistan?
d When / he / come / live / England?
e When / he / arrive back?
f What / he / do / since / he / come back?
g What / he not / do / yet?
4
3
2
Use in context 1
When do we use past simple or present
perfect?
Look at the conversations and write
“past simple” or “present perfect” next
to these points.
• at some time in your life (ever)
• questions with When
• finished, past times (last summer)
• finished situations (before I moved to
Crawley)
• continuing situations (For about six
months now)
• situations where you can see a present
change
Present perfect 3:
present perfect or past simple?
7
Look at the words in bold in this conversation.
Gurinder: Have you ever been to
Scotland?
Rafiq: Yes, I have.
Gurinder: When did you go?
Rafiq: I was there last summer. I went to
Edinburgh. That was after I left London.
Gurinder: How long did you live in
London?
Rafiq: For about eighteen months before I
moved to Crawley.
Gurinder: And how long have you been
a taxi driver?
Rafiq: For about six months now.
19 Unit 7 – Present perfect 3: present perfect or past simple?
Practice
We often use six of these words and phrases with the past simple and six with the present
perfect. Write them in the best column.
When? this week last Tuesday yet just What time? since
yesterday ago already ever last week
1
Gurinder
Rafiq
present perfect
Past simple Present perfect
yet
Where’s he been?
t d ti 55 55
discovery-learning activities make grammar
learning more memorable and worthwhile
www.garneteducation.com 56
KEY FEATURES
• High-frequency idioms
chosen specifically for
their lexical value in
the workplace
• Vivid illustrations show
literal representation of
idioms for high impact
and retention
• Ten six-page sections
comprising: activity
cards, definitions, reading
consolidation using
simulated newspaper
articles, revision activities
• Twenty suggested activity
types for exploiting material
• Resource section
containing further
background information,
answer keys, index and
templates for devising
more activity cards
• Ideal for complementing
functional course books
• Ideal as both fun and
purposeful filler activities
TYPES OF ACTIVITIES
• Picture match
• Find the definition
• Matching pairs
• Memory game
• Happy families
How Idioms Work
Resource Book ............................................ 978 1 85964 554 3
How Idioms Work
A resource book for building students’ idiomatic language skills
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
YVONNE CLARKE, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY MARTIN JONES • INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED: CEF LEVELS B1 TO C1/IELTS 4.0–7.0
NEW
g
y
al
5ection ±
Idiom Summary 1
Bite the bu||et: muke vourself do or uccepL someLhlng dlfflculL or unpleusunL
Bend someone's ear: ouesLlon someone ln deLull ubouL someLhlng
Oraq your hee|s: deul wlLh someLhlng slowlv, becuuse vou don'L wunL Lo do lL
A finqer in every pie: be lnvolved lnllnfluence munv dlfferenL ucLlvlLles
Eat your words: udmlL LhuL someLhlng vou suld wus wrong
Hit the nai| on the head: descrlbe exucLlv whuL ls cuuslng u problemlslLuuLlon
Oraw a |ine under it: flnlsh Lulklng ubouL u Loplc und noL refer Lo lL uguln
Make a mountain out of a mo|ehi||:
keep your hair on:
Put a|| your eqqs in one basket:
keep somethinq under wraps:
An uphi|| struqq|e: u dlfflculL slLuuLlon becuuse someLhlnglsomeone ls cuuslng vou problems
Ruff|e someone's feathers: muke someone ungrvl unnoved
5kate on thin ice: Luke u blg rlsk
Bury your head in the sand: refuse Lo Lhlnk ubouLldeul wlLh u slLuuLlon
5ection ±

5ection ±

fluence munv dlfferenL ucLlvlLles
g vou suld wus wrong
ucLlv whuL ls cuuslng u problemlslLuuLlon
bouL u Loplc und noL refer Lo lL uguln
u problems
someone ungrvl unnoved
use Lo Lhlnk ubouLldeul wlLh u slLuuLlon
5ection ±

Newspaper arrIeIes
Victory for
consumers in
bank charges
test case
Britain's biggest banks today
lost a landmark test case at the
High Court over unauthorised
overdraft charges….
Doug Taylor, personal finance
campaigns manager at Which?
[magazine] said.'This whole saga
has severely damaged the reputation
of the UK`s high street banks. If they
appeal, drag their heels in refunding
their customers or try to introduce
back-door charges to recoup their
losses, their customers will see this
as adding insult to injury.¨
TImes 0nIIne zi Aprll, zoo8
Prince must
eat his words`
on GM crops
Sir, As much as I respect the
Prince of Wales`s knowledge of the
agricultural issues this country faces,
I feel he is being naive in damning
genetically modified foods (report,
August 13) .There are already
many millions of farmers worldwide
growing genetically modified crops
and millions of people eating GM
food, with no ill-effects. We need
to accept that we no longer live in a
world where fresh food is plentiful
and readily available. We need to
cast aside our fears and biases and
realise that GM food is the only way
to ensure that we can feed the world.
Lerrer trom $rruan $revenson,
MEP BrusseIs, Tbe TImes
zo AugusL, zoo8
Scientists
condemn
ill-informed.
negative`
Prince over
GM crops
warning
The Prince of Wales was accused
of launching an ignorant rant about
genetically modified crops last night
after claiming that the technology
would cause 'the biggest
environmental disaster of all time¨
and lead to 'no food in the future¨.
.Mike Childs, campaigns director
of Friends of the Earth, defended
the Prince`s comments, however.
'Prince Charles has hit the nail on
the head about the damaging false
solution that GM crops present.
GM crops will not solve the food
crisis - and forging ahead with an
industrialised farming system will
continue to fail people and the
environment around the world.¨
TImes 0nIIne ±i Aprll, zoo8
Baroness Vadera
regrets green
shoots` optimism
in economy
One of Gordon Brown`s most
trusted ministers, was under fire last
night after saying that she could see
a few 'green shoots¨ of economic
recovery. But Alan Duncan, the
Shadow Business Secretary, said
that her use of the 'green shoots¨
phrase proved that ministers were
out of touch. .Lady Vadera was
said by friends to regret using the
phrase and the row it caused.
