Overview 
 
Unit Name: ​
“A girl gets sick of a rose”: modernizing poetry in three movements​
           Teacher: ​
Matthew Jones 
Subject: ​
Twentieth­century American poetry​
                                                                    Grade: ​
11 
Briefly give a narrative overview of the learning unit: ​
This first unit of the academic year is designed to acquaint eleventh­graders with three 
roughly sketched out moments of particular significance in twentieth­century American poetry — Imagism (and Objectivism), the Harlem 
Renaissance (and Black Arts Movement), and Confessional poetry — as a way to explore, analyze and utilize the figurative language and styles 
made available by the advent of modernism. Each corresponding roughly to poetry’s particular engagement with aesthetics, politics and 
individuality, these three movements will be used to organize the class unit thematically and guide students in composing and workshopping their 
own poems, reviews and artworks. The unit will culminate with students collaborating on online magazines that will include their cumulative work 
alongside summative manifestos that explain and defend what they see as poetry’s purpose and mission. 

 

Desired Results 
Established Goals:  
­ Students will recognize both the specificity and wider applicability of poetic conventions and forms. 
­ Students will understand the main characteristics and valences of ​
the modern​
 and ​
modernism​
 in literature. 
­ Students will become more familiar with the methods and strategies associated with close reading and literary interpretation. 
­ Students will be able to situate literature in a dialogic relationship with its context, as it both reacts and contributes to historical change.  
­ Students will enter into an ongoing, democratizing dialogue with literature by developing their own creative writing skills and voice. 
 
 
 

  

 
Understandings​

 
Students will understand:  
­ that poetry is a medium of versatility and deliberateness; 
­ that criteria for “good poetry” and “good art” change and 
evolve; 
­ that poets, critics and readers based in specific contexts 
effect that change;  
­ and that they themselves can be poets in their own right.   
 
Students will know:  
­ figures of speech; 
­ features of prosody and verse; 
­ important twentieth­century American poets and their 
associated movements; 
­ and how these movements correlate to history. 
  
Students will be able to: 
­ identify certain poetic styles; 
­ interpret poems that connect form to tone and content; 
­ write their own poems. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Essential Questions​
:  
 
Who are poets? 
 
What is figurative language? What purposes does it serve? 
 
What do we mean by ​
modern​
 and ​
modernism​
 in art and literature?  
 
How and why does poetry change? 
 
What connections does poetry make between the individual, the political, and 
the aesthetic?  
 

 
 
 
 
  

 
Assessment Evidence 
Performance Tasks​
:   
 
Students will be divided into three groups, with major performance 
tasks rotating each week. For the week about Imagism, one group 
will write a poem that, formally and thematically, adapts and 
responds to the assigned reading on Imagism; the second group will 
write a 1­2 page review on assigned poem(s) of their choosing; and 
the final group will be tasked with an art project inspired by one of 
the assigned poems. These will be workshopped by their classmates 
in the subsequent class and be turned in for a grade.   
 
These poems, reviews and artworks will be compiled in online 
magazines that each group of students will have worked on 
collaboratively. Accompanying each magazine will be a manifesto 
of sorts that explains the group’s particular stance or orientation 
vis­a­vis poetry. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Other Evidence​

 
Presentations on poets’ biographies and explanations of pertinent 
historical periods and cultural phenomena during each lesson. 
 
Workshops in small groups in which students demonstrate understanding 
by assessing, critiquing and giving feedback to their peers. 
 
Recitations: students will memorize poems, recite them and explain their 
choice of poem.  
 
A final test that asks them to summarize and evaluate their 
understandings of these disparate movements in short answers, with a 
heavy emphasis on comparisons and contrasts. 

 

  

 
 
Learning Plan 
Day 

Essential 
Question(s)  

Standard(s) 
(according to the 
Pennsylvania Core 
Standards) 

Content 

Resources/ Materials 

Learning Activities 

1  

What’s in a 
poem? 
(See more about 
this lesson under 
“Lesson Plan” 
heading.) 

Comparing and 
contrasting treatment 
of similar themes and 
central topics in works 
of the same time 
period. 
 
Evaluation of validity 
of primary and 
secondary sources. 

Contextualizing the 
modernist break: identifying 
conventions and making 
connections between poetry 
and criticism, poetry and 
other forms of art 

Sets of paintings: 
1. Achilles Lamenting 
the Death of Patroclus​
; 
2. Luncheon on the 
Grass​
; 
Pre­assessment test; 
Amy Lowell & Ezra 
Pound prefaces & 
manifesto; 
 

Comparing and contrasting 
paintings to discuss artistic 
conventions. 
Pre­assessment test. 
Jigsaw readings of prefaces 
by Amy Lowell and 
manifesto by Ezra Pound.    

What makes a 
poem modern? 

Recognizing and 
Imagist & Objectivist poetry:  Handouts of syllabus. 
using patterns of word  a formal break with the 
Handouts of poems by 
changes and how they  poetic past  
H.D., Charles Reznikoff 
shift meaning and 
and George Oppen 
function. 
(handed out at the end of 
the previous class). 

How does a poem  Tracking details about  Harlem Renaissance & its 
get political? 
people, events, and 
ripples: multiplying poetic 
ideas that develop the  voices and making poetry a 
set of ideas or 
more inclusive and politically 
sequence of events. 
relevant venture 

Selection of jazz music, 
to be played on 
computer. 
Handouts of poems by 
Langston Hughes, Jean 
Toomer, Etheridge 
Knight, and Gwendolyn 
Brooks (handed out at 

Syllabus overview. 
Classwide discussion of 
assigned poems. 
Workshopping poems in 
small groups. 
Critical listening to jazz. 
Student presentations on 
Great Migration.  
Jigsaw reading of Langston 
Hughes’ “The Negro Artist 
and the Racial Mountain” 
and Marita O. Bonner’s “On 
Being Young ­­ a Woman ­­ 
and Colored.” 
  

 
the end of the previous 
class). 

Who does the 
Analyzing textual 
poem speak for?  evidence that is both 
explicit and implicit. 

Confessional and 
anti­confessional poetry: 
refiguring narrative, trauma 
and the ​

Why write 
poems? 

Wrapping up and questions  Summative test. 
for future reflection: 
Students’ own 
problematizing a “school” of  magazines! 
poetry and pondering 
poetry’s insoluble mix of 
form, content and 
individuality 

Selecting, organizing, 
and analyzing content 
effectively to express 
complex ideas. 
 
Identifying and 
applying publication 
expectations of the 
discipline in which 
writing. 

Handouts of poems by 
Sylvia Plath, Anne 
Sexton, Lucille Clifton, 
and Sharon Olds 
(handed out at the end of 
the previous class). 
Posterboard for gallery. 
Handouts of Frank 
O’Hara’s “Personism: A 
Manifesto.” 

Discussing the advent of 
psychoanalysis through 
select student presentation. 
Gallery­style participation 
on class readings. 
Pair­and­share readings of 
student poems. 
Jigsaw reading of Frank 
O’Hara’s “Personism: A 
Manifesto.” 
Summative test.  
Recitations. 
Presentation of each group’s 
magazine. 
Poetry café.