You are on page 1of 29

The 5­E Lesson Model  

Lesson Plan #​

Social Control  
  
Introduction: 
Norms must be followed for a society to run smoothly, and they are enforced through internalization 
and sanctions. 
  

Objectives: 
 Content/Knowledge: 
1.
Recognize how social norms become internalized 
2.
Compare and Contrast the difference between positive sanctions and negative sanction  
3.
Differentiate the difference between formal and informal sanctions  
4.
Examine how enforcing norms through either internal or external means causes social control 
  
  

Process/Skills: 
1.
Create their own example  sanction and be able to defend the importance of it.  
2.
Use sanctions in a real life setting. 
  
  

Values/Dispositions: 
1.
Judge how social control is used to control their daily lives. 
2.
Interpret the necessity of using sanctions. 
  

Standards: 
State – Illinois Learning Standards: 
 ​

1.​
   ​
Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies: 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, 
publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new 
arguments or information. 
  

National – National Council for the Social Studies Standards: 
1.
2.
3.
4.

III. People, Places, and Continuity: g. describe how people create places that reflect ideas, personality, 
culture, and wants and needs as they design homes, playgrounds, classrooms, and the like; 
V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions: c. identify examples of institutions and describe the interactions 
of people with institutions; 
V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions: f. give examples of the role of institutions in furthering both 
continuity and change;  
VII. Production, Distribution, and Consumption: f. describe the influence of incentives, values, traditions, 
and habits on economic decisions;  

  

National – National Standards for History 
1. 
UCLA Department of History Contemporary U.S. National Standards: 2d. The student understands 
contemporary American culture. 

 
 

Syntax – Procedures 
  

 

1. 

Engagement​

a​

Teacher Instructions 

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

7.
b​

Before class comes into room, place public shaming article [D­1] at 
students desk. 
Write on whiteboard “When Class Starts Begin Reading Article”  
When the students begin to come into class, simply sit at your desk and 
observe students.  
When a student is sitting quietly at their desk, give them a lollipop.  
Observe whether other students recognize this positive sanction and do 
the same.  
Once 5 minutes have passed or all students have caught on and earned 
a lollipop, initiate conversation by asking students “Does anyone know 
why I was giving lollipops to certain people?” 
Discuss with students how you used a positive sanction to enforce 
conformity in the classroom. 

Resource 

1.
2.
3.

Public Shaming Article [D­1] 
Lollipops  
White Board 

1.

Teacher will instruct students to read [D­1] by writing these instructions 
on the board. 
Teacher will have students analyze and discuss the experiment and will 
be able to answer the question as to why certain people were able to 
obtain a lollipop. 

c.​
        ​
Student Activity 

2.

 
 
 
 
 

2. 

Exploration: 

a. Teacher Instructions 

1.
2.
3.

4.
5.

b. 

Teacher will hand out a worksheet on conformity. [D­2] 
Teacher will pull up a PowerPoint Presentation on Conformity and 
Internalizing Norms [P­1] 
Teacher will lead a presentation where students are asked to answer the 
questions on the slides and in the worksheet and interpret the picture on 
the slide.  
Teacher will then initiate discussion on each picture once students are 
done filling out their worksheets.  
Teacher will explore the students perspective on the cartoons by posing 
questions from the teachers questioning sheet, while going to the slide 
on the PowerPoint in which the picture being discussed. [Q­1] 

Resource 

1.
2.
3.

Conformity PowerPoint Presentation [P­1] 
Conformity Worksheet [D­2] 
Questioning Sheet (teacher purposes only) [Q­1] 

1.

Teacher will have students analyze, answer, and take notes on the 
Conformity Worksheet [D­2] 
Teacher will have students vocally share their perspective by answering 
questions about the picture being studied. 
Teacher will have students answer questions that the teacher will pose 
for discussion after completion of worksheet activity and 
worksheet/PowerPoint presentation discussion. 

c.​
        ​
Student Activity 

2.
3.