Lord Mandelson, the Business
Secretary, said critics were making
a mountain out of a molehill.
Tbe TImes ±¸ 1unuurv, zooo
Taxpayer to own
43º in Lloyds
and HBOS
Lloyds TSB marked its transformation
into Britain's new 'super bank¨
today. . The UK taxpayer will now
own 43.4 per cent of the merged
business, which will be known as
the Lloyds Banking Group.
.The banks are expected to gain
approval for the merger today as
Lloyds TSB attempts to draw a line
under a US investigation of its dealings
with Sudanese and Iranian clients.
TImes 0nIIne ±z 1unuurv, zooo
Boris 1ohnson
makes fighting
crime top priority
Boris Johnson, the new mayor of
London, made fighting crime his
top priority as he officially took
over his new role.
.Mr Johnson does not formally
receive the seals of office from
Livingstone until midnight
tomorrow, and he joked that
this would give the outgoing
administration time to cover
up anything it wanted to keep
under wraps.
TImes 0nIIne ¸ Muv, zoo8
How to
buy shares
.Buying single shares that do not
form part of a balanced portfolio is
a risky business and experts advise
against it because you should not
put all your eggs in one basket.
If you have neither the time nor the
money to construct a rounded portfolio
of shares (at least a dozen and ideally
more than 20), you may be better off
buying collective investments such as
unit or investment trusts.
TImes 0nIIne z¸ 1unuurv, zoo8
Oi! Naomi! Just
keep your hair
on, love...
Naomi Campbell was at her diva best
last night, showing that she can't
even leave a restaurant without
causing a scene.
She was enjoying a night at Cipriani
in Mayfair with a group of friends
when the drama unfolded. The
supermodel… was happy to pose
for pictures as she left after dinner.
But, in a flash, she started shouting
and ran back inside where she
waited for a couple of minutes.
She then re-emerged with her friends
shielding her, reportedly shouting and
screaming at them before she got
into her waiting car, where she soon
slumped sideways.
MaII 0nIIne ±, 1une, zoo8
Taylor Wimpey
finally
renegotiates
debt deal
Taylor Wimpey, the UK`s biggest
housebuilder, announced this
afternoon that it has succeeded in
renegotiating terms on its £1.57 billion
debt pile after months of negotiations.
. The company faces an uphill
struggle as property prices sink.
Tbe TImes , Aprll, zooo
Louise Blouin
MacBain's 1ibetan
stance will ruffle
feathers of the
Prince of Wales
Wh||e the great and the good
are accustomed to be|ng urged
to make donat|ons |n a|d of
T|bet, the Duke of York`s former
g|r|fr|end, |ou|se B|ou|n MacBa|n,
hopes to persuade them to stump
up cash to support Oh|na.
No doubt, her ex-boyfr|end`s
brother, the Pr|nce of Wa|es, who
|s an outspoken adm|rer of the
T|betan sp|r|tua| |eader, wou|d
have someth|ng to say about that.
TeIegrapb.eo.uk z6 OcLober, zoo8
ITV`s
Michael
Grade is
skating
on thin ice`
.Against the backdrop of a
tumbling share price and mixed
critical reviews, the performance of
ITV`s executive chairman will face
heavy scrutiny when he unveils his
first set of annual results on March 5.
Underlying profits are forecast to
have slipped 36% to £259m because
of higher interest costs, the closure
of the ITV Play quiz channel and
investment made in online activities.
Tbe $unday TImes zi lebruurv, zoo8
Payout pain
for investors
will get worse
Last week, Enterprise Inns decided
to maintain their final dividend and
their shares took a dive. Ted Tuppen,
the chief executive, clearly thought
that he was showing his confidence
in the company`s cash position.
Instead he found himself criticised
for burying his head in the sand
and putting off the inevitable. The
relatively forgiving climate for
dividend cuts may be encouraging
more companies to bite the bullet.
DSG International, the former
Dixons electricals retailer, yesterday
added its name to the list as it
scrapped its dividend after falling
into the red. It was rewarded with
an initial rise in the share price,
although it ended the day well down.
Tbe TImes z8 November, zoo8
The government
has its finger in
every pie in the
economy
.Thanks to the credit crunch and
consequent recession, the government
is being forced to intervene in
economic activity to an extent last seen
in the 1970s. Its creeping control
extends far beyond the nationalised
banks, with industries ranging from car
manufacturers to technology
start-ups lining up cap in hand for
taxpayers` money.
Tbe $unday TImes zz lebruurv, zooo
Let the
daylight in
Since the Sunday Times splashed
their story last week about four
senior Lords allegedly willing to
take cash to exert influence, it has
been open season for the press on
the activities of the upper
chamber. Once again, the
reputation of Parliament has been
dragged through the mud.
While this has made for some
sensationalist headlines, it has
also given the public a rare insight
into the secretive world of
lobbying. For those of us who
cannot grace the stately rooms of
Parliament, we now know it is a
place where, over cups of tea or
pints of beer, corporate lobbyists
bend the ear of our elected and
non-elected representatives in
favour of their clients.
Tbe GuardIan ¸± 1unuurv, zooo
5ection ±

5ection ±
xo
www.garneteducation.com 57
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
JENNIFER MELDRUM AND BARBARA REIMER • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO UPPER INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B2/IELTS 3.0-5.5
Versatile Vocabulary

Get Going with Grammar
Photocopiable resources for teachers
Games to Go
Versatile Vocabulary ......................... 978 1 85964 802 5
Get Going with Grammar .................. 978 1 85964 748 6
“A great book to have in any staff
room and a useful resource to
liven up grammar lessons.”
Ryan Horsnail, International House,
Barcelona, Spain
“As with their first book, Get
Going with Grammar, the authors
have again managed to offer
teachers a wealth of material –
Versatile Vocabulary will get you
going and maybe even train the
teacher’s brain in versatility.”
Elsbeth Mäder, ETAS Journal, Spring 2007
7
1.1
t
o
o
f
e
w
s
e
v
e
r
a
l
a
lo
t
(o
f
)
m
a
n
y
a
lit
t
le
s
o
m
e
m
u
c
h
f
e
w
t
o
o
m
a
n
y
e
n
o
u
g
h
H
e
r e
a
r e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
b
o
o
k
s . P
l e
a
s e
g
i v
e
t h
e
m
t o
t h
e
c l a
s s .
