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Clifford Browns Approach To The Blues

Leslie M. Sabina, Ph.D.


[presented at the Clifford Brown Symposium: Brownie Speaks, University of The Arts,
Philadelphia, October 30 November 1, 2008]
Upon hearing Clifford Brown for the first time, listeners are impressed with his
technical command of the trumpet (in all registers), change running abilities, and logical
bebop phraseology. Important too, is the overall joie de vive he displays on every
recordingfrom his earliest rhythm and blues outings, to his last informal jam session in
a Philadelphia music store. Many critics insist that a jazz musicians personality comes
through in his or her music. One can hear humor in Dizzy Gillespies work as easily as
moody concentration can be inferred from many of Miles Davis recordings. In Clifford
Brown, we hear a young man whose obvious enjoyment of playing the trumpet is
combined with a deep sense of seriousness and work ethic. His repertoire gives us a clue
to this portrait. Although his career was brief, Clifford Brown managed to write a
significant number of tunes with whom he will forever be associated. These works are
approached with a sense of seriousness by those musicians who choose to tackle them;
we rarely hear causal versions of Joy Spring, Daahoud, and Brownie Speaks.
Based on his recording output, Brown seemed enamored with chord changes. David
Baker lists Browns preferred tune types in the following order, with no surprises found
for the first three categories:
1. Standardsover 75
2. Jazz originalsover 70 compositions by Parker, Gillespie, Silver, etc.
3. Clifford Brown originalsapproximately 10 recordings of his own tunes.
In the bottom three rankings, Baker states that there are very few recordings of I
Got Rhythm, contrafacts (tunes based on other tunes), and, interestingly, blues.
The lack of I Got Rhythm-based tunes is surprising, as these type of tunes usually
offer both the amount of changes and briskness of tempo that Brown seems to have
preferred. However, when one considers the historical importance of the blues upon jazz,
the lack of a substantial blues output is even more surprising.

In the bebop era, the blues was heard often. It was Charlie Parkers number one
category of preferred tunes, with Billies Bounce, Nows The Time, Bloomdido, and
Relaxin At Camarillo all becoming favorites of saxophone players worldwide. To further
his desire to play this basic form in a way that was indicative of the new bebop era,
Parker even applied a complex set of chord changes to the blues (i.e., Blues For Alice).
Although Thelonious Monk is now remembered for his very unique compositions
(including, incidentally, a blues, Misterioso), heads such as Blue Monk and Straight No
Chaser are favorites at jam sessions. Miles Davis used Walkin as his quintets signature
tune in the early 1960s, and in the late 1950s the blues provided a vehicle to showcase his
groups two saxophonists, Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane (i.e., All Blues,
Freddie Freeloader, Dr. Jekyll, Sids Ahead, and Monks Straight No Chaser). And
speaking of Coltrane, his output is partially defined by his approach to the blues,
beginning with the hard bop sounds of Blue Train and including tunes such as Cousin
Mary, Equinox, Mr. P.C., Up Against The Wall, and of course, the LP, Playing The
Blues. Last, but not least, Clifford Browns last tenor man, Sonny Rollins, is best known
for his motivic development solo on Blue Seven, not to mention tunes such as Blues
For Philly Joe, Sonnymoon For Two, and Tenor Madness.
When compared to his immediate predecessors and contemporaries, Clifford Browns
blues output seems somewhat underrepresented. Why? After all, although the postParker period was progressive in terms of jazz writing, the blues never fell out of favor.
Many contemporaries of Brown provided significant blues recordingsmost notably,
Rollins, Silver, Adderley, and McLean. And the argument that the blues was used strictly
as a means for certain players during this time to achieve commercial success is
somewhat tainted, as popular players such as Adderley and Silver also played straightahead and progressive post-bop music.
One fact that is unarguable is that the recorded output of Fats Navarro (who was
Browns main trumpet influence) doesnt contain a whole lot of blues. Undoubtedly,
Navarros associations with Billy Eckstine, Lionel Hampton, and Charlie Parker would
have yielded a good amount of blues performances on the bandstandclub or concert