3. 

Explanation: 

a. Teacher Instructions 

1.
2.
b. 

Teacher will hand out social control and sanction worksheet for the 
students to fill out while being presented the slideshow. [D­3] 
Teacher will lead a question/discussion based presentation on the 
smartboard by using and following a PowerPoint presentation. [P­2] 

Resource 

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Dead Poets Society Conformity Video [L­1] 
Center For Disease Control And Prevention: Smoking and Tobacco Use 
[L­2] [D­4] 
Public Shaming Article [D­1] 
Social Control and Sanctions Worksheet [D­3] 
PowerPoint Presentation [P­2] 

c.​
        ​
Student Activity 

1.
2.

Teacher will have students take notes and answer questions based off of 
the slides presented. 
Teacher will have students take notes on the slides being presented to 
them by filling  out the information on the handouts given to them [D­3] 

3.

Teacher will lead students in a discussion about the information and 
questions being asked in the presentation slides.  

 

 
 
 
 
4. 

Elaboration: 

a. 

Teacher Instructions 

1.
2.

3.
4.
5.
b. 

Teacher will hand out the article and corresponding worksheet for the 
3­level guide. [D­5] [D­5.5] 
Teacher will tell students how they will be determining if the texts said 
the literal statements presented, if the text suggested the idea presented, 
or if the student agrees with the statement.  
Teacher will instruct students that they must have examples from the text 
to back up their response.  
Teacher will give 10­15 minutes to allow students to complete this 
reading and worksheet. 
Teacher will instruct students that whatever is not completed will be 
homework.  

Resource 

1.
2.

Article for the 3­level Guide [D­5] 
3­level Guide Worksheet [D­5.5] 

1.

Teacher will have students read article and fill in the worksheet as told in 
the directions on each sheet.  

c.​
        ​
Student Activity 

 

5. 

Evaluation: 

a. 

Teacher Instructions 

1.
2.
3.
4.

5.
6.
7.

Teacher will hand out the rubric [D­6] and guidelines [D­7] for the 
breaking a social norm project. 
Teacher will hand out a document that has examples of norms that are 
acceptable to break for their project. [D­8] 
Teacher will have the students pick their groups for this project, but there 
may only be 3 students per group.  
Because students will be picking their groups, the teacher will stress the 
importance of picking people that will do the work and not leave it for the 
end.  
Teacher will make it clear that no law is to be broken. 
Teacher will make it clear that the students will be doing a deviant act, 
but this does not mean silly or crazy. 
Teacher will make it clear that the students will be breaking an everyday 
norm that is seen in society.  

8.
9.
10.
11.
b. 

Teacher will make it clear that the acts must be performed seriously and 
without laughter. 
Teacher will express that for each time the norm is broken, an individual 
must record on a phone or camera the response of those around them. 
Teacher will allow the rest of the class period to be used for the groups 
to discuss possibilities for the project. 
Teacher will inform students that this project will be due 3 weeks from 
today. 

Resource 

1.
2.
3.

Rubric for breaking social norm project [D­6] 
Guidelines for breaking social norm project [D­7] 
Examples of norms to break for the breaking social norm project. [D­8] 

1.

Teacher will have students read the rubric, guidelines, and examples for 
the breaking a social norm project. 
Teacher will allow students to form groups of 3. 
Teacher will allow the rest of the period to be used for the groups to 
meet and begin discussing what they will potentially do for their breaking 
social norm project.  

 

c.​
        ​
Student Activity 

2.
3.