I don’t have
__________
apples to give
one to each
person.
Do you have
__________
plans for tonight?
Yes, I am going to
the cinema.
It will be a
big party.
We bought
___________
food.
The flowers
are dying.
There has
been _______
rain this year.
She is a very
quiet girl. She
doesn’t say
__________.
It costs ________ money to travel to Europe every year.
He has ________
books because
he doesn’t like
reading.
I d
o
n
’ t h
a
v
e
v
e
r y
_
_
_
_
_
t i m
e
t o
g
o
t o
t h
e
s h
o
p
.
I a
m
v
e
r y
t h
i r s t y .
I h
a
v
e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
w
a
t e
r b
u
t I n
e
e
d
t o
d
r i n
k
m
o
r e
.
I d
rin
k
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
te
a
.
I h
a
v
e
a
t le
a
st te
n
cu
p
s a
d
a
y.
T
h
e
y
a
r e
v
e
r y
p
o
o
r .
T
h
e
y
d
o
n
’ t h
a
v
e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
m
o
n
e
y
t o
b
u
y
f o
o
d
.
T
h
e
r e
w
a
s n
’ t _
_
_
_
_
_
_
f u
r n
i t u
r e
i n
t h
e
r o
o
m
.
T
h
e
r e
w
a
s o
n
l y
a
b
e
d
a
n
d
a
d
e
s k
.
W
e
a
sk
e
d
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
q
u
e
stio
n
s b
e
fo
re
th
e
e
xa
m
.
H o w _ _ _ _ _ _ p e o p l e c a m e t o y o u r p a r t y y e s t e r d a y ?
T o m i s a g o o d
s w i m m e r
b e c a u s e h e
g o e s t o t h e
p o o l _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .
D i d y o u e a t
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
f o o d f o r
l u n c h t o d a y ?
S o m e s t u d e n t s a r e
l a z y , t h e y d o
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ h o m e w o r k .
Have you
got ________
money for
the bus
today?
START
There was
___________
food in the
fridge. It
was nearly
empty.
I th
in
k
h
e
d
rin
k
s
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
co
ffe
e
. It’s n
o
t
g
o
o
d
fo
r h
im
.
I d
o
n
’ t l i k
e
h
i m
v
e
r y
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
H
e
i s n
o
t k
i n
d
t o
o
t h
e
r s .
H
e
i s v
e
r y
l o
n
e
l y . H
e
h
a
s _
_
_
_
_
_
_
f r i e
n
d
s .
D
o
y
o
u
t h
i n
k
t h
e
r e
a
r e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
b
i s c u
i t s i n
t h
e
b
o
x ? N
o
, i t i s
e
m
p
t y .
D
o
y
o
u
w
a
n
t
co
ffe
e
n
o
w
?
Y
e
s, I th
in
k
I
w
ill h
a
v
e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
T
h
e
r e
i s
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
t r a
f f i c t o
d
a
y .
I w
i l l b
e
l a
t e
f o
r w
o
r k
.
I e
a
t v
e
ry
_
_
_
_
_
_
m
e
a
t. I d
o
n
’t
lik
e
it v
e
ry
m
u
ch
.
P
e
t e
r w
a
s s i c k
s o
h
e
a
t e
v
e
r y
_
_
_
_
_
_
t h
i s w
e
e
k
.
D i d y o u t a k e
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
p h o t o g r a p h s
w h e n y o u w e r e
o n h o l i d a y ?
D o y o u h a v e
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ r i c e
f o r d i n n e r ? – Y e s ,
I t h i n k w e w i l l
h a v e s o m e f o r
e v e r y o n e .
T h e y n e e d t o d o
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ s t u d y i n g
i f t h e y w a n t t o
p a s s t h e t e s t .
I t w i l l o n l y t a k e _ _ _ _ _ _ m i n u t e s t o f i n i s h y o u r
w o r k .
M a r y l i k e s f i l m s .
S h e g o e s t o t h e
c i n e m a
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .
I w a n t t o t a k e _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ b o o k s w i t h m e o n h o l i d a y .
I d
o
n
’t h
a
v
e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
tim
e
to
g
o
to
th
e
b
a
n
k
b
e
fo
re
w
o
rk
.
I w
ill h
a
v
e
to
g
o
la
te
r.
H
o
w
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
p
e
o
p
le
a
re
co
m
in
g
to
th
e
p
a
rty
?
I ’ v
e
g
o
t _
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
c l o
t h
e
s w
i t h
m
e
,
b
u
t I n
e
e
d
t o
b
u
y
m
o
r e
.
Jo
h
n
d
o
e
sn
’t
u
se
h
is ca
r
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
H
e
d
o
e
sn
’t
lik
e
d
riv
in
g
.
I h
a
v
e
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
s u
g
a
r , b
u
t n
o
t t h
e
a
m
o
u
n
t I n
e
e
d
t o
m
a
k
e
a
c a
k
e
.
W
I
N
N
E
R
Photocopiable
Quantifier Quest
www garneteducation com 57
77
Page from Get Going with Grammar Page from Versatile Vocabulary
Varied activities
including: suffix staircases,
preposition pyramids,
lexical ladders, verbal
baseballs – aim high and
motivate your students
with grammar and
vocabulary games!
KEY FEATURES
Versatile Vocabulary
• 21 photocopiable games
featuring the words
most frequently used
by English speakers
• Teacher’s notes for each
game, with suggested
variations to the game
• Templates for teachers
and students to create
their own versions
KEY FEATURES
Get Going with Grammar
• 25 photocopiable games
to motivate and inspire
students to improve
specific grammar points
• Teacher’s notes for each
game, with suggested
variations to the game
• Templates for teachers
and students to create
their own versions
Photocopiable Resources
www.garneteducation.com 58
Better Writing
An introductory workbook for building students’ writing skills at secondary or tertiary level
RICHARD HARRISON • PRE-INTERMEDIATE TO INTERMEDIATE: CEF LEVELS A2 TO B1/IELTS 3.0–4.5
TEACHER
RESOURCES AND
PHOTOCOPIABLES
KEY FEATURES
Each unit is divided into
two sections.
