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Edith Feld

Occupational Profile
1. Client name: Chelsea Morris
2. Age: 22
3. Sex: Female
Briefly discuss each of the following
4. Who is the client?
Chelsea Morris is a 22 year old recent college graduate living in Las Vegas, Nevada. She moved to
Las Vegas from Orange County on a swimming scholarship to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
She graduated with a bachelors degree in culinary management and has dreams of opening up her
own pastry and coffee shop. Currently, she works at the local Starbucks where she is working her
way towards a management position.
5. Why is the client seeking services and/or what are the clients concerns relative to engaging in
occupations and in daily life activities?
Chelsea is seeking Occupational Therapy services because she has been having trouble balancing
important things in her life. She really enjoys baking and cooking for family and friends, but
unfortunately her graveyard work schedule has greatly interfered with her ability to spend as much
time as she wants in the kitchen. She also was used to being a morning person, but now has had to
adjust to sleeping during the day in order for her to be rested for work.
6. In what occupations does the client feel successful and what barriers are affecting his or her
success?
Chelsea feels very successful when she performs activities of daily living and instrumental activities
of daily living. One thing she really loves to do is make up her own recipes for meals and desserts as
well as following classic recipes. Unfortunately, her hectic schedule has not allowed her to perform
to her full capacity like helping her roommates clean the apartment or cook in the kitchen. Her busy
schedule has become a huge barrier between her and having time to spend in the kitchen. Another
barrier she mentioned was that she feels more tired now than she used to be. Chelsea said she used to
bake three to four times a week, and now it has dropped to maybe once a week if she has the energy
or time.
7. What aspects of his or her environments or contexts does the client see as supporting
engagement in desired occupations and what aspects are inhibiting engagement?
The physical environment of the kitchen is very large. Chelsea has a lot of room to work, which has
contributed to her skill at cooking a variety of her favorite things at once. There are a lot of tools that
she works with, so she never runs into the problem of not having enough bowls or utensils. There
were not many things that inhibited her from engaging in the activity. She did notice the measuring
cup she wanted to use was still dirty from her roommate using it earlier in the day, so she had to
spend some time cleaning up some tools she wanted to use before actually starting the cake.

8. What is the clients occupational history?


Chelsea grew up in southern California with her parents and siblings, so her main occupation was
engaging in play activities. When she started school her main occupation was being a student and a
swimmer on her communitys team. During her senior year of high school she received a full ride
scholarship to University of Nevada, Las Vegas for swimming. Her last main occupation was being a
student-athlete at UNLV for the past four years. Currently, she is a coffee barista at the Starbucks
down the street from her house.
9. What are the clients values and interests?
Chelsea values teamwork and honesty. She has always enjoyed being a part of a team environment,
so she values each of her coworkers effort each day at work. Honesty is also extremely important to
Chelsea. Since starting at Starbucks she said she has had a lot of friends ask her to get them free
drinks, but she respects the policies implemented at work and would never do anything like that to
jeopardize her job. Chelsea also has a wide variety of interests. She loves to of course bake, but she
also enjoys hiking, swimming, and dancing. She is always out and about with friends and her
boyfriend. She makes friends very easily, so she always has a great time wherever she goes.
10. What are the clients daily life roles?
Chelseas main daily life role is being a coffee barista at Starbucks. Her dream is to manage her own
coffee shop one day, so she has been working towards getting promoted to a manager position at
work. Almost every day after work she spends a couple of hours studying her work binder in order to
complete all necessary steps and tasks needed to work towards the promotion.
11. What are the clients patterns of engagement in occupations
On a daily basis Chelsea wakes up around 11pm to be at work by midnight. After she wakes up she
takes a shower, changes into her work uniform, eats breakfast, and heads out to drive to work. After
her shift ends around 8am she usually goes to the gym because it is right across the street from
Starbucks. When she is done at the gym she will usually head home and relax. She said she finds
herself usually taking random naps on the couch throughout the day. She will make dinner around 3
or 4pm before actually going to bed around 5pm to wake up for her next shift.
12. What are the clients priorities and desired targeted outcomes related to occupational
performance?
Chelseas main priority is to learn how to balance her schedule better since she started working
graveyard shifts at Starbucks. She does not mind the odd hours, but it has drastically affected her
ability to enjoy her free time outside of work. She hopes to improve her quality of life because she
has not been satisfied with how she has been utilizing her time.