  

Resources (Source Citations & Bookmarks) 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

[D­1]  
Public Shaming Article  
 

Tough love: Sixth­grader suspended by school for 
cursing at teacher is forced to wear apology sign by 
mother  
The South Florida 12­year­old boy had some choice words for his teacher, but Lisette Lopez 
came up with her own punishment to fit the crime. 
BY​
 ​
DAVID BOROFF  
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
A sixth­grader found himself suspended from his South Florida school for three days for 
cursing at a teacher. But the boy's mother didn’t feel that punishment went quite far enough. 
Lisette Lopez forced 12­year­old son Erol Faustin to dress in a suit and tie and carry a large 
sign in front of the Oakland Park school as kids were arriving Monday, and again when they 
were leaving, according to 7News. 
The boy would have to repeat this for the other days he was suspended. 
"I disrespected my teacher. I would like to apologize not only to that teacher but to all adults," 
the sign read in part. When asked by a local 7News reporter whether he believes he did 
anything wrong, Erol responded "Yes." 
The boy can be seen crying as he was observed by other students, but his mother insists the 
idea was just to send a message to her son."This isn't for a punishment," she told 7News. "It's 
for him to understand that I tried everything I could and if this is what it takes, this is what it 
takes." 

Erol was suspended from James S. Rickards Middle School for telling his teacher he doesn't 
give an "f", "b" after being asked to remove his bookbag, his mom told 7News. 
Lisette Lopez also says that despite long talks and even counseling sessions, Erol has been 
acting like a "class clown." 
"He has tons of support at home, tons of support from the after­school system and nothing's 
working," Lopez told 7News. "He doesn't want to listen to anybody but his friends. Maybe 
that's what he needed." 
Many of the students who saw Erol with the sign applauded the mother's approach, but the 
unconventional move may not have the results that Lopez desires. 
"What we know is that shaming is a child is not helpful," Dr. Nadine Kaslow, a clinical 
psychologist with Emory University, told the Daily News. "The intent of the apology is a good 
one, but that apology can be a private apology that can be directed at the person or people 
the disrespect occurred." 
  
Kaslow, who specializes in children and families, says parents often get frustrated when their 
kids keep acting up because there is no simple solution. 
  
"When parents have a child who gets in trouble, they often feel at wits end," says Dr. Kaslow, 
who is president­elect of the American Psychological Association. "They are not sure what to 
do." 
  
Dr. Kaslow also said that just like our legal system, you should not be punished twice for the 
same misbehavior.  
  
"If the school lands a punishment, I don't think the parents need to do one too," she said. 
 

 
 

[D­2] 
Conformity Worksheet 
 
Name_____________________ 
 

Conformity: 
Action or behavior in correspondence with socially accepted standards, 
conventions, rules, or laws 
 

 
1. What does this cartoon say to you about conformity? What is your 
interpretation? Be specific. 
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________ 

 
 
1.
2.
3.

What is thinking “outside of the box?”  
What does it mean to “think about the box?”  
Pick either cartoon and tell me your interpretation of what it is 
symbolizing.  
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________ 

 
 
 
1. What is this cartoon illustrating about conformity and taking action? 
2. What is this cartoon illustrating about conformity and your role as a 
citizen? 
3. What is this cartoon illustrating about conformity and leadership? 
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________ 

 
 
1. What is your interpretation of this cartoon? Be specific. 
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
_________________________________ 

 
1. What are ways in which we imitate each other?  
2. What are examples of ways in which we conform? 
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________ 

 

[D­3] 
Social Control and Sanctions Worksheet  
Name_________________ 

 

[D­4] 
Center For Disease Control and Prevention  
Smoke-Free Policies Improve Health
Overview
Exposure to secondhand smoke from burning tobacco products causes disease and premature
death among nonsmokers.There is no risk-free level of secondhand smoke, and even brief
exposure can cause immediate harm. Studies have shown that smokefree laws that prohibit
smoking in public places like bars and restaurants help improve the health of workers and the
general population. Some of these improvements in health outcomes, such as reductions in
hospital admissions for heart attacks, begin to be realized shortly after the laws take effect.

