You are on page 1of 4

 Alex Johnson 

 
Mr. Herrmann & Mr. Rutherford 
 
AP US History 
 
14 July 2015 
 
The Tuscarora War by David La Vere 
 
Chapter 1:  
i: The land that Christopher DeGraffenried and Michel purchased is a huge amount of territory, 
over 140,000 acres. Graffenried is Swiss which is very surprising to me because I never knew the 
Swiss had anything to do with the colonization of America apart from Immigration. Although 
this book is a non­fiction, the author seems to have the gripping effect that a fiction writer would 
have. On page 25 he gives you an initial scare by mentioning the indians coming out to the forest 
when the Europeans arrive. It is at this moment when your full attention is grabbed. The reader is 
waiting to see if the Indians will violently attack or kindly greet the trespassers.  
 
ii. “Many Palatines even questioned DeGraffenried’s leadership” (27) Was DeGraffenried a 
suitable leader for these people? Probably not. And where does the line of power between 
DeGraffenried and Michel come into play since they both own the land? 
 
iii. Christopher DeGraffenried: 
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi­bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=59518016 
 
Chapter 2: 
Thoughts/comments: The Tuscaroras were called many names but they chose Unkwa­hunwa 
meaning “Real people”. They chose this because its dignified. The Tuscarora people were very 
efficient and worked in a community setting. Hunter­gatherer survival was typical. I find it very 
interesting that tobacco was such a big part of the Indians’ lives. Such as eating and drinking, 
smoking was a part of life . By the eighteenth century, Indians and Europeans lived too close to 
eachother in North Carolina. This growing tension would surely lead to a war. 
 
Questions: What does Iroquoian dialect sound like? Since most Indians smoked tobacco and 
lived exposed to diseases, what was the average lifespan? Why did the English refer to the teetha 
as “king”? 
 
Links: Tobacco ­ ​
https://www.mpm.edu/wirp/ICW­166.html 

Iroquois ­ ​
http://www.ushistory.org/us/1d.asp  
 
Chapter 3: 
Thoughts/comments: Page 70 describing the Indians attack makes them sound terrifying and 
relentless in their attacks. The Indians would hang infants from trees cut people's heads off, Put 
stakes through women and rip their unborn children out. They would also mock Christianity. I 
don't think De Graffenried is the best leader for the new Swiss colony. He seems cowardly and 
refuses to accept the blame for problems that he himself created. Also, he claimed that he was 
friendly to the native Americans which was clearly just selective memory on his part. Hancock 
and his men were well equipped with guns and ammunition while the Indians were still mainly 
using primitive means for weapons. This alone is a big disadvantage. 
 
Questions:  
Was it a coincidence that the first attacks on September 22,1711 happened on the autumnal 
equinox? How important was the Swiss nobleman, Baron De Gravenrodt, that the Indians took? 
  
Links: 
http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bath/tuscarora.htm 
 
Chapter 4: At the start, South Carolina was fairly small, having just small farmers, traders, and 
workers. It is sad that the Barbadian sugar production ran on slave labor. It is especially 
disgusting that the people from South Carolina took native Indians from the land and made them 
their slave laborers too. Irish born Col. Barnwell was a strong leader who had a good sight of his 
goals. The fight at Torhunta between Barnwell’s men and the Tuscaroras was not as easy as the 
Europeans had expected. The Tuscaroras had prepared well and the fight was long and bloody. 
Barnwell’s hot temper would “make him some powerful enemies” (112). 
 
Questions: What would be the outcome of the war between Barnwell and Hancock? 
What was the loyalty of Barnwell’s troops like and how was the morale throughout the 
expedition? 
 