Occupational Analysis
1. Occupation: Baking a chocolate cake.
Categorization of occupation for the client:
Subcategory:
1. Activities of daily living
2. Instrumental activities of daily living Meal Preparation & Cleanup
3. Education
4. Work
5. Play
6. Leisure
Leisure Participation
7. Social participation

2. Values, beliefs, spirituality associated with participation:


Chelsea values cooking because it has been a huge part of her familys life for as long as she can
remember. She recalls getting together with her mom for every single birthday to bake a persons
favorite cake. Though she doesnt live with her parents anymore, she continues that tradition by now
baking for her roommates and friends out here in Las Vegas. She believes that food brings people
together, so when she cooks she has the opportunity to spend time with close family and friends.
3. Contexts:
Context
Physical/space demands
Social

Supports
Large kitchen space
She lives with two roommates
that she can always bake for.

Cultural

N/A

Personal

Chelsea is a 22 year old with a


culinary management degree, so
she has a lot of experience in
the kitchen.
Chelsea bakes during the
afternoon on her days off.

Temporal

Virtual

The oven timer has a loud beep,


so Chelsea has the ability to
walk away from the kitchen and
hear the timer go off.

Inhibits
Old appliances
Her roommates are busy as well,
so it is rare that they are both
home to cook for.
N/A
Her busy work schedule does not
allow her to spend as much time
as she used too in the kitchen.
Her days off are during the
week, so her roommates are
either at school or work when
she has the time to bake for
them.
Chelsea does not own an electric
mixer, so she had to mix the
ingredients by hand.

4. Objects and their properties used:


Tools: Large mixing bowl, large spoon, knife, 2 measuring cups, 13 x 9 cake pan
Materials: Cake mix, Pam cooking spray, 1 toothpick, 3 eggs, 1 cups of water, 1/3 cup of
vegetable oil, and chocolate frosting

Equipment: Oven
Properties: Smooth countertop surface

5. Social demands:
Not eating the raw cake batter mix
Cleaning up all tools and used materials after baking
Shutting the oven off after using it
Not letting the egg shells fall in the cake batter mix
Using oven mitts to grab the hot cake pan out of the oven
6. Sequence and timing:
1) Walk to kitchen cabinet
2) Open cabinet door
3) Grab a large mixing bowl
4) Grab a 13 x 9 cake pan
5) Close the cabinet
6) Walk to drawers on opposite side of kitchen
7) Open kitchen drawer
8) Get a large spoon
9) Get a knife
10) Close kitchen drawer
11) Walk to second kitchen cabinet
12) Open kitchen cabinet door
13) Collect 2 liquid measuring cups
14) Close kitchen cabinet door
15) Walk to refrigerator
16) Open refrigerator
17) Collect 3 eggs
18) Close refrigerator
19) Walk to pantry
20) Open pantry door
21) Get 1 toothpick
22) Get a bottle of spray Pam
23) Close pantry door
24) Walk over to the countertop
25) Pour 1 cups of water from the sink into measuring cup
26) Pour 1/3 of a cup of vegetable oil into second measuring cup
27) Walk to oven
28) Set the oven preheat setting to 350 degrees Fahrenheit
29) Walk to countertop
30) Grab Pam spray in one hand
31) Press the nozzle down and spray the entire bottom surface of the cake pan
32) Pour cake mix into mixing bowl
33) Pour water from measuring cup into mixing bowl
34) Pour vegetable oil from measuring cup into mixing bowl
35) Pick up an egg in one hand