Scientific Reviews
Hospitality Workers’ Health
In 2009, a report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded
that there is sufficient evidence (the highest level of evidence under the report’s
rating scale) that implementation of smokefree legislation decreases respiratory
symptoms in workers.
Hospitality Workers’ Health
● In 2009, a report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer
concluded that there is strong evidence (the second highest level of
evidence under the report’s rating scale) that implementation of
smokefree legislation causes a decline in heart disease morbidity.
● In 2010, a report by the Institute of Medicine concluded that there is a
causal relationship between smokefree laws and decreases in acute
coronary events, although the report was unable to estimate the
magnitude of this association.

● In 2010, a Cochrane review of 12 studies found consistent evidence of a
reduction in hospital admissions for cardiac events following
implementation of smokefree laws.
● In 2010, a meta-analysis of 17 studies of the effect of smokefree laws
on acute coronary events reported a pooled estimate of relative risk of
0.90 (95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 0.94) and concluded that a
large body of evidence exists supporting a reduction in acute coronary
events following the implementation of smokefree laws, with the effect
increasing over time.
● In 2012, a random-effects meta-analysis of 45 studies of 33 smokefree
laws with a median follow-up of 24 months (range: 2–57 months) found
that comprehensive smokefree laws were associated with lower rates of
hospital admissions or deaths for:
○ Coronary events (relative risk: 0.848)
○ Other heart disease (relative risk: 0.610)
○ Cerebrovascular accidents (relative risk: 0.840)
○ Respiratory disease (relative risk: 0.760)
● The difference in risk did not change with longer follow-up. More
comprehensive laws were associated with larger decreases in risk.

 
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/se
condhand_smoke/protection/improve_health/  
 
 
 
 
 
 

[P­1] 
Conformity PowerPoint Presentation 
 

Conformity PowerPoint 
Presentation  
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

[P­2]  
Social Control and Sanctions PowerPoint Presentation  
 

Social Control and Sanctions 
PowerPoint Presentation  
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Lollipops  
 

 
 

 

 
 

[D­5]  
Social Control and Sanctions 3­Level Guide  
“Social Control: Law” 
 
Law 
 
Social control entails rules of behavior that should be followed by the members of a society. 
Some of the rules of conduct fall into the realm of good manners as the culture defines them.  As such 
they describe behavior that is socially desirable but not necessarily compulsory.   Other rules of 
conduct are not optional and are enforced by laws.  In complex, large­scale societies, laws are usually 
written down formally so that they can be known clearly to everyone.  This is not the case with laws in 
small­scale societies such as those of foragers, pastoralists, and horticulturalists.  Their laws 
commonly are much more informal, being rarely written down.  Since they are part of the evolving oral 
tradition that is familiar to members of these societies, there is no need to explain them to anyone. 
However, people visiting from other societies are not likely to know what the laws are until there is a 
dispute. 
How laws come about varies.  In small­scale societies, they usually evolve over time and are part of 
the cultural tradition.  These are referred to as ​
common laws​
.  In large­scale societies, many laws 
derive from old common laws that are now formalized by being written down in penal codes.  Other 
laws in these complex societies do not evolve organically but are created by enactment in legislatures 
or by rulers.  These may or may not be codifications of existing social norms.  Those laws that parallel 
the existing norms usually are more likely to be accepted and followed without coercion. 
It is not uncommon for some laws to be confusing because they are inconsistent or open to 
interpretation in different situations.  Murder laws in the United States provide an example.  Killing 
another individual is considered to be a serious crime except when it is done in self­defense or in 
battle during a war.  When it is defined as a crime, there can be mitigating circumstances that lessen 
the seriousness of the crime.  U.S. state legal codes commonly make a distinction between murder in 
the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree.  In addition there can be 1st and 2nd degree manslaughter.  The age 
and mental state of the killer are often also extenuating circumstances.  Some states consider advising 
or aiding in suicide as being a crime.  Killing certain classes of people, such as law enforcement 
officers, often calls for a harsher sentence as does murder with a gun in the act of committing another 
crime.  The killing of a pregnant woman is considered murder, but the simultaneous killing of her 
unborn child is not necessarily murder.  This is because American society today is divided on the 
understanding of when human life legally begins.  
Crimes and disputes are rarely simple matters in any society.  Laws may be open to 
interpretation, and there often is a difference of opinion about the evidence.  Even when guilt is 
established, there can be a difference of opinion about the appropriate punishment or terms of 
settlement.  Because these issues are open to differing conclusions, most societies settle legal cases 
by the agreement of the entire community or a representative sample of it.  Jury systems around the 

