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Booker T.

Washington
Middle/High
School
New Teacher
Handbook
Table of Contents

SECTION I:
INSTRUCTIONAL BEST PRACTICES

SECTION II:
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

SECTION III:
SCHOOL COUNSELING
Teacher Resources

1

SECTION I:
INSTRUCTIONAL
BEST PRACTICE
S

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INSTRUCTIONAL BEST PRACTICES
Proper planning is the key to successful instruction. Teachers are expected to engage in long-term planning and preparation.
Each teacher will be required to complete nine week plans, which will be turned in to administrative personnel and posted in a
designated area in the classroom. Also daily lesson plans must be completed and kept in a notebook. This notebook should be
available for examination by administrative personnel. Teachers should communicate long range plans to students via the
development and distribution of a class syllabus each nine weeks. This allows students to know very clearly what material will be
covered and in which order. Assignments, both short and long term, should be included.
In planning, teachers should use a variety of teaching strategies as well as a variety of assessment tools. Learning should be
active and involving. Quality work should be emphasized and displayed. Lesson planning and delivery should ensure the use of
all class time. Off task time is detrimental to instructional success. Teachers are expected to be in place to greet students and
provide instruction from the beginning of class. Students are not to be left unsupervised.
Creating the Environment: Preparing the Classroom
Take the time to create a warm and inviting environment in your classroom. Students, even high school, like unique and colorful
rooms. They are turned off by bare walls and blank areas. A classroom needs character. A young person needs to feel at home in
his/her classroom. Oftentimes, teachers see more of these students than their parents do. Creating comfort zones is a tremendous
help for all involved. Here are a few suggestions:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)

Make sure that your room is not cluttered. All materials should be in some type of order.
Make a technology center where students can have access to tape/DVD players and computers. Students can experience “books
on tape/DVD,” listen to instructional audiotape, or use computers for various purposes.
Make a reading center where students can have access to magazines, textbooks, and reading materials, handouts, and critical
thinking activities related to the class.
Provide tutoring corners where students who need to catch up on work alone can have the privacy to do so.
Eventually, put up pictures of the students in action. Photographs provide a real sense of identity and students love to see
themselves in pictures.
Hang attractive and informative posters from which students can learn.
Eventually, display student work and projects in and outside the classroom.
Bloom’s Taxonomy (From Bloom, et al., 1956) As teachers, we tend to ask questions in the "knowledge" category 80% to 90%
of the time. These questions are not bad, but using them all the time is. Try to utilize higher order level of questions. These
questions require much more "brain power" and a more extensive and elaborate answer. Below are the six question categories as
defined by Bloom.

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Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

Arrange
Define
Describe
Duplicate
Identify
Label
List
Match
Memorize
Name
Order
Outline
Recognize
Relate
Recall
Repeat
Reproduce
Select
State

Classify
Convert
Defend
Describe
Discuss
Distinguish
Estimate
Explain
Express
Extend
Generalized
Give examples
Identify
Indicate
Infer
Locate
Paraphrase
Predict
Recognize
Rewrite

Apply
Change
Choose
Compute
Demonstrate
Discover
Dramatize
Employ
Illustrate
Interpret
Manipulate
Modify
Operate
Practice
Predict
Prepare
Produce
Relate
Schedule
Show

Analyze
Appraise
Breakdown
Calculate
Categorize
Compare
Contrast
Criticize
Diagram
Differentiate
Discriminate
Distinguish
Examine
Experiment
Identify
Illustrate
Infer
Model
Outline
Point out

Arrange
Assemble
Categorize
Collect
Combine
Comply
Compose
Construct
Create
Design
Develop
Devise
Explain
Formulate
Generate
Plan
Prepare
Rearrange
Reconstruct
Relate

Appraise
Argue
Assess
Attach
Choose
Compare
Conclude
Contrast
Defend
Describe
Discriminate
Estimate
Evaluate
Explain
Judge
Justify
Interpret
Relate
Predict
Rate

Review
Select
Summarize
Translate

Sketch
Solve
Use
Write

Question
Relate
Select
Separate
Subdivide
Test

Reorganize
Revise
Rewrite
Set up
Summarize
Synthesize
Tell
Write

Select
Summarize
Support
Value

In addition to the above suggestions, the items below must be posted in your classroom and raised daily.








