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11.

Models & Manipulatives:


Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

Depends, usually 0
Standard Arrangement
Model and/or Manipulative

Process Directions:
1) The model or Manipulative is used to aide in the lesson.
When/Example:
The uses of Models & Manipulatives will vary, however it will mostly be used in my
mathematics classroom. Some examples of Models & Manipulatives are fraction bars,
math wrap ups, geo shapes, abacuses, and Geogebra. These Models & Manipulates can
be used to help visualize mathematical concepts such as what happens to an angle when it
is reflected and translated.
Source:
Kipfmiller, S., Sarah Kipfmillers Professional Portfolio.
http://sarahkipfmiller.weebly.com/

12. Triangles:
Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

20 30 minutes
Standard Arrangement
Paper triangle, pencil, construction paper, notebook

Process Directions:
1) Each student gets a triangle
2) They trace the triangle on a piece of construction paper twice and then they mark
the angles , , and .
3) They cut each triangle out.
4) On a sheet of typing paper, they trace the paper triangle off to one side of the
paper and label the angles (corresponding to the construction paper) and extend
one of the side so they have an exterior angle.
5) Triangle Angle Sum Theorem:
a. We tear the angles of one of the construction paper triangles and place
the vertices together to show that when added, the measures of , , and
sum to 180 degreesthey form a straight angle.
b. Then we write the theorem name and mathematical representation.
6) Exterior Angle Theorem:
a. With the other construction triangle, we tear the two angles off the
triangle that do not correspond to our exterior angle and tape them
together.
b. We slide them over the exterior angle to see that the quantities are equal.
We tape the construction paper angles slightly above the drawn exterior
angle-so we can continue to see it.
c. Then we write the theorem name, and a mathematical representation.
When/Example:
I will use this strategy before teaching a lesson on the Triangle Sum Theorem and the
Exterior Angle Theorem in my geometry class. The students get a physical
representation of the two theorems and get to discover what the theorem means for
themselves. For example I would spend the first part of the class doing this activity, then
I would move into some practice problems where students would get to apply what they
discovered.
Source:
Larner, M., Got crazy conic anyone?

13. Linguine Play:


Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

Full class time


Small groups 3 4
3 pieces of linguine, pencil, notebook

Process Directions:
1) Break one piece of linguine into three pieces, no questions asked.
2) Form a triangle with the three pieces.
3) Break another piece into three pieces in a different way.
4) Form a triangle with the three pieces.
5) In your groups answer the following questions:
a. Do your triangles look like the others built in your group?
b. Do your triangles have the same area? Perimeter?
c. Did everyone succeed in making a triangle
6) If you have not been able to form a triangle with your three pieces, break the
second piece of linguine into three pieces that will form a triangle.
7) If you have two good triangles, break the third piece of linguine into three pieces
such that you CANNOT form a triangle.
8) Discuss in your group when a triangle is possible and when it is not.
9) Each group writes a conclusion based on the relationship of the lengths of the
pieces needed to form a triangle.
10) Using any four pieces, form a quadrilateral.
a. Will ANY four pieces form a quadrilateral?
11) Form a triangle with any three broken pieces.
12) Take it apart, mix them up and put it together again.
a. Are the triangles different?
13) Repeat this step for four pieces.
a. Do you think there is an congruence theorem?
14) If all of the angles and all of the sides were congruent, the quadrilaterals would
be congruent.
15) Explore what minimum conditions would guarantee congruency.
a. Answers are , , and , assuming
corresponding parts.
When/Example:
I would use this strategy as an introduction to the properties of similar quadrilaterals, it
should probably follow the students mastering the properties of similar triangles. The
strategy could also be split into two parts, with the first part being an introduction to
similar triangles and the other being an introduction to similar qudrilaterals.
Source:
Larner, M., Got crazy conic anyone?

14. Tanagrams:
Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

20 30 minutes
Standard Arrangement
1 piece of paper, pencil, compass

Process Directions:
1) Label the corners (vertices) of the square , , , and , beginning with the
upper left hand corner and moving in a clock wise direction.
2) Locate a point on line segment so that it is half way between and .
a. Call it .
3) Repeat step 2 for line segment .
a. Call it . ( and are called midpoints)
4) Draw line segments
and
.
5) Find the midpoint of
and label it .
and label it .
6) Find the midpoint of
7) Find the midpoint of
and label it .
8) Find the midpoint of
and label it .
,
.
,
, and
9) Draw line segments
10) Cut out seven pieces and then try to answer the questions for discussion below.
a. Can you give a geometric name to each of the seven shapes?
b. How do the pieces compare to each other in shape? Size? Area?
c. Choose one of the pieces and assign to it an area of 1 unit. Comparing
the other pieces to the one you chose, what is the area of each of the
other pieces?
d. Does it matter which piece you choose?
e. Can you determine the measures of all the angles of the seven pieces
without the use of any measuring instruments?
When/Example:
I would use this strategy as a kind of review game after completing a unit on similarity,
since this strategy covers the major topics in similarity. It would give students the
practice they would need with similar triangles, squares, 30-60-90 triangles, 45-45-90,
triangles and the relationship between all of their areas.
Source:
Larner, M., Got crazy conic anyone?

15. Political Cartoon:


Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

10 15 minutes
Standard arrangement or small groups
Political cartoon, worksheet/board, pencil

Process Directions:
1) Present class with political cartoon.
2) Who is the Author?
3) What is the place/time of the cartoon?
4) What characters are in the cartoon?
a. Who are they supposed to represent?
5) What is the purpose of the cartoon?
a. What is it telling you?
6) What is the significance of the cartoon?
a. Write a thesis statement that includes the position you would elaborate in
a paragraph.
b. What is the counter-argument one could make against your position?
When/Example:
I would use this strategy in my History & World Cultures class during a lesson on racism.
I would present the class with a political cartoon depicting an African American very
negatively. As a class we would go through the questions.
Source:
Beal, C,, Bolick, C., and Martorella, P. (2009; 2013). Teaching Social Studies in Middle
and Secondary Schools (5th & 6th edition). Boston: Allyn & Bacon, Boston (2009, 2013)

16. Shape Poems:


Basics:
Time Allotted
Room Arrangement
Materials

5 10 minutes
Standard Arrangement
Shape or picture, board

Process Directions:
1) Find a shape that illustrates a topic
2) Students write one work descriptors around the shape that link together and
provide the reader with an understanding of the subject.
When/Example:
I would use this strategy in my History & World Cultures class during a lesson on WWII:
Pacific Theater. For example I would provide the class with a picture of an atomic bomb.
Some of the words might be, Fireball, Explosion, Mushroom Cloud, Nagasaki,
Hiroshima, Japanese Surrender, War with Japan Over.
Source:
Beal, C,, Bolick, C., and Martorella, P. (2009; 2013). Teaching Social Studies in Middle
and Secondary Schools (5th & 6th edition). Boston: Allyn & Bacon, Boston (2009, 2013)