world usually are based on this idea.  The assumption is made that jurors will come to an 
understanding that would be acceptable to a "​
reasonable man​
."  In most societies in the past, the 
"reasonable man" was thought to be just that, a man.  Women and children were not thought to be 
reasonable, nor were uneducated poor men.  Subsequently, they were excluded from being jurors and 
judges.  This is still the situation in some of the more traditional societies of the Middle East and some 
other regions. 
Law is by no means the only method for controlling the behavior of deviant individuals.  People 
who violate norms can be subjected to gossip, public ridicule, social ostracism, insults, and even 
threats of physical harm by other members of their community.  These kinds of ​
informal negative 
sanctions​
 are very effective in small­scale societies.  In larger societies, this method also works 
effectively in small towns and sub­groups of cities, such as a family, work group, church, or club.  
In some societies, social control involves the threat of supernatural punishment from the gods 
or ancestral spirits for deviation from the norm.  Since it is assumed that crimes against other people in 
these societies are likely to be punished whether they are publicly known or not, this belief in divine 
retribution provides a powerful tool for getting people to behave properly.  The possibility that others 
could use witchcraft against deviant individuals also is a common effective coercive mechanism for 
bringing people into line, especially in small­scale non­western societies. 
Some societies emphasize the use of positive sanctions to reward appropriate behavior rather 
than negative ones to punish those who do not conform to the social norms.  Common ​
positive 
sanctions​
 include praise and granting honors or awards.  Simply receiving the esteem of one's peers 
is often sufficient motivation for people to be model citizens.  Examples of effective positive sanctions 
in the United States include such things as military promotions, ticker­tape parades, and receiving 
good grades in school.  In order to be effective, a positive sanction does not need to offer an 
immediate reward.  It can be a supernatural reward following death.  The Judeo­Christian and Moslem 
belief that entry into heaven must be earned by a life of good behavior is an example.  Similarly, the 
Hindu and Buddhist belief that a good life results in being reborn at a higher level of existence is a 
promise of a future supernatural reward. 
Some norms in every society usually can be ignored without fear of punishment.  Being a loner 
or dressing oddly are examples of such minor deviations from the norms in North America today. 
Individuals who do these things may be labeled strange, eccentric, or independent but rarely criminal. 
Which of these alternative labels is applied may depend on who the deviant individual happens to be. 
One's gender, ethnicity, age, wealth, and social class are likely to be important factors.  Strange 
behavior by rich, well dressed people is likely to be considered eccentric, while the same behavior by 
poor people living on the street is more likely to be defined as criminal.  This is especially true if the 
deviant individuals are strangers and members of a subculture that is stereotyped as being "trouble 
makers."  Consistently odd behavior by a homeless woman on the street is likely to cause others to 
question her mental health and seek assistance for her, while the same behavior by a homeless man 
may be seen as a potential danger to society and get him arrested for creating a public disturbance. 

Is either of these 
men 
committing a crime 
or 
are they only acting 
oddly?  How do you 
think a policeman 
would interpret 
these 
situations? 