1.
2.
3.
4.

Warm-up/Bell work
School Rules
Standards for your content area large enough for students to see
Classroom Rules/Consequences/Rewards
School mission and vision
SCS Code of Conduct
Emergency Plan
Whiteboard Protocol
Today you will learn
Demonstrate your learning by
Why is this important?
Homework

Preparing the Halls
In addition to preparing the classroom environment, we will also prepare the overall school environment. The halls should bloom
with the knowledge attained in the classroom. To ensure that this is accomplished, six weeks projects and DATA will be
displayed in the hallways. Standards addressed, essential understanding, and essential questions and a brief explanation of the
project should also be included in the display. Rubrics are required.
Creating the Environment: Seating
Seating arrangements make a big difference in the high school classroom. During the first week, it is easy to use alphabetical
order until you make an official seating chart. In general, students have a possessive feeling about their desks. They want to
know where they will be sitting every day. Without a seating chart, valuable class time will be wasted settling disputes. It is
important that seating be enforced and standardized.
Remember that seating is functional, changing according to instruction. There is no need to keep one seating pattern all year.
Following are some varieties of seating patterns.
Traditional Rows
Desks are in straight rows facing the front of class work well for lectures, tests, individual work, or direct instructions. The
traditional manner tends to keep the class well focused.
Group Seating
The next most common form of seating is pushing desks together to form groups. The benefit of group seating is obvious – it
allows students to focus together on work. Some teachers have permanent group seating, seeing the benefit of teamwork on a
daily basis.
Divided Rows

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In this variation of long rows, desks are formed in two wings, facing each other. This allows for a middle area that the teacher
can use for various purposes.
Circular Seating
In this pattern, desks are formed into a circle. This allows for a “round table” effect, which is good for readings and discussions.
Also, this pattern might be a good idea for class quiz shows and games, where contestants are in the middle. The teacher can
circulate around the room.
Creating the Environment: Establishing Routines
In the high school classroom, it is extremely important that you establish some sort of routine. This increases efficiency because
students know what materials to bring to class and what to expect. Successful High school teachers tend to incorporate a number
of routines.
Warm Ups
A routine that gets students on task before the bell rings is a pre-class exercise or warm-up. Warm-ups literally get the brain
ready for the day’s lesson, just like stretching exercises before a game. As students work on their warm-ups, walk around and see
how they are doing. This will ensure accountability.
Warm-ups may be different and suited to each teaching style, but has a set of common denominators:



They do not take longer than 5 – 7 minutes (avg. 5 min)
They are challenging exercises that have relevance to past or future lessons.
They are not “busy work” but quality thinking exercises.
They usually are not graded, but answers are discussed in class.
Some common examples of warm-up exercises are:





Questions and Answers
Journals
Vocabulary
Creative Writing
Problem Solving
Syllabus
Planning a lesson is different for every teacher. Furthermore, teachers organize their lesson plans and curricula in different ways.
Some teachers prefer keeping lesson plan spiral book, while others keep notebooks, and still others keep lesson plans in file
folders.

Making a Syllabus/Keeping a Calendar
Teachers are required to keep detailed lesson plans for each day of teaching. Sometimes these can be so time-consuming that one
loses sight of the big picture. All teachers should take time to reflect on the big picture and plan their objectives for at least a sixweek period. Keep in mind that a syllabus is flexible and can change.

Keeping a Notebook
A good routine to establish with students is good organization. As a teacher, you will have to ask yourself, “How will students
organize and retain information in my class?” For most teachers, this means a three-ring binder. The notebook is probably the
best tool for students because it keeps work in sections, has pockets, and can hold spirals and supply bags.