The first section includes:
• looking at different texts
• picking out language points
• exercises for practising
what you have learnt
The second section covers:
• sentence building
• ways of joining short
sentences together
(conjunctions and
punctuation)
• putting sentences together
to make paragraphs
• punctuation, spelling,
capitalization
• checking what you have
written
• vocabulary building
UNITS
• Describing things
• Describing how
something works
• Describing how
something is made
• Reporting what
someone said
• Comparing
• Describing changes
Better Writing
Study Book ................................................. 978 1 85964 702 8
“Clearly organized units with logical
progression throughout the book and
useful supplementary work to focus on
sentence/paragraph level.”
York St John University College
“Better Writing is ideal for those
students who need to master the nuts
and bolts of writing.”
Philip Horspool, University of Leicester
s
r
‘A’ HE A D I N G
71 70
UN I T FI V E : COMPA R I N G PU N C T UAT I ON / BE T T E R PA R AGR A P H S
Some of these sentences need commas and some do not. Add commas
where necessary.
a. Canberra which is the capital of Australia is not the biggest city in the country.
b. The shop had sold out of Jasmine Mystery which is my favourite perfume.
c. The man who robbed the bank was arrested yesterday.
d. The main course was sardines which are popular in Portugal.
e. Last week I wrote a letter to the college that I want to study in.
f. Yu Lin said she wanted to speak to the woman who was in charge of the shop.
g. The programme that I wanted to watch was cancelled at the last minute.
h. Peter who is a well-known journalist writes for a Cape Town newspaper.
i. All appointments have been cancelled by the president who has a slight stomach upset.
Better paragraphs
Connecting words
Complete this passage with the words and phrases in the list.
although when whereas however on the one hand
who which but less more
Is life better now, or was life more rewarding in the past? (a)_______________ we
have more material things nowadays, such as cars, televisions, videos and so on.
(b)___________ on the other hand, some people think that we were happier in the
past, (c)____________ we had fewer possessions and life was (d)_________ complicated.
My grandfather, for example, was a fisherman. He lived in a small village on the coast
and had a very simple life. There was no electricity and the family had to bring water
from a nearby well, (e)_________ they shared with the whole village. (f)___________,
I have never seen a man as happy as my grandfather.
Life is certainly (g)________ comfortable nowadays. People (h)_________ live in cities
have air-conditioning, hot and cold water and heating in the winter, (i)_________ in the
old days these things were unheard of. One thing surprises me. (j)____________ we
have all of these comforts at home, many people like to take a tent at the weekends
and go camping in the countryside. Perhaps they are looking for a simpler way of life.
19
Organization
Put these sentences in the correct order to make two paragraphs. Write the paragraphs
in your notebook.
20

for and against
1 Is nuclear power a good alternative to other sources of power
such as oil, gas and hydroelectric power?
a. On the other hand, oil and gas can cause a great
deal of damage to the environment.
b. For example, nuclear power is relatively cheap.
c. Although the cost of building a power plant is
high, the running costs are very low.
d. Nuclear power is also very clean.
e. There are many points in its favour.
f. Not only does the process of producing power
cause very little pollution, but also there is very little damage
to the environment through mining and transporting plutonium.
2 However, there are many strong arguments against using nuclear power.
a. There is also the problem of nuclear waste.
b. Nuclear power has a poor safety record and
there have been many accidents around the world.
c. For these reasons nuclear power is likely to
decline in popularity.
d. For example, the explosion at a reactor in Chernobyl
in the Ukraine caused hundreds, perhaps thousands, of deaths.
e. The most powerful argument is safety.
f. Nobody knows how we can get rid of it safely.
a step-by-step approach to writing accurate, cohesive and appropriate English
www.garneteducation.com 59
Journals and Academic Papers
REFERENCE
Current Developments in English
for Academic, Specific and
Occupational Purposes
Collected papers from presentations
at the Cardiff (2005) and Harrogate
(2006) Conferences of the IATEFL
ESP SIG
Edited: Mark Krzanowski
ISBN: 978 1 85964 439 3
Contents include
• Coaching in academic writing
• Dialoguing with students about their
marked work
• An analysis of undergraduate essay
and examination questions
• Using stories with young learners
• Second language acquisition and
pedagogy: A case study
• ESP – Creator of a new reality
The Journal of Professional
and Academic English
ISSN: 1754 – 6850
The journal is published on a quarterly
basis and covers a wide range of
issues of interest to ESP and EAP
practitioners. The journal can be
obtained by joining the IATEFL ESP
SIG, information on which can be
obtained on http://espsig.iatelf.org/
Current Developments in
English for Academic and
Specific Purposes in Developing,
Emerging and Least-Developed
Countries
Collected papers from presentations
at the Harrogate (2006) Conference
of the IATEFL ESP SIG
Edited: Mark Krzanowski
ISBN: 978 1 90109 517 3
Contents include
• ESP in Brazil: History, new trends and
challenges
• A short overview of EAP in Cambodia
in 2006-2007
• Positioning ESP in an ESL situation
• English for specific purposes: Its
place in Kenya’s education context
• Teaching ‘the other English’ for
communication in Nigeria
• Burying the ghost of English in Zambia
Young Learner English Language
Policy and Implementation:
International Perspectives
Collected papers from presentations
at the Bangalore (2008) Conference
on Teaching English to Young Learners
Edited: Janet Enever, Jayne Moon
and Uma Raman
ISBN: 978 1 90109 523 4
Contents include
• An early start: What are the key
conditions for generalized success?
• Teaching English to young learners:
The promise and the threat
• English at Primary school level in
Brazil: Challenges and perspectives
• Primary EFL in China: From policy
to classroom practice
• Beyond English: Primary plurilingual
schools in Buenos Aires, Argentina
EAP in a Globalizing World:
English as an Academic
Lingua Franca
Proceedings of the 2007 BALEAP
Conference
Edited: Melinda Whong
ISBN: 978 1 85964 514 7
Contents include
• Different not Deficit: Towards a More
Critical EAP Pedagogy
• How Global is EAP?