  

  

  

 

What Is A Crime? 
A ​
crime​
 is a deviation from the social norm that is of such magnitude as to go beyond what 
would be considered bad manners or odd behavior.  Societies respond to such exceptionally deviant 
actions by creating laws to curb and sometimes punish them.  There is no universal agreement 
between the societies of the world about what constitutes criminal behavior or how it should be dealt 
with.  Sufficient ​
ethnographic​
 data have been collected over the last century to show that societies with 
different kinds of economies have radically different sorts of laws and legal concerns.  Some activities 
that are defined as serious crimes in foraging societies are often not thought of as criminal at all in 
large­scale agricultural ones.  The reverse is also true.  The way these two dissimilar kinds of societies 
deal with crime is radically different as well.  In order to understand these differences, it is necessary to 
examine their concepts of what constitutes crime and their approaches to dealing with it. 
 
http://anthro.palomar.edu/control/con_2.htm  
 
This page was last updated on Monday, July 10, 2006. 
Copyright © 2004­2006 by Dennis O'Neil. All rights reserved. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Name____________________________ 

[D­5.5] 
Social Control and Sanctions 3­Level Guide  
“Social Control: Law” 
 
Directions:​
 ​
Read the text and then look at the following statements. Respond to the 
statements in each section. Tick if you agree, cross if you disagree. 
 

Part 1: 
As you read the article “Social Control: Law”  decide which statements below are clearly 
stated in the text. Mark each statement that is ​
clearly stated and be prepared to support your 
choice. 
_______1. Social Control entails rules of behavior that should be followed by society and can 
be optional or law. 
 
_______2. Large­Scale societies usually have laws that are formally written down so they are 
known clearly to everyone. 
 
_______3.Laws that parallel existing norms usually are more likely to be accepted and 
followed without coercion.  
 
_______4.  Laws that come about vary depending on whether they are from small­scale 
societies or large­scale societies  
 
_______5.Small­Scale societies make it hard for those in other societies to know their laws. 
 
_______6. Small­Scale societies have much more informal laws that are rarely written down 
since they are part of oral tradition.  

 
Part 2: 
Read the following statements. Mark each statement that ​
expressed an idea that can be 
supported with the information in the text​
. Be prepared to discuss the supporting evidence 
that led you to your choices.  
_______1. Laws can be confusing since they are inconsistent or open to interpretation in 
different situations. 
 

_______2. Killing certain classes of people, such as law enforcement, often calls for a harsher 
sentence. 
 
_______3. The killing of a pregnant woman is considered murder, but the simultaneous killing 
of her unborn child is not necessarily murder. 
 
_______4. Laws may be open to interpretation, and there often is a difference of opinion 
about the evidence. 
 
_______5. Women, children, and poor men were excluded from being jurors and judges since 
they were not accepted as "reasonable man." 
 
_______6. Informal negative and positive sanctions provide another method for controlling the 
behavior of deviant individuals.   

 
Part 3:  
Read the following statements. Mark each statement that ​
you think is reasonable and that can 
be supported from the text combined with what you already know.  
_______1. Social Control can involve the threat of supernatural punishment from the gods of 
ancestral spirits for deviation from the norm. 
 
_______2. Supernatural sanctions from gods or ancestral spirits for deviating from the norm 
are seen to act as a powerful tool for getting people to behave properly. 
 
_______3. An individual's gender, ethnicity, age, wealth, and social class, are important 
factors in applying alternative labels to deviant individuals. 
 
_______4. Crime is a deviation from the social norm that is beyond what would be considered 
bad manners or odd behaviors.  
 
_______5. Societies with different kinds of economies have radically different sorts of laws 
and legal concerns.  
 
 
 
 
 

 

[D­6] 
Rubric for Breaking a Social Norm Project  
 
Student Name:     ________________________________________ 

 
Project:​
 Breaking a Social Norm 
 
CATEGORY 

Digital Camera 
Use 

Picture is high quality. 
The main subject is in 
focus, and the 
breaking of the social 
norm as well as the 
reactions from 
individuals are clear 
and present. 

Picture is good 
quality. The main 
subject is not quite in 
focus, but the 
breaking of the social 
norm as well as the 
reactions from 
individuals are 
acceptable and seen. 

The pictures are of 
marginal quality.The 
subject is in focus but 
it is not clear what 
the picture is about. 

No picture taken OR 
picture of poor 
quality. 