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Cornell Note-Taking is the method of organization that works best for our students. Please use this method in your classroom.
Many teachers find textbooks to be useful and effective tools. However, some advanced teachers will not even crack open
textbook because they have gathered their own materials. Nevertheless, most teachers will find it useful to use textbooks some of
the time. Please consider textbooks as a valuable resource, but not the only resource.
How to Make the “Boring” Fun
Successful teachers learn how to go beyond the textbook and distill the core elements or objectives of the lesson. The master
teacher knows that the text does not teach the class – the teacher does. Teachers have developed a variety of techniques to engage
the students’ interests. These techniques tend to drive home information and get students excited about school. Here are some
examples:







Quiz Shows
Dramatic Interpretation
Costumes
Audio-Visuals
Manipulatives
Simulations
Oral Readings
Word Games/Puzzles
High Level Thinking
It is not enough to teach just the basics. Society demands more emphasis on high-level thinking. Bloom’s Taxonomy is the
standard that will be used here at BTW. Extending questions by students into larger issues, demanding reasoning skills, asking
for judgments, and creating high-level projects are part of every successful teacher’s curriculum.

Learning Styles
The theory of learning styles can be generally summarized as follows:


All students have the capacity to learn
Students can learn the same things by different methods
Recognizing how a student learns is critical to success
The implications for the teacher are that one must be able to recognize how a student learns best and adjust to that style. Teachers
are encouraged to determine student’s learning styles the first three weeks of school.
Special Needs Students
Traditionally kept out of the regular classrooms, students with special needs are making an impact on the regular teacher. Help
and support for these special students can be given first by understanding that in most cases they cannot help their behavior.
Monitor these students carefully and use preventive discipline techniques as much as possible. Talk to the parents, former
teachers, special education teachers, and the counselor of these students to get ideas that work. It is also very important to be
aware of the medications used by these students and their possible side effects. Common special needs are:






ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)
ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)
“Slow Learners”/General Learning Disability
Dyslexia
Emotionally Disturbed
Gifted

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Reading in the Content Area
In high school, every teacher is a reading teacher. It is impossible to overstate the importance of reading on the adolescent brain.
It is the classroom teacher’s responsibility to motivate students to read. This can be done by various ideas such as reading books,
magazine articles, or the newspaper. The idea is to get every child into the habit of reading.

Closure
Though the ideas presented in this instructional handbook are research-based strategies that work, they are not all inclusive.
Adding needed elements to these to individualize your classroom ensures success for you and your students.

Best Instructional Practices
Hands-On
Manipulatives

Group
Discussion

Cornell Notes

Integrated
Technology
(Computer,
Calculator,
CPS

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ProblemSolving

Thinking
Maps

Bloom’s
Taxonomy

Literacy
Strategies
(Anticipation
Guides;
QAR,
Reciprocal
Teaching, &
Quick
Review

Collaborative
Strategies
(Jigsaw, Pair
Share, Take
Five, Parking
Lot, Round
Robin,
PopCorn

Carousel
Brainstorming

AVID
Strategie
s

Research

Critical
Thinking

Senior
Capstone

Differentiated
Instruction

HSTW
Key
Practices

SECTION II:
CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT

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CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
The beginning of a new school year is a critical time for effective classroom management to be set in place. Effective
teachers/managers use the first week of school to clearly communicate to students WHAT IS EXPECTED and
WHAT IS NOT ALLOWED. They begin promptly, conduct activities at a reasonable pace, give students
constructive, real-life assignments, and provide specific explanations and expectations.
“Right or wrong, accurate or not, your reputation will precede you.” (Harry Wong)
Establishing the Class Climate the First Week
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Establish your class procedures beginning the first day (e.g. when to sharpen pencils, how to be recognized by the teacher
during the class period, etc.)
Make certain that you have books for the students to use on the first day. Don’t worry about your reading/writing center on the
first day for you must establish the importance of your class procedures and then put them to work!
We stress not putting desks in straight rows, but make certain that all students can focus their eyes on you during instruction.
Display our class rules in a prominent place. Post the heading (of papers) procedures in a prominent place.
Have a consistent place for the essential learning of the day, daily class outline, homework. It is important that you constantly
reinforce your procedure during the first week. The first couple of days, you may want to review those procedures with the class.