36) Tap the egg against the edge of the mixing bowl until a crack is formed
37) Bring egg above the mixing bowl
38) Using both of your hands, carefully separate by pulling shell apart, letting the egg fall into the
bowl
39) Repeat steps 35-38 with all 3 eggs
40) Throw egg shells away in garbage
41) Mix ingredients for 3 minutes with large spoon (batter will be lumpy)
42) Pour mixed batter into cake pan
43) Carry cake pan over to the oven
44) Open the oven
45) Put cake on the oven rack
46) Close the oven
47) Bake in oven for 29-34 minutes
48) Listen for oven timer to ding
49) Put oven mits on both hands
50) Open oven
51) Take cake out of the oven
52) Place cake pan on the countertop
53) Close oven
54) Let the cake cool for 10 minutes
55) Pick up toothpick
56) Put toothpick in cake
57) Take toothpick out of the cake
58) Look to see if any of the cake comes off on the toothpick
59) If no cake is on the toothpick - Skip to Step 65
60) If cake is on the toothpick place cake pan back in the oven
61) Set timer for 5 more minutes
62) Take cake out of oven when 5 minutes is completed
63) Place on countertop
64) Close the oven
65) Turn oven off
66) Pick up knife off of the countertop
67) Put knife in frosting can
68) Scoop frosting onto the knife
69) Spread frosting with a knife on top of the cake
70) Continue until the top of the cake is covered with frosting
71) Cake is complete

7. Body functions required:


Function

How It Is Used

Judgment

Chelsea had to
determine whether
or not the cake had

None

Minimally
Challenged

Greatly
Challenged

Concept formation

Metacognition

Cognitive flexibility

Insight/awareness

Concentration

Sustained attention

Selective attention

Divided attention

cooled enough to
eat.
She had to
understand how to
bake a cake and
how to apply that
knowledge when
making it.
She thought about
what kind of cake
to make for her
roommates
birthday.
When she noticed
the measuring cup
was dirty, Chelsea
knew to clean it
before pouring any
liquid in it.
She set the oven
timer to a specific
number because
she knew she
wouldnt be able to
keep track of the
amount of time that
passed by for the
cake to bake.
She focused on
how much oil she
had to pour in,
making sure not to
over pour.
She focused on the
egg that she
cracked into the
mixing bowl.
She ignored her
cellphone when it
rang while mixing
the cake batter.
She scooped the
batter out of the
bowl with a spoon
and poured it into
the cake pan while
holding the mixing
bowl. She had to
divide her attention
between scooping
the batter and
holding the bowl.

Short-term memory

Working memory

Long-term memory

Discrimination of senses: Auditory

Discrimination of senses: Tactile

Discrimination of senses: Visual

Discrimination of senses: Olfactory

Discrimination of senses: Vestibularproprioception

Multisensory processing

She used her short


term memory to
know that the
vegetable oil she
poured into the
measuring cup was
going to be poured
into the cake batter
mix.
She used her
working memory
to follow the step
by step instructions
on the cake mix
box to bake the
cake.
She used her prior
knowledge of
knowing how to
bake a cake and
implemented it into
the current cake
she was baking.
She listened for the
ding of the oven
timer, which
signaled the cake
was ready.
She used her hands
to hold the tools
and materials used
to make the cake.
She looked at how
much water to pour
in the cake batter
mixture.
She smelled the
delicious scent of
the cake being
baked in the oven,
which let her know
that it was almost
done.
She had to balance
herself when
standing on her feet
when baking the
cake so she
wouldnt fall.
She used her vision
to see how much
more the batter
needed to mix

Sensory Memory

Spatial relationships

Temporal relationships

Recognition

Categorization

Generalization

Awareness of reality
Logical/coherent thought

Appropriate thought content


Mental functions of sequencing
complex movement

while using her


tactile senses to
hold the bowl
securely in place
on the table.
She knew that an
oven is hot and if
she touched it
while putting the
cake pan in it she
could put herself at
risk for a burn.
She knew where to
place the cake pan
on the oven rack so
it would cook
properly.
She knew how
many minutes she
needed to put the
cake in the oven so
it would cook
thoroughly.
She recognized
each specific
ingredient needed
for the cake.
She put all of the
cake ingredients
together in the
mixing bowl.
She used her past
experiences of
cooking and
applied it to the
current cake she
was baking.
None.
She used logical
thought to follow
the provided
instructions on the
cake mix box to
make the cake.
None.
To mix the batter
Chelsea had to
combine a
sequence of
movements from
her shoulder,