Links: ​
http://www.beaufortonline.com/tuscarora­jack­barnwell­founder­of­beaufort­sc/ 
http://www.funbarbados.com/ourisland/history/sugar_cane_industry.cfm 
 
Chapter 5: Thomas Pollock, aka: the destroyer! Pollock and William Brice were always looking 
for opportunities to increase their wealth. Pollock was much better at it than Brice. Col. 
Barnwell’s army was partly led by Lt. Col. Brice as well. Barnwell’s soldiers were a very strong 
and powerful force. The Indians were up against a tough enemy. Hancock knew he was at the 

disadvantage but still stood his ground. The Tuscaroras were able to hold off Barnwell’s army to 
a stanstill. 
 
Questions: Why did Barnwell’s army choose to take the enemy by canoe? Why did Hyde and 
Pollock call out for more troops for Barnwell’s army if they already knew they would win? 
 
Link: ​
http://www.carolana.com/Carolina/Governors/tpollock.html 
http://nativeheritageproject.com/2013/04/10/john­barnwell­1712­letter­regarding­tuscarora­war/ 
 
Chapter 6: Barnwell thought he had achieved a great victory but in reality, he left the Tuscaroras 
stronger than ever. King Tom Blount was a master negotiator. Governor Edward Hyde and 
Council President Thomas Pollock were outraged at Tuscarora Jack. Not so much for enslaving 
the Indians but having destroyed them in the first place. During the war, Blount always tried to 
show North Carolina that his people were no threat. Hancock’s death did nothing to stop the war. 
Except Pollock now had more faith in King Blount and the upper Tuscaroras. 
 
Questions: Was Barnwell really that daft? How was Pollock affected when he lost the great sum 
of money? Who would North Carolina receive help from? 
 
Links: 
http://haywoodcountyline.blogspot.com/2011/06/chief­tom­blount­and­tuscarora­war­of.html 
http://www.warpaths2peacepipes.com/famous­native­americans/king­hancock.htm 
http://holmehistories.com/elizabeth­barnwell­gough/tuscarora­jack­barnwell.html 
 
Chapter 7: 
Col. James Moore was a great soldier. The South Carolina Assembly met August and supported 
another expedition to North Carolina. Barnwell was offended that the army was not led by him. 
James Moore migrated to South Carolina from Barbados in 1675 and became a founding 
member of the Goose Creek Men. While Col. Barnwell was more passionate and hot tempered, 
Col. James Moore was more thoughtful and precise. The coming of Moore absolutely terrified 
King Tom Blount and the upper Tuscaroras. 
 
Questions: Did Barnwell accompany Moore on the expedition? Were there any complications 
with Barnwell when Moore was chosen to lead the army? Why did the Indians still want to fight 
after Neoheroka was terribly destroyed? 
 
Links:  
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Moore_(Continental_Army_officer) 
http://www.tuscaroranationnc.com/neoheroka 

Chapter 8: 
For North Carolina, the war was a tough and costly victory. In South Carolina, John Barnwell 
and James Moore returned as heroes. By 1717, South Carolina was at peace. Barnwell was 
devastated by the Yamasee War. His plantation was sacked and burned,  his slaves were stolen 
and sold. In North Carolina, the Tuscarora war was especially devastating. In 1715 the North 
Carolina Assembly declared the 22nd of September the anniversary of the “late barbarous 
massacre committed by the Indians on the inhabitants of Bath County” (184). It is a scary thing 
to know that man can do such great harm to himself. Charles Eden and Thomas Pollock ended 
the chaos and got the colony operating normally. The Tuscarora War broke the power of the 
Tuscaroras and other east Indians. This allowed the colony to expand west and south at a very 
fast rate. “History is long and not yet over” (210). 
 
Questions: How was the report of the demise of Indians in North Carolina greatly exaggerated? 
Do the pros of the Tuscarora War outweigh the cons? 
 
Links: 
http://freepages.military.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jmh4/yamaseewar/yamaseewar.htm 
http://www.carolana.com/Carolina/Noteworthy_Events/tuscarorawar.html 
http://ballotpedia.org/North_Carolina_General_Assembly