Effective Teachers are READY


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Effective teachers have their classrooms ready. (Classroom has a warm, positive climate that is work-oriented.)
Effective teachers have their work well-planned and ready each day. (The desks, books, papers, assignments, and materials are
ready when the students enter.)
Effective teachers have themselves ready each day. (The teacher has a warm, positive attitude and has positive expectations that
all students will succeed.)

Habits of Effective Teachers
Be prepared for class. Ten seconds of idle time can develop into ten minutes of problems.
Make your assignments reasonable and clear.
Be a good and neat dresser. Be businesslike. Be friendly.
Be prepared for the unexpected.
Keep rules to a minimum. Too many rules have no real purpose.
Be consistent for 180 school days.
Never punish the entire class for the actions of a few.
Never say anything to a student that you would not say in the presence of his parents.
Never humiliate a student, alone or in front of others.
Do not be afraid to apologize.
Keep parents informed. Use the phone. Let parents work with you.
Never argue with a student in front of the class. The odds are 25 to 1 that you’ll win.
Don’t see and hear everything.
Be enthusiastic. It’s contagious.
Do not be a screamer. A barking teacher does nothing but make noise.
Keep administrators informed when dealing with problem students.

Effective Educators:






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Treat students like you want to be treated.
Acknowledge our mistakes.
Students are always supervised.
No profanity used towards or in presence of students.
Address the action, not the student.
No yelling or berating.
Use our resources. (Counselor, Social Workers, Psychologists, Attendance Teacher)


Establish and implement school and class procedures.

Each teacher’s class is valuable.

We believe that extensive knowledge and application of content and pedagogy and the building of
effective educator-student relationships improve discipline.
Management & Student Conduct
Classroom management can be the difference between a superior teacher and a poor teacher. Even teachers who are well
prepared for teaching the day’s objectives will not succeed without a plan to insure the procedure they want to have followed in
the classroom. Classroom management is not simply a discipline plan; it is a well-communicated management plan to help
reduce discipline problems.
The suggestions here are intended to help the teacher build a climate or culture in his classroom where students can work, learn,
belong, and find success.
Characteristics of a Well-Managed Classroom
(Taken from The First Days of School by Harry Wong)
1.
2.
3.
4.

Students are deeply involved with their work, especially with academic, teacher-led instruction.
Students know what is expected of them and are generally successful.
There is little wasted time.
The climate of the classroom is work-oriented, but relaxed and pleasant.
Student Classroom Procedures
Procedures are “how we do things in this class.” You will need to establish and teach procedures for things like…









What do I do when I enter the room?
How and when do we go the restroom?
How do I hand in papers?
What do I do when you are absent?
What do I do in case of all emergency drills?
What do I do if I need help?
When may I sharpen my pencil?
What do I do when I need to ask a question?
What do I do when I finish an assignment?
The teacher teaches procedures and rehearses them. For example, when a student bolts out of his seat the moment the bell rings
without waiting for you to dismiss class, he has not followed a procedure. You should ask, “What is the correct procedure?” and
then have the student return to his seat and practice the procedure. Do not feel that you have to scold, lecture, or yell when
students do not follow procedures. Fussing will not make the student reform anyway. Just as parents have to teach and re-teach
their children to say “thank you”, teachers have to teach and re-teach procedures. In fact, you may have to spend a great deal of
time at the beginning of the year teaching procedures. But a classroom where procedures have been taught well will have more
uninterrupted teaching and learning time. Students who follow procedures have learned a valuable life lesson.
Please examine all class procedures to ensure that you are making the best of the instructional day. Examples of time wasters:






Writing spelling words X times each
Knowledge level board work/ work sheets
Coloring sheets/Cutting and Pasting
Waiting on all students to finish an assignment with no instructions
Having students copy all work from transparency, board or textbooks
Writing or reading materials that is not relevant to students
Classroom Management Ideas


Establish a routine and follow it. Students need to know what to do, how to do it, and when to do
it. Students like routines and tend to become disruptive when they are not followed.