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performances that were never captured on tape. Navarros material that was available on
disc (for Browns repeated listening and study) consists mainly of AABA format type
tunes, with a few fairly advanced blues thrown into the mix (such as The Skunk with
Howard McGhee or Dance of The Infidels with Bud Powell). In other words, it was
difficult to hear any blues drenched playing from Navarro (but not from Parker, for
example, as illustrated by Parkers Mood).
Lastly, it can be theorized that the straight-forwardness of the blues progression
simply did not interest Brown. A study of his compositions reveals unusualor, at least,
unexpectedelements: The half-step shift in Joy Spring, the altered I Got Rhythm
Changes of Brownie Speaks (including a type of tritone substitution that forecasts
Coltranes famous Giant Steps progression), and the deceptively simple harmony that
stands at odds with the difficult (fast) tempo of Swingin. And when Brown does
compose a blues, he is apt to alter the form by inserting a bridge (Brown and Blue) or by
using unusual chords (Gerkin For Perkin).
Blues Categorization
A study of the trumpeters recorded blues output reinforces the supposition that
Brown preferred challenging material. His blues vehicles may be categorized as follows:
1. Fairly Simpleslow to medium tempo, straight-ahead changes, with little
arrangement of the head. Examples include Blues, Nows The Time, Walkin, and Sandu.
A relaxed, jam session feel is imparted by these performances (and overtly so, in the
case of the first three!).
2. Basic Challengesmay include one of fast tempo, altered changes, or
sophisticated head arrangement. Examples include Wee Dot, Lous Blues, Gerkin For
Perkin, and The Blues Walk. These performances impart Browns technical command of
the trumpet and his understanding of advanced improvisation to the listener.
3. Advanced Challengesmay include at least two of fast tempo, altered form, added
or altered changes, or sophisticated head arrangement. Examples include Cookin, Blue
and Brown, and Jacqui (where the bridge only is in blues form). Along with further

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demonstrating his technical command of the trumpet and understanding of advance


improvisation, these performances demonstrate Browns insistence on further expanding
a basic blues performance and indicate a desire to go beyond the ordinary.
The Solos
Even the most simplistic blues performance by Clifford Brown is never simple, and
each performance certainly offers the listener a multitude of interesting phrases and note
choices. Every blues performance yields sophisticated elements of melody, harmony,
and rhythm.
Clifford Browns first recording session (March 1952) found him playing brief solos
on jump songs by the R & B group, Chris Powell and the Five Blue Flames. His solo on
Ida Red contains elements of the blues, even though the tune itself is not a blues form.
By incorporating some to-the-point blues motives, Brown demonstrates how the blues
sound can be used to good advantage over major tonality in order to provide momentum
and excitement.
See Example 1.
Another early session (June 1953) has Brown playing Cookin, a Bird blues that
incorporates a series of ii-V chord patterns descending by either step or half step. As all
young improvisers know, this type of chord progression is challenging (especially at a
fast tempo) and tends to disguise the underlying blues progression. In other words,
Cookin is a perfect vehicle in which musicians to engage the bebop practice of change
running. And it was left to post-bop musicians such as Brown to reconcile the
differences between the styles of running through the changes in a vertical sense (i.e.,
arpeggiating or change running) and playing melodically with a scalar sensibility.
Browns three choruses show how he alternates between these two styles of playing.
Chords that are frequently outlined (1st chorusmm. 8, 9; 2nd chorusmm.1, 3, 5, 7, 9;
3rd chorusmm. 3, 4, 7, 10, 11) are often followed by brief scale-derived motifs. The