X
X

X
X

Regulation and range of emotion


Appropriateness of emotion

Coping
Behavioral regulation
Body image
Self-concept

Self-esteem

Arousal

Consciousness

Orientation to self

Orientation to place
Orientation to time
Orientation to others
Energy level

elbow, wrist, and


finger joints.
None.
Chelsea was happy
when the final
product of her
chocolate cake
tasted delicious.
None.
None.
None.
She was aware that
she was in the
kitchen that she
shares with her two
roommates.
Chelsea had the
confidence to bake
her own chocolate
cake.
She must be awake
and alert when
cooking in the
kitchen.
She must be
conscious enough
to understand the
listed instructions
on the back of the
cake box.
Chelsea knew she
was cooking in her
kitchen.
None.
None.
None.
She had enough
energy to cook an
entire cake without
becoming tired.

Function

How It Is Used

Motivation

She had a lot of


motivation to make
a delicious cake.
None.
The aroma of the
cake baking in the
oven increased her
desire to eat.
None.

Impulse control
Appetite

Sleep

X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X

None

Minimally
Challenged

X
X

Greatly
Challenged

Detection/registration

Visual modulation

Integration of senses

Awareness at distances

Tolerance of ambient sounds


Location and distance of sounds

Moving against gravity

Taste

Smell

Body in space

Comfort with touch


Localizing pain
Thermal awareness
Joint mobility

She was able to


identify the
ingredients she
needed to make the
chocolate cake.
She had the ability
to recognize the
un-baked cake and
not eat it until it
was baked
thoroughly.
She saw the cake
pan where she had
to pour the cake
batter from the
bowl in her hands.
She knew how far
the oven was from
the countertop
when putting the
cake pan into the
oven.
None.
When she stepped
away from the
kitchen for a
moment she heard
the sound of the
oven timer beep,
which signaled that
the cake was done.
She held the cake
pan in her hands
against gravity.
She tasted the
chocolate cake
after it was done
baking.
She smelled the
scent of the cake
baking in the oven.
She knew where
her hands were
when taking the
cake out of the
oven to avoid
getting burned.
None.
None.
None.
She needed full
range of motion in

X
X

X
X
X
X

Joint stability/alignment

Muscle power

Muscle tone

Muscle endurance

Stretch reflex
ATNR
STNR
Righting and supporting reflex

Eye-hand coordination

Bilateral coordination

Crossing midline

Fine motor control

her upper
extremities to stir
the contents in the
mixing bowl for
three minutes.
She aligned herself
in front of the bowl
to mix the cake
batter.
Muscle power was
needed for her to
stir the cake batter
mixture.
She needed normal
muscle tone to
perform the
activity of baking.
Muscle endurance
was needed for her
to mix the batter
continuously until
it was blended
completely.
None.
None.
None.
She stood the entire
time she baked the
cake, so her
righting reflex
helped prevent her
from falling over.
She used eye-hand
coordination to
pour the cake batter
from the bowl that
was in her hands
directly into the
cake pan.
She carried the
mixing bowl with
both hands to
where the cake pan
was on the counter.
She crossed her
midline when
reaching for the big
spoon on the
counter to mix the
batter with.
She pinched a
toothpick in

X
X
X
X

Blood pressure
Heart rate
Respiratory rate
Respiratory rhythm
Respiratory depth
Physical endurance, aerobic capacity
Voice functions
Voice rhythm and fluency
Alternative vocalization
Digestive system
Metabolic system
Endocrine system

between her first


and second finger
to place it in the
cake, which helped
her determine
whether or not the
cake was baked
completely.
She poured the dry
cake batter mix in
the bowl.
She used her eyes
to find all of the
needed materials
for the cake.
Normal gait
patterns were used
for her to walk
around the kitchen.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

Function

How It Is Used

Urinary functions
Genital and reproductive function
Protective functions of the skin
Repair functions of the skin

None.
None.
None.
None.