• British and Swedish Students
Reading English
• Postgraduate Students’ Perceptions
of Using English for their Studies in
Syria and Wales
“Something for almost everyone.”
Jack Bowers, Australian National University
Garnet Education is becoming increasingly involved with the publication of a variety of academic resources. This is
in line with our policy of putting educational development at the forefront of our work; our involvement will enable
us to better understand current issues of ELT delivery and inform our development of course material.
Current Developments in
English for Academic and Specific Purposes in
Developing, Emerging and Least-Developed Countries
Edited by Mark Krzanowski
www.iatefl.org
iatefl
E D U C A T I O N a r n e t
Young Learner English Language
Policy and Implementation:
International Perspectives
Edited by Janet Enever, Jayne Moon and Uma Raman
www.iatefl.org
iatefl
E D U C A T I O N
a r n e t
www garn
www.garneteducation.com 60
Coming Soon
ESAP Nursing
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 522 2
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 523 9
ESAP Media Studies
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 530 7
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 531 4
ESAP Accountancy
Course Book & audio CDs (x2) ................... 978 1 85964 559 8
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 560 4
Access EAP: Foundations Plus
Course Book ............................................... 978 1 85964 558 1
Teacher’s Book ........................................... 978 1 85964 572 7
$ue Arçent
0Iwyn AIexander
F00ß0A¡I0ß$
FL0$
Access
£AF
0eurse 8eek
FORTHCOMING
TITLES
www.garneteducation.com 61
Agents, Bookshops and Suppliers
ALBANIA
Educational Centre
Islam Alla Street
P39 Ground Floor
Tirana
Albania
Tel: +355 427 3091
oxfcenalb@icc-al.org
ALGERIA
EURL AISC Algiers
Internationals Study Centre
CITE 134 LGTS BT 5A BP 50
BOUCHAOUI 16084
Cheraga
Algiers
Algeria
Tel/Fax: +213 21 39 55 02
eurl-aisc@hotmail.com
ANGOLA
English Teaching Materials
Trading and Services
Angola, Lda (ETM)
Rua Conégo Manuel das
Neves 166/A
PO Box 6434
Luanda
Angola
Tel: +244 222 444 540
Fax: +244 923 216 950/912
205 707
etmangola@yahoo.co.uk
ARGENTINA
Estari Libros S.R.L.
Viamonte 2052
C1056ABF Cdad Aut. de
Buenos Aires
República Argentina
Tel: +(5411) 4371 2738, 4374
0014/0547
Fax: +(5411) 4374 9451
elt@estari.com.ar
www.estarilibros.com
AUSTRALIA
Bookery
9 Victoria Street
Fitzroy
Victoria, 3065
Australia
Tel: +61 (0)3 9416 2115
Fax: +61 (0)3 9416 2209
info@bookery.com.au
www.bookery.com.au
TESL Books
82 Chapel Street
Prahran VIC 3181
Australia
Tel: +61 (0)3 9521 1404
Fax: +61 (0)3 9521 1420
info@teslbooks.com
www.teslbooks.com
AUSTRIA
The British Bookshop
Weihburggasse 24-26
A-1010 Vienna
Austria
Tel: +43 1512 1945 ext. 22
Fax: +43 1512 1026
elc@britishbookshop.at
www.britishbookshop.at
BELGIUM
Audivox
Rubenslei 23
2018 Antwerpen
Belgium
Tel: +32 3470 1777
info@audivox.net
www.audivox.net
BRAZIL
SBS – Special Book
Services
Av. Casa Verde 463
São Paulo-SP CEP 02519-000
Brazil
Tel: +55 11 2238 4477
Fax: +55 11 2256 7151
sbs@sbs.com.br
www.sbs.com.br
BRUNEI
PM Associates Pte Ltd
130 Killiney Road
Singapore 239561
Tel: +65 67329522
Fax: +65 67336076
sales@pma.com.sg
BULGARIA
Educational Centre
63 Gladston Str.
Sofia 1000
Bulgaria
Tel: +359 2 980 9033/980
4701
Fax: +359 2 980 9015
oxford@omega.bg
www.educationalcentre.bg
CANADA
English Central
46 St. Clair Avenue East
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1M9 Canada
Tel: +1 416 850 0833
Tel (toll free): +1 866 518 4170
Fax: +1 416 850 0834
info@englishcentral.net
www.englishcentral.net
CHINA
4KidsBooks Guangzhou
Room A 17, Jin Bi Fei Cui
Building, No 473
Tian Run Road
Tian He District
Guangzhou 510630
China
Tel/Fax: +86 20387 42835
Mobile: +86 2136 974 22 287
customers@4kids.org.cn
www.4kids.org.cn
Ian Taylor Associates Ltd
Beijing Office
1 17C Building C
In-Do Mansion No. 48 Zhichun
Rd
HaiDian District
Beijing 100098
P.R. China
Tel/Fax: +86 10 58732015
zhangpei.beijing@gmail.com
Ian Taylor Associates Ltd
Shanghai Office
Room 1302, Building 6
No.718 Wuyi Road
Shanghai 200051
P.R. China
Tel: +86 21 6229 9481
Fax: +86 21 6273 5270
zhangpei.beijing@gmail.com
COLOMBIA
English Language Services
Carrera 17 No. 142-23
Bogotá, D.C.
Colombia
Tel: +571 4814901/571
2740430
servicio.cliente@elscolumbia.
com
nidia.sanchez@elscolumbia.
com
COSTA RICA
BIS Costa Rica
Del BAC San José
Desamparados, 125m. Sur
San José
Costa Rica
Tel: +506 2219 2319
Fax: +506 2219 3010
libros@biscostarica.com
CUBA
The Caribbean Book
Company Limited
c/o Coral Capital Group
Calle 5b #6206
Entre 62 y 66
Playa Ciudad de la Habana
Cuba
Tel: +53 (07) 832 8834/(07)
204 6250
cbcbooks@ceniai.inf.cu
CZECH REPUBLIC
ILC Czechoslovakia Ltd
Ripská 15a
62700 Brno
Czech Republic
Tel: +420 545 215 669
Fax: +420 545 240 889
www.ilc.cz
ECUADOR
Edusol
Corea El-E24 y 10 de Agosta
Quito
Ecuador
Tel: +593 2246 1174/593 2252
7919
Edusol
Centro Comercial Gran
Albocentro
Local J1
Guayaquil
Ecuador
Tel: +593 4224 7695/593 4227
9173
EL SALVADOR
B&D Distribuidores
S.A. de C.V.