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most obvious scale phrase occurs in the 1st and 3rd choruses beginning at the end of
measure 4 and lasting up until measure 7. While this instance more or less spells out a
type of F major-based scale, the briefer motifs are more interesting because they illustrate
an important part of Browns stylethat is, using extreme chromaticism as a means to a
goal. An example occurs early in the 1st and 3rd choruses as a means to get to an E; a
longer example is seen beginning at measure 3 in the 1st chorus to arrive at the Bb in
measure 4. Lastly, it is important to note that Brown does not play one lick derived from
the blues scalefrom a melodic standpoint, the blues is nowhere to be found!
See Example 2.
So, if Cookin is an early example of Clifford Browns post-bop chromatic style
(which was only a few recording sessions away from complete maturity), what of two
blues performances recorded live with Art Blakey roughly eight months laternamely
Blues and Nows The Time?
With the slow-tempo Blues we hear many instances of reiteration and blue note use,
as well as a common major/minor/major alteration device during the stop-time chorus.
Perhaps the slow tempo inspired Brown to reach into the blues bag, or perhaps the
atmosphere of the live session lent itself to the bluesy approach heard. Whatever the
case, this performance illustrates that Brown was comfortable with the stereotypical
sound of blues melody and, more importantly, able to exploit these clichs through his
own sense of melodic development. For example, the repeated motive at the beginning
of the 2nd chorus takes an unexpected dissonant detour (in measure 13) before arriving at
its concluding notes at measure 17. The same thing with the melodic repetition in the 3rd
chorusthe F# in measure 28 (while not entirely unexpected) introduces an element of
surprise or drama into the proceedings before concluding (twice) with an emphasized and
reiterated blue note (the Bb in measures 29 and 30). Interspersed throughout is
Browns scalar melodic sensethe total concept is somewhat reminiscent of Charlie
Parkers Parkers Mood. Browns solo on Blues is certainly enjoyable and strikes a nice
balance between the vernacular and the sophisticated.

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See Example 3.
Nows The Time, on the other hand, shows that Brown could carry a long
performance (utilizing the standard blues progression) with little reference to the blues
convention. This performance is totally at odds with Blues. Just when Brown is setting
up the listener for some clichs (in this instance, at the beginning of the 3rd chorus), the
blues procedure is abandoned in favor of a scalar/chromatic type of playing. Along with
this chorus, the only other place where elements of the blues scale appear is at the very
end of the solo, complete with a triplet feel. If the melody is heard out of context (i.e.,
without any accompaniment), then it may be difficult to identify the performance as a
blues. Nows The Time is really more typical of Browns overall improvisational style
it is very flowing and non-repetitive.
See Example 4.
An important aspect of Clifford Browns sensibilities may be open to conjecture here.
As Blues illustrates, Brown could play within a traditional blues style. However,
Nows The Time illustrates the approach (or sound) that Brown may have really desired
or preferred. The fact that this preferred sound happened to occur on occasion over a
blues form is somewhat incidental.
On August 11, 1954, in Los Angeles, a jam session was organized that featured
Clifford Brown and Max Roach and some West coast musicians, such as Herb Geller, Joe
Maini, and Curtis Counce. One of the performances was a blues, Coronado. This
performance yields some insight into another facet of Browns playing, namely rhythm.
Quite often, blues licks are known not only for their melodic aspects, but also for their
rhythmic qualities. Blues motifs derived from the blues scale are usually very flowing,
although not necessary long in length. In Coronado Brown stretches out some blues
scale-derived licks, fragments others, and keeps the listener on his or her toes throughout.