Feel comfortable with yourself, with your students, and with your content. Students feel secure
with a confident teacher.
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Expect your students to conduct themselves in socially acceptable ways. Students tend to live up to

what is expected.


Present lessons that are interesting, relevant, and at an appropriate level of instruction. Material that
is too difficult or too easy will cause students to lose interest and become disruptive.

Vary your methods of presenting material.

Always be prepared. Students will take advantage of the opportunity if you are not.

Prevent problems before they happen.

Show that you genuinely respect your students. Give them evidence through your actions: listening
to their ideas and concerns, having friendly chats with them, smiling often, finding something to laugh about, accepting
them, and giving lots of encouragement and praise.

Give your students love and understanding so that they can learn to give it in return.
Classroom Interventions

















Discussed during classroom meeting
Contact with parents (continuous)
Positive Communication
Role Playing
Student Conference
Weekly Reports/Parent’s Signature
Community Resources (Mentors, Adopters)
Tutoring
Peer Tutors
Paired Learning
Student Contracts
Time Out in the classroom
Time Out in another classroom
Conflict Resolution Instruction
Peer Mediation
Anger Management Instruction
Grade Level Review
Office Referral

Suggested Classroom Accommodations for Specific Behavior
Copyright © 1999-2015 Child Development Institute, LLC
published by Child Development Institute

http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/learning/learning_disabilities/teacher/
When you see this behavior

Try this accommodation

1. Difficulty following a plan (has ● Assist student in setting long-range goals: break the goal into
high aspirations but lacks followrealistic parts.

Use
a
questioning
strategy
with the student; ask, What do you
through); sets out to “get straight A’s,
need to be able to do this?
ends up with F’s” (sets unrealistic

Keep
asking
that
question until the student has reached
goals)
anobtainable goal.
● Have student set clear timelines of what he needs to do
toaccomplish each step (monitor student progress frequently).

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2. Difficulty sequencing and
completing steps to accomplish
specific tasks (e.g. writing a book
report, term paper, organized
paragraphs, division problem, etc.)

3. Shifting from one uncompleted ●
activity to another without closure.

● Break up task into workable and obtainable steps.
Provide examples and specific steps to accomplish task.

Define the requirements of a completed activity (e.g. your math
is finished when all six problems are complete and corrected;
do not begin on the next task until it is finished).

4. Difficulty following through on ● Gain student’s attention before giving directions. Use alerting
instructions from others.
cues. Accompany oral directions with written directions.
● Give one direction at a time. Quietly repeat directions to the
student after they have been given to the rest of the class.
Check for understanding by having the student repeat
thedirections.

5. Difficulty prioritizing from most

to least important.

● Prioritize assignment and activities.
Provide a model to help students. Post the model and refer to it
often.

6. Difficulty sustaining effort and ●
accuracy over time.

.
7. Difficulty completing
assignments.

Reduce assignment length and strive for quality (rather that
quantity).
Increase the frequency of positive reinforcements (catch the
student doing it right and let him know it

List and/or post (and say) all steps necessary to complete each
assignment.
● Reduce the assignment into manageable sections with specific
due dates.
● Make frequent checks for work/assignment completion.
● Arrange for the student to have a “study buddy” with phone
number in each subject area.

8. Difficulty with any task that ● Combine seeing, saying, writing and doing; student may need
requires memory.
to subvocalize to remember.
● Teach memory techniques as a study strategy (e.g. mnemonics,
visualization,
● oral rehearsal, numerous repetitions).