Urb. Toluca 2 Calle
Toluca y Ave. B #218
San Salvador
El Salvador
Tel: +503 2260 0508/2260 5703
Fax: +503 2260 5499
byd2@navegante.com.sv
ESTONIA
Allecto
Juhkentali 8
10132 Tallinn
Estonia
Tel: +372 62 77 230
Fax: +372 62 77 233
allecto@allecto.ee
www.allecto.ee

FRANCE
ATTICA la librairie des
langues
11 Rue Boussingault
CS 51309
75214 Paris cedex 13
France
Tel: +33 (0)1 49 29 27 31
Fax: +33 (0)1 48 06 47 85
info@attica.fr
www.attica.fr
Novagora – La librairie de
langues
40 Rue d’Alésia
75014 Paris
France
Tel: +33 1 45 77 91 66
Fax: +33 1 42 18 05 52
librairie@novagora.net
www.novagora.net
GEORGIA
The English Book Georgia
Zakaria Paliashvili 116
Tbilisi
Georgia
Tel: +995 90 977 002
maia_lm@hotmail.com
GERMANY
Schweitzer
Fachinformationen
Hoser & Mende KG
Charlottenplatz 17
D – 70173 Stuttgart
Tel: +49 (07 11) 1 63 54 33
Fax: +49 (07 11) 1 63 54 20
hoser@schweitzer-online.de
www.schweitzer-online.de
GREECE
Andrew Betsis ELT
31 Pyrgou-18542
Piraeus
Greece
Tel: +30 210 492 0871/210
490 0735
Fax: +30 210 490 8926/210
493 3661
orders@andrewbetsiselt.gr
www.andrewbetsiselt.gr
GUATEMALA
Didactica Editores S.A.
8a Avenida 13-49, Zona 1
Ciudad de Guatemala
Guatemala C.A.
Tel: +502 2232 2108/2251
9245
srdidactica@turbonett.com
GULF STATES
For Bahrain, Oman, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia and United Arab
Emirates:
All Prints Publishers and
Distributors
PO Box 857, Sheikh Saif
Moh’d Bin Butty Building
Al Nasr Street
Abu Dhabi
United Arab Emirates
Tel: +971 2 6336999
Fax: +971 2 6320844
allprints@allprints.ae
HONDURAS
DISA Libros
Residencial Plaza
3ra Avenida
Bloque 29, Casa 25
Tegucigalpa
Honduras
Tel: +504 228 6175
disalibros@hotmail.com
HONG KONG
Please contact our
representative:
Jeremy Walenn
Flat 61 G Block 1
The Merton
38 New Praya
Kennedy Town
Hong Kong
Tel: +852 9302 7102
jeremywalenn@
garneteducation.com
Sun Young Books Company
Unit 8, 19/F, Block A, New
Trade Plaza
6 On Ping Street, Shatin
New Territories
Hong Kong
Tel: +852 3124 4135/+852
9636 6541
Fax: +852 3124 4137
Raymond@sybooks.com.hk
^
www.garneteducation.com 62
IRELAND
International Books
18 South Frederick Street
Dublin 2
Ireland
Tel: +353 1 6799375
Fax: +353 1 6799376
info@internationalbooks.ie
www.internationalbooks.ie
ITALY
Please contact our
representative:
Rosalind Hunter
Casella Postale 13114
20130 Milano (MI), Italy
Tel: +39 328424 1081
Fax: +39 0270052 1091
rhunter@garneteducation.com
La Libreria di Mega Libri
Via Del Commercio, 43-45
20090 Buccinasco
Milano
Italy
Tel: +39 (0)24840 1544
Fax: +39 (0)24840 3527
lalibreria@megalibri.it
www.megalibri.it
JAPAN
ABAX Ltd
Shinkawaya Center Bldg 3F
4-24-5 Kuji
Takatsu-ku
Kawasaki-shi
Kanagawa-ken 213 0032
Japan
Tel: +81 (0)44 813 2909
Fax: +81 (0)44 813 2916
sales@abax.co.jp
www.abax.co.jp
Nellie's Group, Ltd
Trade Sales Department
Sunbridge, Bldg. 1F
1-26-6 Yanagibashi
Taito-ku, Tokyo
Japan 111-0052
Tel: +081 (0)3 5825-3490
Fax: +081 (0)3 3865-7533
ipi@nellies.jp
www.nellies.jp
KAZAKHSTAN
Polygon International Ltd
Office #4, 153 Abay Ave.,
Almaty 050009
Republic of Kazakhstan
Tel: +7 727 2506908/3
Fax: +7 727 2501835
KOREA
Global Knowledge Bank
No. 704 ACE Techno Tower 10
th
470-5 Gasan-dong
Geumcheon-gu
Seoul 153-789
Republic of Korea
Tel: +82 2 6670 0458
Fax: +82 2 6670 0457
sks6295@yahoo.co.kr
KUWAIT
Gulf Union EST
PO Box 2911-Safat
13030 Kuwait
Tel: +965 22440889/22426440
Fax: +965 22411688
info@gulfunion-kuwait.com
LEBANON
All Prints Publishers and
Distributors
PO Box 8375
Al Wihad Building
Jeanne D’Arc Street
Beirut
Lebanon
Tel: +961 1 350 722
Fax: +961 1 752 547
bachir@garneteducation.com
MALAYSIA
University Book Store
(M) Sdn. Bhd.
43 Jalan 34/154
Taman Delima
56000 Cheras
Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
Tel: +603 9100 1868
Fax: +603 9102 4730
enquiry@ubsm.com.my
www.ubsm.com.my
MEXICO
Omega Book Company SA
de CV
Retorno 26 de Genaro Garcia #21
Colonia Jardin Balbuena
Mexico D.F.