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The solo begins with a rhythmic motifa kind of stuttering effect that is interrupted
by snippets of the blues scale. However, this idea is discarded in the last third of the
chorus in favor of a scalar presentation. At the beginning of the 2nd chorus, Brown
reintroduces a strong rhythmic sense (through his articulation) while simultaneously
using the blues scale as the main melodic focus. Once again this idea is abandoned in
favor of a lengthy scalar presentation. Another highly identifiable rhythmic/melodic
motif initiates the 3rd chorus (ending at measure 27 with elements of the blues scale) and
is subsequently repeated with its melodic aspects thoroughly altered. This chorus is
concluded with a quote from Dizzy Gillespies Birks Works! The 4th chorus promises to
begin again with a blues sensibility, but immediately gives way to a scalar outing.
However, the end of this chorus reintroduces both a blues lick and sets up a blues shout
(over the backing horns) that occurs for the first part of the 5th chorus. The shouting idea
continues for half of the 6th chorus before being overtaken by the scalar approach. A
new stuttering motif (that is drawn from the blues scale) begins the 7th chorus, but this
too gives way to the scalar approach. The 8th chorus ushers in a strong rhythmic motif
that is repeated two bars later and again referenced half way through the chorus. At the
beginning of the 9th chorus it sounds as if Brown may finally be tiring of the blues sound.
An extremely chromatic melodic approach dominates most of this chorus, although the
last four measures reintroduces the blues scale in a subtle way. Rhythm is used for
dramatic effect to begin the 10th and final chorus. Unfortunately, the early promise of
this chorus gives way to an abrupt melodic petering-out, with nothing present to forcibly
conclude Browns solo. (Perhaps Brown was caught off guard as to when to end his solo
and was forced to truncate such.)
The extended solo situation of Coronado shows that Brown was just as concerned
with the rhythmic aspects of a blues solo as with its melody. It also demonstrates that
Brown is somewhat reluctant to use the blues scale or clichs for an entire chorusblues
ideas are usually discarded by the ninth measure of a chorus.
See Example 5.

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A three-day recording session in February 1955 yielded three blues: Gerkin For
Perkin, Sandu, and The Blues Walk. The first two have fairly arranged head statements,
while The Blues Walk contains a brief introduction. Both Sandu and The Blues Walk
offer a solo break for Brown.
Gerkin For Perkin was recorded on the first session day. It is not a normal blues
progression, as a return to the tonic chord does not occur at the tunes seventh measure.
Instead, a major chord/ii-V descending chord sequence facilitates a return to the tonic
chord at measure eleven. This chord superimposition lends itself to the idea of either
change running or sequence playing. Brown sequences the beginning of his Bb idea
down to Ab in both the second and third choruses (see mm. 19/21 and 31/33). The bulk
of the solo exhibits Browns scalar sense, with goal notes approached via chromaticism
or through an over-and-under configuration (goal notes at mm. 5, 9, 11, 20, 22, 29, and
35). The only blues scale use is at the onset of the third chorus and is abandoned after
only three measures.
See Example 6.
Sandu (recorded on the second session day) is the recording that shows Brown at his
bluesy best. Although brief (two choruses), the solo contains many memorable moments
as Brown exploits the blues scale and reiterates and develops simple ideas. In his blues
scale use, Brown often substitutes the scalar sixth in place of the flatted seventh, with the
resulting sound being less aggressive. A substantial use of triplets also contributes to the
solos overall bluesy feel. After the break, Brown exploits the major/minor shift between
measures 1 and 2 and concludes his opening statement on the chordal 7thboth clich,
but good sounding blues devices. Even the beginning of his double time excursion
contains elements of the blues, with a minor/major shift occurring between measures 6
and 7. The 1st chorus is wrapped up neatly with a return to the blues scale. The
major/minor alteration continues in the 2nd chorus, with the opening idea concluding
abruptly on the raised 4th (m. 16)this abrupt-ending idea is heard again at measure 17.
The solo ends nicely with an offbeat descent tagged onto a long melodic phrase.

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See Example 7.
With Sandus medium tempo, it is not surprising that Brown sounds totally relaxed.
However, with the blistering tempo of The Blues Walk (recorded on the third session
day), it may be surprising to hear Brown sounding as relaxed as ever, completely
unhurried in his output. The three day recording session must have certainly been a
enjoyable session for the well-rehearsed band!
The solo contains many great devices, such as rhythmic exploitation (2nd, 3rd and 7th
choruses), blues statements (7th chorus), blues shouting (4th and 5th choruses), dynamic
contrast (6th chorus), and long melodic phrases (1st and 3rd choruses). The performance
is a great summing-up of different ways to play over the blues form.
See Example 8.
Clifford Browns last recording date was an informal jam session at a Philadelphia
music store. Three tunes were captured on tape, with the blues represented by Walkin.
With seven choruses at a medium tempo, it is a fairly long solo, one that gives the listener
a chance to hear Brown stretching out. The solo begins with the type of long phrase
often presented by Brown, which is followed by fragmented double time runs. The solo
is interesting in that, after the first half of the next chorus, the long runs never reappear in
a dominating fashion (with the exception, perhaps of the middle of the 5th chorus or the
solos very conclusion). (As an aside, observe the angular nature of these runsmaterial
at measures 16-19 keeps on changing direction, as does that at measures 32-35.) Instead,
Brown seems to be in an exploratory mood, and tries out different ideas (ideas that are
often interrupted by brief scale motifs or arpeggios) in each chorus. The material played
at the beginnings of the 4th, 5th, and 6th choruses seem to give Brown time needed to
reflect or to initiate another idea. Lastly, there are really no areas of overt blues
playingthe blues scale is mainly absent. Browns extreme chromaticism dominates this
solo.