Gross motor control

Oculomotor control

Gait patterns

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
None

Minimally
Challenged

Greatly
Challenged

X
X
X
X

8. Muscular analysis of movements required:


Muscle
Shoulder flexion
Shoulder extension
Shoulder abduction
Shoulder adduction
Shoulder internal rotation
Shoulder external rotation
Elbow flexion
Elbow extension
Wrist supination
Wrist pronation

Not used

Minimally
challenged
X

Greatly challenged

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Wrist flexion
Wrist extension
Thumb flexion
Thumb abduction
Finger flexion
Finger extension
Trunk flexion
Trunk extension
Trunk rotation
Lower extremities

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

9. Performance skills required:

Skill- Motor

How It Is Used

Aligns

She aligned
herself in front of
the mixing bowl
on the counter.
She stabilized her
hands on the
measuring cup
when pouring in
the vegetable oil.
She positioned
herself close to
counter to mix
the ingredients.
She reached for
the knife to
spread the
frosting on the
cake.
She bent over to
put the cake pan
in the oven.
She gripped the
spoon in her right
hand when
mixing the
ingredients.
She manipulated
her fingers on the
eggs to crack
them precisely so
the shells
wouldnt break
and fall into the
mix.

Stabilizes

Positions

Reaches

Bends

Grips

Manipulates

None

Minimally
Challenged

Greatly
Challenged

Coordinates

Moves

Lifts

Walks

Transports

Calibrates

Flows

Endures

Paces

She coordinated
her upper and
lower extremity
movements when
moving around
the kitchen to
bake the cake.
She closed the
refrigerator door
after she grabbed
the eggs.
She lifted up the
measuring cup to
pour the
vegetable oil in
the mix.
She walked from
the oven to the
opposite
countertop.
She transported
the cake mix box
from the cabinet
to the countertop.
Not crushing the
egg shells in her
hand when
cracking the eggs
on the side of the
bowl.
She used fluid
arm movements
to mix the
ingredients
together in the
bowl.
She stirred the
entire mixture of
ingredients
together without
taking a break.
She utilized the
entire three
minutes of
stirring time in
order to prevent
her arm from
tiring out while
mixing the batter.

Skill- Process

How It Is Used

Paces

She paced herself


when mixing the

None

Minimally
Challenged

Greatly
Challenged

Attends

Heeds

Chooses

Uses

Handles

Inquires
Initiates

Continues

Sequences

Terminates

cake batter for


three minutes to
avoid getting
tired midway
through.
She focused on
pouring the exact
amount of water
into the
measuring cup as
stated in the
instructions.
She completed
all of the steps on
the instructions
that were listed
on the back of
the cake mix box.
She picked the
pan she wanted
to bake the cake
in.
She used a spoon
to mix the batter
instead of a fork.
She stabilized the
mixing bowl with
one hand as she
mixed the batter
with her other
hand.
None.
She poured the
cake batter into
the cake pan after
she finished
mixing it without
hesitation.
She put all of the
ingredients in the
bowl without
pausing.
She performed
the step by step
instructions on
how to bake the
cake.
She poured the
vegetable oil into
the measuring
cup until it hit 1
cup.

X
X

Searches/locates

Gathers

Organizes

Restores

Navigates

Notices/responds

Adjusts

Accommodates

Benefits

She looked for a


large bowl in the
kitchen to mix
the ingredients
in.
She gathered the
ingredients,
tools, and
materials needed
to bake the cake.
She kept all of
the ingredients
together and all
of the tools
together on the
counter.
She put the
vegetable oil
bottle back in the
cabinet when she
was done with it.
She navigated
her way through
the kitchen when
collecting items
to bake the cake.
When the timer
ran out and
beeped she
responded by
taking the cake
out of the oven.
She adjusted the
knob on the oven
to the appropriate
temperature
needed to bake
the cake.
She left the cake
in the oven for a
longer period of
time when she
realized it wasnt
baked
thoroughly.
She periodically
checked on the
cake to make
sure it was not
burning.

Skill- Social interaction


NOT APPLICABLE TO ACTIVITY

How It Is Used

Approaches/starts

None.