Mexico 15900
Tel: +1-55 5803 6415
genaroperez7@hotmail.com
MOLDOVA
Educational Centre
64 M Eminescu Street
Chisinau
Moldova
Tel: +373 222 78486
oxford@educationalcentre.md
www.educationalcentre.md
MONTENEGRO
Educational Centre
Njegoseva 45
Shopping Center “Petrovic”
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro
Tel: +38 22 066 4430
edcentre@t-com.me
www.educational-montenegro.me
MOROCCO
Calliope
Rue Nassih Eddine
rés. Anfa II
Magasin RDC
Casablanca
Morocco
Tel: +212 022 257 400/063
722 633
Fax: +212 022 257 427
a.debbagh@calliope.ma
www.calliope.ma
THE NETHERLANDS
Audiovox
Rubenslei 23
2018 Antwerpen
Belgium
Tel: +32 3470 1777
info@audivox.net
www.audiovox.net
NEW ZEALAND
One English Bookstore
461B Manukau Rd
Epsom
Auckland
New Zealand
Tel: +64 (9)638 5161
Fax: +64 (9)638 5162
one.english@xtra.co.nz
www.oneenglish.co.nz
PANAMA
Distexsa S.A.
Calle Alberto Navarro, No.6
El Cangrejo
Ciudad de Panama
Panama
Tel: +507 294 1000
Fax: +507 294 1001
ventas@distexsa.com
PERU
Nuevas Técnicas
Educativas SAC-NUTESA
Av República de Panamá 2197
Of 2B
Sta Catalina
La Victoria
Lima, Peru
Tel: +51 1 472 1712
Fax: +51 1 472 9247
info@nutesa.com.pe
www.nutesa.com.pe
POLAND
Hurtownia Ksiazek i
Ksiegarnia ‘POWER’ Ltd
ul. Marszalka Focha 10
85-070 Bydgoszcz
Poland
Tel: +48 52 321 3171
Fax: +48 52 321 0347
info@ksiegarniapower.pl
www.ksiegarniapower.pl
A.B.E. Marketing
ul. Gryzybowska 37a
00-855 Warszawa
Poland
Tel: +48 22 654 0675
Fax: +48 22 652 0767
izabela.pluskota@abe.pl
www.abe.pl
PORTUGAL
Leirilivro – Comércio e
Distribuição de Livros, Lda.
Estrada Principal das
Garruchas
2440-037 Batalha
Portugal
Tel: +351 244 769 070
Fax: +351 244 765 303
info@leirilivro.pt
www.leirilivro.pt
ROMANIA
SC Educational Centre SRL
27 Biserica Amzei St.
Flat 4-5, Sector 1
Bucharest
Romania
Tel/Fax: +40 (21) 311 05 56
oxford@bx.logicnet.ro
www.oxford.ro
RUSSIA
CenterCom Ltd
Office Centre KHRUSTALNYI
36/4 Bolshaya
Novodmitrovskaya Ulitsa
Moscow 127015
Russia
Tel: +7(495)660-96-16
Fax: +7(495)660-96-17
office@centercom.ru
www.centercom.ru
SERBIA
Educational Centre
Kneza Milosa 19/l
11000 Belgrade
Serbia
Tel: +38111 3236281/3241922
Fax: +38111 3236281
engleski@eunet.rs
www.educational.co.rs
SINGAPORE
PM Associates Pte Ltd
130 Killiney Road
Singapore 239561
Tel: +65 67329522
Fax: +65 67336076
sales@pma.com.sg
SLOVENIA
Center Oxford
Mladinska knjiga – Trgovina,
d.d.
Slovenska 29
1000 Ljubljana
SI – Slovenia
Tel: +386 01 588 74 44
Fax: +386 01 588 75 40
urska.ravnjak@mk-trgovina.si
SOUTH AFRICA
Bag of Books
312 Kent Ave
Randburg 2194
South Africa
Tel: +27 11 326 2977
Fax: +27 86 680 0373
info@bagofbooks.co.za
SPAIN
Stanley Publishing
C/Mendelu 15
20280 Hondarribia
Guipúzcoa
Spain
Tel: +34 943 640412
Fax: +34 943 643863
editorial@stanleyformacion.com
www.stanleyformacion.com
SWITZERLAND
OLF S.A.
Z.I.3, Corminbeouf
P.O. Box 1152
CH-1701 Fribourg
Switzerland
Tel: +41 26 467 51 11
Fax: +41 26 467 54 66
information@olf.ch
Staeheli’s Bookshops Ltd
Bederstrasse 77
8021 Zurich 2
Tel: +41 44 209 91 11
Fax: +41 44 209 91 12
info@staehelibooks.ch
www.staehelibooks.ch
Buchzentrum AG
Swiss Book Center
Industriestr. Ost 10
CH-4614 Hägendorf
Switzerland
Tel: +41 62 209 2746
Fax: +4162 209 2627
kundendienst@buchzentrum.ch
www.buchzentrum.ch
TAIWAN
B.K. Norton
5F, 60 Roosevelt Road. Sec 4
Taipei 100
Taiwan
Tel: +886 2 66320088/23684938
Fax: +886 2 66329772
lillianh@bookman.com.tw
Caves Books Ltd
Trade Merchandise
Department
207, Ti-Ding Avenue,
Section 1,
Nei-Hu District, Taipei 114,
Taiwan
Tel: +886-2-87925001 ext.580
joseph@cavesbooks.com.tw
www.cavesbooks.com.tw
THAILAND
D.K. Today Co., Ltd
15/234 Soi Sua Yai Uthit
Ratchada Phisek Road
Chankasem, Chatuchak
Bangkok 10900
Thailand
Tel: +66 0 2541 7375/0 2930
6215
Fax: +66 0 2541 7377/0 2930
7733
dktoday@inet.co.th
www.dktoday.net
TURKEY
Dilyay Egitim Yayınları
Ticaret A.S.