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See Example 9.
Conclusion
Although Clifford Brown did not concentrate on recording many blues tunes, it can
be surmised that, based on his existing blues recordings, he excelled at the genre. More
importantly, he seemed to have enjoyed stretching out on a blues when the opportunity
presented itself. And although his chromatic, scalar bebop style dominated his approach
to the blues, he was able to authenticate the genre through convincing use of blue
notes, blues scales, memorable clichs, and rhythmic devices. In a word, Clifford
Browns blues playing was second to none.
Notes
Ida Red, Blues, Coronado, Gerkin For Perkin, and Sandu transcribed by the author.
Cookin, Nows The Time, and The Blues Walk transcribed by Marc Lewis.
Walkin transcribed by David Baker.
All solo transcriptions edited by the author.
References
Aebersold, Jamey, ed. Clifford Brown: Vol. 53 Play-A-Long Book & Recording Set. New
Albany, IN: Jamey Aebersold, 1992.
Baker, David. Charlie Parker: Alto Saxophone. New York: Shattinger International
Music Corp., 1978.
Baker, David. The Jazz Style Of Clifford Brown. Miami: Studio 224, c/o CPP/Belwin,
Inc., 1982.
Lewis, Marc. Clifford Brown: Complete Transcriptions. Recompiled in 3 volumes by
Ray Vega. Los Angeles: Brownie Publications, 1991.

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Example 1
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Ida Red"

b b

J
&b c J
qca. 186 Break

F6

b
b
b


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4
5
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7
b
8

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10

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11

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C
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b
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12

13

14

15

16

Example 2
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Cookin'"
qca. 192 C

&c
1

b 5)
b
E 7( 9)
A min7
3
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2nd Chorus

13

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A min7

14

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15

F min7

b b
b
17
18

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19

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3rd Chorus

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b min7 A b 7
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22

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23

24

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33
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35
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Example 2

(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Cookin'"
q ca. 192

&c

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F
1
5

3
5

F min7

1
9

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Example 3
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Blues"
qca.72

&c
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C7

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3

13

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3rd Chorus

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Example 4
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Now's The Time"


q ca. 154 G 7

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3
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n b n
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5
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21

3rd Chorus

25

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17

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10

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A min7

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15

18

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20

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26

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29

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30

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31

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32

33

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34
35
36
3

4th Chorus

37

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b

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38

39

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40
41
42
3

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n

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5th Chorus

49

B min7

44

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45

7
b C n 3
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50

46

j
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7
G

51

58

59

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53
54
55 .

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57

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52

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56

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60

6th Chorus

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61

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63

b
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66

A min7

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69

D7

62

65

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70

64

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# b #

n #
3

68

67

b
G7

71

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b
b

72

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3
b b
# n b b # b n b
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7th Chorus

73

74

C7

# 3
b
"
77

A min7

81


G7

75

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B min7

79

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3
3
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78

76

80

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82
83
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84

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n n

b
85
86
87
88

8th Chorus

b
3
3 b n
3
3

b #
b b n

90
91
92
93

C7

#
89

G 73

B min7
3

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n 3 b
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b n b b
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# 97
94
95
96
3

Example 5
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Coronado"
q ca. 202