Effectiveness 

Project includes all 
material needed to 
gain a comfortable 
understanding of the 
topic. It is a highly 
effective study guide. 

Project includes most 
material needed to 
gain a comfortable 
understanding of the 
material but is lacking 
one or two key 
elements. It is an 
adequate study 
guide. 

Project is missing 
more than two key 
elements. It would 
make an incomplete 
study guide. 

Project is lacking 
several key elements 
and has inaccuracies 
that make it a poor 
study guide. 

Cooperation 

Group delegates 
tasks and shares 
responsibility 
effectively all of the 
time. 

Group delegates 
tasks and shares 
responsibility 
effectively most of the 
time. 

Group delegates 
tasks and shares 
responsibility 
effectively some of 
the time. 

Group often is not 
effective in 
delegating tasks 
and/or sharing 
responsibility. 

Sequencing of 
Information 

Information is 
organized in a clear, 
logical way. It is easy 
to anticipate the type 
of material that might 
be on the next card. 

Most information is 
organized in a clear, 
logical way. One card 
or item of information 
seems out of place. 

Some information is 
logically sequenced. 
An occasional card or 
item of information 
seems out of place. 

There is no clear plan 
for the organization 
of information. 

Content ­ 
Accuracy 

All content throughout 
the presentation is 
accurate. There are 
no factual errors. 

Most of the content is 
accurate but there is 
one piece of 
information that might 
be inaccurate. 

The content is 
generally accurate, 
but one piece of 
information is clearly 
flawed or inaccurate. 

Content is typically 
confusing or contains 
more than one 
factual error. 

Originality 

Presentation shows 
considerable 
originality and 
inventiveness. The 
content and ideas are 
presented in a unique 
and interesting way. 

Presentation shows 
some originality and 
inventiveness. The 
content and ideas are 
presented in an 
interesting way. 

Presentation shows 
an attempt at 
originality and 
inventiveness on 1­2 
cards. 

Presentation is a 
rehash of other 
people\'s ideas 
and/or graphics and 
shows very little 
attempt at original 
thought. 

Sounds 
­planning 

Careful planning has 
gone into sounds. All 
sounds improve the 
content or \"feel\" of 
the presentation. 

Some planning has 
gone into sounds. 
Most enhance the 
content or \"feel\" of 
the presentation, but 
1­2 seem to be added 
for no real reason. 
None detract from the 
overall presentation. 

Sounds that are 
chosen are 
appropriate for the 
topic, but some 
detract from the 
overall presentation. 

Sounds are not 
appropriate for the 
presentation. 

Spelling and 
Grammar 

Presentation has no 
misspellings or 
grammatical errors. 

Presentation has 1­2 
misspellings, but no 
grammatical errors. 

Presentation has 1­2 
grammatical errors 
but no misspellings. 

Presentation has 
more than 2 
grammatical and/or 
spelling errors. 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[D­7] 

Guidelines for the Breaking a Social Norm Project 
The following format is to be followed as you write up this exercise.  Please note that this is a skeletal 
outline and is intended to help you decide what information to include in your report.  Be sure to cover 
all of these points, but don’t feel that you are limited to them.  Elaborate and be creative where you 
can.  Incorporate as much as you can from your learning about sociology in everyday settings. 
 
● You MUST have a video of you performing the breaking of the norm.  
● You MUST have a video of the reactions of individuals that the experiment is being performed 
on. 
● You MUST analyze your video and experience and create a 2­5 page report that is typed and 
double­spaced. Good grammar and sentence structure are expected.  
● You MUST create a powerpoint presentation that includes the video, illustrates your overall 
experiment, your findings, and the sanctions given from individuals.  
● You MUST as a group present this to the class the day the assignment is due.  
  
The format to use: 
  
1.​
 ​
Statement of the Problem 
A.​
    ​
Define the norm you will violate. 
B.​
    ​
Describe briefly how this norm acts as a mechanism of social control. 
C.​
    ​
Describe what you will do to violate the norm. 
  