None

Minimally
Challenged

Greatly
Challenged

Produces speech
Gesticulates
Speaks fluently
Turns Toward
Looks
Places self
Touches
Regulates
Questions
Replies
Discloses
Expresses emotion
Disagrees
Thanks
Transitions
Times response
Times duration
Takes turns
Matches language
Clarifies
Acknowledges and encourages
Empathizes
Heeds
Accommodates
Benefits

None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

10. Performance patterns:


Parts of this occupation has elements of which of the following: (check all that apply)

Pattern
Useful habit

X
Dominating habit
Routine
Ritual
Role

Describe
Chelsea never takes the first bite of her baked goods. She always makes
sure that someone, like her roommate, has the first taste.

Intervention Plan
1. Identify 1 objective and measurable goal of the intervention:
Chelsea will take a one hour nap in her room after each work shift within one month.
a. According to OTPF what type of outcome is this?
This outcome would be categorized as quality of life because if Chelsea improves her
ability to sleep by taking a nap during the day, she will give herself more energy and time
to perform and participate in the leisurely activities she enjoys such as baking. Her life
will then be well-balanced and she may become a lot happier.
2. Intervention approach:

Approach
Create/promote

Describe

Establish/restore

The practitioner will collaborate with the client and help her construct a
structured sleep schedule, which will improve her ability to perform other
forms of occupations outside of work.

Maintain
Modify
Prevent

3. Activity selection
a. Activity selection: Identify 1 example of each for the intervention plan
Activity
Occupation

Describe
Setting up Chelseas nap routine for the days she works a graveyard shift and
implementing it in her schedule.

Activity

Sitting down and writing out the exact nap schedule in accordance with her
work schedule.

Preparatory method

She will read a chapter of a book from her collection before going to sleep.

Preparatory task

She will breathe calmly for one minute to promote relaxation before falling
asleep for her nap.

b. Discuss how activity selection relates back to occupational profile and occupational
analysis.

Chelsea has always been extremely passionate about cooking and it is something she
really wants to implement back into her weekly schedule. Ever since she began working
graveyard she has had trouble balancing her occupation of work and her favorite leisure
activities, so she wants to learn how to manage her sleep schedule better in order to
accommodate everything she wants to do.
c. Discuss how activity selection will support achievement of client identified goals and
goal of the intervention plan.
Since Chelsea is very passionate about cooking I believe she will really be motivated to
work on bettering her sleep schedule. In order for her to bake and cook the things she
wants to, Chelsea knows she needs to manage her sleep schedule better so she has the
energy.
4. Describe how intervention can be graded or adapted and why
The sleep intervention plan can be graded up by having Chelsea pick a new preparatory method
to perform before taking one of her daily naps. It can be graded down by having one of her
roommates wake her up after an hour has passed. The sleep intervention plan can also be easily
adapted. It is preferred that Chelsea first starts off by sleeping in her room where she can block
the sunlight with her window shades and curtains, so it feels like night when taking her nap.
This would allow her to possibly fall asleep easier during the day. Once she is consistently taking
her scheduled daily naps she can change it up by taking a nap in the living room where it is
lighter. If she is not able to fall asleep with the light shining in she can easily get up and go back
to the room setting where she is most comfortable.

5. Discuss any safety concerns and/or precautions


If Chelsea were not to get an adequate amount of sleep per day she could risk her life by falling
asleep while driving to work, falling asleep at work, or put herself in danger in any situation she
puts herself in. She also could put others at risk by not having the ability to gear her full attention
towards the occupations she is performing.
6. Discuss the role of the occupational therapy practitioner during the intervention
The occupational therapist would not directly be watching Chelsea sleep, but be involved with
helping her organize a routine that fits her daily schedule. The therapist would be there to
encourage Chelsea throughout the process. A sleep intervention plan requires an individual to
perform a variety of methods and tasks that work for them, so the practitioner could assist
Chelsea with choosing the just right techniques that allow her to fall asleep easier and manage
her time better.
7. Discuss what is expected of the client during the intervention?
The client is expected to follow the planned sleep schedule the practitioner provides, so she can
get used to her new daily schedule. She is also expected to let the practitioner know whether or

not the methods and tasks being used help or hinder her ability to fall asleep. Chelsea is also
expected to communicate with the therapist throughout the process of the intervention in order to
find the right fit for her.