# c
&
C7

G7

C7

3
j

j
E7

j b # j

#
7
8

G. 7

# n

A min7

D7

j b

G7

G7

10

11

12

G7
C7
G7
.
.
3
# b J J b b
b
n

13
14
15
16

2nd Chorus

C7

# n 3
17

A min7

G7

b n

b n 19
18
3

D7

# 3


21

22

3rd Chorus

25


G7

C7

n
b n #
J

20

G7

b
"J J

23

G7


26

E7

27

n b

24

28

#
J

b b

#
C7

b b
b

29

E7

31

32

30

A min7

G7

D7

j b

G7

# # n
b n . J b # n b " . " J "
33

34

G7

#
b n

37

4th Chorus

C7

38

35

36

b n # n n

b
n
b n
J
G7

39

40

C7

G7

E7

#
b n

n
41

42

A min7

45

5th Chorus

49

C7

G7

#

53

43

# J

D7

C7

50

G7

46

# b
#

47

44

# b n # b
57

58

51

52

55

D7

48

A min7

G7

G
3 b n b
b b n

54

G7

59

E7

b n b }
3

56

60

b T

# bw

6th Chorus

G7

61

C7

65

G7

62

63

b
.
J

#
73

G7

C7

64

E7

67

68

G7

74

G7

#
J
75

C7

72

j b n

76

G7

E7

n b

n
b n # n #
77
78
79
80


# n }

81

8th Chorus

85

# n b n 3

G7

D7

A min7

J J


b n
69
70
71

7th Chorus

66

A min7

C7

G7


89

G7

82

83

C7

n
J

C7

D7

84

n #

G7

3
} j j n


}
86
87
88

b
# n
J J J
# n

90

G7

E7

91

92

A min7

D7

b n 3 b

93
94
95
G7

# n

9th Chorus

97

# J

96

3
b b n b b n n b b b

n b b

C7

G7

98

99

C7

100

G7

E7

# n j b n j
n n n
b

102
103
101
104

A min7

G7

105

D7

106

G7

b b n # J .

107

G7

C7

# 3 3 3 3 3 3

10th Chorus

109

# b
C7

113

110

.
114

117

111

3 3

3
3
3

112

n 3 n
#

b b
E7

115

116

118

G7

G7

D
G

# n
#
J

A min7

108

119

b n

120

121

Example 6
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Gerkin For Perkin"


q ca. 204

# c
&

G7

C7

G7

D min7

G7

j j b j j n b J #

J
3

b Maj7
b
b
B min7
E 7
3
3
b n b
# n
n

b n b
n
1

C7

C min7

b Maj7

F7

A min7

D7

G7


b n
b n }

9
10
11
3

2nd Chorus

G7

C7

G7

j j b

13

14

15

C min7

F73

17

A min7

D7

b Maj7

18

12

D min7

D7

b Maj7

16

b7

20

G7

3
# b n 3 b
b b

b n
b b n
# # n J .
21
22
23

b n
b b
!

3rd Chorus

25

G7

C7

26

G7

G7

b # 3 n b

19

A min7

b + n

n
b b
n # J J
n
C7

b7

b min7

b7
b
b b n

D min7

A min7 D 7

24

G7

j b b n
n b n #
27
28

#
29

C7

C min7

F7

b Maj7

b min7

b7

n n b n b b
b b n

n n
j
#

b Maj7

30

31

b7

32

3
# b b j n
j

J
b !
# n

b n #

33

A min7

34

D7

G7

35

A min7

36

D7

Example 7
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Sandu"
q ca. 128

BREAK

&b c
B

b b

b7

3
j b b
3
3

F7

n b b

n.

b b
1
3
3
b
F7
B 7
3

j
#

. - . . n


J b
5

D7
.. - . b n b b

b b
n b b n b ! b n b n
b
F

G min7

b # b n
b n
9

2nd Chorus

F7

b b . J
13

17

b7

j
n

G min7

14

b j
J

A min7

C7

F7

b b

n b b

b7

10

F7
3

11

b b j j n b

C7

18

j b j n

12
3

j
#

16

n j b b
b
n
3

D7
.