2.​
  ​
Hypothesis 
A.​
    ​
Describe the range of possible reactions others will have to the violation of this norm. 
B.​
    ​
What do you predict the major reaction will be? 
  
3.​
 ​
Describe the setting 
A.​
    ​
Physical—where is the norm violation taking place? 
B.​
    ​
Social—How many and what types of persons are observing? 
  
4.​
  ​
Describe the incident—tell what happened. 
  
5.​
  ​
Summary and Interpretation 
A.​
    ​
How did you feel as you were violating the norm? 
B.​
    ​
Why did you feel the way you did? 
C.​
    ​
Did people react the way you expected?  Explain. 
D.​
   ​
Did you encounter any difficulties in carrying out your assignment? 
E.​
    ​
What, if anything, did you learn about how norms exercise social control? 
F.​
     ​
Any other pertinent observations. 
 
Rules for norm violating: 
 

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)

  ​
Be safe. This rule trumps all other rules. 

You must video record the response of the people around you. 
 ​
You must violate the norm with your group but you can have a friend videotape for you. 
 ​
The behavior you choose must be non­normative across our culture here in the United States. 
You many not harm anyone, including yourself. This includes getting yourself in trouble. 
You may NOT disrupt your classes. 
You may NOT break any laws. 
Only break one norm. 
While violating the norm, act totally normally in every other way. Violating many norms at once 
simply makes you look like a crazy teenager, thus you aren’t really breaking a norm (people 
expect teens to act crazy sometimes). 
10)   ​
Do something you wouldn’t normally do. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

[D­8] 

Examples for Breaking a Social Norm Project  
 
Ideas for Norms to Break:
1)​
      ​
Break rules of social distance​
: sit down with a stranger at a restaurant even if other tables are
clearly available, speak to an acquaintance at an unusually small distance, stand right next to
another person in an elevator when only two of you are there, hold hands with a friend of the same
sex, surprise a same-sex friend with a kiss on the cheek, stand too close to someone in line in front
of you.
2)​
      ​
Be unusually helpful​
: buy a small present and give it to a barely known acquaintance, pass out
nickels to strangers on the street, make helpful suggestions to strangers on what to buy in a
supermarket
3)​
      ​
Break rules for eye contact​
: Make too much eye contact (stare) or too little, talk to others while
looking at their forehead or ear, stare at strangers walking past on the sidewalk, blink excessively.
4)​
      ​
Dress inappropriately​
: dress for a different season, dress too fancy or too casual
5)​
      ​
Obey the speed limit
6)​
      ​
Break norms of social etiquette​
: cut into the middle of a line, ask someone you don’t know for
his/her seat in a public place, applaud at the end of a class, randomly greet people as they walk
into school with a handshake and a “good morning.”
7) Pronounce words incorrectly:​
speak to individuals while randomly mispronouncing words. See if
they correct you or if they ignore it completely. Observe their reaction.

 
 
[Q­1] 
Questioning Sheet​
­  


1.
2.
3.

(For Teacher Use Only)  
Closely Observing the Source  
Who created this? 
When was it created? 
Where does your eye go first? 


1.
2.
3.

Seeing Key Details  
What do you see that you didn’t expect? 
What do you see that you did expect? 
What powerful words and ideas are expressed? 

 

 
● Students Personal Response  
1. What feelings/thoughts does this source trigger in you? 
2. What questions does this source raise? 
 

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Speculating About the Source, Creator, Context 
What was happening during this time period? 
What was the creators purpose in making this? 
What does the creator do to get his/her point across?  
Who was the intended audience? 
What biases or stereotypes do you see? 

 
● Does This Agree With What Others Have Said or With What Students 
Initially Believed?  
1. Ask students to test their assumptions from the past. 
2. Ask students if there are other sources that they can recall that support or 
contradict what the creator is giving as his/her main point. 
 
● (Optional) Summarizing What They Have Learned  
Students must include reasons and specific evidence to support their 
conclusions.