9. Difficulty with test taking.
.


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Allow extra time for testing; teach test-taking skills and
strategies; and allow student to be tested orally.
Use clear, readable and uncluttered test forms. Use test format

that the student is most comfortable with. Allow ample space
for student response. Consider having lined answer spaces for
essay or short answer tests
10. Confusion from non-verbal cues ● Directly teach (tell the student) what non-verbal cues mean.
(misreads body language, etc.)
Model and have student practice reading cues in a safe setting.

11. Confusion from written material● Provide student with copy of reading material with main ideas
(difficulty finding main idea from a
underlined or highlighted.
● Provide an outline of important points from reading material.
paragraph; attributes greater
● Teach outlining, main-idea/details concepts.
importance to minor details)
● Provide tape of text/chapter.

12. Confusion from written material
● Provide student with a copy of presentation notes.

Allow peers to share carbon-copy notes from presentation
(difficulty finding main idea from a
(have student
paragraph; attributes greater

compare
own
notes
with a copy of peer’s notes).
importance to minor details)
● Provide framed outlines of presentations (introducing visual
and
● auditory cues to important information).
● Encourage use of tape recorder.
● Teach and emphasize key words (the following…, the most
important point…,etc.)
13. Difficulty sustaining attention to●
tasks or other activities (easily
distracted by extraneous stimuli) ●

14. Frequent messiness or
sloppiness.

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Reward attention. Break up activities into small units. Reward
for timely accomplishment.
Use physical proximity and touch. Use earphones and/or study
carrels, quiet
● place, or preferential seating.

Teach organizational skills. Be sure student has daily, weekly
and/or monthly assignment sheets; list of materials needed
daily; and consistent format for papers. Have a consistent way
for students to turn in and receive back papers; reduce
distractions.
● Give reward points for notebook checks and proper paper
format.
● Provide clear copies of worksheets and handouts and consistent
format for worksheets.
● Establish a daily routine, provide models for what you want the
student to do.
● Arrange for a peer who will help him with organization.
● Assist student to keep materials in a specific place (e.g. pencils

and pens in pouch).
Be willing to repeat expectations.

15. Poor handwriting (often mixing ● Allow for a scribe and grade for content, not handwriting.
cursive with manuscript and capitals
Allow for use of computer.

Consider
alternative
methods for student response (e.g. voice
with low-case letters)
recorder, oral reports, etc.).
● Don’t penalize student for mixing cursive and manuscript
(accept any method of production).
● Use pencil with rubber grip.
16. Difficulty with fluency in
handwriting e.g. good letter/word ●
production but very slow and
laborious.

● Allow for shorter assignments (quality vs. quantity).
Allow alternate method of production (computer, scribe, oral
presentation, etc.).
● Use pencil with rubber grip.

17. Poorly developed study skills ●

Teach study skills specific to the subject area – organization
(e.g. assignment
calendar), textbook reading, notetaking (finding main idea /
detail, mapping, outlining), skimming, summarizing).

18. Poor self-monitoring (careless
errors in spelling, arithmetic,
reading)

Teach specific methods of self-monitoring (e.g. stop-looklisten).
● Have student proof-read finished work when it is cold.

19. Low fluency or production of ● Allow for alternative method for completing ssignment (oral
written material (takes hours on a 10
presentation, taped report, visual presentation, graphs, maps,
minute assignment)
pictures, etc. with reduced written requirements).
● Allow for alternative method of writing (e.g. computer, cursive
or printing, or a scribe.
20. Apparent Inattention
● Get student’s attention before giving directions (tell student
(underachievement, daydreaming,
how to pay attention, look at me while I talk, watch my eyes
not there)
while I speak). Ask student to repeat directions.