b n

# n b

b
3

15

C7

F7

19

A min7

C7

20

F7

b n # j n b # j J n j n b

J J

21

22

23

24

25

Example 8
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"The Blues Walk"


q ca. 252

b n 3
b
&c J
# n # n #
1
2
C7

BREAK

n b
# b

F7

C7

E min7 A 7

C7

n # n

11

D min7

D min7 G 7

G7

2nd Chorus

C7

12

# #

#
10

13

j
14

F7

15

b j b b
J
b
J
J
J
J J
16

C7

b n

19
C7

j
#

23

E min7

A7

18

D min7

G7

j
b J J # n
J
b #
20
21
22

D min7 G 7

24

17


+
+
+
+

3rd Chorus

25

C7

26

27

F7

3

b



29
30
31

28

7
E min7 A +3

32

D min7

36

C7

G7

D min7

G7

b b n b n

b n
#

33
34
35
C7

4th Chorus

#
+ 3 + + b 3 + b
F7

41

42

38

C7

46

52

D min7

61

C7

b J n

53

G7

# n b n
57

6th Chorus

F7

58

.
J
62

D min7 G 7

48

E min7 A 7

D min7

40

44

45

3
b +

C7

5th Chorus

49

b w

39

b
J J b b b

43

47

b n #

.
J

C7



G7

b.
J

37

51

C7

54

50

. b
b b

J
C7

E min7

55

A7

56

C7

D min7

G7

#
j #

59

.
J


J
63

60

64

F7

65

69
"

73

F7

j
b .
77
D min7

81

C7

b j

J

67

66

D min7

7th Chorus

C7

70

b .
J

78

G7

82

D min7

G7

72

b b
b b j .
75
76

3
+ + b + b
3

j b b j

68

C7

A7

J

71

G7

74

E min7

C7

+ 3 +

79

C7

+ 3 +

E min7

+ 3 +

80

D min7

G7

A7

+ 3 + b

C7

n b


b #
83
84
85

Example 9
(Tpt. Key--Sounds M2nd Lower)

"Walkin'"
n
3
# c

n
&

# 1
2
3
4
G7

q ca. 186

C7

10

G7

13

# b n
17

A min7

3rd Chorus

25

C7

14

C7

b b

j
#


18

D7

G7

C7

26

12

b
n

n b n
15
16
G7

G7

b b
n

# 19

#
3

11

# J j n b n 3 b b
n

21

# !

G7

D7

B min7 E 7


# #

2nd Chorus

G7

G7

A min7

C7

D7

j
j #

G7

27

n b

20

G7

22

B min7

23

j
#

E7

! b n

24

D7

28

b n

3
#
b b
JJJ

b n

C7

29

30

C7

b
3

36

G7 j

42

43


D7

b n

53

40

min7

44

j
#

G7

47

.
J

j
#

D7

48

G7

54

3
G
B
E
3
b + b
3
b
#

56 b
55

D7

min7

G7

b n
#

57

# n b
3
n b
b n
b # n #
51
52

C7

50

C7

A min7

j
#

B 3
E

#

J

46

49

G7

"

A min7

5th Chorus

G7

39

C7

j
#

38

45

D7

b b b b
3

41

G7

n n
b

33
34
35
G7

E7

32

D7

37

B min7

31

A min7

4th Chorus

G7

58

59

D7

60

G7

6th Chorus

j
#

61

. .
62

C7

C7

. # R .

65

# j

66

G7

. 3

63

G7

j
#

67

64

. # R .

D7

69

68

7th Chorus

73

G7

C7

j
#

# # n
b
77

A min7

#
81

C7

74

G7

70

E7

3 b
#

3
3
#
# n

b n

A min7

B min7

71

D7

72

b b
3 b

G7

75

76

G7

B min7

E7

3
n b
n n.

#
n # n n b n n
78
79
80

b b
b n
D7

82

G7

D7

j
# j

j j
b n
}
83

84

85