Zümrütevler Mah. Hanımeli
Cad. Aktunç Ísmerkezi
No:5/5 P.K.34852 Maltepe
Ístanbul Turkei
Tel: +90 216 457 45 50
Fax: +90 216 457 45 51
info@dilyay.com
www.dilyay.com
www.garneteducation.com 63
Contacts
If you are unable to order from any of the bookshops or stockists listed, please contact:
Catherine Kennedy
Marketing Executive
Garnet Education
8 Southern Court
South Street
Reading
RG1 4QS
UK
Tel: +44 (0)118 9597847
Fax: +44 (0)118 9590508
catherinekennedy@garneteducation.com
For further information on product content, please contact:
Olly Twist
Academic Representative
Garnet Education
8 Southern Court
South Street
Reading
RG1 4QS
UK
Tel: +44 (0)118 9597847
Fax: +44 (0)118 9590508
ollytwist@garneteducation.com
Our distributor is:
NBN International
10 Estover Road
Plymouth
Devon
PL6 7PY
UK
Tel: +44 (0)1752 202301
Fax: +44 (0)1752 202333
orders@nbninternational.com

If you would like to submit a manuscript, please contact:
Rod Webb
Education and Research Manager
Garnet Education
8 Southern Court
South Street
Reading
RG1 4QS
UK
Tel: +44 (0)118 9597847
Fax: +44 (0)118 9590508
rodwebb@garneteducation.com
UNITED KINGDOM
Avantibooks Ltd
Unit 9, The io Centre
Whittle Way
Arlington Business Park
Stevenage
SG1 2BD, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1438 747000
Fax: +44 (0)1438 741131
orders@avantibooks.com
www.avantibooks.com
Bertrams
1 Broadland Business Park
Norwich
Norfolk
NR7 0WF, UK
Tel: +44 (0)871 803 6600
Fax: +44 (0)871 803 6709
orders@bertrams.com
http://www.bertrams.com
Blackwell's Bookshops
Contact any branch
nationwide or visit:
http://bookshop.blackwell.
co.uk
BEBC – Bournemouth
English Book Centre
Albion Close
Parkstone
Poole
Dorset
BH12 3LL, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1202 715555
Fax: +44 (0)1202 712913
elt@bebc.co.uk
www.bebc.co.uk
Cambridge International
Book Centre
42 Hills Road
Cambridge
CB2 1LA, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1223 365400
Fax: +44 (0)1223 312607
cibc@eflbooks.co.uk
www.eflbooks.co.uk
ELT Bookshop
St Giles College
154 Southampton Row
Bloomsbury
London, WC1B 5JX, UK
Tel: +44 (0)20 7837 0404
(1pm-5pm Monday to Friday)
eltlibrary@stgiles.co.uk
The English Language
Bookshop
31 George Street
Brighton
East Sussex, BN2 1RH, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1273 604864
Fax: +44 (0)1273 687280
sales@elb-brighton.com
www.elb-brighton.com
Foyles
113-119 Charing Cross Road
London, WC2H 0EB, UK
Tel: +44 (0)20 7437 5660
Fax: +44 (0)20 7434 1574
customerservices@foyles.
co.uk
www.foyles.co.uk
Gardners Books
1 Whittle Drive
Eastbourne
East Sussex, BN23 6QH, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1323 521777
Fax: +44 (0)1323 521666
custcare@gardners.com
www.gardners.com
Grant and Cutler
55-57 Great Marlborough
Street
London, W1F 7AY, UK
Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 2012
Fax: +44 (0)20 7734 9272
contactus@grantandcutler.
com
www.grantandcutler.com
KELTIC International
Unit B
Charbridge Way
Bicester
Oxfordshire
OX26 4ST, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1869 363589
Fax: +44 (0)1869 363590
LCL International
Booksellers Ltd
104-106 Judd Street
London
WC1H 9PU, UK
Tel: +44 (0)20 7837 0486
Fax: +44 (0)20 7833 9452
sales.lcl@btinternet.com
www.lclib.com
Waterstone’s Booksellers
Contact any branch
nationwide or visit:
www.waterstones.co.uk
UNITED STATES
Delta Publishing Company
1400 Miller Parkway
McHenry
IL 60050-7030
USA
Tel: +815 363 7891 ext 20
Fax: +815 363 2948
custsvc@deltapublishing.com
www.deltapublishing.com
English Central
46 St. Clair Avenue East
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1M9 Canada
Tel: +1 416 850 0833
Tel (toll free): +1 866 518 4170
Fax: +1 416 850 0834
info@englishcentral.net
www.englishcentral.net
URUGUAY
Bookshop S.A.
José Enrique Rodó 1671
11200 Montevideo
Uruguay
Tel: +598 2 401 10 10
Fax: +598 2 408 89 50
info@bookshop.com.uy
www.bookshop.com.uy
VENEZUELA
Ven-Hill Interamericana de
Venezuela S.A.
2da. Transv. de Bello Monte
entre Av. Abraham Lincoln y
Av. Casanova
Local G-2
Sabana Grande
Caracas
Venezuela Z.P 1050
Tel: +58 212 761 6201
Fax: +58 212 762 3720
servicioalcliente@gmail.com
LIBRARY SUPPLIERS
Coutts UK
Avon House
Headlands Business Park
Ringwood
Hampshire
BH24 3PB, UK
Tel: + 44 (0)1425 471160
Fax: +44 (0)1425 471525
salesuk@couttsinfo.com
www.couttsinfo.com
Dawson Books
Foxhills House
Brindley Close
Rushden
Northamptonshire
NN10 6DB, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1933 417500
Fax: +44 (0)1933 417501
bkcustserv@dawsonbooks.
co.uk
www.dawsonbooks.co.uk
The Holt Jackson Book
Company Limited
Preston Road
Lytham
Lancashire
FY8 5AX, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1253 737464
Fax: +44 (0)1253 733361
info@holtjackson.co.uk
www.holtjackson.co.uk
www.garneteducation.com
Garnet Education
8 Southern Court
South Street
Reading
RG1 4QS
UK
Tel: +44 (0)118 959 7847
Fax: +44 (0)118 959 0508
E-mail: enquiries@garneteducation.com

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.