Attempt
to actively involve student in lesson (e.g. cooperative
.
learning)
21. Difficulty participating in class
without being interruptive; difficulty
working quietly

22. Inappropriate seeking of attention

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Seat student in close proximity to the teacher.
● Reward appropriate behavior (catch
● student being good).
● Use study carrel if appropriate

Show student (model) how to gain other’s attention

(clowns around, exhibits loud
excessive or exaggerated movement
as attention-seeking behavior,
interrupts, butts into other children’s
activities, needles others)
23. Frequent excessive talking


appropriately.
Catch the student when appropriate and reinforce.

Teach student hand signals and use to tell student when and
when not to talk.
Make sure student is called when it is appropriate and reinforce
listening.

24. Difficulty making transitions ● Program child for transitions. Give advance warning of when a
(from activity to activity or class to
transition is going to take place (now we are completing the
class); takes an excessive amount of
worksheet, next we will …) and the expectation for the
time to find pencil, gives up, refuses
transition (and you will need…)
to leave previous task; appears ● Specifically say and display lists of materials needed until a
routine is possible. List steps necessary to complete each
agitated during change.
assignment.
.
● Have specific locations for all materials (pencil pouches, tabs
in notebooks, etc.).
● Arrange for an organized helper (peer)
25. Difficulty remaining seated or in ●
a particular position when required to
for a specific activity.

26. Frequent fidgeting with hands,
feet or objects, squirming in seat.

Give student frequent opportunities to get up and move
around. Allow space for movement.

Break tasks down to small increments and give frequent
positive reinforcement for accomplishments (this type of
behavior is often due to frustration).
● Allow alternative movement when possible.

27. Inappropriate responses in class ● Seat student in close proximity to teacher so that visual and
often blurted out; answers given to
physical monitoring of student behavior can be done by
questions before they have been
theteacher.
● State behavior that you do want (tell the student how you
completed.
expect him to behave).

28. Agitation under pressure and ●
competition (athletic or academic)

.

15

Stress effort and enjoyment for self, rather than competition
with others.
Minimize timed activities; structure class for team effort and
29. Inappropriate behaviors in a team or large group sport or

athletic activity (difficulty waiting turn in games or group
situations)
Give the student a responsible job (e.g. team captain, care and
distribution of the balls, score keeping, etc.); consider
leadership role.
● Have student in close proximity of teacher.
● cooperation

30. Frequent involvement in
physically dangerous activities
without considering possible
consequences


31. Poor adult interactions. Defies

authority. Sucks up. Hangs on.

Anticipate dangerous situations and plan for in advance.
● Stress Stop-Look-Listen.
Pair with responsible peer (rotate responsible students so that
they don’t wear out!).

● Provide positive attention.
Talk with student individually about the inappropriate behavior
(what you are doing is…, a better way of getting what you need
or want is…).

32. Frequent self-putdowns, poor
● Structure for success.
personal care and posture, negative ● Train student for self-monitoring, reinforce improvements,
comments about self and others, low teach self-questioning strategies (What am I doing? How isthat
going to affect others?)
self-esteem
● Allow opportunities for the student to show his strength.
● Give positive recognition.
33. Difficulty using unstructured ●
time – recess, hallways, lunchroom,
locker room, library, assembly

Provide student with a definite purpose during unstructured
activities (The purpose of going to the library is to check
out..the purpose of…is…).
Encourage group games and participation (organized school
clubs and activities).

34. Losing things necessary for task ● Help students organize. Frequently monitor notebook and
or activities at school or at home
dividers, pencil pouch, locker, book bag, desks. A place for
(e.g. pencils, books, assignments
everything and everything in its place.

Provide
positive
reinforcement for good organization. Provide
before, during and after completion
student with a list of needed materials and locations.
of a given task)

35. Poor use of time (sitting, staring ●
off into space, doodling, not working

on task at hand)

Teach reminder cues (a gentle touch on the shoulder, hand
signal, etc.).
Tell the student your expectations of what paying attention
looks like. (You
● look like you are paying attention when…)
● Give the student a time limit for a small unit of work with

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positive reinforcement for accurate completion.
Use a contract, timer, etc. for self-monitoring.

School Wide Discipline Plan
Student Name _______________ Referring Teacher ___________Class Period ________

STEP 1:
I.
II.
III.

VERBAL WARNING

Date:
Infraction:
Summarize Discussion:

Teacher Signature: _______________________ Student Signature: ___________________

STEP 2
I.

Date:

II.

Infraction:

III.

TEACHER-STUDENT CONFERENCE

Summarize Conference (state your behavior expectations):

Teacher Signature: ________________________ Student Signature: _________________

STEP 3
STRATEGY

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INTERVENTION STRATEGIES (LIST THREE)
OUTCOME

STEP 4

PHONE CALL TO PARENT
Date: _______________ Phone Number: _______________Spoke To:__________________
Summarize Conversation: ______________________________
Teacher Signature: ___________________________ Student Signature: __________________

STEP 5

PARENT CONFERENCE

(Teachers will invite parents to conference by both sending the P/C form home AND calling to invite them;
parents are given 3 days to respond)

Date P/C Form Sent Home: _____________

Date of Phone Invitation to P/C: ________

Date of Conference: _________________________ Parent Signature:_____________________

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SECTION III:
School Counseling

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Counseling Services
BTW’s Counseling department/counseling services/counseling program will support all students
academically, emotionally and socially so that they may develop their unique talents and abilities to their
fullest potential. OR These services address the barriers students have to learning, both educational
learning and life-long learning. OR The Counseling Center/counseling program provides services to
students regarding academic, personal/social, career and college.
We are committed to ensuring high quality school counseling programs that are comprehensive and
developmentally appropriate which foster academic, personal, interpersonal, and career development to
all students. School counselors will collaborate with parents, students, staff, and the community to remove
barriers to learning and provide opportunities and supports to empower students to embrace their full
potential and achieve their academic and personal aspirations.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, which specifies that no one
with a disability can be excluded from participating in federally funded programs or activities, including
elementary, secondary or postsecondary schooling. “Disability” in this context refers to a “physical or
mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities.” This can include physical
impairments; illnesses or injuries; communicable diseases; chronic conditions like asthma, allergies and
diabetes; and learning problems. Guidance counselor and committee members will develop a 504 plan
which spells out the modifications and accommodations that will be needed for these students to have an
opportunity perform at the same level as their peers.
A 504 plan, which falls under the Americans with Disabilities Act, is an exercise in civil rights, an attempt
to remove barriers and allow students with disabilities to participate freely. An IEP, which falls under the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, is much more concerned with actually providing educational
services. Students eligible for an IEP, or Individualized Education Plan, represent a small subset of all
students with disabilities. They generally require more than a level playing field -- they require significant
remediation and assistance, and are more likely to work on their own level at their own pace even in an
inclusive classroom. Only certain classifications of disability are eligible for an IEP, and students who do
not meet those classifications but still require some assistance to be able to participate fully in school
would be candidates for a 504 plan.
Student Review Team
The Student Review Team process is designed to ensure that appropriate interventions have been utilized
to help students overcome their learning or behavioral problems before referring for special education
assessment, behavioral interventions, 504 plan development, or any other barriers that may impede
learning. The Student Review Team will review the available information and plan appropriate
intervention services. When intervention plans have failed to ameliorate the problems, the SRT will refer
the student for additional services (such as functional behavior assessment/behavior intervention plan,

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504 eligibility review, special education evaluation, mental health services, and speech-language
evaluation).

Teacher Resource Links
All commonly used resources can be found on the link listed below:
 BTW Classroom/Instructional Request Website: http://btwinstruction.weebly.com/
 BTW Resource Links: http://www.scsk12.org/schools/btwashington.hs/site/resources.shtml
Please use the table provided to write in any individual resources that you might find helpful. Make sure
to share them with your colleagues.

Name/Website address

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Purpose